National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for implied volatility averaged

  1. LTB universes as alternatives to dark energy: does positive averaged acceleration imply positive cosmic acceleration?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Enea Romano

    2007-01-27

    We show that positive averaged acceleration obtained in LTB models through spatial averaging can require integration over a region beyond the event horizon of the central observer. We provide an example of a LTB model with positive averaged acceleration in which the luminosity distance does not contain information about the entire spatially averaged region, making the averaged acceleration unobservable. Since the cosmic acceleration is obtained from fitting the observed luminosity distance to a FRW model we conclude that in general a positive averaged acceleration in LTB models does not imply a positive FRW cosmic acceleration.

  2. LTB universes as alternatives to dark energy: does positive averaged acceleration imply positive cosmic acceleration?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, A E

    2006-01-01

    We show that positive averaged acceleration obtained in LTB models through spatial averaging can require integration over a region beyond the event horizon of the central observer. We provide an example of a LTB model with positive averaged acceleration in which the luminosity distance does not contain information about the entire spatially averaged region, making the averaged acceleration unobservable. Since the cosmic acceleration is obtained from fitting the observed luminosity distance to a FRW model we conclude that in general a positive averaged acceleration in LTB models does not imply a positive FRW cosmic acceleration.

  3. The profitability of trading volatility using realvalued and symbolic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tino, Peter

    implied volatility models . 1 Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF

  4. Coherent Averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien M. E. Fraïsse; Daniel Braun

    2015-04-13

    We investigate in detail a recently introduced "coherent averaging scheme" in terms of its usefulness for achieving Heisenberg limited sensitivity in the measurement of different parameters. In the scheme, $N$ quantum probes in a product state interact with a quantum bus. Instead of measuring the probes directly and then averaging as in classical averaging, one measures the quantum bus or the entire system and tries to estimate the parameters from these measurement results. Combining analytical results from perturbation theory and an exactly solvable dephasing model with numerical simulations, we draw a detailed picture of the scaling of the best achievable sensitivity with $N$, the dependence on the initial state, the interaction strength, the part of the system measured, and the parameter under investigation.

  5. Quantile Forecasting of Commodity Futures' Returns: Are Implied Volatility Factors Informative? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorta, Miguel

    2012-07-16

    - returns has excess kurtosis or skewness, Gaussian based forecast could overexpose investors to financial risk. GARCH-class models, extensively used for log-returns density forecasting, have a somewhat limited ability to allow higher moments to be time... pricing model, which is based on the assumption of a log- normal density and risk-neutrality, would coincide with the true only if the underlying price process is a Brownian motion. Hence, differences between BS-derived put-IVs versus BS-derived call...

  6. Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon

  7. Volatility and commodity price dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Commodity prices tend to be volatile, and volatility itself varies over time. changes in volatility can affect market variables by directly affecting the marginal value of storage, and by affecting a component of the total ...

  8. Neutron resonance averaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  10. Implied Migration Rates from Credit Barrier Models Claudio Albanese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albanese, Claudio

    Implied Migration Rates from Credit Barrier Models Claudio Albanese , Oliver X. Chen Department The risk neutral credit migration process captures quantitative information which is relevant to the pricing theory and risk management of credit derivatives. In this article, we derive implied migration

  11. Volatiles in protoplanetary disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Bergin, Edwin A; Brittain, Sean; Marty, Bernard; Mousis, Olvier; Oberg, Karin L

    2014-01-01

    Volatiles are compounds with low sublimation temperatures, and they make up most of the condensible mass in typical planet-forming environments. They consist of relatively small, often hydrogenated, molecules based on the abundant elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Volatiles are central to the process of planet formation, forming the backbone of a rich chemistry that sets the initial conditions for the formation of planetary atmospheres, and act as a solid mass reservoir catalyzing the formation of planets and planetesimals. This growth has been driven by rapid advances in observations and models of protoplanetary disks, and by a deepening understanding of the cosmochemistry of the solar system. Indeed, it is only in the past few years that representative samples of molecules have been discovered in great abundance throughout protoplanetary disks - enough to begin building a complete budget for the most abundant elements after hydrogen and helium. The spatial distributions of key volatiles are being mapped...

  12. Heat Flow Determinations and Implied Thermal Regime of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heat Flow Determinations and Implied Thermal Regime of the Coso Geothermal Area California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Heat...

  13. Average Angular Velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Essen

    2004-01-28

    This paper addresses the problem of the separation of rotational and internal motion. It introduces the concept of average angular velocity as the moment of inertia weighted average of particle angular velocities. It extends and elucidates the concept of Jellinek and Li (1989) of separation of the energy of overall rotation in an arbitrary (non-linear) $N$-particle system. It generalizes the so called Koenig's theorem on the two parts of the kinetic energy (center of mass plus internal) to three parts: center of mass, rotational, plus the remaining internal energy relative to an optimally translating and rotating frame.

  14. TO WHAT EXTENT DOES GENEALOGICAL ANCESTRY IMPLY GENETIC ANCESTRY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Steven N.

    TO WHAT EXTENT DOES GENEALOGICAL ANCESTRY IMPLY GENETIC ANCESTRY? FREDERICK A. MATSEN AND STEVEN N. EVANS Abstract. Recent statistical and computational analyses have shown that a genealogical most recent of genealogical descen- dants of the individual who possessed that allele for a simple diploid genetic model

  15. Metal price volatility : a study of informative metrics and the volatility mitigating effects of recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Nathan Richard

    2011-01-01

    Metal price volatility is undesirable for firms that use metals as raw materials, because price volatility can translate into volatility of material costs. Volatile material costs and can erode the profitability of the ...

  16. Realized Stock Volatility 2.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    Chapter 2 Realized Stock Volatility 2.1 Introduction Financial market volatility is indispensable for asset and derivative pricing, asset allocation, and risk management. As volatility is not a directly is to calculate the daily volatility from the sample variance of intraday returns, the `realized' volatility

  17. VOLATILITY TIME AND PROPERTIES OF OPTION PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    VOLATILITY TIME AND PROPERTIES OF OPTION PRICES volatility time, to show convexity of option prices in the underlying asset if the contract function is convex as well as continuity and monotonicity of the option price in the volatility

  18. A Primer on Implied Correlation John A. Dodson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    . The theme for the sum- mer session was credit derivatives, and in particular a reading of Philipp Sch Finance in 2003. 1 Indexes Index publishers have started to create standard portfolios of CDS's which every day and the average rate is reported. Standard tranchings of the claims against this portfolio

  19. Heavy tailed K distributions imply a fractional advection dispersion equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meerschaert, Mark M.

    Dispersion Equation (FADE) to model contaminant transport in porous media. This equation characterizes, and Particle Jumps Equations of contaminant transport in porous media are based on assumptions about hydraulic governing groundwater flow (e.g., Freeze and Cherry, 1979): h K v - = (1) where v is average velocity

  20. EFFECTIVE POROSITY IMPLIES EFFECTIVE BULK DENSITY IN SORBING SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flach, G.

