Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Improvement of snowpack simulations in a regional climate model  

SciTech Connect

To improve simulations of regional-scale snow processes and related cold-season hydroclimate, the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), was coupled with the Pennsylvania State University/NCAR fifth-generation Mesoscale Model (MM5). CLM3 physically describes the mass and heat transfer within the snowpack using five snow layers that include liquid water and solid ice. The coupled MM5–CLM3 model performance was evaluated for the snowmelt season in the Columbia River Basin in the Pacific Northwestern United States using gridded temperature and precipitation observations, along with station observations. The results from MM5–CLM3 show a significant improvement in the SWE simulation, which has been underestimated in the original version of MM5 coupled with the Noah land-surface model. One important cause for the underestimated SWE in Noah is its unrealistic land-surface structure configuration where vegetation, snow and the topsoil layer are blended when snow is present. This study demonstrates the importance of the sheltering effects of the forest canopy on snow surface energy budgets, which is included in CLM3. Such effects are further seen in the simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation in regional weather and climate models such as MM5. In addition, the snow-season surface albedo overestimated by MM5–Noah is now more accurately predicted by MM5–CLM3 using a more realistic albedo algorithm that intensifies the solar radiation absorption on the land surface, reducing the strong near-surface cold bias in MM5–Noah. The cold bias is further alleviated due to a slower snowmelt rate in MM5–CLM3 during the early snowmelt stage, which is closer to observations than the comparable components of MM5–Noah. In addition, the over-predicted precipitation in the Pacific Northwest as shown in MM5–Noah is significantly decreased in MM5 CLM3 due to the lower evaporation resulting from the longer snow duration.

Jin, J.; Miller, N.L.

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

An improved lake model for climate simulations: Model structure, evaluation, and sensitivity analyses in CESM1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the numerical weather prediction model COSMO, BorealCurrent numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, regionalof lakes in numerical weather prediction and climate models:

Subin, Z.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Refining climate models  

SciTech Connect

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Refining climate models  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Using dogwood trees, Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers are gaining a better understanding of the role photosynthesis and respiration play in the atmospheric carbon dioxide cycle. Their findings will aid computer modelers in improving the accuracy of climate simulations.

Warren, Jeff; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Ricciuto, Daniel

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

5

Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and inform DOE's energy decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase results are incorporated into Earth system models to improve climate projections. e overarching goal of TES is to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models

6

Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

7

Regional Climate Modeling: Progress, Challenges, and Prospects  

SciTech Connect

Regional climate modeling with regional climate models (RCMs) has matured over the past decade and allows for meaningful utilization in a broad spectrum of applications. In this paper, latest progresses in regional climate modeling studies are reviewed, including RCM development, applications of RCMs to dynamical downscaling for climate change assessment, seasonal climate predictions and climate process studies, and the study of regional climate predictability. Challenges and potential directions of future research in this important area are discussed, with the focus on those to which less attention has been given previously, such as the importance of ensemble simulations, further development and improvement of regional climate modeling approach, modeling extreme climate events and sub-daily variation of clouds and precipitation, model evaluation and diagnostics, applications of RCMs to climate process studies and seasonal predictions, and development of regional earth system models. It is believed that with both the demonstrated credibility of RCMs’ capability in reproducing not only monthly to seasonal mean climate and interannual variability but also the extreme climate events when driven by good quality reanalysis and the continuous improvements in the skill of global general circulation models (GCMs) in simulating large-scale atmospheric circulation, regional climate modeling will remain an important dynamical downscaling tool for providing the needed information for assessing climate change impacts and seasonal climate predictions, and a powerful tool for improving our understanding of regional climate processes. An internationally coordinated effort can be developed with different focuses by different groups to advance regional climate modeling studies. It is also recognized that since the final quality of the results from nested RCMs depends in part on the realism of the large-scale forcing provided by GCMs, the reduction of errors and improvement in physics parameterizations in both GCMs and RCMs remain a priority for climate modeling community.

Wang, Yuqing; Leung, Lai R.; McGregor, John L.; Lee, Dong-Kyou; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ding, Yihui; Kimura, Fujio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Improving Rainfall Processes in Climate Models | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

have completed SCM simulations of seven GCMs participating in the "FASTER" project led by Brookhaven National Laboratory and compared the models' performance to 3 years of...

9

A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nationâ??s capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committeeâ??s report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nationâ??s climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Met Office Hadley Centre climate modelling capability: the competing requirements for improved resolution, complexity and dealing with uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will be implemented in a model version in the HadGEM2 family and coupled to the atmospheric dust scheme. (h) Earth system models In order to understand the overall feedbacks of chemistry and ecosystems on climate, the relevant processes need...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Climate Analysis, Monitoring, and Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and hydrological monitoring stations, and improving the projections on future climate change. Climate change. This project continues the state's climate monitoring and analysis program. Project Description in climate projections for the 21st century. · Provide analyses and interpretation of regional climate

12

Sandia National Laboratories: Accelerated Climate Modeling for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy New Project Is the ACME of Computer Science to Address Climate Change On December 3, 2014, in Analysis, Climate, Global Climate & Energy,...

13

Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon Science Group of Energy and Environment (E and E) are working together to improve predictions of future climate by applying the best available computational methods and computer resources to this problem. Over the last decade, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a number of climate models that provide state-of-the-art simulations on a wide variety of massively parallel computers. We are now developing and applying a second generation of high-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well.

Mirin, A A

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

Testing Climate Models: An Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scientific merit of decadal climate projections can only be established by means of comparisons with observations. Testing of models that are used to predict climate change is of such importance that no single approach will provide the ...

Richard Goody; James Anderson; Gerald North

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models Climate Change Science Program Issues Report on Climate Models July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) today announced the release of the report "Climate Models: An Assessment of Strengths and Limitations," the 10th in a series of 21 Synthesis and Assessment Products (SAPs) managed by U.S. federal agencies. Developed under the leadership of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), this report, SAP 3.1, describes computer models of the Earth's climate and their ability to simulate current climate change. "Complex climate models are tools that provide insights and knowledge into how future climate may evolve. To assure that future climate projections

16

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species Niklaus E. Zimmermanna,1 of climate extremes suggests the importance of understanding their additional influence on range limits. Here, we assess how measures representing climate extremes (i.e., interannual variability in climate

Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

17

The Community Climate System Model: CCSM3  

SciTech Connect

A new version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) has been developed and released to the climate community. CCSM3 is a coupled climate model with components representing the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land surface connected by a flux coupler. CCSM3 is designed to produce realistic simulations over a wide range of spatial resolutions, enabling inexpensive simulations lasting several millennia or detailed studies of continental-scale climate change. This paper will show results from the configuration used for climate-change simulations with a T85 grid for atmosphere and land and a 1-degree grid for ocean and sea-ice. The new system incorporates several significant improvements in the scientific formulation. The enhancements in the model physics are designed to reduce or eliminate several systematic biases in the mean climate produced by previous editions of CCSM. These include new treatments of cloud processes, aerosol radiative forcing, land-atmosphere fluxes, ocean mixed-layer processes, and sea-ice dynamics. There are significant improvements in the sea-ice thickness, polar radiation budgets, equatorial sea-surface temperatures, ocean currents, cloud radiative effects, and ENSO teleconnections. CCSM3 can produce stable climate simulations of millenial duration without ad hoc adjustments to the fluxes exchanged among the component models. Nonetheless, there are still systematic biases in the ocean-atmosphere fluxes in western coastal regions, the spectrum of ENSO variability, the spatial distribution of precipitation in the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and the continental precipitation and surface air temperatures. We conclude with the prospects for extending CCSM to a more comprehensive model of the Earth's climate system.

Collins, W D; Blackmon, M; Bitz, C; Bonan, G; Bretherton, C S; Carton, J A; Chang, P; Doney, S; Hack, J J; Kiehl, J T; Henderson, T; Large, W G; McKenna, D; Santer, B D; Smith, R D

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

18

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Jump to: navigation, search Name LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) Agency/Company /Organization Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sector Energy, Land Topics Pathways analysis References LLNL Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI)[1] Abstract Established in 1989, the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) is an International focal point for understanding climate change and analyzing and diagnosing the performance of the world's climate models; the PCMDI is a DOE program located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The PCMDI mission is to develop improved methods and tools for the diagnosis ...

19

Regional-scale climate simulations: Improvement in near-surface field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional-scale climate simulations: Improvement in near-surface field Regional-scale climate simulations: Improvement in near-surface field projections with spectral nudging July 30, 2013 EVS researchers have established a new optimal approach for downscaling physically based global climate model projections to the regional scale. The new approach is significant because it preserves both the prescribed large-scale dynamics of the global model and the increased variability of the higher-resolution physics in a regional-scale model. Global-scale climate models have coarse spatial resolution and cannot resolve many local and regional-scale features, such as increased precipitation due to the lake effect in the Chicago region. Specially built models that operate at a higher spatial resolution and can resolve these types of features are referred to as regional-scale climate models. These

20

Validation of Climate Model Ice Cloud Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

models are used for understanding the past, present, and future climate. To be able to project future climate it is important that models provide a realistic depiction of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Developing fast and efficient climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report from Tyndall research project IT 1.31 Planning and Prototyping a Climate Module for the Tyndall The aim of this project was to develop a fast and efficient climate model, as a vital componentDeveloping fast and efficient climate models John Shepherd, Peter Challenor, Bob Marsh, Mark

Williamson, Mark

22

Testing Climate Models Using Thermal Infrared Spectra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An approach to test climate models with observations is presented. In this approach, it is possible to directly observe the longwave feedbacks of the climate system in time series of annual average outgoing longwave spectra. Tropospheric ...

Stephen Leroy; James Anderson; John Dykema; Richard Goody

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy | Argonne Leadership...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Credit: Alan Scott and Mark Taylor, Sandia National Laboratories Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy PI Name: Mark Taylor PI Email: mataylo@sandia.gov Institution: Sandia...

24

Modeling Water, Climate, Agriculture, and the Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Describes two models used in the integrated modeling framework designed to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin: (1) the Indus Basin Model Revised (IBMR-1012), a hydro-economic ...

Yu, Winston

25

Improvement of ENSO simulation based on inter-model diversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, a new methodology is developed to improve the climate simulation of state-of-the-art coupled Global Climate Models (GCMs), by a post-processing based on the inter-model diversity. Based on the close connection between the ...

Yoo-Geun Ham; Jong-Seong Kug

26

The Community Climate System Model Version 4  

SciTech Connect

The fourth version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) was recently completed and released to the climate community. This paper describes developments to all the CCSM components, and documents fully coupled pre-industrial control runs compared to the previous version, CCSM3. Using the standard atmosphere and land resolution of 1{sup o} results in the sea surface temperature biases in the major upwelling regions being comparable to the 1.4{sup o} resolution CCSM3. Two changes to the deep convection scheme in the atmosphere component result in the CCSM4 producing El Nino/Southern Oscillation variability with a much more realistic frequency distribution than the CCSM3, although the amplitude is too large compared to observations. They also improve the representation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, and the frequency distribution of tropical precipitation. A new overflow parameterization in the ocean component leads to an improved simulation of the deep ocean density structure, especially in the North Atlantic. Changes to the CCSM4 land component lead to a much improved annual cycle of water storage, especially in the tropics. The CCSM4 sea ice component uses much more realistic albedos than the CCSM3, and the Arctic sea ice concentration is improved in the CCSM4. An ensemble of 20th century simulations runs produce an excellent match to the observed September Arctic sea ice extent from 1979 to 2005. The CCSM4 ensemble mean increase in globally-averaged surface temperature between 1850 and 2005 is larger than the observed increase by about 0.4 C. This is consistent with the fact that the CCSM4 does not include a representation of the indirect effects of aerosols, although other factors may come into play. The CCSM4 still has significant biases, such as the mean precipitation distribution in the tropical Pacific Ocean, too much low cloud in the Arctic, and the latitudinal distributions of short-wave and long-wave cloud forcings.

Gent, Peter R.; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Donner, Leo J.; Holland, Marika M.; Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Jayne, Steve R.; Lawrence, David M.; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Worley, Patrick; Yang, Zong-Liang; Zhang, Minghua

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Global climate models: Past, present, and future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmosphere-ocean models, but common forcing scenarios (compiled by Cubasch and Fischer-Bruns,).¶ Recently, Earth system models are an attempt to integrate even more components of the climate system, such as the biosphere and cryosphere (9...

Martin Stute; Amy Clement; Gerrit Lohmann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modelling the climate response to orbital forcing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...next few years there will be a tremendous expansion in models that include several additional components. Such Earth system models will at last allow us to fully tackle the link between orbital forcing, climate variability, and the sediment...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Property:Buildings/ModelClimateZone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ModelClimateZone ModelClimateZone Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. It links to pages that use the form Buildings Model. The allowed values for this property are: Climate Zone 1A Climate Zone 1B Climate Zone 2A Climate Zone 2B Climate Zone 3A Climate Zone 3B Climate Zone 3C Climate Zone 4A Climate Zone 4B Climate Zone 4C Climate Zone 5A Climate Zone 5B Climate Zone 5C Climate Zone 6A Climate Zone 6B Climate Zone 7A Climate Zone 7B Climate Zone 8A Climate Zone 8B Pages using the property "Buildings/ModelClimateZone" Showing 12 pages using this property. G General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago High Plug Load Baseline + Climate Zone 5A + General Merchandise 2009 TSD Chicago Low Plug Load 50% Energy Savings + Climate Zone 5A +

30

Nonlinear Ensemble Parameter Perturbation for Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Model parameters can introduce significant uncertainties in climate simulations. Sensitivity analysis provides a way to quantify such uncertainties. Existing sensitivity analysis methods, however, cannot estimate the maximum sensitivity of the ...

Xudong Yin; Juanjuan Liu; Bin Wang

31

Soil Moisture Memory in Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water balance considerations at the soil surface lead to an equation that relates the autocorrelation of soil moisture in climate models to 1) seasonality in the statistics of the atmospheric forcing, 2) the variation of evaporation with soil ...

Randal D. Koster; Max J. Suarez

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Including Ocean Model Uncertainties in Climate Predictions Chris Brierley, Alan Thorpe, Mat Collins's to perform the integrations Currently uses a `slab' ocean #12;An Ocean Model Required to accurately model transient behaviour Will have its own uncertainties Requires even more computing power Create new models

Jones, Peter JS

33

CERFACS: Scientific Report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERFACS: Scientific Report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Project 1991 ­ 1992 November 1992 #12; 1 INTRODUCTION (O. Thual) The goals of the Climate Modelling & Global Change project of climate experiments with this general circulation model. The Climate Modelling & Global Change project has

34

The Representation of Water Vapor and Its Dependence on Vertical Resolution in the Hadley Centre Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulations of the Hadley Centre Atmospheric Climate Model version 3, HadAM3, are used to investigate the impact of increasing vertical resolution on simulated climates. In particular, improvements in the representation of water vapor and ...

V. D. Pope; J. A. Pamment; D. R. Jackson; A. Slingo

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Application of Scale-Selective Data Assimilation to Regional Climate Modeling and Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method referred to as scale-selective data assimilation (SSDA) is designed to inject the large-scale components of the atmospheric circulation from a global model into a regional model to improve regional climate simulations and predictions. ...

Shiqiu Peng; Lian Xie; Bin Liu; Fredrick Semazzi

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction to Climate Modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2014 Questions: Describe climate models: how do they help us understand the past and project. slide 8) Experts in climate modelling are careful to say they are "projecting" long-term future climateClimate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points: Module 1, Lesson 4: An Introduction

Pedersen, Tom

37

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

38

Constraining Climate Model Parameters from Observed 20th Century Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present revised probability density functions for climate model parameters (effective climate sensitivity, the rate of deep-ocean heat uptake, and the strength of the net aerosol forcing) that are based on climate change ...

Forest, Chris Eliot

39

ORNL researchers improve soil carbon cycling models | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

researchers improve soil carbon cycling models researchers improve soil carbon cycling models January 01, 2013 ORNL's new carbon cycling model could help scientists understand the role of soil microbes (MBC) in climate change by tracking extracellular enzymes (ENZ) that break down carbon-rich soil materials (SOC) into forms that microbes can respire (DOC). A more robust model of the soil carbon cycle developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) improves understanding of carbon residence time in soils and enables scientists to make more accurate climate predictions. The model does a better job than previous models of accounting for how microbes in the soil break down carbon-rich materials and release carbon dioxide. "Soil is a big reservoir of carbon," said co-author Melanie Mayes of the Environmental Sciences Division and the Climate Change Science

40

What Are Climate Models Missing?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...models miss most. From GCMs to Earth System Models Smagorinsky's GCM was designed...important chemical nutrients, Earth System Models (4, 5). Wide variation...as they are in comprehensive Earth System Models (10). Differences among...

Bjorn Stevens; Sandrine Bony

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Hierarchical Modeling of Variability in Regional Climate Models Using Markov Random Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ensembles, are used to explore the uncertainties associated with projections of climate change (ANOVA), climate model ensembles, un- certainty quantification. 1 Geophysical Statistics Project the Earth's climate and producing projections of climate change. They encapsulate an entire field

Kaufman, Cari

43

An Evaluation of Decadal Probability Forecasts from State-of-the-Art Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While state-of-the-art models of Earth's climate system have improved tremendously over the last 20 years, nontrivial structural flaws still hinder their ability to forecast the decadal dynamics of the Earth system realistically. Contrasting the ...

Emma B. Suckling; Leonard A. Smith

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Introduction. Stochastic physics and climate modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

become a backbone of numerical weather prediction and is used not only by weather forecasters but also. Stochastic physics schemes within weather and climate models have the potential to represent the dynamical history, the present era, whereby predictions are made from numerical solutions of the underlying dynamic

Williams, Paul

45

The MAGS Regional Climate Modeling System: CRCM-MAGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mackenzie GEWEX Study (MAGS) regional climate modeling system (denoted CRCM-MAGS) is a developmental version of the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) tailored for use over North America. It is compose...

Murray MacKay; Paul Bartlett; Ed Chan…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

What Influences the Skill of Climate Models over the Continents?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate modeling groups from four continents have submitted simulations as part of phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). With climate impact assessment in mind, we test the accuracy of the seasonal averages of temperature, ...

I. G. Watterson; J. Bathols; C. Heady

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Improved steamflood analytical model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two field cases, a 45x23x8 model was used that represented 1/8 of a 10-acre 5-spot pattern unit, using typical rock and reservoir fluid properties. In the SPE project case, three models were used: 23x12x12 (2.5 ac), 31x16x12 (5 ac) and 45x23x8 (10 ac...

Chandra, Suandy

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Improving understanding of climate change dynamics using interactive simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global climate change is one of the most complex problems that human kind will face during the 21st century. Long delays in changing greenhouse gas emissions and in the response of the climate to anthropogenic forcing mean ...

Martin Aguirre, Juan Francisco

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

CERFACS: Scientific Report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERFACS: Scientific Report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Project 1992 ­ 1993 October 25 th. The ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' project has played a key role in this achievement, after two years­of­the art climate model. Based on these actual and potential achievements, the Global Change CERFACS project

50

SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science SEESM: Scalable Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science This SciDAC project will transform an existing, state-of-the-science, third-generation global climate model, the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3), into a first-generation Earth system model that fully simulates the relationships between the physical, chemical, and bio-geochemical processes in the climate system. The model will incorporate new processes necessary to predict future climates based on the specification of greenhouse gas emissions rather than specification of atmospheric concentrations, as is done in present models, which make assumptions about the carbon cycle that are likely not valid. This project will include comprehensive treatments of the processes

51

Influence of spatial resolution on regional climate model derived wind climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of northern Europe is more profound in the wind extremes than in the central tendency. The domain are of similar magnitude to the climate change signal in extreme wind events derived in prior research and mayInfluence of spatial resolution on regional climate model derived wind climates S. C. Pryor,1 G

Pryor, Sara C.

52

Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a monetized metric for evaluating the benefits associated with marginal reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. It represents the expected welfare loss from the future damages caused by the release of one tonne of CO2 in a given year, expressed in consumption equivalent terms. It is intended to be a comprehensive measure, taking into account changes in agricultural productivity, human health risks, loss of ecosystem services and biodiversity, and the frequency and severity of flooding and storms, among other possible impacts. Estimating the SCC requires long-term modeling of global economic activity, the climate system, and the linkages between the two through anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of changing climatic conditions on economic activity and human well-being. The United States government currently uses the SCC in regulatory benefit-cost analyses to assess the welfare effects of changes in CO2 emissions. Consistent application of the SCC to federal rulemaking analyses began in 2009-2010 with the development of a set of global SCC estimates that employed three prominent integrated assessment models (IAMs) -- DICE, FUND, and PAGE. The U.S. government report identified a number of limitations associated with SCC estimates in general and its own assumptions in particular: an incomplete treatment of damages, including potential “catastrophic” impacts; uncertainty regarding the extrapolation of damage functions to high temperatures; incomplete treatment of adaptation and technological change; and the evaluation of uncertain outcomes in a risk-neutral fashion. External experts have identified other potential issues, including how best to model long-term socio-economic and emissions pathways, oversimplified physical climate and carbon cycle modeling within the IAMs, and an inconsistency between non-constant economic growth scenarios and constant discount rates. The U.S. government has committed to updating the estimates regularly as modeling capabilities and scientific and economic knowledge improves. To help foster further improvements in estimating the SCC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a pair of workshops on “Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis.” The first focused on conceptual and methodological issues related to integrated assessment modeling and the second brought together natural and social scientists to explore methods for improving damage assessment for multiple sectors. These two workshops provide the basis for the 13 papers in this special issue.

Marten, Alex; Kopp, Robert E.; Shouse, Kate C.; Griffiths, Charles; Hodson, Elke L.; Kopits, Elizabeth; Mignone, Bryan K.; Moore, Chris; Newbold, Steve; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Wolverton, Ann

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

COLLOQUIUM: Ensemble Modeling of Climate-Carbon Cycle Interactions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

change. NOAA-GFDL developed two coupled climate-carbon cycle models - or Earth System Models (ESMs) - that are able to simulate these interactions. While the major...

54

A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

Monier, Erwan

55

Ensemble climate predictions using climate models and observational constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...globalchange/www/Publications/ , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Joint Program...Global Change, Room E40-428, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139. Bayes...greenhouse gas-plus-aerosol and solar forced climate change. Clim. Dyn...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Uncertainty in Climate Modelling; Projected climate changes and low flow discharge in Elverdams Å.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project uses the Danish stream Elversdam Å as a case study to analyse uncertainty in climate modelling, with particular focus on the low flow… (more)

Dam, Peter Rosendahl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

Auffhammer, Maximilian [University of California at Berkeley; Hsiang, Solomon M. [Princeton University; Schlenker, Wolfram [Columbia University; Sobel, Adam H. [Columbia University

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

58

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: TOWARDS ADVANCED UNDERSTANDING AND PREDICTIVE CAPABILITY OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE ARCTIC USING A HIGH-RESOLUTION REGIONAL ARCTIC CLIMATE SYSTEM MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for this project was to advance the science of climate change and prediction in the Arctic region. Its primary goals were to (i) develop a state-of-the-art Regional Arctic Climate system Model (RACM) including high-resolution atmosphere, land, ocean, sea ice and land hydrology components and (ii) to perform extended numerical experiments using high performance computers to minimize uncertainties and fundamentally improve current predictions of climate change in the northern polar regions. These goals were realized first through evaluation studies of climate system components via one-way coupling experiments. Simulations were then used to examine the effects of advancements in climate component systems on their representation of main physics, time-mean fields and to understand variability signals at scales over many years. As such this research directly addressed some of the major science objectives of the BER Climate Change Research Division (CCRD) regarding the advancement of long-term climate prediction.

Gutowski, William J.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

59

Should we believe model predictions of future climate change?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equations are derived from first principles (e.g. equations of motion, and conservation of energy, mass deficiencies in the attempt to provide useful information to the public and policy-makers. Keywords: climate to communicate what we know and what is uncertain about future climate change? Why are climate model projections

Fischlin, Andreas

60

Cpl6: The New Extensible, High-Performance Parallel Coupler forthe Community Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect

Coupled climate models are large, multiphysics applications designed to simulate the Earth's climate and predict the response of the climate to any changes in the forcing or boundary conditions. The Community Climate System Model (CCSM) is a widely used state-of-art climate model that has released several versions to the climate community over the past ten years. Like many climate models, CCSM employs a coupler, a functional unit that coordinates the exchange of data between parts of climate system such as the atmosphere and ocean. This paper describes the new coupler, cpl6, contained in the latest version of CCSM,CCSM3. Cpl6 introduces distributed-memory parallelism to the coupler, a class library for important coupler functions, and a standardized interface for component models. Cpl6 is implemented entirely in Fortran90 and uses Model Coupling Toolkit as the base for most of its classes. Cpl6 gives improved performance over previous versions and scales well on multiple platforms.

Craig, Anthony P.; Jacob, Robert L.; Kauffman, Brain; Bettge,Tom; Larson, Jay; Ong, Everest; Ding, Chris; He, Yun

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Constraining Transient Climate Sensitivity Using Coupled Climate Model Simulations of Volcanic Eruptions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coupled climate model simulations of volcanic eruptions and abrupt changes in CO2 concentration are compared in multiple realizations of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model, version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The change in global-mean ...

Timothy M. Merlis; Isaac M. Held; Georgiy L. Stenchikov; Fanrong Zeng; Larry W. Horowitz

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Estimating the Contribution of Sea Ice Response to Climate Sensitivity in a Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of sea ice to climate change affects Earth’s radiative properties in ways that contribute to yet more climate change. Here, a configuration of the Community Earth System Model, version 1.0.4 (CESM 1.0.4), with a slab ocean model and a ...

Ken Caldeira; Ivana Cvijanovic

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Climate determinism revisited: multiple equilibria in a complex climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marshall and Brian Rose Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts June 17th, 2010 Submitted to Journal of Climate Corresponding author by incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. We demonstrate that the multiple equilibria owe

Marshall, John

64

Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The Role of Aerosols J. E. Penner and C. C. Chuang Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California...

65

Subtask 2.4 - Integration and Synthesis in Climate Change Predictive Modeling  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a brief evaluation of the existing status of predictive modeling to assess options for integration of our previous paleohydrologic reconstructions and their synthesis with current global climate scenarios. Results of our research indicate that short-term data series available from modern instrumental records are not sufficient to reconstruct past hydrologic events or predict future ones. On the contrary, reconstruction of paleoclimate phenomena provided credible information on past climate cycles and confirmed their integration in the context of regional climate history is possible. Similarly to ice cores and other paleo proxies, acquired data represent an objective, credible tool for model calibration and validation of currently observed trends. It remains a subject of future research whether further refinement of our results and synthesis with regional and global climate observations could contribute to improvement and credibility of climate predictions on a regional and global scale.

Jaroslav Solc

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Preindustrial to present-day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane lifetime from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): overviewand Biogeosciences Climate Model Intercomparison Project (and Climate Model Intercompari- son Project (ACCMIP), Atmos.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The origins of computer weather prediction and climate modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of an ever-increasing range of geophysical phenomena is adding enormously to our understanding of complex processes in the Earth system. The consequences for mankind of ongoing climate change will be far-reaching. Earth System Models ... Keywords: Climate modelling, History of NWP, Numerical weather prediction

Peter Lynch

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Regional-Scale Climate Change: Observations and Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative proposal addressed key issues in understanding the Earthâ??s climate system, as highlighted by the U.S. Climate Science Program. The research focused on documenting past climatic changes and on assessing future climatic changes based on suites of global and regional climate models. Geographically, our emphasis was on the mountainous regions of the world, with a particular focus on the Neotropics of Central America and the Hawaiian Islands. Mountain regions are zones where large variations in ecosystems occur due to the strong climate zonation forced by the topography. These areas are particularly susceptible to changes in critical ecological thresholds, and we conducted studies of changes in phonological indicators based on various climatic thresholds.

Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

69

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Pincus, Robert NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Category: Modeling Statistical cloud schemes (or assumed probability distribution function cloud schemes) are attractive because they provide a way to implement horizontal sub-grid scale cloud heterogeneity in a self-consistent way between physical parameterizations of the a climate model, such as radiation and cloud microphysics. In this work, we will present results dealing with two aspects of our ongoing work towards the implementation of statistical cloud scheme ideas in the climate model of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. First, we will address the representation of cloud

70

Earth system models of intermediate complexity: closing the gap in the spectrum of climate system models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...We propose a new perspective on the hierarchy of climate models which goes beyond the "classical" climate modeling pyramid that is restricted mainly to atmospheric processes. Most notably, we introduce a new i...

M. Claussen; L. Mysak; A. Weaver; M. Crucifix; T. Fichefet…

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

Monier, Erwan

72

Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any economic analysis of climate change policy requires some model that describes the impact of warming on future GDP and consumption. Most integrated assessment models (IAMs) relate temperature to the level of real GDP ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

73

Changing the Climate Sensitivity of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model through Cloud Radiative Adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting probabilistic climate projections with a particular climate model requires the ability to vary the model’s characteristics, such as its climate sensitivity. In this study, the authors implement and validate a ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

74

with the NCAR Climate System Model Solar influence on climate during the past millennium: Results from transient simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in climate re- constructions, and if part of the previously estimated large range of past solar irradiancewith the NCAR Climate System Model Solar influence on climate during the past millennium: Results.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;Solar influence on climate during the past millennium: Results from

Fortunat, Joos

75

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Agriculture model development to improve performance of the Community Land Model April 3, 2013 The important relationships between climate change and agriculture are uncertain, particularly the feedbacks related to the carbon cycle. Nevertheless, vegetation models have not yet considered the full impacts of management practices and nitrogen feedbacks on the carbon cycle. We are working to meet this need. We have integrated three crop types (corn, soybean, and spring wheat) into the Community Land Model (CLM). In developing the agriculture version of CLM, we added plant processes related to management practices and nitrogen cycling. A manuscript documenting our changes to CLM has been accepted for publication in Geoscientific Model Development Discussions ("Modeling

76

The Program for climate Model diagnosis and Intercomparison: 20-th anniversary Symposium  

SciTech Connect

Twenty years ago, W. Lawrence (Larry) Gates approached the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (now the Office of Science) with a plan to coordinate the comparison and documentation of climate model differences. This effort would help improve our understanding of climate change through a systematic approach to model intercomparison. Early attempts at comparing results showed a surprisingly large range in control climate from such parameters as cloud cover, precipitation, and even atmospheric temperature. The DOE agreed to fund the effort at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in part because of the existing computing environment and because of a preexisting atmospheric science group that contained a wide variety of expertise. The project was named the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI), and it has changed the international landscape of climate modeling over the past 20 years. In spring 2009 the DOE hosted a 1-day symposium to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of PCMDI and to honor its founder, Larry Gates. Through their personal experiences, the morning presenters painted an image of climate science in the 1970s and 1980s, that generated early support from the international community for model intercomparison, thereby bringing PCMDI into existence. Four talks covered Gates���¢��������s early contributions to climate research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the RAND Corporation, and Oregon State University through the founding of PCMDI to coordinate the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The speakers were, in order of presentation, Warren Washington [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)], Kelly Redmond (Western Regional Climate Center), George Boer (Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis), and Lennart Bengtsson [University of Reading, former director of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)]. The afternoon session emphasized the scientific ideas that are the basis of PCMDI���¢��������s success, summarizing their evolution and impact. Four speakers followed the various PCMDI-supported climate model intercomparison projects, beginning with early work on cloud representations in models, presented by Robert D. Cess (Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Stony Brook University), and then the latest Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Projects (CFMIPs) led by Sandrine Bony (Laboratoire de M�������©t�������©orologie Dynamique). Benjamin Santer (LLNL) presented a review of the climate change detection and attribution (D & A) work pioneered at PCMDI, and Gerald A. Meehl (NCAR) ended the day with a look toward the future of climate change research.

Potter, Gerald L; Bader, David C; Riches, Michael; Bamzai, Anjuli; Joseph, Renu

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

78

A Simple Empirical Model for Decadal Climate Prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decadal climate prediction is a challenging aspect of climate research. It has been and will be tackled by various modeling groups. This study proposes a simple empirical forecasting system for the near-surface temperature that can be used as a ...

Oliver Krueger; Jin-Song Von Storch

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Empirical correction of a toy climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving the accuracy of forecast models for physical systems such as the atmosphere is a crucial ongoing effort. The primary focus of recent research on these highly nonlinear systems has been errors in state estimation, but as that error has been successfully diminished, the role of model error in forecast uncertainty has duly increased. The present study is an investigation of an empirical model correction procedure involving the comparison of short forecasts with a reference “truth” system during a training period, in order to calculate systematic (1) state-independent model bias and (2) state-dependent error patterns. An estimate of the likelihood of the latter error component is computed from the current state at every time step of model integration. The effectiveness of this technique is explored in a realistic scenario, in which the model is structurally different (in dynamics, dimension, and parametrization) from the target system. Results suggest that the correction procedure is more effective for reducing error and prolonging forecast usefulness than parameter tuning. However, the cost of this increase in average forecast accuracy is the creation of substantial qualitative differences between the dynamics of the corrected model and the true system. A method to mitigate dynamical ramifications and further increase forecast accuracy is presented.

Nicholas A. Allgaier; Kameron D. Harris; Christopher M. Danforth

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

Investment Dimension: Enhanced Data Equals Better Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy provided the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility with $60 million for new and upgraded instrumentation, equipment, and infrastructure to improve atmospheric data sets. These enhancements will take place among the permanent ARM research sites in Oklahoma and Alaska in the United States, and near the equator in the tropical Western Pacific. They will also advance the capabilities of ARM’s mobile and aerial research platforms. This article focuses on key enhancements - particularly new scanning radars, enhanced lidar technologies, aerosol observation systems, and in situ aircraft probes - that will provide unprecedented data sets for the modeling community.

Roeder, Lynne R.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Global climate change model natural climate variation: Paleoclimate data base, probabilities and astronomic predictors  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University at Palisades, New York, under subcontract to Pacific Northwest Laboratory it is a part of a larger project of global climate studies which supports site characterization work required for the selection of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository and forms part of the Performance Assessment Scientific Support (PASS) Program at PNL. The work under the PASS Program is currently focusing on the proposed site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and is under the overall direction of the Yucca Mountain Project Office US Department of Energy, Las Vegas, Nevada. The final results of the PNL project will provide input to global atmospheric models designed to test specific climate scenarios which will be used in the site specific modeling work of others. The primary purpose of the data bases compiled and of the astronomic predictive models is to aid in the estimation of the probabilities of future climate states. The results will be used by two other teams working on the global climate study under contract to PNL. They are located at and the University of Maine in Orono, Maine, and the Applied Research Corporation in College Station, Texas. This report presents the results of the third year`s work on the global climate change models and the data bases describing past climates.

Kukla, G.; Gavin, J. [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Uncertainty in emissions projections for climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future global climate projections are subject to large uncertainties. Major sources of this uncertainty are projections of anthropogenic emissions. We evaluate the uncertainty in future anthropogenic emissions using a ...

Webster, Mort David.; Babiker, Mustafa H.M.; Mayer, Monika.; Reilly, John M.; Harnisch, Jochen.; Hyman, Robert C.; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Wang, Chien.

83

Climate models: challenges for Fortran development tools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate simulation and weather forecasting codes are among the most complex examples of scientific software. Moreover, many of them are written in Fortran, making them some of the largest and most complex Fortran codes ever developed. For companies and ...

Mariano Méndez, Fernando G. Tinetti, Jeffrey L. Overbey

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

[10-386] Assessing and Improving the Scale Dependence of Ecosystem Processes in Earth System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Goodale Cornell U. *Overall Project Lead *Lead Institution Intellectual Merit: Earth system models include policies. Our research assesses and improves Earth system model simulations of the carbon cycle, ecosystem of the Community Climate System Model/Community Earth System Model, which includes statistical meteorological

85

Modeling Water Resource Systems under Climate Change: IGSM-WRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the integration of a Water Resource System (WRS) component, the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM) framework has been enhanced to study the effects of climate change on managed water-resource systems. ...

Strzepek, K.

86

Causal Discovery for Climate Research Using Graphical Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Causal discovery seeks to recover cause–effect relationships from statistical data using graphical models. One goal of this paper is to provide an accessible introduction to causal discovery methods for climate scientists, with a focus on ...

Imme Ebert-Uphoff; Yi Deng

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Amazon Deforestation and Climate Change in a Coupled Model Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of Amazon deforestation on climate change are investigated using twin numerical experiments of an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with prescribed global sea surface temperature and the same AGCM coupled to an ocean GCM (...

Paulo Nobre; Marta Malagutti; Domingos F. Urbano; Roberto A. F. de Almeida; Emanuel Giarolla

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Discriminating between climate observations in terms of their ability to improve an ensemble of climate predictions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...increase in quality, the more...including surface air temperature...Reflected solar radiation...capable of improving accuracy by...Radiation Energy System (CERES...H ( 2003 ) AIRS/AMSU/HSB...Department of Energy. This work...types for improving the accuracy...50-y surface air temperature...

Yi Huang; Stephen Leroy; Richard M. Goody

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model  

SciTech Connect

Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries) and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Rothenberg, D. [Cornell University; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Moore, Jefferson Keith [University of California, Irvine; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Jones, C. D. [Hadley Center, Devon, England

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Developing the next-generation climate system models: challenges and achievements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...need to evolve further into Earth system models. This is also immensely challenging...physical climate models to full Earth system models, through the incorporation...living organisms into climate (Earth) system models. Theoretical bases for modelling...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The origins of computer weather prediction and climate modeling  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation of an ever-increasing range of geophysical phenomena is adding enormously to our understanding of complex processes in the Earth system. The consequences for mankind of ongoing climate change will be far-reaching. Earth System Models are capable of replicating climate regimes of past millennia and are the best means we have of predicting the future of our climate. The basic ideas of numerical forecasting and climate modeling were developed about a century ago, long before the first electronic computer was constructed. There were several major practical obstacles to be overcome before numerical prediction could be put into practice. A fuller understanding of atmospheric dynamics allowed the development of simplified systems of equations; regular radiosonde observations of the free atmosphere and, later, satellite data, provided the initial conditions; stable finite difference schemes were developed; and powerful electronic computers provided a practical means of carrying out the prodigious calculations required to predict the changes in the weather. Progress in weather forecasting and in climate modeling over the past 50 years has been dramatic. In this presentation, we will trace the history of computer forecasting through the ENIAC integrations to the present day. The useful range of deterministic prediction is increasing by about one day each decade, and our understanding of climate change is growing rapidly as Earth System Models of ever-increasing sophistication are developed.

Lynch, Peter [Meteorology and Climate Centre, School of Mathematical Sciences, University College Dublin, Belfield (Ireland)], E-mail: Peter.Lynch@ucd.ie

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) Large Ensemble Project: A Community Resource for Studying Climate Change in the Presence of Internal Climate Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While internal climate variability is known to affect climate projections, its influence is often underappreciated and confused with model error. Why? In general, modeling centers contribute a small number of realizations to international climate ...

J. E. Kay; C. Deser; A. Phillips; A. Mai; C. Hannay; G. Strand; J. M. Arblaster; S. C. Bates; G. Danabasoglu; J. Edwards; M. Holland; P. Kushner; J.-F. Lamarque; D. Lawrence; K. Lindsay; A. Middleton; E. Munoz; R. Neale; K. Oleson; L. Polvani; M. Vertenstein

93

Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Climate and Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and NCAR in the development of a comprehensive, earth systems model. This model incorporates the most-performance climate models. Through the addition of relevant physical processes, we are developing an earth systems modeling capability as well. Our collaborators in climate research include the National Center

94

The New Hadley Centre Climate Model (HadGEM1): Evaluation of Coupled Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new coupled general circulation climate model developed at the Met Office's Hadley Centre is presented, and aspects of its performance in climate simulations run for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC ...

T. C. Johns; C. F. Durman; H. T. Banks; M. J. Roberts; A. J. McLaren; J. K. Ridley; C. A. Senior; K. D. Williams; A. Jones; G. J. Rickard; S. Cusack; W. J. Ingram; M. Crucifix; D. M. H. Sexton; M. M. Joshi; B.-W. Dong; H. Spencer; R. S. R. Hill; J. M. Gregory; A. B. Keen; A. K. Pardaens; J. A. Lowe; A. Bodas-Salcedo; S. Stark; Y. Searl

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional climate model data Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(1), 10851096, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional within the SWURVE project 2: addressing uncertainty in regional climate model data for five European case regions (CSRs) of the EC-funded project SWURVE, estimates of uncertainty in climate model data need

Boyer, Edmond

96

Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

97

Modelling the local climate in island environments: water balance applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In small volcanic islands the local scale climate is influenced by the regional scale climate and by the orography and orientation of air masses movement over the islands. A model was developed in a GIS environment to generate local scale climate variables from those observed at the synoptic scale, from coastal weather stations. An advective submodel, based on the Foehn effect and assuming the conservation of mass and energy, computes local scale air temperature, relative humidity, clouds occurrence and precipitation. A radiative submodel, using information generated by the advective submodel, computes local scale global radiation. A rotational terrain model allows that computations be performed according to the direction of wind. Because the model works within a GIS, results concern the spatial distribution of all climatic variables on the island territory. Results of the validation of temperature, relative humidity, global radiation and rainfall are presented. For agro-meteorological purposes, an application of generated data to perform the sequential water balance is also analysed by comparing results from computations using simulated and observed data at a control weather station located at medium altitude. Results support assumptions utilised in the model and the further use of generated local climate fields for water management and environmental studies in small island environments.

Eduardo Brito de Azevedo; Lu??s Santos Pereira; Bernard Itier

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Testing an astronomically-based decadal-scale empirical harmonic climate model versus the IPCC (2007) general circulation climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare the performance of a recently proposed empirical climate model based on astronomical harmonics against all available general circulation climate models (GCM) used by the IPCC (2007) to interpret the 20th century global surface temperature. The proposed model assumes that the climate is resonating with, or synchronized to a set of natural harmonics that have been associated to the solar system planetary motion, mostly determined by Jupiter and Saturn. We show that the GCMs fail to reproduce the major decadal and multidecadal oscillations found in the global surface temperature record from 1850 to 2011. On the contrary, the proposed harmonic model is found to well reconstruct the observed climate oscillations from 1850 to 2011, and it is able to forecast the climate oscillations from 1950 to 2011 using the data covering the period 1850-1950, and vice versa. The 9.1-year cycle is shown to be likely related to a decadal Soli/Lunar tidal oscillation, while the 10-10.5, 20-21 and 60-62 year cycles are sy...

Scafetta, Nicola

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory A multidisciplinary research fields. The Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory routinely partners simulations to improve regional modeling of climate extremes - Partners from Oak Ridge, Lawrence Berkeley

100

New Climate Research Centers Forecast Changes and Challenges  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Two new observation stations -– in Alaska and the Azore islands -– should reduce uncertainties and improve global climate models.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Overview and Description of Models, Simulations and Climate Diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) consists of a series of timeslice experiments targeting the long-term changes in atmospheric composition between 1850 and 2100, with the goal of documenting radiative forcing and the associated composition changes. Here we introduce the various simulations performed under ACCMIP and the associated model output. The ACCMIP models have a wide range of horizontal and vertical resolutions, vertical extent, chemistry schemes and interaction with radiation and clouds. While anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions were specified for all time slices in the ACCMIP protocol, it is found that the natural emissions lead to a significant range in emissions, mostly for ozone precursors. The analysis of selected present-day climate diagnostics (precipitation, temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind) reveals biases consistent with state-of-the-art climate models. The model-to-model comparison of changes in temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind between 1850 and 2000 and between 2000 and 2100 indicates mostly consistent results, but with outliers different enough to possibly affect their representation of climate impact on chemistry.

Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, Drew; Josse, B.; Young, P. J.; Cionni, I.; Eyring, Veronika; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Collins, W. J.; Doherty, R.; Dalsoren, S.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Plummer, David; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S.; Schulz, M.; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Voulgarakis, A.; Zeng, G.

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

RHP: HOW CLIMATE MODELS GAIN AND EXERCISE How Climate Models Gain and Exercise Authority  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional models, intermediate complexity models, general circulation models, and Earth system models. 2 www

Hulme, Mike

103

Predictions of Climate Several Years Ahead Using an Improved Decadal Prediction System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decadal climate predictions are now established as a source of information on future climate alongside longer-term climate projections. This information has the potential to provide key evidence for decisions on climate change adaptation, ...

Jeff R. Knight; Martin B. Andrews; Doug M. Smith; Alberto Arribas; Andrew W. Colman; Nick J. Dunstone; Rosie Eade; Leon Hermanson; Craig MacLachlan; K. Andrew Peterson; Adam A. Scaife; Andrew Williams

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A simple model of multiple climate regimes Kerry Emanuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Climate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA Received 28 June 2001 to a roughly 30% increase in solar insolation over the life of the planet. To this enigma may be added to produce multiple equilibrium states for the same solar forcing. Here we present a simple model

Emanuel, Kerry A.

105

Congo Basin rainfall climatology: can we believe the climate models?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Asare, Simon Lewis and Philippe Mayaux Congo Basin rainfall climatology: can we believe...rainforests: past, present and future . The Congo Basin is one of three key convective regions...rainfall products and climate models. Congo rainfall|climatology|moisture flux...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A SIMULATION MODEL FOR CANADA-US CLIMATE POLICY ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts how energy trade between Canada and the US might change due to the policies. The results gas emissions; carbon tax; energy consumption; energy supply; energy trade Subject Terms: Climatic policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in Canada and the US. A model of the combined energy

107

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

108

A Gaussian graphical model approach to climate networks  

SciTech Connect

Distinguishing between direct and indirect connections is essential when interpreting network structures in terms of dynamical interactions and stability. When constructing networks from climate data the nodes are usually defined on a spatial grid. The edges are usually derived from a bivariate dependency measure, such as Pearson correlation coefficients or mutual information. Thus, the edges indistinguishably represent direct and indirect dependencies. Interpreting climate data fields as realizations of Gaussian Random Fields (GRFs), we have constructed networks according to the Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM) approach. In contrast to the widely used method, the edges of GGM networks are based on partial correlations denoting direct dependencies. Furthermore, GRFs can be represented not only on points in space, but also by expansion coefficients of orthogonal basis functions, such as spherical harmonics. This leads to a modified definition of network nodes and edges in spectral space, which is motivated from an atmospheric dynamics perspective. We construct and analyze networks from climate data in grid point space as well as in spectral space, and derive the edges from both Pearson and partial correlations. Network characteristics, such as mean degree, average shortest path length, and clustering coefficient, reveal that the networks posses an ordered and strongly locally interconnected structure rather than small-world properties. Despite this, the network structures differ strongly depending on the construction method. Straightforward approaches to infer networks from climate data while not regarding any physical processes may contain too strong simplifications to describe the dynamics of the climate system appropriately.

Zerenner, Tanja, E-mail: tanjaz@uni-bonn.de [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Friederichs, Petra; Hense, Andreas [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany) [Meteorological Institute, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 20, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Complex Systems, University of Bonn, Brühler Straße 7, 53119 Bonn (Germany); Lehnertz, Klaus [Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany) [Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Radiation and Nuclear Physics, University of Bonn, Nussallee 14-16, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Complex Systems, University of Bonn, Brühler Straße 7, 53119 Bonn (Germany)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Modeling the Impacts of Future Climate Change on Irrigation over China: Sensitivity to Adjusted Projections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the limitations of coarse-resolution general circulation models (GCMs), delta change (DC) methods are generally used to derive scenarios of future climate as inputs into impact models. In this paper, the impact of future climate change ...

Guoyong Leng; Qiuhong Tang

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, andEdwards, Paul N. A Vast Machine: Computer Models, ClimateEdwards, Paul N. 2004. "A vast machine: standards as social

Maret, Susan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Parameter Optimization in an Intermediate Coupled Climate Model with Biased Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Imperfect physical parameterization schemes in a coupled climate model are an important source of model biases that adversely impact climate prediction. However, how observational information should be used to optimize physical parameterizations ...

Xuefeng Zhang; Shaoqing Zhang; Zhengyu Liu; Xinrong Wu; Guijun Han

112

Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence K. Sham Bhat, Murali Haran, Adam Terando, and Klaus Keller. Abstract Projections of future climatic changes are a key input to the design of climate change mitiga- tion and adaptation strategies. Current climate change projections

Haran, Murali

113

Description of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3). Technical note  

SciTech Connect

This repor presents the details of the governing equations, physical parameterizations, and numerical algorithms defining the version of the NCAR Community Climate Model designated CCM3. The material provides an overview of the major model components, and the way in which they interact as the numerical integration proceeds. This version of the CCM incorporates significant improvements to the physic package, new capabilities such as the incorporation of a slab ocean component, and a number of enhancements to the implementation (e.g., the ability to integrate the model on parallel distributed-memory computational platforms).

Kiehl, J.T.; Hack, J.J.; Bonan, G.B.; Boville, B.A.; Briegleb, B.P.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Coupled Climate and Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are all familiar with weather forecasts that predict the local weather for the next few days. These are made using a high-resolution numerical model of the atmosphere, and sometimes extend out as far as 10 ...

Peter R. Gent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Conceptual stochastic climate models Peter Imkeller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be thoroughly inve- stigated but too simple to be treated as quantitatively accurate, through Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity (EMICs) which represent some clima- te subsystems (e.g. the ocean

Monahan, Adam Hugh

116

Toward a high performance distributed memory climate model  

SciTech Connect

As part of a long range plan to develop a comprehensive climate systems modeling capability, the authors have taken the Atmospheric General Circulation Model originally developed by Arakawa and collaborators at UCLA and have recast it in a portable, parallel form. The code uses an explicit time-advance procedure on a staggered three-dimensional Eulerian mesh. The authors have implemented a two-dimensional latitude/longitude domain decomposition message passing strategy. Both dynamic memory management and interprocessor communication are handled with macro constructs that are preprocessed prior to compilation. The code can be moved about a variety of platforms, including massively parallel processors, workstation clusters, and vector processors, with a mere change of three parameters. Performance on the various platforms as well as issues associated with coupling different models for major components of the climate system are discussed.

Wehner, M.F.; Ambrosiano, J.J.; Brown, J.C.; Dannevik, W.P.; Eltgroth, P.G.; Mirin, A.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Farrara, J.D.; Ma, C.C.; Mechoso, C.R.; Spahr, J.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

1993-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Status and Improvements of Coupled General Circulation Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...change impacts; and (iv) be a firmer basis for Earth system models that describe the feedbacks of societies to climate...change impacts; and (iv) be a firmer basis for Earth system models that describe the feedbacks of societies to climate...

Hartmut Grassl

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

CLOUD MODELING CHALLENGES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE SIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ENTRAINMENT IN THE OF ENTRAINMENT IN THE DIURNAL TRANSITION FROM SHALLOW TO DEEP CONVECTION Tony Del Genio and Jingbo Wu NASA/GISS ARM Science Team Meeting, 3/31/09 Continental rainfall rates tend to peak in mid-late afternoon or evening Time of peak rainfall, TRMM PR Hirose et al. (2008) But not in GCMs, which like to rain near noon ___ TRMM 3B42 - - - gauge colors = models IPCC AR4 models (Dai, 2006) Some recent studies * Derbyshire et al. (2004): SCMs insensitive to tropospheric humidity * Grabowski et al. (2006): Need entrainment rate to decrease with time of day * Kuang and Bretherton (2006): Weaker entrainment rates for deep than for shallow convection - increasing parcel size as cold pools form? * Khairoutdinov and Randall (2006): Demonstration of downdraft/cold pool role in transition from shallow to deep

119

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Climate, Land, Water Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/mosaicc/66705/en/ FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Screenshot References: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC)[1] "FAO-MOSAICC (for MOdelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change) is a system of models designed to carry out each step of the impact

120

Statistical representation of clouds in climate models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

novel approach for representing novel approach for representing ice microphysics in bin and bulk schemes: Application to TWP-ICE deep convection Hugh Morrison and Wojciech Grabowski National Center for Atmospheric Research ARM STM, Monday, April 1, 2009 -1) Uncertainty of ice initiation processes -2) Wide range of ice particle characteristics (e.g., shape, effective density) -3) No clear separation of physical processes for small and large crystals The treatment of ice microphysics has a large impact on model simulations, e.g., precipitation, interactions with dynamics, radiation, etc. However, it is complicated by: Pristine ice crystals, grown by diffusion of water vapor Snowflakes, grown by aggregation Pruppacher and Klett Rimed ice crystals (accretion of supercooled cloud water) Graupel (heavily

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A multi-resolution method for climate system modeling: application of spherical centroidal Voronoi tessellations  

SciTech Connect

During the next decade and beyond, climate system models will be challenged to resolve scales and processes that are far beyond their current scope. Each climate system component has its prototypical example of an unresolved process that may strongly influence the global climate system, ranging from eddy activity within ocean models, to ice streams within ice sheet models, to surface hydrological processes within land system models, to cloud processes within atmosphere models. These new demands will almost certainly result in the develop of multiresolution schemes that are able, at least regionally, to faithfully simulate these fine-scale processes. Spherical centroidal Voronoi tessellations (SCVTs) offer one potential path toward the development of a robust, multiresolution climate system model components. SCVTs allow for the generation of high quality Voronoi diagrams and Delaunay triangulations through the use of an intuitive, user-defined density function. In each of the examples provided, this method results in high-quality meshes where the quality measures are guaranteed to improve as the number of nodes is increased. Real-world examples are developed for the Greenland ice sheet and the North Atlantic ocean. Idealized examples are developed for ocean–ice shelf interaction and for regional atmospheric modeling. In addition to defining, developing, and exhibiting SCVTs, we pair this mesh generation technique with a previously developed finite-volume method. Our numerical example is based on the nonlinear, shallow water equations spanning the entire surface of the sphere. This example is used to elucidate both the potential benefits of this multiresolution method and the challenges ahead.

Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Improving Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Modeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improving Air-Conditioner Improving Air-Conditioner and Heat Pump Modeling Building America Stakeholders Meeting Jon Winkler March 2, 2012 2 * How do you recommend the most cost-effective A/C? Simple Question 3 Solution Whole-House Simulation Tool A/C Information * SEER 13 * SEER 14 * SEER 15 * SEER 16 * SEER 17 * SEER 18 * SEER 21 Annualized Cooling Cost (Energy + Equipment) 4 Background * Power, capacity and SHR vary with: o Outdoor temperature o Entering wetbulb o Air mass flow rate o Part load ratio Power Sensible Capacity Latent Capacity * How to accurately and easily model A/C performance? 5 Background: Model Development * A/C modeling utilizes two types of input o Rated values (capacity, efficiency, etc.) o Performance curves Capacity 1 / Efficiency 6 Background: Manufacturer's Data

123

Autonomie Modeling Tool Improves Vehicle Design and Testing,...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Autonomie Modeling Tool Improves Vehicle Design and Testing, Informs New Fuel Economy Standards Autonomie Modeling Tool Improves Vehicle Design and Testing, Informs New Fuel...

124

Coupling climate models with the Earth System Modeling Framework and the Common Component Architecture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typical Earth system models involve coupled model components in high-performance computing (HPC) environments. In the last few years, several frameworks have been developed for HPC applications. Two of them are component-based frameworks: the Earth System ... Keywords: climate model, framework, model coupling

S. J. Zhou

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Climate model dependence and the Ensemble Dependence Transformation of CMIP projections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Obtaining multiple estimates of future climate for a given emissions scenario is key to understanding the likelihood and uncertainty associated with climate-related impacts. This is typically done by collating model estimates from different ...

Abramowitz; G.Bishop; C. H.

126

Impacts on ocean heat from transient mesoscale eddies in a hierarchy of climate models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We characterize impacts on heat in the ocean climate system from transient ocean mesoscale eddies. Our tool is a suite of centennial-scale 1990 radiatively forced numerical climate simulations from three GFDL coupled models comprising the CM2-O ...