    2012-02-27

    The concept of an effective porosity is widely used in solute transport modeling to account for the presence of a fraction of the medium that effectively does not influence solute migration, apart from taking up space. This non-participating volume or ineffective porosity plays the same role as the gas phase in single-phase liquid unsaturated transport: it increases pore velocity, which is useful towards reproducing observed solute travel times. The prevalent use of the effective porosity concept is reflected by its prominent inclusion in popular texts, e.g., de Marsily (1986), Fetter (1988, 1993) and Zheng and Bennett (2002). The purpose of this commentary is to point out that proper application of the concept for sorbing solutes requires more than simply reducing porosity while leaving other material properties unchanged. More specifically, effective porosity implies the corresponding need for an effective bulk density in a conventional single-porosity model. The reason is that the designated non-participating volume is composed of both solid and fluid phases, both of which must be neglected for consistency. Said another way, if solute does not enter the ineffective porosity then it also cannot contact the adjoining solid. Conceptually neglecting the fluid portion of the non-participating volume leads to a lower (effective) porosity. Likewise, discarding the solid portion of the non-participating volume inherently leads to a lower or effective bulk density. In the author's experience, practitioners virtually never adjust bulk density when adopting the effective porosity approach.

  1. Analysis of Federal Subsidies: Implied Price of Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Craig Cooper; Thomas Foulke

    2010-10-01

    For informed climate change policy, it is important for decision makers to be able to assess how the costs and benefits of federal energy subsidies are distributed and to be able to have some measure to compare them. One way to do this is to evaluate the implied price of carbon (IPC) for a federal subsidy, or set of subsidies; where the IPC is the cost of the subsidy to the U.S. Treasury divided by the emissions reductions it generated. Subsidies with lower IPC are more cost effective at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while subsidies with a negative IPC act to increase emissions. While simple in concept, the IPC is difficult to calculate in practice. Calculation of the IPC requires knowledge of (i) the amount of energy associated with the subsidy, (ii) the amount and type of energy that would have been produced in the absence of the subsidy, and (iii) the greenhouse gas emissions associated with both the subsidized energy and the potential replacement energy. These pieces of information are not consistently available for federal subsidies, and there is considerable uncertainty in cases where the information is available. Thus, exact values for the IPC based upon fully consistent standards cannot be calculated with available data. However, it is possible to estimate a range of potential values sufficient for initial comparisons. This study has employed a range of methods to generate “first order” estimates for the IPC of a range of federal subsidies using static methods that do not account for the dynamics of supply and demand. The study demonstrates that, while the IPC value depends upon how the inquiry is framed and the IPC cannot be calculated in a “one size fits all” manner, IPC calculations can provide a valuable perspective for climate policy analysis. IPC values are most useful when calculated within the perspective of a case study, with the method and parameters of the calculation determined by the case. The IPC of different policy measures can then be quantitatively evaluated within the case. Results can be qualitatively compared across cases, so long as such comparisons are considered to be preliminary and treated with the appropriate level of caution.

  2. Spacetime Averaged Null Energy Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Urban; Ken D. Olum

    2010-06-13

    The averaged null energy condition has known violations for quantum fields in curved space, even if one considers only achronal geodesics. Many such examples involve rapid variation in the stress-energy tensor in the vicinity of the geodesic under consideration, giving rise to the possibility that averaging in additional dimensions would yield a principle universally obeyed by quantum fields. However, after discussing various procedures for additional averaging, including integrating over all dimensions of the manifold, we give a class of examples that violate any such averaged condition.

  3. Spacetime averaged null energy condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, Douglas; Olum, Ken D.

    2010-06-15

    The averaged null energy condition has known violations for quantum fields in curved space, even when one considers only achronal geodesics. Many such examples involve rapid variation in the stress-energy tensor in the vicinity of the geodesic under consideration, giving rise to the possibility that averaging in additional dimensions would yield a principle universally obeyed by quantum fields. However, after discussing various procedures for additional averaging, including integrating over all dimensions of the manifold, we give here a class of examples that violate any such averaged condition.

  4. Volatility in natural gas and oil markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pindyck, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Using daily futures price data, I examine the behavior of natural gas and crude oil price volatility since 1990. I test whether there has been a significant trend in volatility, whether there was a short-term increase in ...

  5. Averaging Hypotheses in Newtonian Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Buchert

    1995-12-20

    Average properties of general inhomogeneous cosmological models are discussed in the Newtonian framework. It is shown under which circumstances the average flow reduces to a member of the standard Friedmann--Lema\\^\\i tre cosmologies. Possible choices of global boundary conditions of inhomogeneous cosmologies as well as consequences for the interpretation of cosmological parameters are put into perspective.

  6. Target Volatility Option Pricing Giuseppe Di Graziano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macrina, Andrea

    for the pricing of Target Volatility Options (TVOs), a recent market innovation in the eld of volatility are lower than the target volatility, the pay-o of the former is higher than the pay-o of the corresponding experi- enced a steep increase, with a signicant impact on option (long vega) costs. The generalized

  7. On the relation between expected returns and implied cost of capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, John; Liu, Jing; Liu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Toward an implied cost of capital. Journal of AccountingP. (2003). Inferring the cost of capital using the Ohlson–2003). Properties of implied cost of capital using analysts’

  8. Implied Expected Tranched Loss Surface from CDO Data Roberto Torresetti Damiano Brigo Andrea Pallavicini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brigo, Damiano

    Implied Expected Tranched Loss Surface from CDO Data Roberto Torresetti Damiano Brigo Andrea losses (ETL). ETL are natural quantities to imply from market data. No-arbitrage constraints on ETL. Instruments bid/asks enter our analysis, contrary to Walker's (2006) earlier work on the ETL implied surface

  9. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  10. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY)

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  11. Quantum Averages of Weak Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir Aharonov; Alonso Botero

    2005-08-23

    We re-examine the status of the weak value of a quantum mechanical observable as an objective physical concept, addressing its physical interpretation and general domain of applicability. We show that the weak value can be regarded as a \\emph{definite} mechanical effect on a measuring probe specifically designed to minimize the back-reaction on the measured system. We then present a new framework for general measurement conditions (where the back-reaction on the system may not be negligible) in which the measurement outcomes can still be interpreted as \\emph{quantum averages of weak values}. We show that in the classical limit, there is a direct correspondence between quantum averages of weak values and posterior expectation values of classical dynamical properties according to the classical inference framework.

  12. Update on Biochemistry of Plant Volatiles Biochemistry of Plant Volatiles1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichersky, Eran

    to be emitted from plants, al- though a comprehensive list is available only for floral volatiles (Knudsen et alUpdate on Biochemistry of Plant Volatiles Biochemistry of Plant Volatiles1 Natalia Dudareva*, Eran, Beutenberg Campus, D­007745 Jena, Germany (J.G.) Plants have a penchant for perfuming the atmo- sphere around

  13. Volatile Loss and Classification of Kuiper Belt Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, R E; Young, L A; Volkov, A N; Schmidt, C

    2015-01-01

    Observations indicate that some of the largest Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) have retained volatiles in the gas phase, which implies the presence of an atmosphere that can affect their reflectance spectra and thermal balance. Volatile escape rates driven by solar heating of the surface were estimated by Schaller and Brown (2007) (SB) and Levi and Podolak (2009)(LP) using Jeans escape from the surface and a hydrodynamic model respectively. Based on recent molecular kinetic simulations these rates can be hugely in error (e.g., a factor of $\\sim 10^{16}$ for the SB estimate for Pluto). In this paper we estimate the loss of primordial N$_2$ for several large KBOs guided by recent molecular kinetic simulations of escape due to solar heating of the surface and due to UV/EUV heating of the upper atmosphere. For the latter we extrapolate simulations of escape from Pluto (Erwin et al. 2013) using the energy limited escape model recently validated for the KBOs of interest by molecular kinetic simulations (Johnson et al. 2...