Stephen M. Griffies; Michael Winton; Whit G. Anderson; Rusty Benson; Thomas L. Delworth; Carolina O. Dufour; John P. Dunne; Paul Goddard; Adele k. Morrison; Anthony Rosati; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Jianjun Yin; Rong Zhang

127

A snowball Earth versus a slushball Earth: Results from Neoproterozoic climate modeling sensitivity experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Goosse, H., Lohmann, G., Lunkeit, F., Mokhov, I., Petoukhov, V., Stone, P., and Wang, Z., 2002, Earth system models of intermediate complexity: Closing the gap in the spectrum of climate system: Climate Dynamics, v. 18 p. 579-586...

128

Responses of energy use to climate change: A climate modeling study  

SciTech Connect

[1] Using a general-circulation climate model to drive an energy-use model, we projected changes in USA energy-use and in corresponding fossil-fuel CO2 emissions through year 2025 for a low (1.2 XC) and a high (3.4 XC) temperature response to CO2 doubling. The low- T scenario had a cumulative (2003-2025) energy increase of 1.09 quadrillion Btu (quads) for cooling/heating demand. Northeastern states had net energy reductions for cooling/heating over the entire period, but in most other regions energy increases for cooling outweighed energy decreases for heating. The high-?T scenario had significantly increased warming, especially in winter, so decreased heating needs led to a cumulative (2003-2025) heating/cooling energy decrease of 0.82 quads. In both scenarios, CO2 emissions increases from electricity generation outweighed CO2 emissions decreases from reduced heating needs. The results reveal the intricate energy-economy structure that must be considered in projecting consequences of climate warming for energy, economics, and fossil-fuel carbon emissions.

Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Blasing, T J [ORNL; Hernandez Figueroa, Jose L [ORNL; Broniak, C [Oregon State University

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Climate change and uncertainty in ecological niche modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enhance regional climate change impact studies." Eos Trans.hydrologic impacts of climate change in the Sierra Nevada,of a century of climate change on small-mammal communities

Alvarez, Otto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Integrated Numerical Modeling Process for Evaluating Automobile Climate Control Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FCC-70 FCC-70 Integrated Numerical Modeling Process for Evaluating Automobile Climate Control Systems John Rugh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT The air-conditioning (A/C) system compressor load can significantly impact the fuel economy and tailpipe emissions of conventional and hybrid electric automobiles. With the increasing emphasis on fuel economy, it is clear that the A/C compressor load needs to be reduced. In order to accomplish this goal, more efficient climate control delivery systems and reduced peak soak temperatures will be necessary to reduce the impact of vehicle A/C systems on fuel economy and tailpipe emissions. Good analytical techniques are important in identifying promising concepts. The goal at

131

World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3): Multi-Model Dataset Archive at PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In response to a proposed activity of the WCRP's Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM),PCMDI volunteered to collect model output contributed by leading modeling centers around the world. Climate model output from simulations of the past, present and future climate was collected by PCMDI mostly during the years 2005 and 2006, and this archived data constitutes phase 3 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3). In part, the WGCM organized this activity to enable those outside the major modeling centers to perform research of relevance to climate scientists preparing the Fourth Asssessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environmental Program to assess scientific information on climate change. The IPCC publishes reports that summarize the state of the science. This unprecedented collection of recent model output is officially known as the WCRP CMIP3 multi-model dataset. It is meant to serve IPCC's Working Group 1, which focuses on the physical climate system - atmosphere, land surface, ocean and sea ice - and the choice of variables archived at the PCMDI reflects this focus. A more comprehensive set of output for a given model may be available from the modeling center that produced it. As of November 2007, over 35 terabytes of data were in the archive and over 303 terabytes of data had been downloaded among the more than 1200 registered users. Over 250 journal articles, based at least in part on the dataset, have been published or have been accepted for peer-reviewed publication. Countries from which models have been gathered include Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany and Korea, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Great Britain and the United States. Models, variables, and documentation are collected and stored. Check http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/data_status_tables.htm to see at a glance the output that is available. (Description taken from http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php)

132

Assessing the consistency between short-term global temperature trends in observations and climate model projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing the consistency between short-term global temperature trends in observations and climate model projections is a challenging problem. While climate models capture many processes governing short-term climate fluctuations, they are not expected to simulate the specific timing of these somewhat random phenomena - the occurrence of which may impact the realized trend. Therefore, to assess model performance, we develop distributions of projected temperature trends from a collection of climate models running the IPCC A1B emissions scenario. We evaluate where observed trends of length 5 to 15 years fall within the distribution of model trends of the same length. We find that current trends lie near the lower limits of the model distributions, with cumulative probability-of-occurrence values typically between 5 percent and 20 percent, and probabilities below 5 percent not uncommon. Our results indicate cause for concern regarding the consistency between climate model projections and observed climate behavior...

Michaels, Patrick J; Christy, John R; Herman, Chad S; Liljegren, Lucia M; Annan, James D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A framework for interpreting climate model outputs Nadja A. Leith and Richard E. Chandler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to illustrate the methodology. Some key words: Climate change; Climate model uncertainty; Contemporaneous ARMA acknowledged that human activities have caused changes in the Earth's climate (Solomon et al., 2007). Indeed #12;the hydrological cycle (Solomon et al., 2007). To accommodate this possibility therefore, planners

Guillas, Serge

134

Extreme events in solutions of hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the assumptions made in applying them to operational numerical weather prediction (NWP), climate modelling-hydrostatic (NPE) primitive equations that have been used extensively in numerical weather prediction and climate weather, climate and global ocean circulation predictions for many decades. The HPE govern incompressible

Gibbon, J. D.

135

Developing an integrated end-to-end TeraGrid climate modeling environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a widely used community model for studying the climate system on the Earth. The CESM model is both data and computationally intensive, making it difficult for users to set up and run CESM simulations using local ... Keywords: CCSM, CESM, ESMF, Purdue CCSM portal, TeraGrid, climate model, earth system grid, metadata, science gateway

Lan Zhao; Carol X. Song; Christopher S. Thompson; Han Zhang; Madhavan Lakshminarayanan; Cecelia DeLuca; Sylvia Murphy; Kathy Saint; Don Middleton; Nathan Wilhelmi; Eric Nienhouse; Michael Burek

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

BNL | Climate, Environment and Bisoscience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate, Environment, and Biosciences Climate, Environment, and Biosciences bioscience research Revealing Nature-from Microscopic to Atmospheric Scales With recognized expertise in plant sciences, imaging, and climate studies, Brookhaven Lab advances some of the most promising scientific methods of achieving a sustainable future. This cross-disciplinary research seeks to understand the relationships between climate change, sustainable energy initiatives, and the planet's natural ecosystems. As environmental and economic issues mount, this research will provide increasingly important guidance and opportunities for climate change management strategies, approaches to adaptation, and policy decisions. Building a Sustainable Future Major goals include: Significantly improving climate models based on high-quality data

137

Towards the Prediction of Decadal to Centennial Climate Processes in the Coupled Earth System Model  

SciTech Connect

In this proposal, we have made major advances in the understanding of decadal and long term climate variability. (a) We performed a systematic study of multidecadal climate variability in FOAM-LPJ and CCSM-T31, and are starting exploring decadal variability in the IPCC AR4 models. (b) We develop several novel methods for the assessment of climate feedbacks in the observation. (c) We also developed a new initialization scheme DAI (Dynamical Analogue Initialization) for ensemble decadal prediction. (d) We also studied climate-vegetation feedback in the observation and models. (e) Finally, we started a pilot program using Ensemble Kalman Filter in CGCM for decadal climate prediction.

Zhengyu Liu, J. E. Kutzbach, R. Jacob, C. Prentice

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Opportunities for improving leaf water use efficiency under climate change conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract \\{WUEi\\} (intrinsic water use efficiency) is a complex (multi)-trait, that depends on several physiological processes, driving plant productivity and its relation with a changing environment. Climatic change predictions estimate increases in temperature and drought in the semi-arid regions, rendering improved water use efficiency is a mandatory objective to maintain the current global food supply. The aims of this review were (i) to identify through a meta-analysis the leaf traits mostly related to intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi, the ratio between A – net photosynthesis and gs – stomatal conductance), based on a newly compiled dataset covering more than 200 species/varieties and 106 genus of C3 plants (ii) to describe the main potential targets for \\{WUEi\\} improvement via biotechnological manipulations and (iii) to introduce emergent and innovative technologies including \\{UAVs\\} (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) to scale up levels from leaf to whole plant water status. We confirmed that increases in gm/gs and Vcmax/gs ratios are systematically related with increases in \\{WUEi\\} maintained across species, habitats, and environmental conditions. Other emergent opportunities to improve \\{WUEi\\} are described such as the relationship between photosynthesis and respiration and their link with metabolomics. Finally, we outline our hypothesis that we are observing the advent of a “smart” agriculture, wherein new technologies, such as \\{UAVs\\} equipped with remote sensors will rapidly facilitate an efficient water use regulating the irrigation schedule and determination, under field conditions, of cultivars with improved water use efficiency. We, therefore, conclude that the multi-disciplinary challenge toward WUE has only just begun.

Jorge Gago; Cyril Douthe; Igor Florez-Sarasa; Jose M. Escalona; Jeroni Galmes; Alisdair R. Fernie; Jaume Flexas; Hipolito Medrano

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Integrated science model for assessment of climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment models are intended to represent processes that govern physical, ecological, economic and social systems. This report describes a scientific model relating emissions to global temperature and sea level. This model is intended to be one component of an integrated assessment model which is, of course, much more comprehensive. The model is able to reproduce past changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, global temperature, and sea level. The model is used to estimate the emissions rates required to lead to stabilization of CO{sub 2} at various levels. The model is also used to estimate global temperature rise, the rate of temperature change, and sea level rise driven by IPCC emissions scenarios. The emission of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} is modeled to have the largest long term effect on climate. Results do show the importance of expected changes of trace greenhouse gases other than CO{sub 2} in the near future. Because of the importance of these other trace gases, further work is recommended to more accurately estimate their effects.

Jain, A.K.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kheshgi, H.S. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

General and Partial Equilibrium Modeling of Sectoral Policies to Address Climate Change in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This document provides technical documentation for work using detailed sectoral models to calibrate a general equilibrium analysis of market and non-market sectoral policies to address climate change. Results of this work can be found in the companion paper, ?Modeling Costs of Economy-wide versus Sectoral Climate Policies Using Combined Aggregate-Sectoral Models?.

Pizer, William; Burtraw, Dallas; Harrington, Winston; Newell, Richard; Sanchirico, James; Toman, Michael

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The computational future for climate and Earth system models: on the path to petaflop and beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...computational future for climate and Earth system models: on the path to petaflop and...development of the climate and Earth system models has had a long history, starting...long-term goal of building the Earth system models that would go beyond what is...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The near future availability of photovoltaic energy in Europe and Africa in climate-aerosol modeling experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The near future change in productivity of photovoltaic energy (PVE) in Europe and Africa is assessed by using the climate variables simulated by the ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, and a model for the performance of photovoltaic systems. The climate simulations are forced by green-house gases emissions from the IPCC SRES B2 scenario. In addition, different scenarios for future anthropogenic aerosols emissions are applied. Thus, the sensitivity of the future PVE productivity to changes in aerosol atmospheric burdens between 2000 and 2030 is analyzed. The analysis indicates that reductions in aerosols emissions in the near future result in an increase of global warming, and a significant response in surface solar radiation and associated PVE productivity. A statistically significant reduction in PVE productivity up to 7% is observed in eastern Europe and northern Africa, while a significant increase up to 10% is observed in western Europe and eastern Mediterranean. The changes in surface solar radiation and PVE productivity are related to global effects of aerosols reduction on the large scale circulation and associated cloud cover pattern, rather than to local effects on the atmospheric optical properties. PVE assessment is then discussed in the frame of the present situation and next decades evolution of the photovoltaic market, highlighting that the effects on productivity induced by industrial and public policies, and technological development are comparable to climate related effects. The presented results encourage the improvement and further use of climate models in assessment of future renewable energies availability.

Marco Gaetani; Thomas Huld; Elisabetta Vignati; Fabio Monforti-Ferrario; Alessandro Dosio; Frank Raes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Environmental stratification to model climate change impacts on biodiversity and rubber production in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An analysis and multi-model approach, based on a statistically derived Global Environmental Stratification (GEnS) and using a downscaled ensemble (n = 63) of CIMP5 Earth System Models applied across four representative concentration pathways (RCP), has been used to project the impact of climate change on spatial distribution of bioclimatic zones and ecosystems within the biodiverse rich Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan Province, by the year 2050. Four bioclimatic zones and 9 strata were identified, overlaid with protected areas, and associated with on-going landuse change, i.e. a rapid increase in rubber plantation from 8% to 22% of total area between 2002 and 2010. Significant changes in the areal extent and distribution of all zones and strata are projected, with an averaged mean annual temperature increase ranging from 1.6 °C to 2.4 °C. By 2050, there are significant geographical shifts in all identified strata, with an average upward shift of 309 m of elevation for all strata. On average, more than 75% of Xishuangbanna is predicted to shift to a different zone, with 96% shifting to a different stratum. The area conducive to rubber plantations, currently limited by climatic conditions, expands to nearly 75% of the total area. Climatic change potentially removes the bioclimatic barriers to further expansion of rubber plantations within the area and increases pressure on remaining biodiversity both within and outside of protected areas. The analysis provides the basis for understanding potential impacts of changing bioclimatic conditions on managed and unmanaged ecosystems and landuse change trends, within the context of ongoing rapid change and agricultural expansion in the area. Current efforts to conserve forests, biodiversity and traditional landuse systems require an improved understanding of both the projected climatic changes and the responses of biodiversity and traditional agricultural systems to changing conditions.

Robert J. Zomer; Antonio Trabucco; Mingcheng Wang; Rong Lang; Huafang Chen; Marc J. Metzger; Alex Smajgl; Philip Beckschäfer; Jianchu Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Modeling Obliquity and CO2 Effects on Southern Hemisphere Climate during the Past 408 ka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of obliquity and CO2 changes on Southern Hemispheric climate is studied with a series of numerical modeling experiments. Using the Earth system model of intermediate complexity Loch–VECODE–ECBilt–CLIO–Agism Model (LOVECLIM) and a ...

Axel Timmermann; Tobias Friedrich; Oliver Elison Timm; Megumi O. Chikamoto; Ayako Abe-Ouchi; Andrey Ganopolski

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Analysis of Permafrost Thermal Dynamics and Response to Climate Change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze global climate model predictions of soil temperature [from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) database] to assess the models’ representation of current-climate soil thermal dynamics and their predictions ...

Charles D. Koven; William J. Riley; Alex Stern

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change projections using the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model: from CMIP3 to CMIP5 J relevant to the climate system, it may be referred to as an Earth System Model. However, the IPSL-CM5 model climate and Earth System Models, both developed in France and contributing to the 5th coupled model

Codron, Francis

147

Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

148

California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

Caldwell, P M

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

149

Analysis of Workload and Load Balancing Issues in the NCAR Community Climate Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Climate Model were instrumented to produce per­cell load data for each time step, revealing load, this approach reduced the amount of load data by a factor of 12, and simplified greatly the taskAnalysis of Workload and Load Balancing Issues in the NCAR Community Climate Model John G

150

A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Multi-Model Assessment of Regional Climate Disparities Caused by Solar Geoengineering Brunswick, NJ. 5 Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 6 School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Robock, Alan

151

A Sparse Bayesian Model for Dependence Analysis of Extremes: Climate Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Sparse Bayesian Model for Dependence Analysis of Extremes: Climate Applications Debasish Das applications, such as climate, finance and social media among others, we are often interested in extreme events. An important part of modeling extremes is dis- covery of covariates on which the quantities related

Obradovic, Zoran

152

American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, 12/14/07 Analyzing Regional Climate Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of future climate and produce high resolution climate change projections using multiple GCM/RCM simulations for weight- ing models and improved projections of regional climate and climate change. · RecognizingAmerican Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, 12/14/07 Analyzing Regional Climate

Sain, Steve

153

The mean climate of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) in forced SST and fully coupled experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4) was released as the atmosphere component of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) and is described. The finite volume dynamical core available in CAM3 is now the default due to its superior transport and conservation properties. Deep convection parameterization changes include a dilute plume calculation of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the introduction of a formulation for Convective Momentum Transport (CMT). For the cloud fraction an additional calculation is performed following macrophysical state updates that provides improved thermodynamic condistancy. A freeze-drying modification is further made to the cloud fraction calculation in very dry environments, such as arctic Winter, where cloud fractionand cloud water estimates were often inconsistant in CAM3. In CAM4 the finite volume dynamical core leads to a degradation in the excessive trade-wind simulation, but with an accompanying reduction in zonal stresses at higher latitudes. Plume dilution leads to a moister deep tropics alleviating much of the mid-tropospheric dry biases and reduces the persistant precipitation biases over the Arabian peninsular and the southern Indian ocean during the Indian Monsoon. CMT reduces much of the excessive trade-wind biases in eastern ocean basins. The freeze drying modification alleviates much of the high latitude, winter-time excessive cloud bias and improves the associated surface cloud-related energy budget, but the updated cloud macrophysical calculation generally leads to reduced cloud fraction and cloud forcing away from high latitudes. Although there are marginal improvements in time-averaged, large-scale hydrology there are signficant improvements in regional climate features such as the generation of tropical and propagation of stationary waves from the Pacific into mid-latitudes and in the seasonal frequency of Northern Hemisphere blocking events. A 1? versus 2? horizontal resolution of the finite volume 24 dynamical core exhibits signficiant improvements in model climate. Improvements in the fully coupled mean climate between CAM3 and CAM4 are also much more signficant than in forced Sea Surface Temperature (SST) simulations. Furthermore, improvements in the transient characteristics ofthe model climate, documented elsewhere, are substantial.

Neale, Richard; Richter, Jadwiga; Park, Sungsu; Lauritzen, P. H.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhang, Minghua

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Development of Ensemble Neural Network Convection Parameterizations for Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

The novel neural network (NN) approach has been formulated and used for development of a NN ensemble stochastic convection parametrization for climate models. This fast parametrization is built based on data from Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations initialized with and forced by TOGA-COARE data. The SAM (System for Atmospheric Modeling), developed by D. Randall, M. Khairoutdinov, and their collaborators, has been used for CRM simulations. The observational data are also used for validation of model simulations. The SAM-simulated data have been averaged and projected onto the GCM space of atmospheric states to implicitly define a stochastic convection parametrization. This parametrization is emulated using an ensemble of NNs. An ensemble of NNs with different NN parameters has been trained and tested. The inherent uncertainty of the stochastic convection parametrization derived in such a way is estimated. Due to these inherent uncertainties, NN ensemble is used to constitute a stochastic NN convection parametrization. The developed NN convection parametrization have been validated in a diagnostic CAM (CAM-NN) run vs. the control CAM run. Actually, CAM inputs have been used, at every time step of the control/original CAM integration, for parallel calculations of the NN convection parametrization (CAM-NN) to produce its outputs as a diagnostic byproduct. Total precipitation (P) and cloudiness (CLD) time series, diurnal cycles, and P and CLD distributions for the large Tropical Pacific Ocean for the parallel CAM-NN and CAM runs show similarity and consistency with the NCEP reanalysis. The P and CLD distributions for the tropical area for the parallel runs have been analyzed first for the TOGA-COARE boreal winter season (November 1992 through February 1993) and then for the winter seasons of the follow-up parallel decadal simulations. The obtained results are encouraging and practically meaningful. They show the validity of the NN approach. This constitutes an important practical conclusion of the study: the obtained results on NN ensembles as a stochastic physics parametrization show a realistic possibility of development of NN convection parametrization for climate (and NWP) models based on learning cloud physics from CRM/SAM simulated data.

Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Krasnopolsky, V. M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

155

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) -NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen Klein, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLIMATE MODELING BEST ESTIMATE DATASET (CMBE) - NEW ADDITIONS Renata McCoy, Shaocheng Xie, Stephen ARM product, the Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) dataset, is being augmented with the additional observational and model data. The CMBE dataset was created to serve the needs of climate model developers

156

Mechanisms of Decadal Arctic Climate Variability in the Community Climate System Model, Version 2 (CCSM2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain natural climate variability in the Arctic. These include processes related to the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation/Arctic Oscillation (NAO/AO), anticyclonic/cyclonic regimes, changes in ...

Hugues Goosse; Marika M. Holland

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

Jochum, Markus

158

Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM Development Testing of the Global Climate Model CESM/CAM Event Sponsor: Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Seminar Start Date: Dec 16 2013 - 10:30am Building/Room: Building 240/Room 4301 Location: Argonne National Laboratory Speaker(s): Chris A. Fischer Speaker(s) Title: National Center for Atmospheric Research The Community Earth System Model (CESM) and Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) are community models involving several different developers. With so many different developers it becomes imperative to carry out continuous testing during development. I'll provide a brief introduction to CESM and CAM then cover the testing that is being carried out on both. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a global climate model used to predict past, present and future climates. CESM is a fully couple model,

160

Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By comparing the response of clouds and water vapor to ENSO forcing in nature with that in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations by some leading climate models, an earlier evaluation of tropical cloud and water vapor ...

De-Zheng Sun; Yongqiang Yu; Tao Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Modelling the economic and social consequences of drought under future projections of climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, China, Ethiopia, India, Spain/Portugal and the USA. Future projections of drought magnitude for 2003-2050 were modelled using the integrated assessment model CIAS (Community Integrated Assessment System), for a range of climate and emission scenarios...

Jenkins, Katie L.

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

162

Simulations of the West African Monsoon with a Superparameterized Climate Model. Part I: The Seasonal Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The West African monsoon seasonal cycle is simulated with two coupled general circulation models: the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), which uses traditional convective parameterizations, and the “superparameterized” CCSM (SP-CCSM), in which ...

Rachel R. McCrary; David A. Randall; Cristiana Stan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Simulations of the West African Monsoon with a Superparameterized Climate Model. Part II: African Easterly Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between African easterly waves and convection is examined in two coupled general circulation models: the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and the “superparameterized” CCSM (SP-CCSM). In the CCSM, the easterly waves are much ...

Rachel R. McCrary; David A. Randall; Cristiana Stan

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle: Climate Relations in Eight CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Eight Earth System Models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are evaluated, focusing on both the net carbon dioxide flux and its components and their relation with climatic variables (temperature, precipitation, and ...

Pu Shao; Xubin Zeng; Koichi Sakaguchi; Russell K. Monson; Xiaodong Zeng

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sciences Enhancing the Capability of Computational Earth System Models and Using NASA Data for Operation and Assessment...Science, Decadal and Regional Climate Prediction using Earth System Models program (M.W. and S.J.G.). PNNL is operated...

Yuan Wang; Minghuai Wang; Renyi Zhang; Steven J. Ghan; Yun Lin; Jiaxi Hu; Bowen Pan; Misti Levy; Jonathan H. Jiang; Mario J. Molina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Market analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: sei-us.org/projects/id/218 CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development Screenshot References: SEI-CRED[1] SEI's Climate and Regional Economics of Development (CRED) is an integrated

167

Progress Report 2008: A Scalable and Extensible Earth System Model for Climate Change Science  

SciTech Connect

This project employs multi-disciplinary teams to accelerate development of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM), based at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). A consortium of eight Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories collaborate with NCAR and the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). The laboratories are Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL) Los Alamos (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore (LLNL), Oak Ridge (ORNL), Pacific Northwest (PNNL) and Sandia (SNL). The work plan focuses on scalablity for petascale computation and extensibility to a more comprehensive earth system model. Our stated goal is to support the DOE mission in climate change research by helping ... To determine the range of possible climate changes over the 21st century and beyond through simulations using a more accurate climate system model that includes the full range of human and natural climate feedbacks with increased realism and spatial resolution.

Drake, John B [ORNL; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jones, Phil [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE Title Climate simulations for 1880-2003 with GISS modelE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Hansen, James E., Makiko Sato, Reto Ruedy, Pushker A. Kharecha, Andrew A. Lacis, Ronald L. Miller, Larissa Nazarenko, Kwok-Wai Ken Lo, Gavin A. Schmidt, Gary L. Russell, Igor D. Aleinov, Susanne E. Bauer, Ellen Baum, Brain Cairns, Vittorio M. Canuto, Mark Chandler, Ye Cheng, Armond Cohen, Anthony Del Genio, Gregory S. Faluvegi, Eric L. Fleming, Andrew D. Friend, Timothy M. Hall, Charles H. Jackman, Jeffrey Jonas, Maxwell Kelley, Nancy Y. Kiang, Dorothy M. Koch, Gordon J. Labow, J. Lerner, Surabi Menon, Tihomir Novakov, Valdar Oinas, Jan Perlwitz, Judith Perlwitz, David H. Rind, Anastasia Romanou, Robert B. Schmunk, Drew T. Shindell, Peter H. Stone, S. Sun, David G. Streets, Nicholas Tausnev, D. Thresher, Nadine Unger, Mao-Sung Yao, and S. Zhang

169

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI Name: Venkatramani Balaji PI Email: balaji@princeton.edu Institution: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Earth Science We expect our understanding of the role of clouds in climate to undergo a qualitative change as the resolutions of global models begin to encompass clouds. At these resolutions, non-hydrostatic dynamics become significant and deep convective processes are resolved. We are poised at the threshold of being able to run global scale simulations that include direct, non-parameterized, simulations of deep convective clouds. The goal of this

170

Climate Studies with a Multi-Layer Energy Balance Model. Part I: Model Description and Sensitivity to the Solar Constant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A nine-layer, zonally averaged, steady-state model has been developed for use in climate sensitivity studies. The model is based upon thermal energy balance and includes recently developed accurate treatment of radiative transfer, parameterized ...

Li Peng; Ming-Dah Chou; Albert Arking

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Improving the Performance of Air-Conditioning Systems in an ASEAN Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an analysis of air conditioning performance under hot and humid tropical climate conditions appropriate to the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries. This region, with over 280 million people, has one...

Busch, J. F.; Warren, M. L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Climate Change and Extinctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures presents: Climate Change and Extinctions Happening2013. He will present a climate change extinction model that

Sinervo, Barry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.

Robert G. Ellingson

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

PAGES 111–112 Climate and Earth system models are the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only tools used to make predictions of future climate change. Such predictions are subject to considerable uncertainties, and understanding these uncertainties has clear and important policy implications. This Forum highlights the concepts of reductionism and emergence, and past climate variability, to illuminate some of the uncertainties faced by those wishing to model the future evolution of global climate. General circulation models (GCMs) of the atmosphere-ocean system are scientists’ principal tools for providing information about future climate. GCMs consequently have considerable influence on climate change–related policy questions. Over the past decade, there have been significant attempts, mainly by statisticians and mathematicians, to explore the uncertainties in model simulations of possible futures, accompanied by growing debate about the interpretation of these simulations as aids in societal decisions. In this Forum, we discuss atmosphere-ocean GCMs in the context of reductionist and emergent approaches to scientific study.

unknown authors

175

Energy Department Announces Funding to Improve Grid Resiliency and Climate Preparedness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Department’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability announced that it is making up to $3.5 million in funding available for communities to deploy smart grid tools and technologies to advance climate preparedness and resiliency of the electricity delivery infrastructure. This Funding Opportunity supports the goals of other initiatives by the Administration to prepare the Nation for the impacts of climate change by providing funding to local and tribal governments.

176

Resampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the simulation of extreme river flows. This is important to assess the impact of climate change on river flooding biases in the RCM data, the simulated extreme flood quantiles correspond quite well with those obtainedResampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows Robert

Haak, Hein

177

USING SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS AND REANALYSES TO EVALUATE CLIMATE AND WEATHER FORECAST MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USING SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS AND REANALYSES TO EVALUATE CLIMATE AND WEATHER FORECAST MODELS Richard Email: rpa@mail.nerc-essc.ac.uk ABSTRACT Satellite observations of water vapour and radiative fluxes are used in combination with reanalyses data to evaluate the Met Office weather and climate prediction

Allan, Richard P.