  14. VOLATILITY TIME AND PROPERTIES OF OPTION PRICES: A SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    VOLATILITY TIME AND PROPERTIES OF OPTION PRICES: A SUMMARY volatility time, to show convexity of option prices in the underlying asset if the contract function is convex as well as continuity and monotonicity of the option price in the volatility

  15. Average-Atom Thomson Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Walter R.

    -Atom Approximation W. R. Johnson, Notre Dame J. Nilsen & K. T. Cheng, LLNL The cross section for Thomson scattering Average-Atom Model Divide plasma into WS cells with a nucleus and Z electrons p2 2 - Z r + V a(r) = a a(r) V(r) = VKS(n(r), r) n(r) = nb(r) + nc(r) 4r2nb(r) = nl 2(2l+1) 1+exp[( nl -µ)/kBT] Pnl(r)2 Z = r

  16. Noise Reduced Realized Volatility: A Kalman Filter Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, John; Steigerwald, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    F. , 2004. Microstructure Noise, Realized Volatility, andof Market Microstructure Noise. Working Paper w9611, NBER.Noise Reduced Realized Volatility: A Kalman Filter Approach

  17. RESEARCH PAPER Identification of loci affecting flavour volatile emissions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klee, Harry J.

    RESEARCH PAPER Identification of loci affecting flavour volatile emissions in tomato fruits Denise shown that emissions of carotenoid-derived volatiles were directly correlated with the fruit carotenoid

  18. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  19. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  20. Achronal averaged null energy condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Noah; Olum, Ken D. [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States) and Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts 02155 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    The averaged null energy condition (ANEC) requires that the integral over a complete null geodesic of the stress-energy tensor projected onto the geodesic tangent vector is never negative. This condition is sufficient to prove many important theorems in general relativity, but it is violated by quantum fields in curved spacetime. However there is a weaker condition, which is free of known violations, requiring only that there is no self-consistent spacetime in semiclassical gravity in which ANEC is violated on a complete, achronal null geodesic. We indicate why such a condition might be expected to hold and show that it is sufficient to rule out closed timelike curves and wormholes connecting different asymptotically flat regions.

  1. The Implied Cost of Carbon Dioxide under the Cash for Clunkers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knittel, Christopher R

    2009-01-01

    25-51. Tables Cost of Carbon Dioxide (per ton) Three YearsPollutants Table 1: Cost of Carbon Dioxide Estimates VintageImplied Price for Carbon Dioxide ($/tons)! Years Clunkers

  2. Implied motion activation in cortical area MT can be explained by visual low-level features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oram, Mike

    ForReview Only Implied motion activation in cortical area MT can be explained by visual low Neuroscience #12;ForReview Only 1 Implied motion activation in cortical area MT can be explained by visual low, The Netherlands Page 1 of 51 Jounal of Cognitive Neuroscience 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

  3. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  4. Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Evaluation of how sampling details affect the measurement of volatile organic compounds in diesel exhaust

  5. Reactive flash volatilization of fluid fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Dreyer, Bradon J.; Salge, James R.

    2013-01-08

    The invention provides methods for the production of synthesis gas. More particularly, various embodiments of the invention relate to systems and methods for volatilizing fluid fuel to produce synthesis gas by using a metal catalyst on a solid support matrix.

  6. Pressure maintenance in a volatile oil reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Bruce Alan

    1989-01-01

    PRESSURE MAINTENANCE IN A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR A Thesis BRUCE ALAN SCHUSTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1989 Major... Subject: Petroleum Engineering PRESSURE MAINTENANCE IN A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR A Thesis BRUCE ALAN SCHUSTER Approved as to style and content by: S. A. Holditch (Chair of Committee) W. J. Lee (Member) R. R, Berg (Member) , Jz W. D. Von Gonten...

  7. A non-planar organic molecule with non-volatile electrical bistability for nano-scale data storage{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    A non-planar organic molecule with non-volatile electrical bistability for nano-scale data storage-planar organic molecule with electron donor and acceptor capabilities was synthesized for nano-scale data storage possesses good electrical bistability. Nano-scale recording dots with an average diameter of 2.5 nm were

  8. Spectral averaging techniques for Jacobi matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael del Rio; Carmen Martinez; Hermann Schulz-Baldes

    2008-02-20

    Spectral averaging techniques for one-dimensional discrete Schroedinger operators are revisited and extended. In particular, simultaneous averaging over several parameters is discussed. Special focus is put on proving lower bounds on the density of the averaged spectral measures. These Wegner type estimates are used to analyze stability properties for the spectral types of Jacobi matrices under local perturbations.

  9. On Melting Temperature of Heavy Quarkonium with the AdS/CFT Implied Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Defu Hou; Hai-cang Ren

    2009-03-06

    The quarkonium states in a quark-gluon plasma is examined with the potential implied by AdS/CFT duality. Both the vanila AdS-Schwarzschild metric and the one with an infrared cutoff are considered. The calculated dissociation temperatures for $J/\\psi$ and $\\Upsilon$ are found to agree with the lattice results within a factor of two.

  10. Coseismic slip on the southern Cascadia megathrust implied by tsunami deposits in an Oregon lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    Coseismic slip on the southern Cascadia megathrust implied by tsunami deposits in an Oregon lake August 2012; published 9 October 2012. [1] We test hypothetical tsunami scenarios against a 4,600-year for prehistoric Cascadia tsunamis. Tsunami simulations constrain coseismic slip estimates for the southern

  11. Low fault friction in Iran implies localized deformation for the ArabiaEurasia collision zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernant, Philippe

    Low fault friction in Iran implies localized deformation for the Arabia­Eurasia collision zone P velocity field of the present-day deformation in Iran is modeled using a 3-dimensional (3D) finite element of the kinematics in Iran, but the complex velocity field of the surrounding South Caspian basin cannot be fitted

  12. A Big Data Approach to Analyzing Market Volatility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng; Bethel, E. Wes; Gu, Ming; Leinweber, David; Ruebel, Oliver

    2013-06-05

    Understanding the microstructure of the financial market requires the processing of a vast amount of data related to individual trades, and sometimes even multiple levels of quotes. Analyzing such a large volume of data requires tremendous computing power that is not easily available to financial academics and regulators. Fortunately, public funded High Performance Computing (HPC) power is widely available at the National Laboratories in the US. In this paper we demonstrate that the HPC resource and the techniques for data-intensive sciences can be used to greatly accelerate the computation of an early warning indicator called Volume-synchronized Probability of Informed trading (VPIN). The test data used in this study contains five and a half year?s worth of trading data for about 100 most liquid futures contracts, includes about 3 billion trades, and takes 140GB as text files. By using (1) a more efficient file format for storing the trading records, (2) more effective data structures and algorithms, and (3) parallelizing the computations, we are able to explore 16,000 different ways of computing VPIN in less than 20 hours on a 32-core IBM DataPlex machine. Our test demonstrates that a modest computer is sufficient to monitor a vast number of trading activities in real-time ? an ability that could be valuable to regulators. Our test results also confirm that VPIN is a strong predictor of liquidity-induced volatility. With appropriate parameter choices, the false positive rates are about 7percent averaged over all the futures contracts in the test data set. More specifically, when VPIN values rise above a threshold (CDF > 0.99), the volatility in the subsequent time windows is higher than the average in 93percent of the cases.