178

Feedback and sensitivity in an electrical circuit: An analog for climate models  

SciTech Connect

Earth's climate sensitivity is often interpreted in terms of feedbacks that can alter the sensitivity from that of a no-feedback Stefan-Boltzmann radiator, with the feedback concept and algebra introduced by analogy to the use of this concept in the electronics literature. This analogy is quite valuable in interpreting the sensitivity of the climate system, but usage of this algebra and terminology in the climate literature is often inconsistent, with resultant potential for confusion and loss of physical insight. Here a simple and readily understood electrical resistance circuit is examined in terms of feedback theory to introduce and define the terminology that is used to quantify feedbacks. This formalism is applied to the feedbacks in an energy-balance model of Earth's climate and used to interpret the magnitude of feedback in the climate system that corresponds to present estimates of Earth's climate sensitivity.

Schwartz, S.E.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

179

Short-term improvements in public health from global-climate policies on fossil-fuel combustion: an interim report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SummaryBackground Most public-health assessments of climate-control policies have focused on long-term impacts of global change. Our interdisciplinary working group assesses likely short-term impacts on public health. Methods We combined models of energy consumption, carbon emissions, and associated atmospheric particulate-matter (PM) concentration under two different forecasts: business-as-usual (BAU); and a hypothetical climate-policy scenario, where developed and developing countries undertake significant reductions in carbon emissions. Findings We predict that by 2020, 700?000 avoidable deaths (90% CI 385000–1034000) will occur annually as a result of additional PM exposure under the BAU forecasts when compared with the climate-policy scenario. From 2000 to 2020, the cumulative impact on public health related to the difference in PM exposure could total 8 million deaths globally (90% CI 4.4–11.9 million). In the USA alone, the avoidable number of annual deaths from PM exposure in 2020 (without climate-change-control policy) would equal in magnitude deaths associated with human immunodeficiency diseases or all liver diseases in 1995. Interpretation The mortality estimates are indicative of the magnitude of the likely health benefits of the climate-policy scenario examined and are not precise predictions of avoidable death. While characterised by considerable uncertainty, the short-term public-health impacts of reduced PM exposures associated with greenhouse-gas reductions are likely to be substantial even under the most conservative set of assumptions.

Devra Lee Davis

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Collaborative Research: Towards Advanced Understanding and Predictive Capability of Climate Change in the Arctic using a High-Resolution Regional Arctic Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect

Primary activities are reported in these areas: climate system component studies via one-way coupling experiments; development of the Regional Arctic Climate System Model (RACM); and physical feedback studies focusing on changes in Arctic sea ice using the fully coupled model.

Lettenmaier, Dennis P

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Initializing Decadal Climate Predictions with the GECCO Oceanic Synthesis: Effects on the North Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims at improving the forecast skill of climate predictions through the use of ocean synthesis data for initial conditions of a coupled climate model. For this purpose, the coupled model of the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for ...

Holger Pohlmann; Johann H. Jungclaus; Armin Köhl; Detlef Stammer; Jochem Marotzke

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Leveraging The Open Provenance Model as a Multi-Tier Model for Global Climate Research  

SciTech Connect

Global climate researchers rely upon many forms of sensor data and analytical methods to help profile subtle changes in climate conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program provides researchers with curated Value Added Products (VAPs) resulting from continuous sensor data streams, data fusion, and modeling. The ARM operations staff and software development teams (data producers) rely upon a number of techniques to ensure strict quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) standards are maintained. Climate researchers (data consumers) are highly interested in obtaining as much provenance (data quality, data pedigree) as possible to establish data trustworthiness. Currently all the provenance is not easily attainable or identifiable without significant efforts to extract and piece together information from configuration files, log files, codes, and status information from ARM databases. The need for a formalized approach to managing provenance became paramount with the planned addition of 120 new instruments, new data products, and data collection scaling to half a terabyte daily. Last year our research identified the need for a multi-tier provenance model to enable the data consumer easy access to the provenance for their data. This year we are leveraging the Open Provenance Model as a foundational construct that serves the needs of both the VAP producers and consumers, we are organizing the provenance in different tiers of granularity to model VAP lineage, causality at the component level within a VAP, and the causality for each time step as samples are being assembled within the VAP. This paper shares our implementation strategy and how the ARM operations staff and the climate research community can greatly benefit from this approach to more effectively assess and quantify VAP provenance.

Stephan, Eric G.; Halter, Todd D.; Ermold, Brian D.

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

183

Open problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Current weather radar detection and prediction sys- tems primarily rely on numerical models. We proposeOpen problem: Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Amy McGovern1, #12;Dynamic Relational Models for Improved Hazardous Weather Prediction Radar velocity Radar

McGovern, Amy

184

Modeling Climate Feedbacks to Energy Demand: The Case of China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is an empirical investigation of the effects of climate on the use of electricity by consumers and producers in urban and rural areas within China. It takes advantage of an unusual combination of temporal and ...

Asadoorian, Malcolm O.

185

Modeled climate change effects on distributions of Canadian butterfly species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Climate change effects on biodiversity are being documented now frequently in the form of changes in phenology and distributional shifts. However, the form that these effects will take over a longer timespan is ...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Martí nez-Meyer, Enrique; Gonzá lez-Salazar, Constantino; Hall, Peter W.

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Valuing Climate Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models: The MIT IGSM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a strategy for investigating the impacts of climate change on Earth’s physical, biological and human resources and links to their socio-economic consequences. The features of the integrated global system framework ...

Reilly, John

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

187

GFDL’s ESM2 Global Coupled Climate–Carbon Earth System Models. Part I: Physical Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The physical climate formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbon–climate Earth System Models, ESM2M and ESM2G, are described. These models demonstrate similar climate fidelity as the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Alistair J. Adcroft; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Matthew J. Harrison; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Peter J. Phillipps; Lori T. Sentman; Bonita L. Samuels; Michael J. Spelman; Michael Winton; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Niki Zadeh

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Climate Collections  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional/Global > Climate Collections Regional/Global > Climate Collections Climate Collections Overview Climate encompasses the statistics of temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, rainfall, atmospheric particle count, and numerous other meteorological elements in a given region over long periods of time. Climate can be contrasted to weather, which is the present condition of these same elements over periods up to two weeks. The climate collections project includes data sets containing measured and modeled values for variables such as temperature, precipitation, humidity, radiation, wind velocity, and cloud cover and include station measurements as well as gridded mean values. The ORNL DAAC Climate Collections Data archive includes 10 data products from the following categories:

190

Estimation of the mean depth of boreal lakes for use in numerical weather prediction and climate modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models through parameterisation. For parameterisation, data. The effect of lakes should be parameterised in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate modellingEstimation of the mean depth of boreal lakes for use in numerical weather prediction and climate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

191

Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling Energy Management Strategies for Fast Battery Temperature Rise and Engine...

192

Evaluating the Use of Ocean Models of Different Complexity in Climate Change Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of the uncertainties in future climate projections requires large ensembles of simulations with different values of model characteristics that define its response to external forcing. These characteristic include ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

193

New approaches to data-assimilation in paleo-climatic modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approaches to data-assimilation in paleo-climatic modeling ­ p.1 #12;NH temperature reconstruction ECHO-G (Erik1), ECHO-G (Erik2), CCSM ECBilt-Clio, Jones and Mann (2004) New approaches to data

Schrier, Gerard van der

194

Climate change uncertainty evaluation, impacts modelling and resilience of farm scale dynamics in Scotland   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Thesis explored a range of approaches to study the uncertainty and impacts associated with climate change at the farm scale in Scotland. The research objective was to use a process of uncertainty evaluation and simulation modelling to provide...

Rivington, Michael

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Most Systematic Errors in Climate Models Appear in Only a Few...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hindcast ensembles from the Transpose-AMIP II for July-August 2009 (short-term) to the climate simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5)...

196

Modeling land surface processes of the midwestern United States : predicting soil moisture under a warmer climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation seeks to quantify the response of soil moisture to climate change in the midwestern United States. To assess this response, a dynamic global vegetation model, Integrated Biosphere Simulator, was coupled ...

Winter, Jonathan (Jonathan Mark)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Dynamic Cost-Loss Ratio Decision-making Model with an Autocorrelated Climate Variable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dynamic decision-making problem is considered involving the use of information about the autocorrelation of a climate variable. Specifically, an infinite horizon, discounted version of the dynamic cost-loss ratio model is treated, in which only ...

Richard W. Katz

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

On the Contribution of Longwave Radiation to Global Climate Model Biases in Arctic Lower Tropospheric Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous research has found that global climate models (GCMs) usually simulate greater lower tropospheric stabilities compared to reanalysis data. To understand the origins of this bias, the authors examine hindcast simulations initialized with ...

Neil P. Barton; Stephen A. Klein; James S. Boyle

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Carbon–Concentration and Carbon–Climate Feedbacks in CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnitude and evolution of parameters that characterize feedbacks in the coupled carbon–climate system are compared across nine Earth system models (ESMs). The analysis is based on results from biogeochemically, radiatively, and fully coupled ...

Vivek K. Arora; George J. Boer; Pierre Friedlingstein; Michael Eby; Chris D. Jones; James R. Christian; Gordon Bonan; Laurent Bopp; Victor Brovkin; Patricia Cadule; Tomohiro Hajima; Tatiana Ilyina; Keith Lindsay; Jerry F. Tjiputra; Tongwen Wu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

An Evaluation of Proposed Representations of Subgrid Hydrologic Processes in Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The temporal and spatial scales that characterize surface hydrologic processes provide conceptual and practical difficulties to the development of parameterization schemes for incorporation into climate models. In particular, there is a ...

G. Thomas; A. Henderson-Sellers

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The Surface-Pressure Signature of Atmospheric Tides in Modern Climate Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although atmospheric tides driven by solar heating are readily detectable at the earth’s surface as variations in air pressure, their simulations in current coupled global climate models have not been fully examined. This ...

Covey, Curt

202

The Influence of Hadley Circulation Intensity Changes on Extratropical Climate in an Idealized Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments have been performed using a simple global model with idealized physics and zonally symmertrical forcings to investigate the influence of Hadley circulation intensity changes on extratropical climate. The heating within the Tropics is ...

Edmund K. M. Chang

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Deep Convective Transition Characteristics in the Community Climate System Model and Changes under Global Warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tropical deep convective transition characteristics, including precipitation pickup, occurrence probability, and distribution tails related to extreme events, are analyzed using uncoupled and coupled versions of the Community Climate System Model (...

Sandeep Sahany; J. David Neelin; Katrina Hales; Richard B. Neale

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Emission-Induced Nonlinearities in the Global Aerosol System: Results from the ECHAM5-HAM Aerosol-Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a series of simulations with the global ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model, the response to changes in anthropogenic emissions is analyzed. Traditionally, additivity is assumed in the assessment of the aerosol climate impact, as the underlying ...

Philip Stier; Johann Feichter; Silvia Kloster; Elisabetta Vignati; Julian Wilson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Projected Changes to the Southern Hemisphere Ocean and Sea Ice in the IPCC AR4 Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fidelity and projected changes in the climate models, used for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4), are assessed with regard to the Southern Hemisphere extratropical ocean and sea ice systems. While ...

Alexander Sen Gupta; Agus Santoso; Andréa S. Taschetto; Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Jessica Trevena; Matthew H. England

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

Pan, Feifei

208

Experiments with a time-dependent, zonally averaged, seasonal, enery balance climatic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXPERIMENTS WITH A TI&E-DEPENDENT, ZONALLY AVERAGED, SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the decree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology EXPERIMENTS WITH A TIME DEPENDENT~ ZONALLY AVERAGED~ SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee...

Thompson, Starley Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Global air quality and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP;of chemistry–climate models with RCP emissions thus projectto project air quality responses to future climate change

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Modelling the effects of climate change on the energy system—A case study of Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The overall objective of this work is to identify the effects of climate change on the Norwegian energy system towards 2050. Changes in the future wind- and hydro-power resource potential, and changes in the heating and cooling demand are analysed to map the effects of climate change. The impact of climate change is evaluated with an energy system model, the MARKAL Norway model, to analyse the future cost optimal energy system. Ten climate experiments, based on five different global models and six emission scenarios, are used to cover the range of possible future climate scenarios and of these three experiments are used for detailed analyses. This study indicate that in Norway, climate change will reduce the heating demand, increase the cooling demand, have a limited impact on the wind power potential, and increase the hydro-power potential. The reduction of heating demand will be significantly higher than the increase of cooling demand, and thus the possible total direct consequence of climate change will be reduced energy system costs and lower electricity production costs. The investments in offshore wind and tidal power will be reduced and electric based vehicles will be profitable earlier.

Pernille Seljom; Eva Rosenberg; Audun Fidje; Jan Erik Haugen; Michaela Meir; John Rekstad; Thore Jarlset

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change  

SciTech Connect

While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change  

SciTech Connect

While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » September 2012 Are the Effects of Black Carbon Overestimated in Climate Models? Atmospheric black carbon may not cause as much warming of the climate as we thought. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe

215

Improvement of Offshore Wind Resource Modeling in the Mid-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of Offshore Wind Resource Modeling in the Mid- Atlantic Bight Wind Energy Symposium Sienkiewicz , Chris Hughes 26 February 2013 #12;Improving Atmospheric Models for Offshore Wind Resource Interaction Tower ­ 23 m NOAA Buzzard's Bay Tower ­ 25 m Cape Wind Tower (60 m from 2003-2011; just platform

Firestone, Jeremy

216

Transformer Thermal Modeling: Improving Reliability Using Data Quality Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Transformer Thermal Modeling: Improving Reliability Using Data Quality Control Daniel J. Tylavsky--Eventually all large transformers will be dynamically loaded using models updated regularly from field measured data. Models obtained from measured data give more accurate results than models based on transformer

217

Perspective: The Climate-Population-Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation Fertile Area for New Research  

SciTech Connect

Managing the risks posed by climate change and extreme weather to energy production and delivery is a challenge to communities worldwide. As climate conditions change, populations will shift, and demand will re-locate; and networked infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers, and, hopefully, minimize vulnerability to natural disaster. Climate effects such as sea level rise, increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, force populations to move locations. Displaced population creates new demand for built infrastructure that in turn generates new economic activity that attracts new workers and associated households to the new locations. Infrastructures and their interdependencies will change in reaction to climate drivers as the networks expand into new population areas and as portions of the networks are abandoned as people leave. Thus, infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Forecasting the location of these vulnerabilities by combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for defining these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. By combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory it has been only recently possible to examine electricity demand response to increased climactic temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. These emerging results suggest a research agenda of coupling these disparate modelling approaches to understand the implications of climate change for protecting the nation s critical infrastructure.

Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Improved diagnostic model for estimating wind energy  

SciTech Connect

Because wind data are available only at scattered locations, a quantitative method is needed to estimate the wind resource at specific sites where wind energy generation may be economically feasible. This report describes a computer model that makes such estimates. The model uses standard weather reports and terrain heights in deriving wind estimates; the method of computation has been changed from what has been used previously. The performance of the current model is compared with that of the earlier version at three sites; estimates of wind energy at four new sites are also presented.

Endlich, R.M.; Lee, J.D.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Modeling the prospects for climatic change: current state-of-the-art and implications  

SciTech Connect

It has been increasingly suggested that the world's climate is going to change in the next several decades, primarily as a result of anthropogenic perturbations to the global carbon cycle brought about by fossil fuel burning and large-scale deforestation. In order to cope with these future climatic changes, it is necessary that tools be developed to predict how complex systems respond to a given change of conditions. This report summarizes the status of our ability to model the planetary system that determines the climate. (ACR)

Kellogg, W.M.

1980-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

220

ReseaRch at the University of Maryland Climate Modeling and Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the familiar seven-day weather forecast and the century-long global-warming projection, Maryland-Rabinovitz's work is leading to improved predictions of extreme weather events such as monsoons, intense storms-use patterns and their contribution to climate change. Ning Zeng investigates how ice sheets store carbon

Hill, Wendell T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Improving Comfort in Hot-Humid Climates with a Whole-House, Windermere...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Efficiency Measure (including labor): 2,600 Projected Energy Savings: 8.2% reduction in air conditioning Projected Energy Cost Savings: 53year Other Benefits: * Improved...

222

PhD Student Position Vacancy Satellite Humidity Climate Data Records  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's objective is to improve weather and climate predictions with the help of satellite data, particularly from1 PhD Student Position Vacancy Satellite Humidity Climate Data Records Climate change is a key satellite measurements of atmospheric humidity and clouds, and with climate model results. The group

Hamburg,.Universität

223

Subgrid-Scale Mixing in Climate Models: A Novel Look at Diffusion, Accuracy, Stability and Climate Sensitivity  

SciTech Connect

This project focuses on evaluating the role of subgrid-scale dissipation in the dynamical core of atmospheric models. All dynamical cores of atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) employ some form of subgrid-scale dissipation, either explicitly specified or inherent in the chosen numerical schemes. The dissipation processes are needed to keep the simulation stable or to satisfy important physical properties, and the hope is that they capture and mimic in some poorly understood way the true processes at the unresolved subgrid scale. There is no physical basis that such dissipation can accomplish this. We originally posed a set of numerical test cases chosen or designed to isolate the role of the filters and fixers on both the dynamical variables (pressure, temperature, velocity, vorticity) and trace constituents. From these test case results, we synthesize the information to determine the impact of the subgrid-scale assumptions on weather and climate models.

Rood, Richard B; Jablonowski, Christiane

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Improving fish farmers' climate change adaptation strategies through information utilisation in Akinyele local government area of Oyo State, Nigeria: implication for sustainable fish production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper assesses the information utilisation by fish farmers on climate change adaptation strategies with the view of improving their adaptation to climate change and as well increasing fish production in Nigeria. A survey was carried out to obtain data from the farmers. The data collected were analysed by using frequency count, mean and percentage. Information that could have improved adaptive capacity of farmers on devastating effects of climate change on fish production was not frequently disseminated to the farmers in the study area. Extension education should make evident the variables that hinder fish farmers' information utilisation because inadequate information prevents potential users from using appropriate information on their farms. Effort should therefore be made to promote the dissemination of information on how farmers can adapt to climate change through investment in information technology such as remote sensing. The effort should also include adequate and consistent sponsorship of extension information broadcast on radio and television stations.

Kayode Arimi; Adetola Jenyo-Oni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Earth System Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Earth system models are important research tools for improving understanding ... climate system (and maybe never will), Earth system models nowadays typically focus on specific aspects, for...

Patrick Jöckel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Early Eocene equable climate problem: can perturbations of climate model parameters identify possible solutions?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...generation of models sitting between the higher resolution AOGCMs and the lower resolution, highly parametrized Earth system models of intermediate complexity. The reduced resolution allows us to fully spin-up the ocean, with all of the simulations...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Inferring Likelihoods and Climate System Characteristics from Climate Models and Multiple  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the information contained in large-scale observational data sets with simulations of Earth system models in a sta

Haran, Murali

228

Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Climate Prediction and Radiative Heating Climate models are driven by forcing, and these forces are seen primarily by the thermal field in general circulation models (GCMs). The major forces that affect the thermal field are longwave radiative (LWR) heating, shortwave radiative (SWR) heating, and convection (cumulus, etc.). These forcing effects are cycled through the thermal field to the motion field by nonlinear transfer. The dependent variables-in particular, temperature (T), moisture (Q) and especially clouds-evolve in time in a model and determine the subsequent forcing. If the dependent variables are not accurately calculated in space and time, the forcing

229

Improved computer models support genetics research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February » February » Simple computer models unravel genetic stress reactions in cells Simple computer models unravel genetic stress reactions in cells Integrated biological and computational methods provide insight into why genes are activated. February 8, 2013 When complete, these barriers will be a portion of the NMSSUP upgrade. This molecular structure depicts a yeast transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA), which carries a single amino acid to the ribosome during protein construction. A combined experimental and computational approach, to better understand signaling pathways that lead to genetic mutations, is at the core of this research. Contact thumbnail of Brian Munsky, PhD Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow Brian Munsky, PhD Information Services, Advanced Measurement Science

230

Cloud/Aerosol Parameterizations: Application and Improvement of General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

One of the biggest uncertainties associated with climate models and climate forcing is the treatment of aerosols and their effects on clouds. The effect of aerosols on clouds can be divided into two components: The first indirect effect is the forcing associated with increases in droplet concentrations; the second indirect effect is the forcing associated with changes in liquid water path, cloud morphology, and cloud lifetime. Both are highly uncertain. This project applied a cloud-resolving model to understand the response of clouds under a variety of conditions to changes in aerosols. These responses are categorized according to the large-scale meteorological conditions that lead to the response. Meteorological conditions were sampled from various fields, which, together with a global aerosol model determination of the change in aerosols from present day to pre-industrial conditions, was used to determine a first order estimate of the response of global cloud fields to changes in aerosols. The response of the clouds in the NCAR CAM3 GCM coupled to our global aerosol model were tested by examining whether the response is similar to that of the cloud resolving model and methods for improving the representation of clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions were examined.

Penner, Joyce

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIODIVERSITY AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uncertainty in these projections. Climate change is expected to strongly affect ecosystem services. Carbon, but current models project reduced carbon storage in trees due to climate change. Altered agricultural. Improved understanding of projected climate change impacts on natural habitats will contribute

232

Probabilistic Forecast for Twenty-First-Century Climate Based on Uncertainties in Emissions (Without Policy) and Climate Parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model is used to make probabilistic projections of climate change from 1861 to 2100. Since the model’s first projections were published in 2003, substantial improvements ...

A. P. Sokolov; P. H. Stone; C. E. Forest; R. Prinn; M. C. Sarofim; M. Webster; S. Paltsev; C. A. Schlosser; D. Kicklighter; S. Dutkiewicz; J. Reilly; C. Wang; B. Felzer; J. M. Melillo; H. D. Jacoby

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Construction Logistics Improvements using the SCOR model Tornet Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Construction Logistics Improvements using the SCOR model �Tornet Case Fredrik Persson1 , Jonas are emerging that leads to cost reductions in construction. In this strive towards improvement, logistics on cost savings from the logistics perspective in different areas of the logistic system. Keywords

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

234

BISON Enhanced with Improved Models for Cladding and Coolant Channels |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced with Improved Models for Cladding and Coolant Enhanced with Improved Models for Cladding and Coolant Channels BISON Enhanced with Improved Models for Cladding and Coolant Channels January 29, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis Pin-scale Code Development Development of BISON for the engineering-scale simulation of nuclear fuel performance continued. Enhancements during this quarter include implementation of a nonlinear material model for Zircaloy cladding that simultaneously combines the phenomena of plasticity, thermal creep, and irradiation creep; implementation of a complete set of material properties and a creep model for stainless steel cladding; and modification of the coolant sub-channel model to better support simulations of loss-of- coolant-accidents. BISON simulations are being compared to relevant empirical fuel pin data

235

A Global Interactive Chemistry and Climate Model Chien Wang, Ronald G. Prinn and Andrei P. Sokolov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with calculated or estimated trace gas emissions from both anthropogenic and natural sources, it is designed to the chemistry sub-model. Model predictions of the surface trends of several key species are close, if the current increasing trends of anthropogenic emissions of climate-relevant gases are continued over the next

236

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

Fischlin, Andreas

237

Climate Simulations for 1951–2050 with a Coupled Atmosphere–Ocean Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors simulate climate change for 1951–2050 using the GISS SI2000 atmospheric model coupled to HYCOM, a quasi-isopycnal ocean model (“ocean E”), and contrast the results with those obtained using the same atmosphere coupled to a passive Q-...

Shan Sun; James E. Hansen

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Cascading uncertainty in climate change models and its implications for policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commentary Cascading uncertainty in climate change models and its implications for policy MARK, there are intrinsic problems with modelling natural systems (Cartwright 1983). This is because it is impossible). The original IPCC reports used simplistic assumption of greenhouse gas emissions over the next 100 years. From

Jones, Peter JS

239

Sensitivity of sea ice to physical parameterizations in the GISS global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

absorbed by the polar regions. Second, sea ice has a strong insulating effect on the under- lying oceanSensitivity of sea ice to physical parameterizations in the GISS global climate model Jiping Liu,1 coupled model is used to investigate the sensitivity of sea ice to each of the following parameterizations

240

Reducing spread in climate model projections of a September ice-free Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...15). Relative to the CMIP3, a more diverse set of model types is included in the CMIP5 (i.e., climate/Earth system models with more interactive components such as atmospheric chemistry, aerosols, dynamic vegetation, ice sheets, and...

Jiping Liu; Mirong Song; Radley M. Horton; Yongyun Hu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Downscaling CMIP5 climate models shows increased tropical cyclone activity over the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of historical and future climate states simulated by six Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) global energy of the subcloud layer. On time scales larger than that characterizing the thermal equilibration of greater intensity. Calculations with a single-column model (4) confirm that increasing greenhouse gas

Rothman, Daniel

242

The Role of Simple Models in Understanding Climate Change Thomas F. Stocker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equations of the Earth System. For example, some 1 #12;aspects of the large-scale ocean circulation are well of processes that are responsible for climate change. The examples of the carbon cycle and the ocean uses general circulation models of the at- mosphere, and the ocean which are then coupled to model

Stocker, Thomas

243

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

244

A climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model, J. Geophys System model Roman Olson,1 Ryan Sriver,1 Marlos Goes,2,3 Nathan M. Urban,4,5 H. Damon Matthews,6 MuraliA climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth

245

Combining Modeling Methodologies for Improved Understanding of Smart Material Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining Modeling Methodologies for Improved Understanding of Smart Material Characteristics Material Systems and Structures February 2, 1998 ABSTRACT Smart materials are complex materials performance capabilities but the synergistic response of the smart material and companion structure. Behavior

Lindner, Douglas K.

246

The Faculty of Science and the Bolin Centre for Climate Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Future Development of Climate and Earth System Models for Scientific and Policy Use Warren M. Washington of climate and Earth system models has been regarded primarily as the making of scientific tools to study, the development of climate and Earth system models became intimately linked to the need to not only improve our

247

Improved load models for multi-area reliability calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPROVED LOAD MODELS FOR MULTI-AREA RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by SANJESH PATHAK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1992 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering IMPROVED LOAD MODELS FOR MULTI-AREA RELIABILITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by SAN JESH PATHAK Approved as to style and content by: Chanan Singh (Chair of Committee) Prasad Enjeti (Member) Ces . Mal, e...

Pathak, Sanjesh

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Scaling Process Studies and Observations in the Arctic for Improved Climate Predictability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and representation of that knowledge in Earth System models. Geomorphological units, including thaw lakes, drained

Hubbard, Susan

249

Accounting for Mountain Topography in Climate Models | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Accounting for Mountain Topography in Climate Models Accounting for Mountain Topography in Climate Models Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » October 2012 Accounting for Mountain Topography in Climate Models 3D simulation shows mountain impacts on surface solar fluxes. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

250

Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements makes an accurate quantification of solar contributions to recent climate change difficult. Whereas earlier SSI observations and models provided a qualitatively consistent picture of the SSI variability, recent measurements by the SORCE satellite suggest a significantly stronger variability in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range and changes in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands in anti-phase with the solar cycle. A number of recent chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations have shown that this might have significant implications on the Earth's atmosphere. Motivated by these results, we summarize here our current knowledge of SSI variability and its impact on Earth's climate. We present a detailed overview of existing SSI measurements and provide thorough comparison of models available to date. SSI changes influence the Earth's atmosphere, both directly, through changes in shortwave (SW) heating and therefore, temp...

Ermolli, I; de Wit, T Dudok; Krivova, N A; Tourpali, K; Weber, M; Unruh, Y C; Gray, L; Langematz, U; Pilewskie, P; Rozanov, E; Schmutz, W; Shapiro, A; Solanki, S K; Woods, T N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The 1997/98 El Nino: A Test for Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

Version 3 of the Hadley Centre Atmospheric Model (HadAM3) has been used to demonstrate one means of comparing a general circulation model with observations for a specific climate perturbation, namely the strong 1997/98 El Nino. This event was characterized by the collapse of the tropical Pacific's Walker circulation, caused by the lack of a zonal sea surface temperature gradient during the El Nino. Relative to normal years, cloud altitudes were lower in the western portion of the Pacific and higher in the eastern portion. HadAM3 likewise produced the observed collapse of the Walker circulation, and it did a reasonable job of reproducing the west/east cloud structure changes. This illustrates that the 1997/98 El Nino serves as a useful means of testing cloud-climate interactions in climate models.

Lu, R; Dong, B; Cess, R D; Potter, G L

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

Coupled Aerosol-Chemistry–Climate Twentieth-Century Transient Model Investigation: Trends in Short-Lived Species and Climate Responses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors simulate transient twentieth-century climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, with aerosol and ozone chemistry fully coupled to one another and to climate including a full dynamic ocean. Aerosols include sulfate, ...

Dorothy Koch; Susanne E. Bauer; Anthony Del Genio; Greg Faluvegi; Joseph R. McConnell; Surabi Menon; Ronald L. Miller; David Rind; Reto Ruedy; Gavin A. Schmidt; Drew Shindell

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Analysis of permafrost thermal dynamics and response to climate change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coupled climate-carbon earth system models part i: PhysicalChange in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  Koven, C.D. , W.J.output from a set of Earth System Models (ESMs) (Table 1)

Koven, C.D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Descriptive Analysis of the Global Climate System and Predictive Modeling for Uncertainty Reduction in Climate Projections using Complex Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Climate Projections using Complex Networks Karsten Steinhaeuser (ksteinha@nd.edu) Department of Computer focuses mainly on the second of these objectives, namely, projections of changes in regional climate and their impacts on natural and man-made systems. Traditionally, projections of future climate are based primarily

Chawla, Nitesh V.

255

Population and Climate Change:Population and Climate Change: Coupling Population Models withCoupling Population Models with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupling Population Models with Earth System ModelsEarth System Models Eugenia Kalnay, Safa Motesharrei, Jorge Rivas Change: Fully Coupling Population and Earth System Models" My research at the U. of Maryland #12

Kalnay, Eugenia

256

Accounting for Global Climate Model Projection Uncertainty in Modern Statistical Downscaling  

SciTech Connect

Future climate change has emerged as a national and a global security threat. To carry out the needed adaptation and mitigation steps, a quantification of the expected level of climate change is needed, both at the global and the regional scale; in the end, the impact of climate change is felt at the local/regional level. An important part of such climate change assessment is uncertainty quantification. Decision and policy makers are not only interested in 'best guesses' of expected climate change, but rather probabilistic quantification (e.g., Rougier, 2007). For example, consider the following question: What is the probability that the average summer temperature will increase by at least 4 C in region R if global CO{sub 2} emission increases by P% from current levels by time T? It is a simple question, but one that remains very difficult to answer. It is answering these kind of questions that is the focus of this effort. The uncertainty associated with future climate change can be attributed to three major factors: (1) Uncertainty about future emission of green house gasses (GHG). (2) Given a future GHG emission scenario, what is its impact on the global climate? (3) Given a particular evolution of the global climate, what does it mean for a particular location/region? In what follows, we assume a particular GHG emission scenario has been selected. Given the GHG emission scenario, the current batch of the state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) is used to simulate future climate under this scenario, yielding an ensemble of future climate projections (which reflect, to some degree our uncertainty of being able to simulate future climate give a particular GHG scenario). Due to the coarse-resolution nature of the GCM projections, they need to be spatially downscaled for regional impact assessments. To downscale a given GCM projection, two methods have emerged: dynamical downscaling and statistical (empirical) downscaling (SDS). Dynamic downscaling involves configuring and running a regional climate model (RCM) nested within a given GCM projection (i.e., the GCM provides bounder conditions for the RCM). On the other hand, statistical downscaling aims at establishing a statistical relationship between observed local/regional climate variables of interest and synoptic (GCM-scale) climate predictors. The resulting empirical relationship is then applied to future GCM projections. A comparison of the pros and cons of dynamical versus statistical downscaling is outside the scope of this effort, but has been extensively studied and the reader is referred to Wilby et al. (1998); Murphy (1999); Wood et al. (2004); Benestad et al. (2007); Fowler et al. (2007), and references within those. The scope of this effort is to study methodology, a statistical framework, to propagate and account for GCM uncertainty in regional statistical downscaling assessment. In particular, we will explore how to leverage an ensemble of GCM projections to quantify the impact of the GCM uncertainty in such an assessment. There are three main component to this effort: (1) gather the necessary climate-related data for a regional SDS study, including multiple GCM projections, (2) carry out SDS, and (3) assess the uncertainty. The first step is carried out using tools written in the Python programming language, while analysis tools were developed in the statistical programming language R; see Figure 1.

Johannesson, G

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

257

Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understood and many remain uncertain in terms of their representation in Earth System models. Increasing our System models. By extending an already well-established framework for fractional sub-grid area System Model grid cell (i.e., 30x30 km grid size). This vision includes mechanistic studies in the field

Hubbard, Susan

258

DOE/SC-ARM-13-004 Charter for the ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

designed to improve the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their interactions and coupling with the...

259

USING NETWORKS OF JOURNEYS TO IMPROVE A PETROL MARKET MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USING NETWORKS OF JOURNEYS TO IMPROVE A PETROL MARKET MODEL Alison Heppenstall1 , Andrew Evans1 that the majority of consumers purchased petrol on their way to work or on shopping trips. A network model at the micro level are not tied to global level variables like oil prices); the parameters are often difficult

Clark, Joanna

260

IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS Jacek Makinia*, Scott A in a full-scale activated sludge reactor. The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 was used to describe for dissolved oxygen. KEYWORDS Activated sludge; dispersion; dissolved oxygen dynamics; mass transfer

Wells, Scott A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

RESEARCH ARTICLE A model for improving microbial biofuel production using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH ARTICLE A model for improving microbial biofuel production using a synthetic feedback loop be compared. We propose a model for microbial biofuel production where a synthetic control system is used to increase cell viability and biofuel yields. Although microbes can be engineered to produce biofuels

Dunlop, Mary

262

Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects using a Cumulus Microphysics Parameterization in a Regional Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

A new Zhang and McFarlane (ZM) cumulus scheme includes a two-moment cloud microphysics parameterization for convective clouds. This allows aerosol effects to be investigated more comprehensively by linking aerosols with microphysical processes in both stratiform clouds that are explicitly resolved and convective clouds that are parameterized in climate models. This new scheme is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is coupled with the physics and aerosol packages from the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). A test case of July 2008 during the East Asian summer monsoon is selected to evaluate the performance of the new ZM scheme and to investigate aerosol effects on monsoon precipitation. The precipitation and radiative fluxes simulated by the new ZM scheme show a better agreement with observations compared to simulations with the original ZM scheme that does not include convective cloud microphysics and aerosol convective cloud interactions. Detailed analysis suggests that an increase in detrained cloud water and ice mass by the new ZM scheme is responsible for this improvement. To investigate precipitation response to increased anthropogenic aerosols, a sensitivity experiment is performed that mimics a clean environment by reducing the primary aerosols and anthropogenic emissions to 30% of that used in the control simulation of a polluted environment. The simulated surface precipitation is reduced by 9.8% from clean to polluted environment and the reduction is less significant when microphysics processes are excluded from the cumulus clouds. Ensemble experiments with ten members under each condition (i.e., clean and polluted) indicate similar response of the monsoon precipitation to increasing aerosols.

Lim, Kyo-Sun; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ma, Po-Lun; Singh, Balwinder; Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Guang; Song, Xiaoliang

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

263

Evaluation of Hydrometeor Occurrence Profiles in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Climate Model using Atmospheric Classification  

SciTech Connect

Vertical profiles of hydrometeor occurrence from the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) climate model are compared with profiles observed by a vertically pointing millimeter wavelength cloud-radar (located in the U.S. Southern Great Plains) as a function of the largescale atmospheric state. The atmospheric state is determined by classifying (or clustering) the large-scale (synoptic) fields produced by the MMF and a numerical weather prediction model using a neural network approach. The comparison shows that for cold frontal and post-cold frontal conditions the MMF produces profiles of hydrometeor occurrence that compare favorably with radar observations, while for warm frontal conditions the model tends to produce hydrometeor fractions that are too large with too much cloud (non-precipitating hydrometeors) above 7 km and too much precipitating hydrometeor coverage below 7 km. We also find that the MMF has difficulty capturing the formation of low clouds and that for all atmospheric states that occur during June, July, and August, the MMF produces too much high and thin cloud, especially above 10 km.

Marchand, Roger T.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model Title An Improved Simple Chilled Water Cooling Coil Model Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-6031E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wang, Liping, Philip Haves, and Walter F. Buhl Conference Name SimBuild 2012 IBPSA Conference Date Published 08/2012 Abstract The accurate prediction of cooling and dehumidification coil performance is important in model-based fault detection and in the prediction of HVAC system energy consumption for support of both design and operations. It is frequently desirable to use a simple cooling coil model that does not require detailed specification of coil geometry and material properties. The approach adopted is to match the overall UA of the coil to the rating conditions and to estimate the air-side and water-side components of the UA using correlations developed by Holmes (1982). This approach requires some geometrical information about the coil and the paper investigates the sensitivity of the overall performance prediction to uncertainties in this information, including assuming a fixed ratio of air-side to water-side UA at the rating condition. Finally, simulation results from different coil models are compared, and experimental data are used to validate the improved cooling coil model.

265

On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy On the Use of Computational Models for Wave Climate Assessment in Support of the Wave Energy Industry Effective, economic extraction of ocean wave energy requires an intimate under- standing of the ocean wave

Victoria, University of

266

Climate Change Policy: What Do the Models Tell Us?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Very little. A plethora of integrated assessment models (IAMs) have been constructed and used to estimate the social cost of carbon (SCC) and evaluate alternative abatement policies. These models have crucial flaws that ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

267

Efficient estimation and ensemble generation in climate modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conjunction with computationally cheap energy-balance Earth system models (Andronova Schlesinger 2001; Forest et al. 2002...Team. 2006 Multiobjective tuning of grid-enabled earth system models using a non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Modelling the future distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungus: the influence of climate and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORUM Modelling the future distribution of the amphibian chytrid fungus: the influence of climate of amphibians are believed to be caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Hence, determining its present and future environmental suitability should help to inform management and surveillance

Rohr, Jason

269

Selected translated abstracts of Russian-language climate-change publications. 4: General circulation models  

SciTech Connect

This report presents English-translated abstracts of important Russian-language literature concerning general circulation models as they relate to climate change. Into addition to the bibliographic citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Russian. Author and title indexes are included to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Razuvaev, V.N.; Sivachok, S.G. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Hydrometeorological Information--World Data Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Modeling Climate Change Policies in Canada and the U.S.: An Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a report to the IETC in 2007, we described the set of CIMS models that would be used to simulate different climate policies in both the United States and Canada. This report will describe the various policies simulated in the two countries...

Roop, J. M.; Tubbs, W. J.

271

Introduction: the concept of the MOC Climate models project a slow down of the Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be sustained. Also the `pull' by small-scale mixing, that gradually lightens the deep waters, is necessary water cools and sinks, forming North Atlantic Deep Water which spreads southward into the deep ocean78 Introduction: the concept of the MOC Climate models project a slow down of the Atlantic

Drijfhout, Sybren

272

Modeling the Dependence of Tropical Storm Counts in the North Atlantic Basin on Climate Indices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze and model time series of annual counts of tropical storms lasting more than 2 days in the North Atlantic basin and U.S. landfalling tropical storms over the period 1878–2008 in relation to different climate indices. The ...

Gabriele Villarini; Gabriel A. Vecchi; James A. Smith

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Response of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice to greenhouse forcing in a global climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in summer, in part because of the reductions in ice cover and thickness that insulate the winter atmosphereResponse of the Northern Hemisphere sea ice to greenhouse forcing in a global climate model Larissa warming of about 4³C for doubled CO2. Enhanced warming is found at higher latitudes near sea-ice margins

274

Interannual Variations of Stratospheric Water Vapor in MLS Observations and Climate Model Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By analyzing the almost-decade-long record of water vapor measurements from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on the NASA Aura satellite and by detailed diagnostic analysis of the results from state-of-the art climate model simulations, ...

Yoshio Kawatani; Jae N. Lee; Kevin Hamilton

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Improving the Contribution of Economic Models in Evaluating Industrial Energy Efficiency Improvements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional representation of improved end-use efficiency in the manufacturing sector has tended to assume “a net cost” perspective. In other words, the assumption for many models is that any change within the energy end-use patterns must imply a...

Laitner, J. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Simulation of polar stratospheric clouds in the specified dynamics version of the whole atmosphere community climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the simulation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model for the Antarctic winter 2005. In this model, PSCs are assumed to form ...

Wegner, T.

277

Tropical precipitation simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3): an evaluation based on TRMM satellite measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the TRMM Science Data and Information System; the Community Climate Model group at NCAR for developing and assistance with running CCM3; and the Program for Cli- mate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

Collier, Jonathan Craig

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A look at the ocean in the EC-Earth climate model Andreas Sterl Richard Bintanja Laurent Brodeau Emily Gleeson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the special issue on EC-Earth, a global climate and earth system model based on the seasonal forecast system-011-1239-2 #12;phytoplankton) processes are involved. To study such complex interactions, Earth System Models

Haak, Hein

279

Simulating the Biogeochemical and Biogeophysical Impacts of Transient Land Cover Change and Wood Harvest in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) from 1850 to 2100  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To assess the climate impacts of historical and projected land cover change in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4), new time series of transient Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4) plant functional ...

Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Meehl, Gerald A.; O’ Neill, Brian C.; Oleson, Keith W.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, David M.; Kluzek, Erik; Lindsay, Keith

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Probabilistic Forecast for 21st Century Climate Based on Uncertainties in Emissions (without Policy) and Climate Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Integrated Global System Model is used to make probabilistic projections of climate change from 1861 to 2100. Since the model's first projections were published in 2003 substantial improvements have been made to ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Effects of Global Climate on Infectious Disease: the Cholera Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...impossible to predict precisely the...building predictive models for disease...events and cholera outbreaks have been increasing...Bangladesh, cholera outbreaks are related to...the nonlinear models, and interannual...variability of cholera outbreaks (124). Because...to use ENSO to predict variability in...

Erin K. Lipp; Anwar Huq; Rita R. Colwell

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model  

SciTech Connect

The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

METEOROLOGICAL Journal of Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ocean projections. Mk3.5 captures a number of robust changes common to most climate models that contribute to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP3), an initiative by the World Climate Research projected by climate models. However, the response of these currents to climate change may directly affect m

Feng, Ming

284

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Weakly screened thermonuclear reactions in astrophysical plasmas: Improving Salpeter's model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a detailed study of the electron degeneracy and nonlinear screening effects which play a crucial role in the validity of Salpeter's weak-screening model. The limitations of that model are investigated and an improved one is proposed which can take into account nonlinear screening effects. Its application to the solar pp reaction derives an accurate screening enhancement factor and provides a very reliable estimation of the associated neutrino flux uncertanties.

Theodore E. Liolios

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

287

Incorporation of Aerosol Optical Properties into Climate Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Measured Annual Lightning Flash Rate Data from NASA LIS/OTD Science Team Model (4ox5o resolution) calculates lightning by accounting for size-resolved bounceoffs and charge separation in clouds. Results

288

Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

289

Land Processes in a High Resolution Community Climate Model with Sub-Grid Scale Parameterizations Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of land important for climate are very heterogeneous, as are the key atmospheric inputs to land, i.e. precipitation and radiation. To adequately represent this heterogeneity, state-of-the-art climate models should represent atmospheric inputs to land, land properties, and the dynamical changes of land at the highest resolution accessible by climate models. The research funded under this project focused on the development of an alternative approach to this problem in which a sub-mesh is imposed on each atmospheric model grid square. This allows representation of the land climate dynamics at a higher resolution than that achievable in the global atmospheric models. The high spatial detail of the fine-mesh treatment provides not only a more accurate representation of land processes to the atmospheric model, but also the opportunity for direct downscaling of the surface climate. The proposed project continued the development and refinement of a high-resolution land surface model that is compatible for inclusion into the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM), a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) that is used for climate simulation and prediction.

R. E. Dickinson; Andrea N. Hahmann

2002-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

"Managing Department Climate Change"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

Sheridan, Jennifer

291

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

292

Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models  

SciTech Connect

Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors  

SciTech Connect

Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten people’s awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

Maurakis, Eugene G

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Instability of Glacial Climate in a Model of the Ocean-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the horizontal trans- ports of energy and moisture are parameter- ized as diffusive processes. A dynamic.2 1015 W of poleward heat trans- port (7). Near-surface currents bring warm, saline waters from integrated energy moisture balance model of the atmosphere (18). Atmospheric dynamics are absent

Schmittner, Andreas

295

Improving the transition modelling in hidden Markov models for ECG segmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the transition modelling in hidden Markov models for ECG segmentation Benoît Frénay, Gaël/ELEC/DICE - Place du Levant, 3 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium Abstract. The segmentation of ECG signal is a useful-dependent. Experiments show that both methods improve the results on pathological ECG signals. 1 Introduction Physicians

Verleysen, Michel

296

Atmospheric and Climate Science | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric and Climate Science Atmospheric and Climate Science Argonne research in aerosols, micro-meteorology, remote sensing, and atmospheric chemistry combined with our scalable, portable, high-performance climate and weather applications offer a unique look at the complexities of a dynamic planet. Changes in climate can affect biodiversity, the cost of food, our health, and even whole economies. Argonne is developing computational models and tools designed to shed light on complex biological processes and their economic, social, and health effects. Research spans the molecular level to whole organisms and their interaction with climate, the ecosystem, and human activities. The goal is to improve our understanding of the world around us while increasing the accuracy of regional climate models to

297

Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Superlakes, Megafloods, and Abrupt Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...climate changes. The Center for Climatic Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison develops and uses coupled earth system models to study past, present, and future climate. The Global Change and Climate Modelling Team, Paris, develops models...

Garry Clarke; David Leverington; James Teller; Arthur Dyke

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

programs in climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

300

Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Modeling the Recent Evolution of Global Drought and Projections for the Twenty-First Century with the Hadley Centre Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Meteorological drought in the Hadley Centre global climate model is assessed using the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), a commonly used drought index. At interannual time scales, for the majority of the land surface, the model captures the ...

Eleanor J. Burke; Simon J. Brown; Nikolaos Christidis

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Voronoi Tessellations and Their Application to Climate and Global Modeling  

SciTech Connect

We review the use of Voronoi tessellations for grid generation, especially on the whole sphere or in regions on the sphere. Voronoi tessellations and the corresponding Delaunay tessellations in regions and surfaces on Euclidean space are defined and properties they possess that make them well-suited for grid generation purposes are discussed, as are algorithms for their construction. This is followed by a more detailed look at one very special type of Voronoi tessellation, the centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT). After defining them, discussing some of their properties, and presenting algorithms for their construction, we illustrate the use of CVTs for producing both quasi-uniform and variable resolution meshes in the plane and on the sphere. Finally, we briefly discuss the computational solution of model equations based on CVTs on the sphere.

Ju, Lili [University of South Carolina; Ringler, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gunzburger, Max [Florida State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Comparisons of model simulations of climate variability with data, Task 2  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made in our investigations aimed at diagnosing low frequency variations of climate in General Circulation Models. We have analyzed three versions of the Oregon State University General Circulation Model (OSU GCM). These are: (1) the Slab Model in which the ocean is treated as a static heat reservoir of fixed depth, (2) the coupled upper ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean dynamics are calculated in two layers of variable depths representing the mixed layers and the thermocline; this model is referred to OSU2 in the following discussion, and (3) the coupled full ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean is represented by six layers of variable depth; this model is referred to as OSU6 GCM in the discussion.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Comparisons of model simulations of climate variability with data, Task 2. [Progress report  

SciTech Connect

Significant progress has been made in our investigations aimed at diagnosing low frequency variations of climate in General Circulation Models. We have analyzed three versions of the Oregon State University General Circulation Model (OSU GCM). These are: (1) the Slab Model in which the ocean is treated as a static heat reservoir of fixed depth, (2) the coupled upper ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean dynamics are calculated in two layers of variable depths representing the mixed layers and the thermocline; this model is referred to OSU2 in the following discussion, and (3) the coupled full ocean-atmosphere model in which the ocean is represented by six layers of variable depth; this model is referred to as OSU6 GCM in the discussion.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modelling the impacts of projected future climate change on water resources in north-west England Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 11151126, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling the impacts of projected future climate change on water resources in north-west England of projected future climate change on water resources in north-west England H.J. Fowler1 , C.G. Kilsby1 and J (Fowler and Kilsby, 2002) and future projections from Global Climate Models (GCMs) suggest that winters

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

306

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 1:projected changes in seasonal patterns and estimation of PET Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 10691083, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional climate model data used within the SWURVE project 1:projected changes in seasonal patterns) project, assessing the risk posed by future climatic change to various hydrological and hydraulic systems/1069/2007 © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Regional climate model data used

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

307

Estimates of Twenty-First-Century Flood Risk in the Pacific Northwest Based on Regional Climate Model Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from a regional climate model simulation show substantial increases in future flood risk (2040–69) in many Pacific Northwest river basins in the early fall. Two primary causes are identified: 1) more extreme and earlier storms and 2) ...

Eric P. Salathé Jr.; Alan F. Hamlet; Clifford F. Mass; Se-Yeun Lee; Matt Stumbaugh; Richard Steed

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

3-PG Productivity Modeling of Regenerating Amazon Forests: Climate Sensitivity and Comparison with MODIS-Derived NPP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential forest growth predicted by the Physiological Principles in Predicting Growth (3-PG) model was compared for forest and deforested areas in the Legal Amazon to assess potential differing regeneration associated with climate. Historical ...

Joseph D. White; Neal A. Scott; Adam I. Hirsch; Steven W. Running

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Response of the NCAR Community Climate Model to the Radiative Forcing by the Naturally Occurring Tropospheric Aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We insert the effect of naturally occurring tropospheric aerosols on solar radiation into the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The effect of the aerosol depends on concentration and type (continental, maritime), surface albedo, solar zenith ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Robert D. Cess

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrological Processes in Regional Climate Model Simulations of the Central United States Flood of June–July 1993  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thirteen regional climate model (RCM) simulations of June–July 1993 were compared with each other and observations. Water vapor conservation and precipitation characteristics in each RCM were examined for a 10° × 10° subregion of the upper ...

Christopher J. Anderson; Raymond W. Arritt; Zaitao Pan; Eugene S. Takle; William J. Gutowski Jr.; Francis O. Otieno; Renato da Silva; Daniel Caya; Jens H. Christensen; Daniel Lüthi; Miguel A. Gaertner; Clemente Gallardo; Filippo Giorgi; René Laprise; Song-You Hong; Colin Jones; H-M. H. Juang; J. J. Katzfey; John L. McGregor; William M. Lapenta; Jay W. Larson; John A. Taylor; Glen E. Liston; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; John O. Roads

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Comparison of Rainfall Profiles in the West African Monsoon as Depicted by TRMM PR and the LMDZ Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical rainfall profiles obtained with TRMM-PR 2A25 standard products are compared with rain profiles deduced from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique second generation global climate model (LMDZ, the Z stands for zoom capability) with ...

Samo Diatta; Frédéric Hourdin; Amadou Thierno Gaye; Nicolas Viltard

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Extreme wind climate modeling of some locations in India for the specification of the design wind speed of structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wind load on a structure is proportional to the square of the wind speed. Extreme wind climate modeling should be required for specifying the design wind speed of structures. Extreme wind speeds for a storm t...

Arnab Sarkar; Navneet Kumar; Debojyoti Mitra

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations  

SciTech Connect

Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

314

Improving Comfort in Hot-Humid Climates with a Whole-House Dehumidifier, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Maintaining comfort in a home can be challenging in hot-humid climates. At the common summer temperature set point of 75 degrees F, the perceived air temperature can vary by 11 degrees F because higher indoor humidity reduces comfort. Often the air conditioner (AC) thermostat set point is lower than the desirable cooling level to try to increase moisture removal so that the interior air is not humid or "muggy." However, this method is not always effective in maintaining indoor relative humidity (RH) or comfort. In order to quantify the performance of a combined whole-house dehumidifier (WHD) AC system, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America team Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored the operation of two Lennox AC systems coupled with a Honeywell DH150 TrueDRY whole-house dehumidifier for a six-month period. By using a WHD to control moisture levels (latent cooling) and optimizing a central AC to control temperature (sensible cooling), improvements in comfort can be achieved while reducing utility costs. Indoor comfort for this study was defined as maintaining indoor conditions at below 60% RH and a humidity ratio of 0.012 lbm/lbm while at common dry bulb set point temperatures of 74 degrees -80 degrees F. In addition to enhanced comfort, controlling moisture to these levels can reduce the risk of other potential issues such as mold growth, pests, and building component degradation. Because a standard AC must also reduce dry bulb air temperature in order to remove moisture, a WHD is typically needed to support these latent loads when sensible heat removal is not desired.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Bringing Clouds into Focus: A New Global Climate Model May Reduce the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bringing Clouds into Bringing Clouds into Focus Bringing Clouds into Focus A New Global Climate Model May Reduce the Uncertainty of Climate Forecasting May 11, 2010 | Tags: Lattice QCD Contact: John Hules, JAHules@lbl.gov , +1 510 486 6008 Randall-fig4.png The large data sets generated by the GCRM require new analysis and visualization capabilities. This 3D plot of vorticity isosurfaces was developed using VisIt, a 3D visualization tool with a parallel distributed architecture, which is being extended to support the geodesic grid used by the GCRM. (Image Courtesy of the NERSC Analytics Team) Clouds exert two competing effects on the Earth's temperature: they cool the planet by reflecting solar radiation back to space, but they also warm the planet by trapping heat near the surface. These two effects coexist in

316

Automobile technology, hydrogen and climate change: a long term modelling analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transitions in the global automobile sector in the 21st century are uncertain both in terms of technologies and energy carriers. A key driving force of technological change in the long term could be the need to mitigate GHG emissions. This paper examines the role of the passenger car sector in a GHG mitigation strategy and presents a scenario of the automobile technology choices when a price on greenhouse gas emissions is imposed on the global energy system. The analysis has been conducted with ERIS, a multiregional energy systems, 'bottom up' optimisation model that endogenises technology learning and allows a detailed technology representation, in addition to capturing competing demands for transportation fuels, including hydrogen. Our results provide some policy insights by illustrating the potential for hydrogen to contribute to climate change mitigation, but show that fuel cell cars are an option for climate policy only over the very long term.

Hal Turton; Leonardo Barreto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fostering a triple response mechanism to combat global climate change: Emission abatement, carbon capture and water improvement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Kyoto Protocol has established emission abatement and carbon sink increase to cope with climate change. However, in recent years, developed countries tend to focus more on the former. The simplifying of GH...

Ke Zhou; Xia Cao

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A georeferenced Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to analyze the climate change impacts on the ski industry in Andorra and the effect of snowmaking as future adaptation strategy. The present study is the first attempt to analyze the ski industry in the Pyrenees region and will contribute to a better understanding of the vulnerability of Andorran ski resorts and the suitability of snowmaking as potential adaptation strategy to climate change. The resulting model can be used as a planning support tool to help local stakeholders understand the vulnerability and potential impacts of climate change. This model can be used in the decision-making process of designing and developing appropriate sustainable adaptation strategies to future climate variability.

Pons-Pons, M; Rosas-Casals, M; Sureda, B; Jover, E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate/Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateEnvironment ClimateEnvironment On January 27, 2011, in ClimateEnvironment Sensing and Monitoring Modeling and Analysis Carbon Management Water Security Publications...