  13. Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2002-01-01

    AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger, RyanAGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger, Ryanwake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during

  14. Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  15. Non-volatile memory for checkpoint storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Cipolla, Thomas M.; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Ohmacht, Martin; Takken, Todd E.

    2014-07-22

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in high performance parallel computing systems and storing of checkpoint data to a non-volatile memory storage device. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity. In one embodiment, the non-volatile memory is a pluggable flash memory card.

  16. Integration of Non-volatile Memory into Storage Hierarchy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Sheng

    2013-12-04

    In this dissertation, we present novel approaches for integrating non-volatile memory devices into storage hierarchy of a computer system. There are several types of non- volatile memory devices, such as flash memory, Phase ...

  17. Cursed Resources? Political Conditions and Oil Market Volatility*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    a country's political conditions affect oil production within its borders. We show production, with very democratic regimes exhibiting less volatility in their oil production than more of oil production volatility. Our finding has implications both for understanding world oil markets

  18. CEC-500-2010-FS-017 Volatility of Ultrafine Particulate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas Vehicles TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research www. Limited research has been done to characterize compressed natural gas mass emissions and practically-volatile and semi-volatile fractions of ultrafine particulate matter emissions from compressed natural gas vehicles

  19. Storage Systems for Non-volatile Memory Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xiaojian

    2011-10-21

    This dissertation presents novel approaches to the use of non-volatile memory devices in building storage systems. There are many types of non-volatile memory devices, and they usually have better performance than regular magnetic hard disks...

  20. Ultra High Frequency Volatility Estimation with Dependent Microstructure Noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ultra High Frequency Volatility Estimation with Dependent Microstructure Noise Yacine Aït sampled at frequencies high enough for that noise to be a dominant consideration. We show that combining; Serial dependence; High frequency data; Realized volatility; Sub- sampling; Two Scales Realized

  1. Forecasting Stock Market Volatility: Evidence from Fourteen Countries. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaban, Ercan; Bayar, Asli; Faff, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This paper evaluates the out-of-sample forecasting accuracy of eleven models for weekly and monthly volatility in fourteen stock markets. Volatility is defined as within-week (within-month) standard deviation of continuously ...

  2. Essays on Financial Market Volatility and Real Economic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    we add the volatility of crude oil prices (West Texas Inter-Federal Funds Rate Corr w/ changes in Crude oil price Corrw/ Crude oil price volatility* Corr w/ changes in Baa-Aaa

  3. Momentum conservation implies anomalous energy transport in 1d classical lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomaz Prosen; David K. Campbell

    1999-08-26

    Under quite general conditions, we prove that for classical many-body lattice Hamiltonians in one dimension (1D) total momentum conservation implies anomalous conductivity in the sense of the divergence of the Kubo expression for the coefficient of thermal conductivity, $\\kappa$. Our results provide rigorous confirmation and explanation of many of the existing ``surprising'' numerical studies of anomalous conductivity in 1D classical lattices, including the celebrated Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem.

  4. X-ray elemental online analyzer measures volatiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, A.; Pilz, K.; Reich, K. [Indutech Instruments GmbH, Simmersfeld (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    The use of an online XRF analyser for determining the volatiles content of coal is outlined. 3 figs.

  5. Volatility Persistence in Crude Oil Markets Amlie CHARLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Volatility Persistence in Crude Oil Markets Amélie CHARLES Audencia Nantes, School of Management announcements on production reduction or US announcements on crude inventories. We find that the crude oil on the volatility modelling process improve the understanding of volatility in crude oil markets. Keywords: Crude

  6. Robust Replication of Volatility Derivatives and Roger Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Roger

    The tradeoff between risk and return is a central theme of finance, and volatility and variance of returns are standard measures of risk. The volatility of a stock is revealed by the market price of an option, allow us to replicate volatility derivatives, by dynamic trading in standard options and the underlying

  7. Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, S. C.

    A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

  8. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical engineering applications.

  9. MESOSCALE AVERAGING OF NUCLEATION AND GROWTH MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    MESOSCALE AVERAGING OF NUCLEATION AND GROWTH MODELS MARTIN BURGER , VINCENZO CAPASSO , AND LIVIO-Kolmogorov relations for the degree of crystallinity. By relating the computation of expected values to mesoscale averaging, we obtain a suitable description of the process at the mesoscale. We show how the variance

  10. Optimal Average Cost Manufacturing Flow Controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veatch, Michael H.

    policy the differ- ential cost is C1 on attractive control switching boundaries. Index Terms Average costOptimal Average Cost Manufacturing Flow Controllers: Convexity and Differentiability Michael H and differentiability of the differential cost function are investigated. It is proven that under an optimal control

  11. Averages in vector spaces over finite fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright J.; Carbery A.; Stones B.

    2008-01-01

    We study the analogues of the problems of averages and maximal averages over a surface in R-n when the euclidean structure is replaced by that of a vector space over a finite field, and obtain optimal results in a number ...

  12. STAFF FORECAST: AVERAGE RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STAFF FORECAST: AVERAGE RETAIL ELECTRICITY PRICES 2005 TO 2018 Mignon Marks Principal Author Mignon Marks Project Manager David Ashuckian Manager ELECTRICITY ANALYSIS OFFICE Sylvia Bender Acting Deputy Director ELECTRICITY SUPPLY DIVISION B.B. Blevins Executive Director

  13. Distributed Averaging Via Lifted Markov Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Kyomin

    Motivated by applications of distributed linear estimation, distributed control, and distributed optimization, we consider the question of designing linear iterative algorithms for computing the average of numbers in a ...

  14. Thermal ghost imaging with averaged speckle patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    We present theoretical and experimental results showing that a thermal ghost imaging system can produce images of high quality even when it uses detectors so slow that they respond only to intensity-averaged (that is, ...

  15. Selling Geothermal Systems The "Average" Contractor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selling Geothermal Systems #12;The "Average" Contractor · History of sales procedures · Manufacturer Driven Procedures · What makes geothermal technology any harder to sell? #12;"It's difficult to sell a geothermal system." · It should

  16. Spacetime Average Density (SAD) cosmological measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Don N.

    2014-11-01

    The measure problem of cosmology is how to obtain normalized probabilities of observations from the quantum state of the universe. This is particularly a problem when eternal inflation leads to a universe of unbounded size so that there are apparently infinitely many realizations or occurrences of observations of each of many different kinds or types, making the ratios ambiguous. There is also the danger of domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here two new Spacetime Average Density (SAD) measures are proposed, Maximal Average Density (MAD) and Biased Average Density (BAD), for getting a finite number of observation occurrences by using properties of the Spacetime Average Density (SAD) of observation occurrences to restrict to finite regions of spacetimes that have a preferred beginning or bounce hypersurface. These measures avoid Boltzmann brain domination and appear to give results consistent with other observations that are problematic for other widely used measures, such as the observation of a positive cosmological constant.