320

NEW WORK AND STUDY OPPORTUNITIES IN CLIMATE CHANGE Climate System Analysis Group (CSAG)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. - Postdoc: Climate modeling - Postdoc: Climate change information communication and dissemination - Research Associate: Climate change information communication and dissemination - PhD: Climate change information communication and dissemination - MSc/PhD: Physical science of climate change What to expect: Successful

Cohen, Ronald C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Projected climate regime shift under future global warming from multi-model, multi-scenario CMIP5 simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study examined shifts in climate regimes over the global land area using the Köppen–Trewartha (K–T) climate classification by analyzing observations during 1900–2010, and simulations during 1900–2100 from twenty global climate models participating in Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5). Under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenario, the models projected a 3°–10 °C warming in annual temperature over the global land area by the end of the twenty-first century, with strong (moderate) warming in the high (middle) latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and weaker warming in the tropics and the Southern Hemisphere. The projected changes in precipitation vary considerably in space and present greater uncertainties among the models. Overall, the models are consistent in projecting increasing precipitation over the high-latitude of the Northern Hemisphere, and reduced precipitation in the Mediterranean, southwestern North America, northern and southern Africa and Australia. Based on the projected changes in temperature and precipitation, the K–T climate types would shift toward warmer and drier climate types from the current climate distribution. Regions of temperate, tropical and dry climate types are projected to expand, while regions of polar, sub-polar and subtropical climate types are projected to contract. The magnitudes of the projected changes are stronger in the RCP8.5 scenario than the low emission scenario RCP4.5. On average, the climate types in 31.4% and 46.3% of the global land area are projected to change by the end of the twenty-first century under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios, respectively. Further analysis suggests that changes in precipitation played a slightly more important role in causing shifts of climate type during the twentieth century. However, the projected changes in temperature play an increasingly important role and dominate shifts in climate type when the warming becomes more pronounced in the twenty-first century.

Song Feng; Qi Hu; Wei Huang; Chang-Hoi Ho; Ruopu Li; Zhenghong Tang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A reduced-form statistical climate model suitable for coupling with economic emissions projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we use models based on past data and scientific analysis to determine possible future states of the environment. We attempt to improve the equations for temperature and greenhouse gas concentration used in ...

Rabin, Gregory S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Representing Grass– and Shrub–Snow–Atmosphere Interactions in Climate System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vegetation-protruding-above-snow parameterization for earth system models was developed to improve energy budget calculations of interactions among vegetation, snow, and the atmosphere in nonforested areas. These areas include shrublands, ...

Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

DOE Workshop; Pan-Gass Conference on the Representation of Atmospheric Processes in Weather and Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

This is the first meeting of the whole new GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) Atmospheric System Study (GASS) project that has been formed from the merger of the GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) Project and the GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Studies (GABLS). As such, this meeting will play a major role in energizing GEWEX work in the area of atmospheric parameterizations of clouds, convection, stable boundary layers, and aerosol-cloud interactions for the numerical models used for weather and climate projections at both global and regional scales. The representation of these processes in models is crucial to GEWEX goals of improved prediction of the energy and water cycles at both weather and climate timescales. This proposal seeks funds to be used to cover incidental and travel expenses for U.S.-based graduate students and early career scientists (i.e., within 5 years of receiving their highest degree). We anticipate using DOE funding to support 5-10 people. We will advertise the availability of these funds by providing a box to check for interested participants on the online workshop registration form. We will also send a note to our participants' mailing lists reminding them that the funds are available and asking senior scientists to encourage their more junior colleagues to participate. All meeting participants are encouraged to submit abstracts for oral or poster presentations. The science organizing committee (see below) will base funding decisions on the relevance and quality of these abstracts, with preference given to under-represented populations (especially women and minorities) and to early career scientists being actively mentored at the meeting (e.g. students or postdocs attending the meeting with their advisor).

Morrison, PI Hugh

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

325

Dark Stars: Improved Models and First Pulsation Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We use the stellar evolution code MESA to study dark stars. Dark stars (DSs), which are powered by dark matter (DM) self-annihilation rather than by nuclear fusion, may be the first stars to form in the Universe. We compute stellar models for accreting DSs with masses up to 10^6 M_sun. While previous calculations were limited to polytropic interiors, our current calculations use MESA, a modern stellar evolution code to solve the equations of stellar structure. The heating due to DM annihilation is self-consistently included, assuming extended adiabatic contraction of DM within the minihalos in which DSs form. We find remarkably good overall agreement with the basic results of previous models. There are some differences, however, in the details, with positive implications for observability of DSs. We found that, in the mass range of 10^4 - 10^5 M_sun, using MESA, our DSs are hotter by a factor of 1.5 than those in Freese et al.(2010), are smaller in radius by a factor of 0.6, denser by a factor of 3-4, and more luminous by a factor of 2. The higher luminosities we find improve the prospect of observing DSs in upcoming observations using the James Webb Space Telescope. Our improved models also confirm previous results, according to which DSs are very well approximated by (n=3)-polytropes. Earlier findings on the properties of supermassive DSs have thus turned out to be robust. We also perform a first study of DS pulsations. Our DS models have pulsation modes with timescales which range from less than a day to more than two years in their rest frames, at a redshift of about 15, depending on DM particle mass and overtone number. Such pulsations may someday be used to identify bright, cool objects uniquely as DSs; if properly calibrated, they might, in principle, also supply novel standard candles for cosmological studies.

Tanja Rindler-Daller; Michael H. Montgomery; Katherine Freese; Donald E. Winget; Bill Paxton

2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

326

Improving Convection Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

Highlight of Accomplishments: We made significant contribution to the ASR program in this funding cycle by better representing convective processes in GCMs based on knowledge gained from analysis of ARM/ASR observations. In addition, our work led to a much improved understanding of the interaction among aerosol, convection, clouds and climate in GCMs.

Zhang, Guang J [Scripps Institution of Oceanography

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.  

SciTech Connect

This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)  

SciTech Connect

A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Does the Danube exist? Versions of reality given by various regional climate models and climatological datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an intercomparison and verification analysis of several regional climate models (RCMs) nested into the same run of the same Atmospheric Global Circulation Model (AGCM) regarding their representation of the statistical properties of the hydrological balance of the Danube river basin for 1961-1990. We also consider the datasets produced by the driving AGCM, from the ECMWF and NCEP-NCAR reanalyses. The hydrological balance is computed by integrating the precipitation and evaporation fields over the area of interest. Large discrepancies exist among RCMs for the monthly climatology as well as for the mean and variability of the annual balances, and only few datasets are consistent with the observed discharge values of the Danube at its Delta, even if the driving AGCM provides itself an excellent estimate. Since the considered approach relies on the mass conservation principle and bypasses the details of the air-land interface modeling, we propose that the atmospheric components of RCMs still face diffic...

Lucarini, V; Kriegerova, I; Speranza, A; Danihlik, Robert; Kriegerova, Ida; Lucarini, Valerio; Speranza, Antonio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Strategic Plan Water is a key component of the earth and human  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and subsurface processes, as well as climate and earth system modeling and integrated assessment modeling and plan the development of next- generation human-earth system models for improving long-term predictions

Wood, Robert

331

Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

Simulation of Urban Climate with High-Resolution WRF Model: A Case Study in Nanjing, China  

SciTech Connect

In this study, urban climate in Nanjing of eastern China is simulated using 1-km resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with a single-layer Urban Canopy Model. Based on the 10-summer simulation results from 2000 to 2009 we find that the WRF model is capable of capturing the high-resolution features of urban climate over Nanjing area. Although WRF underestimates the total precipitation amount, the model performs well in simulating the surface air temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation frequency, diurnal cycle and inter-annual variability. We find that extremely hot events occur most frequently in urban area, with daily maximum (minimum) temperature exceeding 36ºC (28ºC) in around 40% (32%) of days. Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect at surface is more evident during nighttime than daytime, with 20% of cases the UHI intensity above 2.5ºC at night. However, The UHI affects the vertical structure of Planet Boundary Layer (PBL) more deeply during daytime than nighttime. Net gain for latent heat and net radiation is larger over urban than rural surface during daytime. Correspondingly, net loss of sensible heat and ground heat are larger over urban surface resulting from warmer urban skin. Because of different diurnal characteristics of urban-rural differences in the latent heat, ground heat and other energy fluxes, the near surface UHI intensity exhibits a very complex diurnal feature. UHI effect is stronger in days with less cloud or lower wind speed. Model results reveal a larger precipitation frequency over urban area, mainly contributed by the light rain events (<10 mm day-1). Consistent with satellite dataset, around 10-20% more precipitation occurs in urban than rural area at afternoon induced by more unstable urban PBL, which induces a strong vertical atmospheric mixing and upward moisture transport. A significant enhancement of precipitation is found in the downwind region of urban in our simulations in the afternoon.

Yang, Ben; Zhang, Yaocun; Qian, Yun

2012-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

333

COUNTERCURRENT FLOW LIMITATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING FOR IMPROVED REACTOR SAFETY  

SciTech Connect

This project is investigating countercurrent flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. To better understand the occurrence of flooding in the surge line geometry of a PWR, two experimental programs were performed. In the first, a test facility with an acrylic test section provided visual data on flooding for air-water systems in large diameter tubes. This test section also allowed for development of techniques to form an annular liquid film along the inner surface of the “surge line” and other techniques which would be difficult to verify in an opaque test section. Based on experiences in the air-water testing and the improved understanding of flooding phenomena, two series of tests were conducted in a large-diameter, stainless steel test section. Air-water test results and steam-water test results were directly compared to note the effect of condensation. Results indicate that, as for smaller diameter tubes, the flooding phenomena is predominantly driven by the hydrodynamics. Tests with the test sections inclined were attempted but the annular film was easily disrupted. A theoretical model for steam venting from inclined tubes is proposed herein and validated against air-water data. Empirical correlations were proposed for air-water and steam-water data. Methods for developing analytical models of the air-water and steam-water systems are discussed, as is the applicability of the current data to the surge line conditions. This report documents the project results from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2008.

Vierow, Karen

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

335

Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-07ER64470 [“Incorporation of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) into the Community Climate System Model (CCSM): Evaluation and Climate Applications”  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the project entitled “Incorporation of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) into the Community Climate System Model (CCSM): Evaluation and Climate Applications” was to systematically investigate the performance of the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) as an alternative oceanic component of the NCAR’s Community Climate System Model (CCSM). We have configured two versions of the fully coupled CCSM3/HYCOM: one with a medium resolution (T42) Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) and the other with higher resolution (T85). We have performed a comprehensive analysis of the 400-year fully coupled CCSM3/HYCOM simulations and compared the results with those from CCSM3/POP and with climatological observations, and also we have performed tuning of critical model parameters, including Smagorinsky viscosity, isopycnal diffusivity, and background vertical diffusivity. The analysis shows that most oceanic features are well represented in the CCSM3/HYCOM. The coupled CCSM3/HYCOM (T42) has been integrated for 400 years, and the results have been archived and transferred to the High Performance Computer in the Florida State Univesity. In the last year, we have made comprehensive diagnostics of the long-term simulations by the comparison with the original CCSM3/POP simulation and with the observations. To gain some understanding of the model biases, the mean climate and modes of climate variability of the two models are compared with observations. The examination includes the Northern and Southern Annular Modes (NAM and SAM), the Pacific-North-American (PNA) pattern, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), and the main Southern Ocean SST mode. We also compared the performance of ENSO simulation in the coupled models. This report summarizes the main findings from the comparison of long-term CCSM3/HYCOM and CCSM3/POP simulations.

Chassignet, Eric P

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

336

Little Ice Age glaciers in Britain: Glacier–climate modelling in the Cairngorm Mountains  

SciTech Connect

It is widely believed that the last glaciers in the British Isles disappeared at the end of the Younger Dryas stadial (12.9–11.7 cal. kyr BP). Here, we use a glacier–climate model driven by data from local weather stations to show for the first time that glaciers developed during the Little Ice Age (LIA) in the Cairngorm Mountains. Our model is forced from contemporary conditions by a realistic difference in mean annual air temperature of -1.5 degrees C and an increase in annual precipitation of 10%, and confirmed by sensitivity analyses. These results are supported by the presence of small boulder moraines well within Younger Dryas ice limits, and by a dating programme on a moraine in one cirque. As a result, we argue that the last glaciers in the Cairngorm Mountains (and perhaps elsewhere in upland Britain) existed in the LIA within the last few hundred years, rather than during the Younger Dryas.

Stephan Harrison; Ann V. Rowan; Neil F. Glasser; Jasper Knight; Mitchell A. Plummer; Stephanie C. Mills

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Downscaling CMIP5 climate models shows increased tropical cyclone activity over the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently developed technique for simulating large [O(10[superscript 4])] numbers of tropical cyclones in climate states described by global gridded data is applied to simulations of historical and future climate states ...

Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

338

On the origins of the ice ages : insolation forcing, age models, and nonlinear climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis revolves about the relationship between orbital forcing and climate variability. To place paleo and modern climate variability in context, the spectrum of temperature variability is estimated from time-scales ...

Huybers, Peter, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Strategy for Process-Oriented Validation of Coupled Chemistry–Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate and reliable predictions and an understanding of future changes in the stratosphere are major aspects of the subject of climate change. Simulating the interaction between chemistry and climate is of particular importance, because ...

V. Eyring; N. R. P. Harris; M. Rex; T. G. Shepherd; D. W. Fahey; G. T. Amanatidis; J. Austin; M. P. Chipperfield; M. Dameris; P. M. De F. Forster; A. Gettelman; H. F. Graf; T. Nagashima; P. A. Newman; S. Pawson; M. J. Prather; J. A. Pyle; R. J. Salawitch; B. D. Santer; D. W. Waugh

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Tropical cyclones in the UPSCALE ensemble of high resolution global climate models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The UPSCALE (UK on PRACE: weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk) project, using PRACE (Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe) resources, constructed and ran an ensemble of atmosphere-only global climate ...

Malcolm J. Roberts; Pier Luigi Vidale; Matthew S. Mizielinski; Marie-Estelle Demory; Reinhard Schiemann; Jane Strachan; Kevin Hodges; Ray Bell; Joanne Camp

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sandia National Laboratories: Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to address the most challenging and demanding climate-change issues. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) is designed to accel-erate the development and applica-tion of...

342

Detection and Attribution of Regional Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

We developed a high resolution global coupled modeling capability to perform breakthrough studies of the regional climate change. The atmospheric component in our simulation uses a 1{sup o} latitude x 1.25{sup o} longitude grid which is the finest resolution ever used for the NCAR coupled climate model CCSM3. Substantial testing and slight retuning was required to get an acceptable control simulation. The major accomplishment is the validation of this new high resolution configuration of CCSM3. There are major improvements in our simulation of the surface wind stress and sea ice thickness distribution in the Arctic. Surface wind stress and ocean circulation in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current are also improved. Our results demonstrate that the FV version of the CCSM coupled model is a state of the art climate model whose simulation capabilities are in the class of those used for IPCC assessments. We have also provided 1000 years of model data to Scripps Institution of Oceanography to estimate the natural variability of stream flow in California. In the future, our global model simulations will provide boundary data to high-resolution mesoscale model that will be used at LLNL. The mesoscale model would dynamically downscale the GCM climate to regional scale on climate time scales.

Bala, G; Mirin, A

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Position Description: Ph.D. Student in Vegetation Modeling and Climate Vulnerability Montana State University is seeking a Ph.D. student for a NASA Applied Sciences project on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biological resources under climate and land use change. The project will use NASA resources to inform climate to present and under projected future climate and land use scenarios using NASA and other data and modelsPosition Description: Ph.D. Student in Vegetation Modeling and Climate Vulnerability Assessment

Hansen, Andrew J.

344

Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

Davy, Richard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Methods and Resources for Climate Impacts Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The prediction of climate variability and change requires the use of a range of simulation models. Multiple climate model simulations are needed to sample the inherent uncertainties in seasonal to centennial prediction. Because climate models are ...

Andrew Juan Challinor; Tom Osborne; Len Shaffrey; Hilary Weller; Andy Morse; Tim Wheeler; Pier Luigi Vidale

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Improved cache performance in Monte Carlo transport calculations using energy banding A. Siegel a , K. Smith b , K. Felker c,∗ , P . Romano b , B. Forget b , P . Beckman c a Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences and Nuclear Engineering Division b Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering c Argonne National Laboratory, Theory and Computing Sciences Abstract We present an energy banding algorithm for Monte Carlo (MC) neutral parti- cle transport simulations which depend on large cross section lookup tables. In MC codes, read-only cross section data tables are accessed frequently, ex- hibit poor locality, and are typically much too large to fit in fast memory. Thus, performance is often limited by long latencies to RAM, or by off-node communication latencies when the data footprint is very large and must be decomposed on

347

Evaluation of very long baseline interferometry atmospheric modeling improvements  

SciTech Connect

We determine the improvement in baseline length precision and accuracy using new atmospheric delay mapping functions and MTT by analyzing the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project research and development (R&D) experiments and the International Radio Interferometric Surveying (IRIS) A experiments. These mapping functions reduce baseline length scatter by about 20% below that using the CfA2.2 dry and Chao wet mapping functions. With the newer mapping functions, average station vertical scatter inferred from observed length precision (given by length repeatabilites) is 11.4 mm for the 1987-1990 monthly R&D series of experiments and 5.6 mm for the 3-week-long extended research and development experiment (ERDE) series. The inferred monthly R&D station vertical scatter is reduced by 2 mm or by 7 mm is a root-sum-square (rss) sense. Length repeatabilities are optimum when observations below a 7-8 deg elevation cutoff are removed from the geodetic solution. Analyses of IRIS-A data from 1984 through 1991 and the monthly R&D experiments both yielded a nonatmospheric unmodeled station vertical error or about 8 mm. In addition, analysis of the IRIS-A exeriments revealed systematic effects in the evolution of some baseline length measurements. The length rate of change has an apparent acceleration, and the length evolution has a quasi-annual signature. We show that the origin of these effects is unlikely to be related to atmospheric modeling errors. Rates of change of the transatlantic Westford-Wettzell and Richmond-Wettzell baseline lengths calculated from 1988 through 1991 agree with the NUVEL-1 plate motion model (Argus and Gordon, 1991) to within 1 mm/yr.

Macmillan, D.S.; Ma, C. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?  

SciTech Connect

The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluating sub-national building-energy efficiency policy options under uncertainty: Efficient sensitivity testing of alternative climate, technolgical, and socioeconomic futures in a regional intergrated-assessment model.  

SciTech Connect

Improving the energy efficiency of the building stock, commercial equipment and household appliances can have a major impact on energy use, carbon emissions, and building services. Subnational regions such as U.S. states wish to increase their energy efficiency, reduce carbon emissions or adapt to climate change. Evaluating subnational policies to reduce energy use and emissions is difficult because of the uncertainties in socioeconomic factors, technology performance and cost, and energy and climate policies. Climate change may undercut such policies. Assessing these uncertainties can be a significant modeling and computation burden. As part of this uncertainty assessment, this paper demonstrates how a decision-focused sensitivity analysis strategy using fractional factorial methods can be applied to reveal the important drivers for detailed uncertainty analysis.

Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Zhou, Yuyu; Rice, Jennie S.; Patel, Pralit L.; McJeon, Haewon C.; Kyle, G. Page; Kim, Son H.; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Synthesis of Remote Sensing and Field Observations to Model and Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of Oregon & Northern California  

SciTech Connect

The goal is to quantify and explain the carbon (C) budget for Oregon and N. California. The research compares "bottom -up" and "top-down" methods, and develops prototype analytical systems for regional analysis of the carbon balance that are potentially applicable to other continental regions, and that can be used to explore climate, disturbance and land-use effects on the carbon cycle. Objectives are: 1) Improve, test and apply a bottom up approach that synthesizes a spatially nested hierarchy of observations (multispectral remote sensing, inventories, flux and extensive sites), and the Biome-BGC model to quantify the C balance across the region; 2) Improve, test and apply a top down approach for regional and global C flux modeling that uses a model-data fusion scheme (MODIS products, AmeriFlux, atmospheric CO2 concentration network), and a boundary layer model to estimate net ecosystem production (NEP) across the region and partition it among GPP, R(a) and R(h). 3) Provide critical understanding of the controls on regional C balance (how NEP and carbon stocks are influenced by disturbance from fire and management, land use, and interannual climate variation). The key science questions are, "What are the magnitudes and distributions of C sources and sinks on seasonal to decadal time scales, and what processes are controlling their dynamics? What are regional spatial and temporal variations of C sources and sinks? What are the errors and uncertainties in the data products and results (i.e., in situ observations, remote sensing, models)?

Beverly Law; David Turner; Warren Cohen; Mathias Goeckede

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

351

Tropical Cyclone Simulation and Response to CO2 Doubling in the GFDL CM2.5 High-Resolution Coupled Climate Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Global tropical cyclone (TC) activity is simulated by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Climate Model, version 2.5 (CM2.5), which is a fully coupled global climate model with a horizontal resolution of about 50 km for the atmosphere ...

Hyeong-Seog Kim; Gabriel A. Vecchi; Thomas R. Knutson; Whit G. Anderson; Thomas L. Delworth; Anthony Rosati; Fanrong Zeng; Ming Zhao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Simulating the Biogeochemical and Biogeophysical Impacts of Transient Land Cover Change and Wood Harvest in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) from 1850 to 2100  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assess the climate impacts of historical and projected land cover change in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4), new time series of transient Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4) plant functional type (PFT) and wood harvest ...

Peter J. Lawrence; Johannes J. Feddema; Gordon B. Bonan; Gerald A. Meehl; Brian C. O’Neill; Keith W. Oleson; Samuel Levis; David M. Lawrence; Erik Kluzek; Keith Lindsay; Peter E. Thornton

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

GFDL’s ESM2 Global Coupled Climate–Carbon Earth System Models. Part II: Carbon System Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors describe carbon system formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbon–climate Earth System Models (ESM), ESM2M and ESM2G. These models demonstrate good climate fidelity as described in part I of this study ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Lori T. Sentman; Alistair J. Adcroft; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Matthew J. Harrison; Hiram Levy; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Peter J. Phillips; Niki Zadeh

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. (2003), 129, pp. 33713389 doi: 10.1256/qj.02.217 Evaluation of moisture in the Hadley Centre climate model using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Hadley Centre climate model using simulations of HIRS water-vapour channel radiances By RICHARD P. ALLAN1 , M. A. RINGER1 and A. SLINGO2 1 Hadley Centre, Met Of ce, Exeter, UK 2ESSC, University of Reading, UK, are simulated within the Hadley Centre atmospheric climate model, version HadAM3, allowing direct comparison

Allan, Richard P.

355

A spatial agent-based model for assessing strategies of adaptation to climate and tourism demand changes in an alpine tourism destination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vast body of literature suggests that the European Alpine Region is amongst the most sensitive socio-ecosystems to climate change impacts. Our model represents the winter tourism socio-ecosystem of Auronzo di Cadore, located in the Dolomites (Italy), ... Keywords: Adaptation strategies, Alpine tourism, Climate change, Social simulation, Spatial agent-based model

Stefano Balbi; Carlo Giupponi; Pascal Perez; Marco Alberti

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Impact of IBM Cell Technology on the Programming Paradigm in the Context of Computer Systems for Climate and Weather Models  

SciTech Connect

The call for ever-increasing model resolutions and physical processes in climate and weather models demands a continual increase in computing power. The IBM Cell processor's order-of-magnitude peak performance increase over conventional processors makes it very attractive to fulfill this requirement. However, the Cell's characteristics, 256KB local memory per SPE and the new low-level communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. As a trial, we selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics components (half the total computational time), (2) has an extremely high computational intensity: the ratio of computational load to main memory transfers, and (3) exhibits embarrassingly parallel column computations. In this paper, we converted the baseline code (single-precision Fortran) to C and ported it to an IBM BladeCenter QS20. For performance, we manually SIMDize four independent columns and include several unrolling optimizations. Our results show that when compared with the baseline implementation running on one core of Intel's Xeon Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2, the Cell is approximately 8.8x, 11.6x, and 12.8x faster, respectively. Our preliminary analysis shows that the Cell can also accelerate the dynamics component (~;;25percent total computational time). We believe these dramatic performance improvements make the Cell processor very competitive as an accelerator.

Zhou, Shujia; Duffy, Daniel; Clune, Thomas; Suarez, Max; Williams, Samuel; Halem, Milton

2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

357

Northeast Climate Science Center: Transposing Extreme Rainfall to Assess Climate Vulnerability  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Climate models predict significant increases in the magnitude and frequency of extreme rainfalls.  However, climate model projections of precipitation vary greatly across models.  For communities...

358

Climate Change and Agriculture Reconsidered  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their use of the older Hadley II climate model for climaterecent and less optimistic Hadley III climate model used inother applica- tion of the Hadley GCM model that predicts

Fisher, Anthony

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Dynamics of Arctic and Sub-Arctic Climate and Atmospheric Circulation: Diagnosis of Mechanisms and Biases Using Data Assimilation  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of work performed under this grant is to enhance understanding of simulations of present-day climate and greenhouse gas-induced climate change. The examination of present-day climate also includes diagnostic intercomparison of model simulations and observed mean climate and climate variability using reanalysis and satellite datasets. Enhanced understanding is desirable 1) as a prerequisite for improving simulations; 2) for assessing the credibility of model simulations and their usefulness as tools for decision support; and 3) as a means to identify robust behaviors which commonly occur over a wide range of models, and may yield insights regarding the dominant physical mechanisms which determine mean climate and produce climate change. A further objective is to investigate the use of data assimilation as a means for examining and correcting model biases. Our primary focus is on the Arctic, but the scope of the work was expanded to include the global climate system.

Eric T. DeWeaver

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

"Bivariate Downscaling for Climate Projections"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Bivariate Downscaling for Climate Projections" Xuming He Department of Statistics University is a useful technique to localize global or regional climate model projections to assess the potential impact of climate changes. It requires quantifying a relationship between climate model output and local

Wang, Lily

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Climate and Energy Policy for U.S. Passenger Vehicles: A Technology-Rich Economic Modeling and Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-based relationship between income growth and travel demand, turnover of the vehicle stock, and cost-driven investment both in reduction of internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle fuel consumption as well as in adoptionClimate and Energy Policy for U.S. Passenger Vehicles: A Technology-Rich Economic Modeling

362

Detecting anthropogenic influences on climate with an atmospheric model forced with observed variations in sea surface temperature  

SciTech Connect

Six ensembles of four simulations with the Hadley Centre atmospheric general circulation model (HADAM2a) have been carried out for late 1948 to the end of 1994 with different specified atmospheric forcing distributions. These simulations are being used to understand the role of different forcing processes in determining the observed climate variations during the second half of the twentieth century. All ensembles started from different initial conditions and were forced with specified global observed monthly sea ice and sea surface temperature distributions using the GISST1.1 data set. The approach used deterministic sampling of observed variations in climate rather than a coupled model. The technique was also different in that it looked at the smaller residual climate signal due to direct anthropogenic over and above those captured in ocean surface temperatures. The results indicate that this method is a useful complement to approaches based on coupled models, aided by the fact that some of the residual climate signals are almost as large as the full signals seen in coupled models, particularly in the stratosphere. 9 refs., 4 figs.

Folland, C.K.; Sexton, D. [Hadley Centre, Bracknell (United Kingdom); Karoly, D. [Monash Univ., Victoria (Australia)] [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling hydrologic and water quality extremes in a changing climate: A statistical approach based on extreme value theory Erin Towler,1,2 Balaji Rajagopalan,1,3 Eric Gilleland,2 R. Scott Summers,1 David makes quantifying changes to hydrologic extremes, as well as associated water quality effects

Katz, Richard

364

Evaluating Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with RRTMG/McICA using Modeled and Observed AIRS Spectral Radiances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with Water Vapor in the NCAR CAM3 Climate Model with RRTMG/McICA using Modeled and Observed AIRS Spectral Radiances Michael J. Iacono, Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 USA 1. Overview Objectives: * Evaluate water vapor and temperature simulation in two versions of CAM3 by comparing modeled and observed cloud-cleared AIRS spectral radiances. * Use spectral differences to verify comparisons between modeled water vapor and temperature and observed fields retrieved from AIRS radiances. Models: OSS: Optimal Spectral Sampling model developed at AER was used to simulate clear sky AIRS radiance spectra in CAM3. RRTMG/McICA: ARM-supported LW and SW radiative transfer model developed at AER for application to GCMs. RRTMG has been fully

365

Improved Modeling of Residential Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps for Energy Calculations  

SciTech Connect

This report presents improved air conditioner and heat pump modeling methods in the context of whole-building simulation tools, with the goal of enabling more accurate evaluation of cost effective equipment upgrade opportunities and efficiency improvements in residential buildings.