  17. Average transmission probability of a random stack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin Lu; Christian Miniatura; Berthold-Georg Englert

    2009-07-31

    The transmission through a stack of identical slabs that are separated by gaps with random widths is usually treated by calculating the average of the logarithm of the transmission probability. We show how to calculate the average of the transmission probability itself with the aid of a recurrence relation and derive analytical upper and lower bounds. The upper bound, when used as an approximation for the transmission probability, is unreasonably good and we conjecture that it is asymptotically exact.

  18. Microlens OGLE-2005-BLG-169 Implies Cool Neptune-Like Planets are Common

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gould; A. Udalski; D. An; D. P. Bennett; A. -Y. Zhou; S. Dong; N. J. Rattenbury; B. S. Gaudi; P. C. M. Yock; I. A. Bond; G. W. Christie; K. Horne; J. Anderson; K. Z. Stanek; D. L. DePoy; C. Han; J. McCormick; B. -G. Park; R. W. Pogge; S. D. Poindexter; I. Soszynski; M. K. Szymanski; M. Kubiak; G. Pietrzynski; O. Szewczyk; L. Wyrzykowski; K. Ulaczyk; B. Paczynski; D. M. Bramich; C. Snodgrass; I. A. Steele; M. J. Burgdorf; M. F. Bode; C. S. Botzler; S. Mao; S. C. Swaving

    2006-03-10

    We detect a Neptune mass-ratio (q~8e-5) planetary companion to the lens star in the extremely high-magnification (A~800) microlensing event OGLE-2005-BLG-169. If the parent is a main-sequence star, it has mass M~0.5 M_sun implying a planet mass of ~13 M_earth and projected separation of ~2.7 AU. When intensely monitored over their peak, high-magnification events similar to OGLE-2005-BLG-169 have nearly complete sensitivity to Neptune mass-ratio planets with projected separations of 0.6 to 1.6 Einstein radii, corresponding to 1.6--4.3 AU in the present case. Only two other such events were monitored well enough to detect Neptunes, and so this detection by itself suggests that Neptune mass-ratio planets are common. Moreover, another Neptune was recently discovered at a similar distance from its parent star in a low-magnification event, which are more common but are individually much less sensitive to planets. Combining the two detections yields 90% upper and lower frequency limits f=0.37^{+0.30}_{-0.21} over just 0.4 decades of planet-star separation. In particular, f>16% at 90% confidence. The parent star hosts no Jupiter-mass companions with projected separations within a factor 5 of that of the detected planet. The lens-source relative proper motion is \\mu~7--10 mas/yr, implying that if the lens is sufficiently bright, Iplanet. Analogs of OGLE-2005-BLG-169Lb orbiting nearby stars would be difficult to detect by other methods of planet detection, including radial velocities, transits, or astrometry.

  19. Polarized electron beams at milliampere average current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poelker, Matthew

    2013-11-01

    This contribution describes some of the challenges associated with developing a polarized electron source capable of uninterrupted days-long operation at milliAmpere average beam current with polarization greater than 80%. Challenges will be presented in the context of assessing the required level of extrapolation beyond the performance of today's CEBAF polarized source operating at ~ 200 uA average current. Estimates of performance at higher current will be based on hours-long demonstrations at 1 and 4 mA. Particular attention will be paid to beam-related lifetime-limiting mechanisms, and strategies to construct a photogun that operate reliably at bias voltage > 350kV.

  20. Table 1. Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Average Transportation and Delivered Costs of Coal, By Year and Primary Transport Mode" "Year","Average Transportation Cost of Coal (Dollars per Ton)","Average Delivered Cost...

  1. Laser Fusion Energy The High Average Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laser Fusion Energy and The High Average Power Program John Sethian Naval Research Laboratory Dec for Inertial Fusion Energy with lasers, direct drive targets and solid wall chambers Lasers DPPSL (LLNL) Kr posters Snead Payne #12;Laser(s) Goals 1. Develop technologies that can meet the fusion energy

  2. Extracting gluon condensate from the average plaquette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taekoon Lee

    2015-03-27

    The perturbative contribution in the average plaquette is subtracted using Borel summation and the remnant of the plaquette is shown to scale as a dim-4 condensate. A critical review is presented of the renormalon subtraction scheme that claimed a dim-2 condensate. The extracted gluon condensate is compared with the latest result employing high order (35-loop) calculation in the stochastic perturbation theory.

  3. Volatiles as a link between planetary interiors and the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Benjamin A. (Benjamin Alexander)

    2013-01-01

    Volatiles derived from planetary interiors influence magma evolution and environmental processes. Over appropriate timescales, Earth's mantle, crust, ocean, and atmosphere constitute coupled systems. The apparently synchronous ...

  4. Volatility of Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical Fuel Injection Volatility of Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Blends for Supercritical Fuel Injection Supercritical dieseline could be...

  5. Evaluation of Models for Solubility and Volatility of Copper...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Evaluation of Models for Solubility and Volatility of Copper Compounds Under Steam Generation Conditions The loss in efficiency of power plants with mixed metallurgy,...

  6. A Big Data Approach to Analyzing Market Volatility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Kesheng

    2014-01-01

    A Big Data Approach to Analyzing Market Volatility KeshengUniversity of California. A Big Data Approach to Analyzingefforts to handle the big data problem. However, the

  7. Class 2 Permit Modification Request Revise Volatile Organic Compound...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monitoring Program scfm standard cubic feet per minute (ft 3 min) TCE trichloroethylene TIC tentatively identified compound TRU transuranic VOC volatile organic compound WIPP...

  8. Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  9. Guava leaf volatiles and dimethyl disulphide inhibit response of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama to host plant volatiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    bacteria in the genus Liberibacter, which are the causal agents of huang- longbing (HLB) (Tsai et al. 1988 citrus with guava, Psidium guajava L., was reported to reduce D. citri populations and incidence of HLB conducted to compare sulphur volatile profiles of citrus and guava, used in our behavioural assays

  10. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K. M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-07-24

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of the oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased duringmore »photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29 to 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  11. Bound on the variation in the fine structure constant implied by Oklo data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamdan, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical models of dark energy can imply that the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ varies over cosmological time scales. Data on shifts in resonance energies $E_r$ from the Oklo natural fission reactor have been used to place restrictive bounds on the change in $\\alpha$ over the last 1.8 billion years. We review the uncertainties in these analyses, focussing on corrections to the standard estimate of $k_\\alpha\\!=\\!\\alpha\\,dE_r/d\\alpha$ due to Damour and Dyson. Guided, in part, by the best practice for assessing systematic errors in theoretical estimates spelt out by Dobaczewski et al. [in J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 41, 074001 (2014)], we compute these corrections in a variety of models tuned to reproduce existing nuclear data. Although the net correction is uncertain to within a factor of 2 or 3, it constitutes at most no more than 25% of the Damour-Dyson estimate of $k_\\alpha$. Making similar allowances for the uncertainties in the modeling of the operation of the Oklo reactors, we conclude that the rela...