Cutler, D.; Winkler, J.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.; Brendemuehl, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

367

The long-term change of El Niño Southern Oscillation in an ensemble reanalysis and climate coupled models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE LONG-TERM CHANGE OF EL NI?O SOUTHERN OSCILLATION IN AN ENSEMBLE REANALYSIS AND CLIMATE COUPLED MODELS A Dissertation by CHUNXUE YANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...ESM1-M Norwegian Climate Centre 3 F19, L26 gx1v6L53 Bentsen et al. [2012] 20 CHAPTER III RESULTS Ensemble Reanalysis Ensemble Statistics El Ni?o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has significant impact on world economics, society...

Yang, Chunxue 1984-

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

Improvement of an Esocid Bioenergetics Model for Juvenile Fish CASEY W. SCHOENEBECK*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of an Esocid Bioenergetics Model for Juvenile Fish CASEY W. SCHOENEBECK* Department temperature are known to influence the accuracy of fish bioenergetics models. In an effort to improve the accuracy of a juvenile esocid bioenergetics model, we used a regression-based approach to develop

369

Submitted to BAMS v5, 13/10/2011 Documenting the climate modelling process: how climate scientists now share their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(DKRZ, Germany), Sylvia Murphy (NOAA, US), Karl Taylor (PCMDI, US) and the METAFOR team In earth system system models"). The complexity of these simulators, measured in terms of the number of the processes we modelling, the performance of common simulation experiments by multiple research groups has emerged

Guilyardi, Eric

370

An animal model for genetic/evolutionary responses to global climate change. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A multi-level attack was made on a molecular-genetics-based vulnerability of thermally sensitive organisms to global climate change.

Ward B. Watt

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Speed Dynamometer CAN measured Drive trace measurement Engine RPM CAN spark frequency Model input Brake Torque CAN Flywheel torque, model input Toil Dipstick...

372

Improved Space Charge Modeling for Simulation and Design of Photoinjectors  

SciTech Connect

Photoinjectors in advanced high-energy accelerators reduce beam energy spreads and enhance undulator photon fluxes. Photoinjector design is difficult because of the substantial differences in time and spatial scales. This Phase I program explored an innovative technique, the local Taylor polynomial (LTP) formulation, for improving finite difference analysis of photoinjectors. This included improved weighting techniques, systematic formula for high order interpolation and electric field computation, and improved handling of space charge. The Phase I program demonstrated that the approach was powerful, accurate, and efficient. It handles space charge gradients better than currently available technology.

Robert H. Jackson, Thuc Bui, John Verboncoeur

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

373

Improving Face Recognition Performance Using a Hierarchical Bayesian Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which can result in an improved recognition performance over already existing baseline approaches. We use Kernelized Fisher Discriminant Analysis (KFLD) as our baseline as it is superior to PCA in a way that it produces well separated classes even under...

Shikaripur Nadig, Ashwini

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

Solving Problems with GCMs: General Circulation Models and Their Role in the Climate Modeling Hierarchy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­Southern Oscillation, from the Devil's Staircase to prediction 16 A. ENSO's regularity and irregularity 16 B. The Devil's Staircase across the modeling hierarchy 18 C. Regularity and prediction 22 IV. Interdecadal oscillations

Robertson, Andrew W.

375

Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction Path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction Path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

376

Improvement of Electrocatalyst Performance in Hydrogen Fuel Cells by Multiscale Modelling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work in this thesis addresses the improvement of electrocatalyst performance inhydrogen PEM fuel cells. An agglomerate model for a catalyst layer was coupled witha… (more)

Marthosa, Sutida

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The influence of Hadley circulation intensity changes on extratropical climate in an idealized model  

SciTech Connect

Experiments have been performed using a simple global model with idealized physics and zonally symmetrical forcings to investigate the influence of Hadley circulation intensity changes on extratropical climate. The heating within the Tropics is latitudinally concentrated, while the heating in the extratropics is kept unchanged. This leads to an increase in the intensity of the Hadley circulation. As found earlier by Hou, along with the increase in the intensity of the Hadley circulation, there is a statistically significant temperature increase in the winter high latitudes. Zonal-mean diagnostics have been performed in order to identify the link between the changes in the Tropics and the extratropics. Detailed diagnostics of the heat budget shows that warming in the winter high latitudes is induced by changes in the mean meridional circulation, over the opposing cooling effects caused by changes in the eddy heat fluxes. Such a change is consistent with an equatorward shift of the jet stream and its associated heating pattern. It is suggested that the equatorward shift in jet position is caused by an increase in westerly acceleration within the Tropics associated with the enhancement in the intensity of the Hadley circulation. Limitations of the model are also discussed. 28 refs., 16 figs.

Chang, E.K.M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Application of Improved Grey Model in Long-term Load Forecasting of Power Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Grey model is usually been used for long-term load forecasting in power engineering, but it has significant limitations. If the moving average method and Markov model are connected with grey model, the accuracy of this improved grey model used for long-term load forecasting in power engineering can be effectively increased. In this paper, ordinary grey model and improved grey model are all chosen and used for long-term power load forecasting in power engineering, and the power load data of Qingdao in the past decade is selected for the analysis. The result of the analysis shows that the accuracy of improved grey model is significant higher than ordinary model, so the improved grey model can be used for long-term load forecasting in power engineering.

Junjie Kang; Huijuan Zhao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Evaluating Single Column Models using an ensemble approach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a valuable tool for evaluating and improving parameterizations for climate and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. Their drawback is that they can usually only be applied...

380

CSSEF: Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSSEF: Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future CSSEF: Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Simulation on Intrepid of Katrina-like hurricanes Simulation on Intrepid of Katrina-like hurricanes The Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project objectives are to: Accelerate incorporation of new knowledge, including process data and observations, into climate models; Develop new methods for rapid evaluation of improved models; and Develop novel approaches to exploit computing at the level of tens of petaflops in climate models. Success in this project will enable scientists to answer questions posed in the period after the publication of the IPCC 5th Assessment Report. The project comprises three components: data and testbeds, numerical methods and computational science, and uncertainty quantification. There are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Pluralistic Modelling Approaches to Simulating Climate-Land Change Interactions in East Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with atmospheric trends such as greenhouse gas concentrations, to loop back to regional and global climate change dynamics (Giorgi and Mearns 1999). Developing robust forecasts of land use change is essential in the proper simulation of land-climate interactions. Forecasts of land use at regional scales require several

382

Ensemble operational air quality assessments in Europe Improving modeling platforms with statistical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ensemble operational air quality assessments in Europe ­ Improving modeling platforms. For regional air quality, seven regional modeling teams combine state-of-the-art atmospheric modeling the ensemble or a unique model. Keywords: Air quality, modeling system, ensemble approach, validation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

383

Photosynthesis-dependent isoprene emission from leaf to planet in a global carbon-chemistry-climate model  

SciTech Connect

We describe the implementation of a biochemical model of isoprene emission that depends on the electron requirement for isoprene synthesis into the Farquhar/Ball- Berry leaf model of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance that is embedded within a global chemistry-climate simulation framework. The isoprene production is calculated as a function of electron transport-limited photosynthesis, intercellular carbon dioxide concentration, and canopy temperature. The vegetation biophysics module computes the photosynthetic uptake of carbon dioxide coupled with the transpiration of water vapor and the isoprene emission rate at the 30 min physical integration time step of the global chemistry-climate model. In the model, the rate of carbon assimilation provides the dominant control on isoprene emission variability over canopy temperature. A control simulation representative of the present day climatic state that uses plant functional types (PFTs), prescribed phenology and generic PFT-specific isoprene emission potentials (fraction of electrons available for isoprene synthesis) reproduces 50% of the variability across different ecosystems and seasons in a global database of measured campaign-average fluxes. Compared to time-varying isoprene flux measurements at select sites, the model authentically captures the observed variability in the 30 min average diurnal cycle (R2 = 64-96 %) and simulates the flux magnitude to within a factor of 2. The control run yields a global isoprene source strength of 451 TgCyr?1 that increases by 30% in the artificial absence of plant water stress and by 55% for potential natural vegetation.

Unger, N.; Harper, K.; Zheng, Y.; Kiang, N. Y.; Aleinov, I.; Arneth, Almut; Schurgers, G.; Amelynck, C.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Heinesch, B.; Hewitt, C. N.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Langford, B.; McKinney, Karena A.; Misztal, P.; Potosnak, M.; Rinne, J.; Pressley, S.; Schoon, N.; Serca, D.

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

Vapor intrusion modeling : limitations, improvements, and value of information analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor intrusion is the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a subsurface source into the indoor air of an overlying building. Vapor intrusion models, including the Johnson and Ettinger (J&E) model, can be ...

Friscia, Jessica M. (Jessica Marie)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development of an equipment management model to improve effectiveness of processes  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industries have developed and are trying to create a performance model to improve effectiveness of the processes implemented at nuclear plants in order to enhance performance. Most high performing nuclear stations seek to continually improve the quality of their operations by identifying and closing important performance gaps. Thus, many utilities have implemented performance models adjusted to their plant's configuration and have instituted policies for such models. KHNP is developing a standard performance model to integrate the engineering processes and to improve the inter-relation among processes. The model, called the Standard Equipment Management Model (SEMM), is under development first by focusing on engineering processes and performance improvement processes related to plant equipment used at the site. This model includes performance indicators for each process that can allow evaluating and comparing the process performance among 21 operating units. The model will later be expanded to incorporate cost and management processes. (authors)

Chang, H. S.; Ju, T. Y.; Song, T. Y. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 25-1 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A model for improving ocean wind forecasts using satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the dynamical model from previous talk we now want to assimilate the satellite measurements Using the dynamical model from previous talk we now want to assimilate the satellite measurements now want to assimilate the satellite measurements into this model. We will discuss the measurement

Malmberg, Anders

387

CFD modeling of entrained-flow coal gasifiers with improved physical and chemical sub-models  

SciTech Connect

Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. While the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside entrained-flow gasifiers has been modeled through computational fluid dynamic (CFD), the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented here include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate, a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and heating rate effect on volatile yield, and careful selection of global gas phase reaction kinetics. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for systemwide design and optimization.

Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Comparing Large-Scale Hydrological Model Predictions with Observed Streamflow in the Pacific Northwest: Effects of Climate and Groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing uncertainties in hydrologic models can improve accuracy in predicting future streamflow. Here, simulated streamflows using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model at coarse (°) and fine (°) spatial resolutions were evaluated ...

Mohammad Safeeq; Guillaume S. Mauger; Gordon E. Grant; Ivan Arismendi; Alan F. Hamlet; Se-Yeun Lee

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Improving the Modeling of Hydrogen Solubility in Heavy Oil Cuts Using an Augmented  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the Modeling of Hydrogen Solubility in Heavy Oil Cuts Using an Augmented Grayson Streed -- Improving the Modeling of Hydrogen Solubility in Heavy Oil Cuts Using an Augmented Grayson Streed (AGS for calculating hydrogen solubility in petroleum fluids. However, its accuracy becomes very bad when very heavy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

390

Learning with Probabilistic Features for Improved Pipeline Models Razvan C. Bunescu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learning with Probabilistic Features for Improved Pipeline Models Razvan C. Bunescu School of EECS for pipeline models aimed at improving the com- munication between consecutive stages in a pipeline. Our method exploits the confidence scores associated with outputs at any given stage in a pipeline in order to compute

Bunescu, Razvan C.

391

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project modelprojects are supported by the European Commission Directorate General XII Environment, Climate

Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Improvements to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado W. J. Wiscombe National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

393

Improved Usage Model for Web Application Reliability Testing .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Testing the reliability of an application usually requires a good usage model that accurately captures the likely sequences of inputs that the application will receive… (more)

Wan, Bo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

NREL: News - NREL Model Licensed to Improve Accuracy of Battery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL is a recognized leader in vehicle energy storage R&D. In addition to groundbreaking thermal evaluation and analysis, NREL's energy storage modeling, simulation, and testing...

395

Dissemination of Climate Model Output to the Public and Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

Climate is defined by the Glossary of Meteorology as the mean of atmospheric variables over a period of time ranging from as short as a few months to multiple years and longer. Although the term climate is often used to refer to long-term weather statistics, the broader definition of climate is the time evolution of a system consisting of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Physical, chemical, and biological processes are involved in interactions among the components of the climate system. Vegetation, soil moisture, and glaciers are part of the climate system in addition to the usually considered temperature and precipitation (Pielke, 2008). Climate change refers to any systematic change in the long-term statistics of climate elements (such as temperature, pressure, or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Climate change can be initiated by external forces, such as cyclical variations in the Earth's solar orbit that are thought to have caused glacial and interglacial periods within the last 2 million years (Milankovitch, 1941). However, a linear response to astronomical forcing does not explain many other observed glacial and interglacial cycles (Petit et al., 1999). It is now understood that climate is influenced by the interaction of solar radiation with atmospheric greenhouse gasses (e.g., carbon dioxide, chlorofluorocarbons, methane, nitrous oxide, etc.), aerosols (airborne particles), and Earth's surface. A significant aspect of climate are the interannual cycles, such as the El Nino La Nina cycle which profoundly affects the weather in North America but is outside the scope of weather forecasts. Some of the most significant advances in understanding climate change have evolved from the recognition of the influence of ocean circulations upon the atmosphere (IPCC, 2007). Human activity can affect the climate system through increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases, air pollution, increasing concentrations of aerosol, and land alteration. A particular concern is that atmospheric levels of CO{sub 2} may be rising faster than at any time in Earth's history, except possibly following rare events like impacts from large extraterrestrial objects (AMS, 2007). Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations have increased since the mid-1700s through fossil fuel burning and changes in land use, with more than 80% of this increase occurring since 1900. The increased levels of CO{sub 2} will remain in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. The complexity of the climate system makes it difficult to predict specific aspects of human-induced climate change, such as exactly how and where changes will occur, and their magnitude. The Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) was established by World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations in 1988. The IPCC was tasked with assessing the scientific, technical and socioeconomic information needed to understand the risk of human-induced climate change, its observed and projected impacts, and options for adaptation and mitigation. The IPCC concluded in its Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) that warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and that most of the observed increase in globally averaged temperatures since the mid-20th century is very likely due to the observed increased in anthropogenic greenhouse gas concentrations (IPCC, 2007).

Robert Stockwell, PhD

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

396

Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biogeosciences, 6, 2099–2120, 2009 www.biogeosciences.net/6/2099/2009/ © Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Biogeosciences Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.... Inclusion of fundamental ecological interactions between carbon and nitrogen cycles in the land component of an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) leads to decreased carbon uptake associated with CO2 fertil- ization, and increased carbon...

Thornton, P. E.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, Keith; Moore, J. K.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Lamarque, J. F.; Feddema, Johannes J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Transient climate changes in a perturbed parameter ensemble of emissions-driven earth system model simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe results from a 57-member ensemble of transient climate change simulations, featuring simultaneous perturbations to 54 parameters in the atmosphere, ocean, sulphur cycle and terrestrial ecosystem compo...

James M. Murphy; Ben B. B. Booth; Chris A. Boulton; Robin T. Clark…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wetlands are ecosystems of important functions in the earth’s climate system. Through relatively high evapotranspiration, they affect surface water and energy exchange with the atmosphere directly influencing ...

Ying Fan; Gonzalo Miguez-Macho

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Coastal communities and climate change : a dynamic model of risk perception, storms, and adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change impacts, including sea-level rise and changes in tropical storm frequency and intensity, will pose signicant challenges to city planners and coastal zone managers trying to make wise investment and protection ...

Franck, Travis Read

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Study of Climate Change Impact on Flood Frequencies: A Combined Weather Generator and Hydrological Modeling Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change is expected to lead to more frequent and intensive flooding problems for watersheds in the south part of China. This study presented a coupled Long Ashton Research Station Weather Generator (LARS-WG) and Semidistributed Land Use–...

X. S. Qin; Y. Lu

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Statistical downscaling of precipitation on a spatially dependent network using a regional climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a detailed downscaling simulation methodology for generating precipitation events, conditioned on external climate covariates, on a network of meteorological stations. These events can be input to h...

R. J. Erhardt; L. E. Band; R. L. Smith…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Improved di-neutron cluster model for 6He scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the three-body Borromean nucleus 6He is approximated by a two-body di-neutron cluster model. The binding energy of the 2n-\\alpha system is determined to obtain a correct description of the 2n-\\alpha coordinate, as given by a realistic three-body model calculation. The model is applied to describe the break-up effects in elastic scattering of 6He on several targets, for which experimental data exist. We show that an adequate description of the di-neutron-core degree of freedom permits a fairly accurate description of the elastic scattering of 6He on different targets.

A. M. Moro; K. Rusek; J. M. Arias; J. Gomez-Camacho; M. Rodriguez-Gallardo

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Improving sound propagation modeling for wind power projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sound propagation from wind power projects can be modeled in the same manner as other more common outdoor noisesources but are these models suited to wind turbines' uniquely high source heights operating under high wind conditions and various degrees of terrain ruggedness. In "Propagation Modeling Parameters for Wind Turbines" (K. Kaliski and E. Duncan Proceedings of Institute of Noise ControlEngineers NOISECON 2007) the effects of ground attenuation and various adjustments for wind conditions on sound propagationmodeling were discussed. This paper continues the discussion and explores the accuracy of existing sound propagationmodeling methods for wind power projects including ISO 9613 and other standards. Model data for wind power projects and the implications of various terrain and ground coverage will be discussed.

Eddie Duncan; Kenneth Kaliski

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Improved Model Formulations for Multi-Period Hydrogen Network Designs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Operating cost reduction and/or air pollution abatement via hydrogen integration is a research issue that has recently attracted considerable attention in the petroleum refining industries. Although a number of mathematical programming models have been ...

Che-Chi Kuo; Chuei-Tin Chang

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

407

An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

Monier, Erwan

408

Future Climate Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada (Figure 1), the site of a potential repository for high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this AMR provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the infiltration model (USGS 2000) and for the total system performance assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) at YM. Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one method, among many, of establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Revision 00 of this AMR was prepared in accordance with the ''Work Direction and Planning Document for Future Climate Analysis'' (Peterman 1999) under Interagency Agreement DE-AI08-97NV12033 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The planning document for the technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department''. (BSC 2001b, Addendum B, Section 4.1).

James Houseworth

2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

409

Climate Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

410

ERDC TN-EMRRP-EBA-5 Improving Conceptual Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's goals and stakeholders' expectations. In aquatic ecosystem restoration projects, these often include model is a required step in creating any ecosystem restoration project plan regardless of project size available through the Ecosystem Restoration Gateway (http://cw-environment.usace. army.mil/restoration

US Army Corps of Engineers

411

Uncertainty analysis of an aviation climate model and an aircraft price model for assessment of environmental effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating, presenting, and assessing uncertainties are important parts in assessment of a complex system. This thesis focuses on the assessment of uncertainty in the price module and the climate module in the Aviation ...

Jun, Mina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATE: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS Rick Katz Institute) Unified Modeling of Distributions (6) Resources #12;4 #12;5 (1) Background · Use of Extremal Models -- Stochastic weather generators Improved treatment of extremes #12;6 (2) Observed Tail Behavior · Extreme Value

Katz, Richard

413

Climate VISION: Program Mission  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

PROGRAM MISSION PROGRAM MISSION Climate VISION - Voluntary Innovative Sector Initiatives: Opportunities Now - is a voluntary public-private partnership initiative to improve energy efficiency and greenhouse gas intensity in energy-intensive industrial sectors. Climate VISION - Voluntary Innovative Sector Initiatives: Opportunities Now - is a public-private partnership initiative launched by the Department of Energy on February 12, 2003. Its primary goal is to identify and pursue cost-effective options to improve the energy or GHG intensity of industry operations by accelerating the transition to technologies, practices, and processes that are cleaner, more efficient, and capable of reducing, capturing or sequestering GHGs. Climate VISION links these objectives with technology development,

414

Modeling distributions of stem characteristics of genetically improved loblolly pine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presented in this study. N de 'n th Parame s Once the parameter estimates for each plot had been computed for the chosen distribution, multiple regression techniques were utilized to relate the parameter estimates to stand characteristics. Regression... best characterized the data. Models were subsequently developed to predict the diameter, height, and volume distributions using the moment-based beta probability density function. The probability density function parameters were predicted from stand...

Janssen, Jill Elizabeth

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK-BOX MODELLING OF HVAC SYSTEM: IMPROVING THE PERFORMANCES OF NEURAL NETWORKS Eric FOCK Ile de La Réunion - FRANCE ABSTRACT This paper deals with neural networks modelling of HVAC systems of HVAC system can be modelled using manufacturer design data presented as derived performance maps

Boyer, Edmond

416

Improving Efficiency of Data Assimilation Procedure for a Biomechanical Heart Model by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving Efficiency of Data Assimilation Procedure for a Biomechanical Heart Model by Representing to perform parameter estimation in a biomechanical model of the heart using synthetic observations [1, 3, 7, 8, 12, 15, 16] as an es- sential tool in heart modeling in order to personalize from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

417

IN THIS ISSUE Regional Climate Change..............1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN THIS ISSUE · Regional Climate Change..............1 · From the Executive Director...........2 release of new climate change scenarios from the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) heralds of the fundamental questions remaining with respect to understanding climate change and even climate variability. And

Hamann, Andreas

418

4, 28752899, 2007 Climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HESSD 4, 2875­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Climate change impact­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

419

Global Climate Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Data The climate data at the ORNL DAAC are used primarily as driving variables in terrestrial biogeochemistry models. These models typically use data on temperature (min,max), precipitation, humidity (relative humidity, vapor pressure deficit, dew point), radiation (PFD in PAR, shortwave, direct/diffuse, and UV radiation, daylength), and wind velocity. Climate / meteorology data are required at hourly to monthly time scales, either point or gridded, at spatial scales ranging from regional to continental to global. The ORNL DAAC currently distributes climate data from several related projects: VEMAP-1 Hydroclimatology, and Global Historical Climatology Network. We are also now distributing climate data developed at the East Anglia Climate Research Unit and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Research.

420

Dark Stars: Improved Models and First Pulsation Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We use the stellar evolution code MESA to study dark stars. Dark stars (DSs), which are powered by dark matter (DM) self-annihilation rather than by nuclear fusion, may be the first stars to form in the Universe. We compute stellar models for accreting DSs with masses up to 10^6 M_sun. While previous calculations were limited to polytropic interiors, our current calculations use MESA, a modern stellar evolution code to solve the equations of stellar structure. The heating due to DM annihilation is self-consistently included, assuming extended adiabatic contraction of DM within the minihalos in which DSs form. We find remarkably good overall agreement with the basic results of previous models. There are some differences, however, in the details, with positive implications for observability of DSs. We found that, in the mass range of 10^4 - 10^5 M_sun, using MESA, our DSs are hotter by a factor of 1.5 than those in Freese et al.(2010), are smaller in radius by a factor of 0.6, denser by a factor of 3...

Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Freese, Katherine; Winget, Donald E; Paxton, Bill

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

TOWARDS IMPROVED 1-D SETTLER MODELLING: CALIBRATION OF THE B URGER MODEL AND CASE STUDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). Indeed, the performance of secondary clarifiers affects the effluent. Furthermore, more intense rain events and longer draughts between rain events, caused by climate change quality as well as the biomass inventory in the entire treatment plant. As biomass is the driving force

Bürger, Raimund

422

Improvements to building energy usage modeling during early design stages and retrofits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of improvements to the MIT Design Advisor, a whole-building energy usage modeling tool intended for use during early design stages, are investigated. These include changes to the thermal mass temperature distribution ...

Mandelbaum, Andrew (Andrew Joseph)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

NREL Reduces Climate Control Loads in Electric Vehicles (Fact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

demonstrates that zonal climate control can reduce air conditioning power and improve range while maintaining driver thermal sensation. When the climate control system in an...

424

Improvements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Hydrogen to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results May 8, 2007 Amgad Elgowainy Argonne National Laboratory Comparison of Delivery Pathways- V1.0 vs. V2.0 2 1 3 i delivery by a Loading, the plant Version 1.0 character zed components for 3 pathways with single mode. conditioning and storage are at or adjacent to Liquid Hydrogen (LH) Truck H2 Production 100 or 1500 kg/d Compressed H2 (CH) Truck H2 Production 3 or 7 kpsi 100 or 1500 kg/d H2 Production Gaseous H2 Pipeline 100 or 1500 kg/d HDSAM V1.0 Estimates Delivery Cost for 3 Pathways 4 H2 H2 1 2 3 H2 Distribution and Ci I. Liquid H2 Distribution: HDSAM V2.0 Simulates Nine Pathways Production Production LH Terminal LH Terminal Production LH Terminal Transmission Transmission Distribution

425

Improved user interface design for site selection modeling system  

SciTech Connect

The Site Selection Modeling System (SSMS) is a customized application within the Environmental Data Atlas (EDA), which is an integrated geographic information system (GIS) for environmental applications at the Savannah River site (SRS) developed jointly by the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of Westinghouse Savannah River Company and by the University of South Carolina (USC). The SSMS was developed to assist analysts with site selection activities carried out by the ESS and is a powerful tool with a graphical user interface that allows non-GIS analysts to use the application. However, use of the SSMS in recent siting exercises revealed deficiencies in the user interface as a production tool. This paper specifies user interface design criteria necessary for a production application and describes the implementation of these design criteria in the SSMS.

Koffman, L.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Climate change under aggressive mitigation: the ENSEMBLES multi-model experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-10, 12165 Berlin, Germany H. Huebener Hessian Agency for the Environment and Geology, Rheingaustra�e 186, Italy W. May Á S. Yang Danish Climate Centre, Danish Meteorological Institute, Lyngbyvej 100, 2100.4) with reduced fossil fuel use for energy production aimed at stabilizing global warming below 2 K, is studied

Dufresne, Jean-Louis

427

On the Use of Autoregression Models to Estimate Climate Sensitivity Michael E. Schlesinger1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anthropogenic sulfate aerosol (GA), (3) GA plus tropospheric ozone and putative solar irradiance variations changes. To do so the ARM considerably reduces the heat capacity of the climate system such that h ranges Science and Management and Department of Economics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. 3

Kolstad, Charles

428

Integrating seasonal climate prediction and agricultural models for insights into agricultural practice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the global climate system, and substantial...a number of pilot studies targeting smallholder...and tradeoffs, and foster co-learning and...discussion support systems (Meinke et al...Challinor, A., Wheeler, T. Moron, V...Burkina Faso as a case study. Agr. Syst. 74...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Evaluating the present-day simulation of clouds, precipitation, and radiation in climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] This paper describes a set of metrics for evaluating the simulation of clouds, radiation, and precipitation in the present-day climate. As with the skill scores used to measure the accuracy of short-term weather forecasts, these metrics are low-order statistical measures of agreement with relevant, well-observed physical quantities

Robert, Pincus

430

Nuclear winter revisited with a modern climate model and current nuclear arsenals: Still catastrophic consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of nuclear weapons states, with additional states trying to develop nuclear arsenals. We use a modern climate and upper stratosphere, producing a long aerosol lifetime. The indirect effects of nuclear weapons would. [2007], who showed that a regional nuclear conflict using 100 Hiroshima-size (15 kt) nuclear weapons

Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

431

From GCM grid cell to agricultural plot: scale issues affecting modelling of climate impact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...on climate impact. More information...surface wind speed (W...spatially (grid cell) or...analysis of the impact of aggregated...per 2.8 grid unit. As...by water, energy or both...parameterization of energy flow to smaller...representation of sub-grid scale processes...represent the impact on agricultural...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

P 4.3 MIADAC Modelling Climate Change Policies: Mitigation, Adaptation, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in emission trading markets. · Analyze the political economy side of national and international climate policy in Switzerland We will extend our phase 2 work on adaptation measures (Gonseth, 2008) and refine existing estimates of impact costs for the Swiss economy (Ecoplan - Sigmaplan, 2007) in order to achieve more

Richner, Heinz

433

RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: COKE FORMATION PREDICTABILITY MAPS  

SciTech Connect

The dispersed particle solution model of petroleum residua structure was used to develop predictors for pyrolytic coke formation. Coking Indexes were developed in prior years that measure how near a pyrolysis system is to coke formation during the coke formation induction period. These have been demonstrated to be universally applicable for residua regardless of the source of the material. Coking onset is coincidental with the destruction of the ordered structure and the formation of a multiphase system. The amount of coke initially formed appears to be a function of the free solvent volume of the original residua. In the current work, three-dimensional coke make predictability maps were developed at 400 C, 450 C, and 500 C (752 F, 842 F, and 932 F). These relate residence time and free solvent volume to the amount of coke formed at a particular pyrolysis temperature. Activation energies for two apparent types of zero-order coke formation reactions were estimated. The results provide a new tool for ranking residua, gauging proximity to coke formation, and predicting initial coke make tendencies.