  12. Average gluon and quark jet multiplicities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Kotikov

    2014-11-30

    We show the results in [1,2] for computing the QCD contributions to the scale evolution of average gluon and quark jet multiplicities. The new results came due a recent progress in timelike small-x resummation obtained in the MSbar factorization scheme. They depend on two nonperturbative parameters with clear and simple physical interpretations. A global fit of these two quantities to all available experimental data sets demonstrates by its goodness how our results solve a longstandig problem of QCD. Including all the available theoretical input within our approach, alphas(Mz)=0.1199 +- 0.0026 has been obtained in the MSbar scheme in an approximation equivalent to next-to-next-to-leading order enhanced by the resummations of ln x terms through the NNLL level and of ln Q2 terms by the renormalization group. This result is in excellent agreement with the present world average.

  13. Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Scott

    Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function Ken relaxation length, v sat ø h''i (¸ 0:05¯m), the energy distribution function is not well described calculation of impact ionization coefficient requires the use of a high energy distribution function because

  14. PSERC 98-22 "Market Power and Price Volatility in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PSERC 98-22 "Market Power and Price Volatility in Restructured Markets for Electricity" Tim Mount/IEEE Service Center/445 Hoes Lane/P.O. Box 1331/Piscataway, NJ 08855-1331, USA. Telephone: + Intl. 908-562-3966. #12;MARKET POWER AND PRICE VOLATILITY IN RESTRUCTURED MARKETS FOR ELECTRICITY Tim Mount School

  15. Multivariate High-Frequency-Based Volatility (HEAVY) Models Diaa Noureldin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Multivariate High-Frequency-Based Volatility (HEAVY) Models Diaa Noureldin Department of Economics.sheppard@economics.ox.ac.uk February 18, 2011 Abstract This paper introduces a new class of multivariate volatility models multivariate GARCH models. We also discuss their covariance targeting speci...cation and provide closed

  16. MARKET VOLATILITY AND FEEDBACK EFFECTS FROM DYNAMIC HEDGING1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Rüdiger

    expression for the transformation of market volatility under the impact of such strategies. It turns outMARKET VOLATILITY AND FEEDBACK EFFECTS FROM DYNAMIC HEDGING1 Rudiger Frey Department of Statistics, University of Bonn, D-53113 Bonn, Germany Alexander Stremme Financial Markets Group, London School

  17. Scaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    markets, we study the return intervals between the daily volatilities of the price changes that are above.federal- reserve.gov releases H10 hist. We choose to study daily data records because there are intraday trendsScaling and memory in volatility return intervals in financial markets Kazuko Yamasaki* , Lev

  18. Numerical Convergence Properties of Option Pricing PDEs with Uncertain Volatility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    is then simply the cost of this hedge. The principal source of risk is the price of the underlying assetNumerical Convergence Properties of Option Pricing PDEs with Uncertain Volatility D. M. Pooley , P, 2001 Abstract The pricing equations derived from uncertain volatility models in finance are often cast

  19. IMPLICIT SOLUTION OF UNCERTAIN VOLATILITY/TRANSACTION COST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Peter A.

    IMPLICIT SOLUTION OF UNCERTAIN VOLATILITY/TRANSACTION COST OPTION PRICING MODELS WITH DISCRETELY OBSERVED BARRIERS P.A. FORSYTH \\Lambda AND K.R. VETZAL y Abstract. Option pricing models with uncertain volatility/transaction costs give rise to a nonlinear PDE. Previous work has focussed on explicit methods

  20. Reappraisal of the limit on the variation in $?$ implied by Oklo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward D. Davis; Leila Hamdan

    2015-05-27

    We reconsider the analysis of the sensitivity of neutron resonance energies $E_i$ to changes in $\\alpha$ with a view to resolving uncertainties that plague earlier treatments. We point out that, with more appropriate choices of nuclear parameters, the standard estimate (due to Damour and Dyson) of the sensitivity for resonances in ${}^{150}$Sm is increased by a factor of 2.5. We go on to identify and compute excitation, Coulomb and deformation corrections. To this end, we use deformed Fermi density distributions fitted to the output of Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS calculations (with both the SLy4 and SkM$^*$ Skyrme functionals), the energetics of the surface diffuseness of nuclei, and thermal properties of their deformation. We also invoke the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, performing the requisite microcanonical averages with two phenomenological level densities which, via the leptodermous expansion of the level density parameter, include the effect of increased surface diffuseness. Theoretical uncertainties are assessed with the \\emph{inter-model} prescription of Dobaczewski et al. [J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. {\\bf 41}, 074001 (2014)]. The corrections diminish the revised ${}^{150}$Sm sensitivity but not by more than 25\\%. Subject to a weak and testable restriction on the change in $m_q/\\Lambda$ (relative to the change in $\\alpha$) since the time when the Oklo reactors were active ($m_q$ is the average of the $\\text{u}$ and $\\text{d}$ current quark masses, and $\\Lambda$ is the mass scale of quantum chromodynamics), we deduce that $|\\alpha_{\\text{Oklo}}-\\alpha_{\\text{now}}|<1.1\\times 10^{-8}\\alpha_{\\text{now}}$ (95\\% confidence level). The corresponding bound on the present-day time variation of $\\alpha$ is tighter than the best limit to date from atomic clock experiments.

  1. Time-dependent angularly averaged inverse transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Bal; Alexandre Jollivet

    2009-05-07

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters in a time-dependent linear transport equation from knowledge of angularly averaged measurements performed at the boundary of a domain of interest. We show that the absorption coefficient and the spatial component of the scattering coefficient are uniquely determined by such measurements. We obtain stability results on the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters with respect to the measured albedo operator. The stability results are obtained by a precise decomposition of the measurements into components with different singular behavior in the time domain.

  2. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100Nationalquestionnaires 0serial codesReversingprovedReynolds-Averaged

  3. Moving contact line of a volatile fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Janecek; B. Andreotti; D. Prazak; T. Barta; V. S. Nikolayev

    2012-12-15

    Interfacial flows close to a moving contact line are inherently multi-scale. The shape of the interface and the flow at meso- and macroscopic scales inherit an apparent interface slope and a regularization length, both called after Voinov, from the dynamical processes at work at the microscopic level. Here, we solve this inner problem in the case of a volatile fluid at equilibrium with its vapor. The evaporative/condensation flux is then controlled by the dependence of the saturation temperature on interface curvature -- the so-called Kelvin effect. We derive the dependencies of the Voinov angle and of the Voinov length as functions of the substrate temperature. The relevance of the predictions for experimental problems is finally discussed.

  4. Moving contact line of a volatile fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janecek, V; Prazak, D; Barta, T; Nikolayev, V S

    2012-01-01

    Interfacial flows close to a moving contact line are inherently multi-scale. The shape of the interface and the flow at meso- and macroscopic scales inherit an apparent interface slope and a regularization length, both called after Voinov, from the dynamical processes at work at the microscopic level. Here, we solve this inner problem in the case of a volatile fluid at equilibrium with its vapor. The evaporative/condensation flux is then controlled by the dependence of the saturation temperature on interface curvature -- the so-called Kelvin effect. We derive the dependencies of the Voinov angle and of the Voinov length as functions of the substrate temperature. The relevance of the predictions for experimental problems is finally discussed.

  5. The 2009 World Average of $?_s$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegfried Bethke

    2009-08-15

    Measurements of $\\alpha_s$, the coupling strength of the Strong Interaction between quarks and gluons, are summarised and an updated value of the world average of $\\alpha_s (M_Z)$ is derived. Building up on previous reviews, special emphasis is laid on the most recent determinations of $\\alpha_s$. These are obtained from $\\tau$-decays, from global fits of electroweak precision data and from measurements of the proton structure function $\\F_2$, which are based on perturbative QCD calculations up to $O(\\alpha_s^4)$; from hadronic event shapes and jet production in $\\epem$ annihilation, based on $O(\\alpha_s^3) $ QCD; from jet production in deep inelastic scattering and from $\\Upsilon$ decays, based on $O(\\alpha_s^2) $ QCD; and from heavy quarkonia based on unquenched QCD lattice calculations. Applying pragmatic methods to deal with possibly underestimated errors and/or unknown correlations, the world average value of $\\alpha_s (M_Z)$ results in $\\alpha_s (M_Z) = 0.1184 \\pm 0.0007$. The measured values of $\\alpha_s (Q)$, covering energy scales from $Q \\equiv \\mtau = 1.78$ GeV to 209 GeV, exactly follow the energy dependence predicted by QCD and therefore significantly test the concept af Asymptotic Freedom.

  6. Fact #744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster than Average Used Light Vehicle Price Fact 744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster...

  7. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  8. Fact #849: December 1, 2014 Midsize Hybrid Cars Averaged 51%...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cars are for gasoline cars only. Fuel economy average is the production-weighted harmonic mean. 2014 data are preliminary. Fact 849 Dataset Supporting Information Average...

  9. 1 Coseismic slip on the southern Cascadia megathrust 2 implied by tsunami deposits in an Oregon lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    1 Coseismic slip on the southern Cascadia megathrust 2 implied by tsunami deposits in an Oregon August 2012; accepted 29 August 2012; published XX Month 2012. 7 [1] We test hypothetical tsunami minimum inundation limits for prehistoric 9 Cascadia tsunamis. Tsunami simulations constrain coseismic

  10. Fact #744: September 10, 2012 Average New Light Vehicle Price Grows Faster than Average Used Light Vehicle Price

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In 2011 the average used light vehicle price was 36% higher than in 1990, while the average new light vehicle price was 67% higher than it was in 1990. The average price of a used vehicle had been...

  11. Bond Price Volatility c2012 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 75

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    Bond Price Volatility c2012 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 75 #12;"Well Taiwan University Page 76 #12;Price Volatility · Volatility measures how bond prices respond to interest-coupon bonds here. c2012 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 77 #12;Price Volatility

  12. Bond Price Volatility c 2008 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 71

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    Bond Price Volatility c 2008 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 71 #12;"Well Taiwan University Page 72 #12;Price Volatility · Volatility measures how bond prices respond to interest-coupon bonds throughout. c 2008 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 73 #12;Price Volatility

  13. Bond Price Volatility c 2011 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 74

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    Bond Price Volatility c 2011 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 74 #12;"Well Taiwan University Page 75 #12;Price Volatility · Volatility measures how bond prices respond to interest-coupon bonds throughout. c 2011 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 76 #12;Price Volatility

  14. Volatility and Growth: Credit Constraints and the Composition of Investment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aghion, Philippe

    How does uncertainty and credit constraints affect the cyclical composition of investment and thereby volatility and growth? This paper addresses this question within a model where firms engage in two types of investment: ...

  15. In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Particulate and Semi-Volatile Organic Compound Exhaust Materails from a Set of Gasoline and a Set of Diesel Engine Vehicles Operated at 30F In Vitro Genotoxicity of Particulate...

  16. Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  17. The impact of fuel price volatility on transportation mode choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Eun Hie

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the price of oil has driven large fluctuations in the price of diesel fuel, which is an important cost component in freight logistics. This thesis explores the impact of fuel price volatility on supply ...

  18. Neuropeptide alterations in the tree shrew hypothalamus during volatile anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuropeptide alterations in the tree shrew hypothalamus during volatile anesthesia Laetitia spectral analysis, we first identified 85 peptides from the tree shrew hypothalamus. Differential analysis Tree shrew Neuropeptide Hypothalamus Anesthesia 1. Introduction General anesthesia is characterized

  19. Essays on Return and Volatility on World Stock Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jia

    2013-08-31

    sizes and etc. Those questions are addressed in this dissertation research. In Chapter 2, co-movements across worldwide stock markets are investigated. A dynamic factor model is designed to decompose stock return volatility into three orthogonal factors...

  20. Bulls, Bears and Excess Volatility: can currency intervention help?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrado, Luisa; Miller, Marcus; Zhang, Lei

    and exit of currency 'bulls' and 'bears' with switches driven by 'draw-down' trading rules. We argue that non-sterilised intervention - in support of 'monitoring band' - can reduce excess volatility by coordinating beliefs in line with policy. Strategic...

  1. Financial distortions and the distribution of global volatility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eden, Maya Rachel

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I study the interactions between various aspects of the financial system and macroeconomic volatility in a globally integrated environment. In Chapter 1, I illustrate that an efficient allocation of liquidity ...

  2. Double Diffusion in Enclosure Bounded by Massive and Volatilizing Walls 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

    2006-01-01

    Hazard volatilization emitted from walls enters into airflow in the room, making the indoor air quality worse. An exterior wall of some thickness is affected on its surface by the outdoor air environment. In this paper, ...

  3. Volatility of Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under Accelerated Aging Conditions Volatility of Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under Accelerated Aging Conditions TiO2-supported...

  4. The Average Mass Profile of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Carlberg; H. K. C. Yee; E. Ellingson; S. L. Morris; R. Abraham; P. Gravel; C. J. Pritchet; T. Smecker-Hane; F. D. A. Hartwick; J. E. Hesser; J. B. Hutchings; J. B. Oke

    1997-05-23

    The average mass density profile measured in the CNOC cluster survey is well described with the analytic form rho(r)=A/[r(r+a_rho)^2], as advocated on the basis on n-body simulations by Navarro, Frenk & White. The predicted core radii are a_rho=0.20 (in units of the radius where the mean interior density is 200 times the critical density) for an Omega=0.2 open CDM model, or a_rho=0.26 for a flat Omega=0.2 model, with little dependence on other cosmological parameters for simulations normalized to the observed cluster abundance. The dynamically derived local mass-to-light ratio, which has little radial variation, converts the observed light profile to a mass profile. We find that the scale radius of the mass distribution, 0.20<= a_rho <= 0.30 (depending on modeling details, with a 95% confidence range of 0.12-0.50), is completely consistent with the predicted values. Moreover, the profiles and total masses of the clusters as individuals can be acceptably predicted from the cluster RMS line-of-sight velocity dispersion alone. This is strong support of the hierarchical clustering theory for the formation of galaxy clusters in a cool, collisionless, dark matter dominated universe.