John F. Schabron; A. Troy Pauli; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effect of Scale on the Modeling of Hydrologic Effects of Climate Change on the Niger River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infrastructural investments for irrigation and hydroelectricity development. Climate change is a potential threat

Mountziaris, T. J.

435

Coupling Chemical Transport Model Source Attributions with Positive Matrix Factorization: Application to Two IMPROVE Sites Impacted by Wildfires  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coupling Chemical Transport Model Source Attributions with Positive Matrix Factorization: Application to Two IMPROVE Sites Impacted by Wildfires ... § Cooperative

Timothy M. Sturtz; Bret A. Schichtel; Timothy V. Larson

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

436

Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections Email: oar.cpo.mapp@noaa.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth system models to better simulate the climate system? Can we improve intraseasonal to seasonal mission, MAPP supports the development of advanced Earth system models that can predict climate variations, and the external research community. MAPP Objectives · Improve Earth system models · Achieve an integrated Earth

437

Climate change and Ecotone boundaries: Insights from a cellular automata ecohydrology model in a Mediterranean catchment with topography controlled vegetation patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regions of vegetation transitions (ecotones) are known to be highly sensitive to climate fluctuations. In this study, the Cellular-Automata Tree Grass Shrub Simulator (CATGraSS) has been modified, calibrated and used with downscaled future climate scenarios to examine the role of climate change on vegetation patterns in a steep mountainous catchment (1.3 km2) located in Sicily, Italy. In the catchment, north-facing slopes are mostly covered by trees and grass, and south-facing slopes by Indian Fig opuntia and grass, with grasses dominating as elevation grows. \\{CATGraSS\\} simulates solar radiation, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture in space and time. Each model cell can hold a single plant type or can be bare soil. Plant competition is modeled explicitly through mortality and the establishment of individual plants in open spaces. In this study, \\{CATGraSS\\} is modified to account for heterogeneity in soil thickness and tested in the study catchment using the historical climate of the region. Predicted vegetation patterns are compared with those obtained from satellite images. Results of model under current climate underscore the importance of solar irradiance and soil thickness, especially in the uplands where soil is shallow, in determining vegetation composition over complex terrain. A stochastic weather generator is used to generate future climate change scenarios for the catchment by downscaling GCM realizations in space and time. Future increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration was considered through modifying the vegetation water use efficiency and stomatal resistance for our study site. Model results suggest that vegetation pattern is highly sensitive to temperature and rainfall variations provided by climate scenarios (30% reduction of the annual precipitation and a 2.8 °C increase of the mean annual temperature). Future climate change is predicted to bring a considerable reorganization of the plant composition following topographic patterns, leading to a decrease of trees cover at the expenses of a grass expansion, which will cause loss of landscape vegetation diversity.

Domenico Caracciolo; Leonardo Valerio Noto; Erkan Istanbulluoglu; Simone Fatichi; Xiaochi Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Improved quasi-unary nucleation model for binary H 2 S O 4 – H 2 O homogeneous nucleation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aerosol nucleation events have been observed at a variety of locations worldwide and may have significant climatic and health implications. Binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN) of H 2 S O 4 and H 2 O is the foundation of recently proposed nucleation mechanisms involving additional species such as ammonia ions and organic compounds and it may dominate atmospheric nucleation under certain conditions. We have shown in previous work that H 2 S O 4 – H 2 O BHN can be treated as a quasi-unary nucleation (QUN) process involving H 2 S O 4 in equilibrium with H 2 O vapor and we have developed a self-consistent kinetic model for H 2 S O 4 – H 2 O nucleation. Here the QUN approach is improved and an analytical expression yielding H 2 S O 4 – H 2 O QUN rates is derived. Two independent measurements related to monomer hydration are used to constrain the equilibrium constants for this process which reduces a major source of uncertainty. It is also shown that the capillarity approximation may lead to a large error in the calculated Gibbs free energy change for the evaporation of H 2 S O 4 molecules from small H 2 S O 4 – H 2 O clusters which affects the accuracy of predicted BHN nucleation rates. The improved QUN model—taking into account the recently measured energetics of small clusters—is thermodynamically more robust. Moreover predicted QUN nucleation rates are in better agreement with available experimental data than rates calculated using classical H 2 S O 4 – H 2 O BHN theory.

Fangqun Yu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Computational Modeling of Ballast Tanks to Improve Understanding and Maximize Effectiveness of Management Practices and Treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Modeling of Ballast Tanks to Improve Understanding and Maximize Effectiveness tanks exchange coastal ballast water with mid-ocean seawater (referred to as "ballast water exchange of high-resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to model ballast tank water flow and to predict EE

440

A Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the dependency of an electronic system to primary energy sources (i.e. AC power or battery). For reliable energy generation and consumption parameters. The system uses economics inspired supply-demand modelA Supply-Demand Model Based Scalable Energy Management System for Improved Energy Utilization

Bhunia, Swarup

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Improving the Production Efficiency of Beef Cows through Mathematical Modeling and Genomics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the Production Efficiency of Beef Cows through Mathematical Modeling and Genomics that integrating recent advances in genomics, the identification of intrinsic genetic factors that determine and evaluate the individual-based model for production efficiency· of beef cows using genomic and biomarker

442

Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their Community Earth System Model (Richard Neale, personaldevelopment of Earth system models capable of reproducing

Pritchard, Michael Stephen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Moving Toward Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a response to climate disruption. Even the most optimistic models forecast that if greenhouse-gas emissions Appendix 1 Solutions on the Ground 67 Appendix 2 Reliability of Trends and Forecasts 78 Literature Cited 81. In the absence of substantial reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions, the climate of the Y2Y region

444

Equivalent circuit-level model and improvement of terahertz quantum cascade lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An equivalent circuit-level model of terahertz (THz) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is developed by using rate equations. This model can be employed to investigate the characteristics of THz QCLs accurately and to improve their design. We use the circuit-level model to analyse a new active structure, which can improve the performance of THz QCLs by means of enhancing carrier injection. The simulation result shows that THz QCLs with the new active structure have a much higher performance compared with conventional THz QCLs. The high-performance THz QCLs are expected to be operated at higher temperatures.

Wei Zhou; Shaobin Liu; Jie Wu; Xiaoliu Zhang; Wu Tang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Data Quality Assessment and Control for the ARM Climate Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is to provide observations of the earth climate system to the climate research community for the purpose of improving the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their coupling with the Earth's surface. In order for ARM measurements to be useful toward this goal, it is important that the measurements are of a known and reasonable quality. The ARM data quality program includes several components designed to identify quality issues in near-real-time, track problems to solutions, assess more subtle long-term issues, and communicate problems to the user community.

Peppler, R

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

446

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistryâ??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earthâ??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

SciTech Connect

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Improved low-order model for shear flow driven by Rayleigh-Benard convection  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the low-order model for two-dimensional fluid flow with shear proposed by Drake [ital et] [ital al]. [Phys. Fluids B 4, 488 (1992)] is undertaken. Their two-term model for the shear is an extension of the model put forth by Howard and Krisnamurti [J. Fluid Mech. 170, 385 (1986)], and is shown to be an improved model in the sense that it respects certain conditions for vorticity conservation arising directly from the Boussinesq equations. In so doing, it provides a more realistic model of the physics involved. An important consequence of the improved model is the appearance of cutoff values for the shear instability that are dependent upon the aspect ratio of the interacting Rayleigh-Taylor cell. Numerical results are presented as confirmation of this prediction.

Hermiz, K.B. (Department of Mathematics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States)); Guzdar, P.N.; Finn, J.M. (Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Future Climate Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an analysis that was performed to estimate climatic variables for the next 10,000 years by forecasting the timing and nature of climate change at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The future-climate estimates are based on an analysis of past-climate data from analog meteorological stations, and this report provides the rationale for the selection of these analog stations. The stations selected provide an upper and a lower climate bound for each future climate, and the data from those sites will provide input to the following reports: ''Simulation of Net Infiltration for Present-Day and Potential Future Climates'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170007]), ''Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Model/Analysis for the License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 168504]), ''Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170012]), and ''Features, Events, and Processes in SZ Flow and Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170013]). Forecasting long-term future climates, especially for the next 10,000 years, is highly speculative and rarely attempted. A very limited literature exists concerning the subject, largely from the British radioactive waste disposal effort. The discussion presented here is one available forecasting method for establishing upper and lower bounds for future climate estimates. The selection of different methods is directly dependent on the available evidence used to build a forecasting argument. The method used here involves selecting a particular past climate from many past climates, as an analog for future climate. While alternative analyses are possible for the case presented for Yucca Mountain, the evidence (data) used would be the same and the conclusions would not be expected to drastically change. Other studies might develop a different rationale or select other past climates resulting in a different future climate analog. Other alternative approaches could include simulation of climate over the 10,000-year period; however, this modeling extrapolation is well beyond the bounds of current scientific practice and would not provide results with better confidence. A corroborative alternative approach may be found in ''Future Climate Analysis-10,000 Years to 1,000,000 Years After Present'' (Sharpe 2003 [DIRS 161591]). The current revision of this report is prepared in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]).

C. G. Cambell

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

451

Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Climate Analysis The central theme of the Climate Analysis Division is the analysis and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-duration nrp (National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change) project on climateClimate Analysis The central theme of the Climate Analysis Division is the analysis and diagnosis of the climate and its variability on the basis of observations and models. The objective of this research

Haak, Hein

453

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

454

Improving capabilities for dealing with key complexities of water availability modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluates short term diversion/storage reliabilities based on an initial storage level. WRAP-CON has been evaluated and improved, in addition a new modeling methodology has been developed, in which probabilities of occurrence for each hydrologic sequence... is based on the relationship between storage and future flows. Recently developed WRAP capabilities have been evaluated, providing users new tools and increased flexibility. Some of these improvements are firm yield analysis, cycling and dual simulation...

Olmos Alejo, Hector Elias

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

455

Oceanographers' contribution to climate modelling and prediction: progress to date and a future perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmosphere-ocean-ice models, and recently more comprehensive Earth system models, are the central tool for generating projections...reminder that in the drive for ever more realistic Earth system models, simplified models can still provide valuable insight...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

How well do CMIP5 Earth System Models simulate present climate conditions in Europe and Africa?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study assesses the ability of seven Earth System Models (ESMs) from the Coupled Model Intercomparison...

S. Brands; S. Herrera; J. Fernández; J. M. Gutiérrez

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part I: Control climate and flux adjustment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control integration with respect to climate drift is assessed, and aspects of the model climatology relevant to the simulation of climate change are discussed. The observed variation of oceanic temperature with latitude and depth is basically well simulated, although, in common with other ocean models, the main thermocline is too diffuse. Nevertheless, it is found that large heat and water flux adjustments must be added to the surface layer of the ocean in order to prevent the occurrence of unacceptable climate drift. The ocean model appears to achieve insufficient meridional heat transport, and this is supported by the pattern of the heat flux adjustment term, although errors in the simulated atmosphere-ocean heat flux also contribute to the latter. The application of the flux adjustments restricts climate drift during the 75-year control experiment. However, a gradual warming still occurs in the surface layers of the Southern Ocean because the flux adjustments are inserted as additive terms in this integration and cannot therefore be guaranteed to prevent climate drift completely. 68 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Murphy, J.M. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes  

SciTech Connect

We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

459

The CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT): Where Climate Simulation Meets Weather Prediction  

SciTech Connect

To significantly improve the simulation of climate by general circulation models (GCMs), systematic errors in representations of relevant processes must first be identified, and then reduced. This endeavor demands, in particular, that the GCM parameterizations of unresolved processes should be tested over a wide range of time scales, not just in climate simulations. Thus, a numerical weather prediction (NWP) methodology for evaluating model parameterizations and gaining insights into their behavior may prove useful, provied that suitable adaptations are made for implementation in climate GCMs. This method entails the generation of short-range weather forecasts by realistically initialized climate GCM, and the application of six-hourly NWP analyses and observations of parameterized variables to evaluate these forecasts. The behavior of the parameterizations in such a weather-forecasting framework can provide insights on how these schemes might be improved, and modified parameterizations then can be similarly tested. In order to further this method for evaluating and analyzing parameterizations in climate GCMs, the USDOE is funding a joint venture of its Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: the CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT). This article elaborates the scientific rationale for CAPT, discusses technical aspects of its methodology, and presents examples of its implementation in a representative climate GCM. Numerical weather prediction methods show promise for improving parameterizations in climate GCMs.

Phillips, T J; Potter, G L; Williamson, D L; Cederwall, R T; Boyle, J S; Fiorino, M; Hnilo, J J; Olson, J G; Xie, S; Yio, J J

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

460

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Climate Change: The Physical Basis and Latest Results  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The 2007 Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes: "Warming in the climate system is unequivocal." Without the contribution of Physics to climate science over many decades, such a statement would not have been possible. Experimental physics enables us to read climate archives such as polar ice cores and so provides the context for the current changes. For example, today the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, the second most important greenhouse gas, is 28% higher than any time during the last 800,000 years. Classical fluid mechanics and numerical mathematics are the basis of climate models from which estimates of future climate change are obtained. But major instabilities and surprises in the Earth System are still unknown. These are also to be considered when the climatic consequences of proposals for geo-engineering are estimated. Only Physics will permit us to further improve our understanding in order to provide the foundation for policy decisions facing the global climate change challenge.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

462

Atmospheric Rivers Induced Heavy Precipitation and Flooding in the Western U.S. Simulated by the WRF Regional Climate Model  

SciTech Connect

Twenty years of regional climate simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model for North America has been analyzed to study the influence of the atmospheric rivers and the role of the land surface on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S. Compared to observations, the simulation realistically captured the 95th percentile extreme precipitation, mean precipitation intensity, as well as the mean precipitation and temperature anomalies of all the atmospheric river events between 1980-1999. Contrasting the 1986 President Day and 1997 New Year Day atmospheric river events, differences in atmospheric stability are found to have an influence on the spatial distribution of precipitation in the Coastal Range of northern California. Although both cases yield similar amounts of heavy precipitation, the 1997 case was found to produce more runoff compared to the 1986 case. Antecedent soil moisture, the ratio of snowfall to total precipitation (which depends on temperature), and existing snowpack all seem to play a role, leading to a higher runoff to precipitation ratio simulated for the 1997 case. This study underscores the importance of characterizing or simulating atmospheric rivers and the land surface conditions for predicting floods, and for assessing the potential impacts of climate change on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S.

Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

463

U.S. and Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration U.S. and Portugal Sign Agreement for Climate Research Collaboration March 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The United States signed an agreement with Portugal today to launch the installation of a portable climate observatory on Graciosa Island in the Azores. The mobile observatory will obtain measurements of cloud and aerosol properties from the island's marine environment for 20 months, beginning in May. The measurements are expected to greatly enhance scientific understanding of the microscopic processes that occur in low-level marine clouds, and will be used to test and improve climate models. The portable observatory, or Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility, is part of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ARM Climate Research

464

Climate Change Effects on the Sacramento Basin's Flood Control Projects ANN DENISE FISSEKIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate Change Effects on the Sacramento Basin's Flood Control Projects By ANN DENISE FISSEKIS B.......................................................................6 Chapter III. Climate Change................................................................11 models...........................................................20 Climate change data

Lund, Jay R.

465

Global climate feedbacks  

SciTech Connect

The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

Manowitz, B.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Improving estimates of African woodland biomass by fusing radar data, models and ground observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving estimates of African woodland biomass by fusing radar data, models and ground management of savannahs and woodlands requires accurate estimates of the woody biomass. For these reasons, developing new methods to accurately estimate woody biomass and its changes is high on the political

467

Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Improving Managed Environmental Water Use: Shasta River Flow and Temperature Modeling By SARAH and perhaps reduce some water management conflicts. Additional research for managing environmental water use manage water supplies and demands to increase water use efficiency through conservation, water markets

Lund, Jay R.

468

An improved numerical scheme for a coupled system to model soil erosion and polydispersed sediments transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An improved numerical scheme for a coupled system to model soil erosion and polydispersed sediments, the positivity of both water depth and sediment concentrations. Recently, a well-balanced MUSCL-Hancock scheme step is required to ensure the positivity of sediment concentrations. The main result of this paper

Boyer, Edmond

469

Project Title Improved Emission Models for Project Evaluation (MOVES-Matrix) University Georgia Institute of Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Title Improved Emission Models for Project Evaluation (MOVES-Matrix) University Georgia or organization) DOT - $92,292.15 Total Project Cost $92,292.15 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and End Dates November 2013 - June 2015 Brief Description of Research Project Local governments are using

California at Davis, University of

470

Carbon Nanotube Mats and Fibers with Irradiation-Improved Mechanical Characteristics: ATheoretical Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotube Mats and Fibers with Irradiation-Improved Mechanical Characteristics: ATheoretical model to calculate mechanical characteristics of macroscopic mats and fibers of single-walled carbon-flow technique [4]. The SWNT fibers, which in contrast to most ordinary carbon fibers could be strongly bent with

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

471

Adaptive Software Testing in the Context of an Improved Controlled Markov Chain Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adaptive Software Testing in the Context of an Improved Controlled Markov Chain Model Hai Hu, Chang@buaa.edu.cn Abstract Adaptive software testing is the counterpart of adaptive control in software testing. It means that software testing strategy should be adjusted on- line by using the testing data collected during software

Kundu, Sukhamay

472

Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction of microscopic friction. We will also present our investigation on the relative effectiveness of the use, it is possible to facilitate the refinement of students' ideas of microscopic friction. Keywords: friction

Zollman, Dean

473

Analysis of Precipitation Using Satellite Observations and Comparisons with Global Climate Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is investigated by comparisons with satellite observa- iv tions. Speci cally, six-year long (2000-2005) simulations are performed using a high- resolution (36-km) Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model and the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) at T85 spatial... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 B. Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 1. Satellite data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2. Weather research and forecast model simulations . . . 34 3. Community atmosphere model simulations...

Murthi, Aditya

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

474

Quantifying the role of internal climate variability in future climate trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the climate system gives rise to large uncertainty in projections of future climate. The uncertainty in future Ensemble Project includes 40 climate change simulations run with the same coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-land model (the NCAR Community Climate System Model 3; CCSM3) and forced with identical projected changes

Schumacher, Russ

475

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

476

Climate & Environmental Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

477

Climate & Environment | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environment Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including climate change, environmental stress and energy production and use. By integrating field and laboratory methods with new theory, modeling, data systems and policy analysis, we develop solutions to complex environmental challenges. ORNL has an increasing programmatic focus on climate change and subsurface biogeochemical research. Current priorities in the area of climate and environmental research are focused on understanding biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems by creating new databases and models to inform

478

On an improved sub-regional water resources management representation for integration into earth system models  

SciTech Connect

Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of earth system models in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies at regional to global scales. Emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are flexible for coupling with earth system models. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing the overall regulated flow at large basin scales. This study investigates the uncertainties of the reservoir models from different implementations of the generic operating rules using the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System in northwestern United States as an example to understand their effects on not only regulated flow but also reservoir storage and fraction of the demand that is met. Numerical experiments are designed to test new generic operating rules that combine storage and releases targets for multi-purpose reservoirs and to compare the use of reservoir usage priorities, withdrawals vs. consumptive demand, as well as natural vs. regulated mean flow for calibrating operating rules. Overall the best performing implementation is the use of the combined priorities (flood control storage targets and irrigation release targets) operating rules calibrated with mean annual natural flow and mean monthly withdrawals. The challenge of not accounting for groundwater withdrawals, or on the contrary, assuming that all remaining demand is met through groundwater extractions, is discussed.

Voisin, Nathalie; Li, Hongyi; Ward, Duane L.; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

Improvement plans for the RHIC/AGS on-line model environments  

SciTech Connect

The on-line models for Relativistic Ion Collider (RHIC) and the RHIC pre-injectors (the AGS and the AGS Booster) can be thought of as containing our best collective knowledge of these accelerators. As we improve these on-line models we are building the framework to have a sophisticated model-based controls system. Currently the RHIC on-line model is an integral part of the controls system, providing the interface for tune control, chromaticity control, and non-linear chromaticity control. What we discuss in this paper is our vision of the future of the on-line model environment for RHIC and the RHIC preinjectors. Although these on-line models are primarily used as Courant-Snyder parameter calculators using live machine settings, we envision expanding these environments to encompass many other problem domains.

Brown,K.A.; Ahrens, L.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Development of a High-Performance Office Building Simulation Model for a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the field measured data and was presented in the previous publication (Cho and Haberl, 2008a). The calibrated simulation model was further extended to an ASHRAE 90.1 code-compliant model, which was used as the baseline model for the development of a... high-performance (energy-efficient) model. However, the code-compliant model did not use the as-built building geometry of the JBC building; rather, it used a simplified geometry. The simplified- geometry, code-compliant simulation model...

Cho, S.; Haberl, J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "improve climate models" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

3080 VOLUME 13J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E Water Vapor Feedbacks in the ECMWF Reanalyses and Hadley Centre Climate Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Hadley Centre Climate Model A. SLINGO, J. A. PAMMENT, R. P. ALLAN, AND P. S. WILSON Hadley Centre by the latest version of the Hadley Centre climate model. Results are taken from an integration. Corresponding author address: Dr. Anthony Slingo, Hadley Cen- tre, The Met. Office, London Road, Bracknell

Allan, Richard P.

482

Integrated assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) climate change projections on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In response to a congressional mandate, the US Global Change Research Program organized a National Assessment of Climate Change focusing on geographic regions (e.g. Alaska, Great Plains) and sectors (e.g. public health, agriculture, water resources). This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory contributing to the water sector analysis. The subsequent paper makes use of the water supply results to estimate the climate change impacts on irrigated agriculture. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous US to climate changes in 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095 as projected by the Hadley/United Kingdom Meteorological Office (UKMO) general circulation model (GCM; HadCM2) were modeled using the Hydrologic Unit Model for the United States (HUMUS). HUMUS, a biophysically based hydrology model, consists of a Geographical Information System (GIS) that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the eight-digit United States Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Unit Area (HUA) of which there are 2101 in the conterminous US. Results are aggregated to the four- and two-digit (major water resource region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of maximum/minimum temperature and precipitation (PPT) from 1961 to 1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY), used as a measure of water supply for irrigation, increases from the 1961–1990 baseline period over most of the US in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm (35%) from baseline in the Pacific Northwest. Driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation, WY is projected to decrease in the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins. The HadCM2 (2095) scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in water yield increases of 38% on average. Water yield increases are projected to be significant throughout the eastern US—39% in the Ohio basin, for example. Water yields increase significantly in the western US, as well—57 and 76% in the Upper and Lower Colorado, respectively. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased water yields in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations [CO2] to account for the potential impacts of the ‘CO2-fertilization’ effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated [CO2] but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

Norman J Rosenberg; Robert A Brown; R.Cesar Izaurralde; Allison M Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Modeling the downstream improvements in dissolved oxygen from aeration of Cherokee and Douglas releases  

SciTech Connect

This report is an evaluation of downstream improvements in dissolved oxygen (DO) which can be anticipated as a result of different levels of aeration at Cherokee and Douglas Dams. The report describes (a) field studies undertaken to describe late summer conditions for model calibration and verification; (b) development and calibration of unsteady flow and water quality models for the tailwater reaches from Cherokee and Douglas Dams to the Holston and French Broad River confluence at the head of Fort Loudoun Reservoir; and (c) model predictions of DO in the tailwater reaches and at their confluence (after mixing) with and without aeration. 7 refs., 47 figs., 4 tabs.

Hauser, G.E.; Beard, L.M.; Brown, R.T.; McKinnon, M.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Small Residence Multizone Modeling with Partial Conditioning for Energy Effieiency in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation Code 2012 and Building America benchmark definitions. A detailed comparison was made between the commonly used energy modeling tools (DOE-2.1e, EnergyPlus and TRNSYS) and a modeling method was developed for the estimation...

Andolsun, Simge

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

Mechanisms of aerosol-forced AMOC variability in a state of the art climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a new state-of-the-art Earth system model. Anthropogenic aerosols have previously been highlighted anthropogenic aerosols force a strengthening of the AMOC by up to 20% in our state-of-the-art Earth system model

486

MJO and Convectively Coupled Equatorial Waves Simulated by CMIP5 Climate Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluates the simulation of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) and convectively coupled equatorial waves (CCEWs) in 20 models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) phase 5 (CMIP5) in the Intergovernmental Panel on ...

Meng-Pai Hung; Jia-Lin Lin; Wanqiu Wang; Daehyun Kim; Toshiaki Shinoda; Scott J. Weaver

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

1Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity: Closing the Gap in the Spectrum of Climate System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) is discussed. It be-comes apparent that there exists a

Martin Claussen; Michel Crucifix; Thierry Fichefet; Andrey Ganopolski; Huges Goosse; Vladimir Petoukhov; Thomas Stocker; Peter Stone; Zhaoming Wang; Andrew Weaver; Susanne L. Weber

488

On the interpretation of constrained climate model ensembles Benjamin M. Sanderson (1), Reto Knutti (2),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a distribution of models, such that model and truth are statistically indistinguishable. Both interpretations are ubiquitous and have different consequences for the uncertainty of model projections, and the interpretation of the ensemble may evolve seamlessly from the former to the latter. We show some `truth plus

489

NREL Reduces Climate Control Loads in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

NREL demonstrates that zonal climate control can reduce air conditioning power and improve range while maintaining driver thermal sensation.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Assimilation of satellite reflecance dataa into a dynamical leaf model to infer seasonally varying leaf area for climate and carbon models  

SciTech Connect

Leaf area index is an important input for many climate and carbon models. The widely used leaf area products derived from satellite-observed surface reflectances contain substantial erratic fluctuations in time due to inadequate atmospheric corrections and observational and retrieval uncertainties. These fluctuations are inconsistent with the seasonal dynamics of leaf area, known to be gradual. Their use in process-based terrestrial carbon models corrupts model behavior, making diagnosis of model performance difficult. We propose a data assimilation approach that combines the satellite observations of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo with a dynamical leaf model. Its novelty is that the seasonal cycle of the directly retrieved leaf areas is smooth and consistent with both observations and current understandings of processes controlling leaf area dynamics. The approach optimizes the dynamical model parameters such that the difference between the estimated surface reflectances based on the modeled leaf area and those of satellite observations is minimized. We demonstrate the usefulness and advantage of our new approach at multiple deciduous forest sites in the United States.

Liu, Qing [Georgia Institute of Technology; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Dickinson, Robert E. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tian, Y [Georgia Institute of Technology; Zhou, L [Georgia Institute of Technology; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessmentUsing NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography

492

The connection between the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and the Indian1 Summer Monsoon in Bergen Climate Model Version 2.02  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A pre-industrial multi-century simulation with Bergen Climate Model Version 227 (BCM in brief) is used (ISR), several recent66 Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman Formatted: Font: (Default) Times New Roman Formatted