  5. Detecting Contagion with Correlation: Volatility and Timing Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dungey, Mardi; Yalama, Abdullah

    , volatility spillover JEL Classi?cation: G01, C22, G15, C51. ?Yalama acknowledges support from an Eskisehir Osmangazi University Research Grant (200817046).The authors contact details are: Dungey; Mardi.Dungey@utas.edu.au, Yalama; Abdul- lah... countries during times of ?nancial crisis by comparing the results of the Forbes and Rigobon test with those of the Hong (2001) volatility spillover test. The second potentially important determinant of contagion outcomes is in the tim- ing of the collected...

  6. the average weight of Connecticut River fish was considerably less (Table 1). The difference in average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the average weight of Connecticut River fish was considerably less (Table 1). The difference in the Connecticut River basin. Fisheries (Bethesda) 7(6): 2-11. POTTER. I. C.· F. W. H. BEAMISH, AND B. G. H. Freshwater fishes of Connecticut. State Geol. Nat. Hist. Servo Conn.· Dep. Environ. Prot., Bull. 101, 134 p

  7. Gasoline volatility: Environmental interactions with blending and processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unzelman, G.H. [ed.

    1996-05-01

    Gasoline volatility has long been an economic consideration for petroleum refiners. Although front-end volatility and Rvp (Reid vapor pressure) are primary factors, volatility can impact any part of the distillation range. Specifications, whether in-house, exchange or pipeline, require flexibility to optimize the bottom line with respect to marketed composition. Utilizing lower-value butanes, within Rvp and ASTM distillation limits, to maximize gasoline volume has been traditional. Also, optimizing the T{sub 90} (ASTM distillation temperature at 90% distilled), raises the end point and has been used to extend the gasoline barrel. In most refining situations, controlling back-end gasoline volatility is a function of gasoline vs. distillate volume, the latter generally the lower-value product. Recently, the concept of gasoline reformulation collide with the less complex approach of simply reducing vapor pressure to improve air quality. Reducing Rvp of gasoline shifts front-end composition, while reformulation, especially under future Complex Model rules, shifts volatility and composition over the entire boiling range. While low Rvp vs. RFG is a recent issue, gasoline volatility has always been an economic factor in petroleum refining and a performance factor for the auto maker.

  8. Aging of secondary organic aerosol from small aromatic VOCs. Changes in chemical composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2014-12-12

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form and transform SOA from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx. The effects of chemical aging on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state OSC) and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased duringmore »photo-oxidation, and the final OA OS C ranged from -0.29 to 0.45 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  9. Volatility literature of chlorine, iodine, cesium, strontium, technetium, and rhenium; technetium and rhenium volatility testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langowski, M.H.; Darab, J.G.; Smith, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    A literature review pertaining to the volatilization of Sr, Cs, Tc (and its surrogate Re), Cl, I and other related species during the vitrification of Hanford Low Level Waste (LLW) streams has been performed and the relevant information summarized. For many of these species, the chemistry which occurs in solution prior to the waste stream entering the melter is important in dictating their loss at higher temperatures. In addition, the interactive effects between the species being lost was found to be important. A review of the chemistries of Tc and Re was also performed. It was suggested that Re would indeed act as an excellent surrogate for Tc in non-radioactive materials testing. Experimental results on Tc and Re loss from sodium aluminoborosilicate melts of temperatures ranging from 900--1350{degrees}C performed at PNL are reported and confirm that Re behaves in a nearly identical manner to that of technetium.

  10. Fact #671: April 18, 2011 Average Truck Speeds | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 Average Truck Speeds The Federal Highway Administration studies traffic volume and flow on major truck routes by tracking more than 500,000 trucks. The average speed of trucks...

  11. Fact #889: September 7, 2015 Average Diesel Price Lower than...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: September 7, 2015 Average Diesel Price Lower than Gasoline for the First Time in Six Years Fact 889: September 7, 2015 Average Diesel Price Lower than Gasoline for the First...

  12. Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The average age of household vehicles has increased from 6.6 years in 1977 to 9.2 years in 2009. Pickup trucks have the oldest average age in every year listed. Sport utility vehicles (SUVs), first...

  13. Averaging top quark results in Run 2 M. Strovink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strovink, Mark

    average (cont'd) The pie chart shows the relative weights of the five input measurements in the world

  14. Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging: the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging: the case of the North. (2015) Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging: the case of the North;Improving climate change detection through optimal seasonal averaging:1 the case of the North Atlantic jet

  15. Engineering Grads Earn The Most Major Average Salary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Engineering Grads Earn The Most Table Major Average Salary Offer Petroleum Engineering $86/Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering $57,231 Information Sciences & Systems $54,038 Source: Winter 2010 Salary Survey, National was the fourth most lucrative degree, with graduates starting at $61,205 on average. The average salary

  16. Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2002-01-01

    Gas Pricing by Regulated Natural Gas Utilities, Docket No.A HEDGE AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger,A HEDGE AGAINST VOLATILE NATURAL GAS PRICES Mark Bolinger,

  17. A two-dimensional volatility basis set – Part 2: Diagnostics of organic-aerosol evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donahue, Neil M.

    We discuss the use of a two-dimensional volatility-oxidation space (2-D-VBS) to describe organic-aerosol chemical evolution. The space is built around two coordinates, volatility and the degree of oxidation, both of which ...

  18. Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

    2002-01-01

    Gas Pricing by Regulated Natural Gas Utilities, Docket No.a Hedge Against Volatile Natural Gas Prices Mark Bolinger,wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during

  19. Quantifying the value that energy efficiency and renewable energy provide as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Bachrach, Devra; Golove, William

    2002-01-01

    Against Volatile Natural Gas Prices Mark Bolinger, Ryanwake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility duringyears) to a 10-year natural gas price forecast (i.e. , what

  20. Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds Ethylbenzene Carbon tetrachloride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glossary of Volatile Organic Compounds · Ethylbenzene · Carbon tetrachloride · Benzene · 1 and petroleum. It is also found in manufactured products such as inks, insecticides, and paints. Ethylbenzene, carpet glues, varnishes and paints, and use of tobacco. Some people are exposed to ethylbenzene at work

  1. The Volatility of Liquidity and Expected Stock Returns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbas, Ferhat 1981-

    2011-07-29

    The pricing of total liquidity risk is studied in the cross-section of stock returns. The study suggests that there is a positive relation between total volatility of liquidity and expected returns. Our measure of liquidity is based on Amihud...

  2. Enhanced phytoremediation of volatile environmental pollutants with transgenic trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    , and approved September 12, 2007 (received for review April 9, 2007) Small, volatile hydrocarbons, including systems, these transgenic poplars may provide the means to effectively remediate sites contaminated-and-treat systems as they take up water-soluble contam- inants through their roots and transport/translocate them

  3. Predicting Market-Volatility from Federal Reserve Board Meeting Minutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    been applied to predict intra-day stock market returns, e.g. by (Pui Cheong Fung et al., 2003Predicting Market-Volatility from Federal Reserve Board Meeting Minutes NLP for Finance Reza Bosagh Zadeh, Andreas Zollmann 1 Introduction Predicting markets has always had a certain appeal to researchers

  4. Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of the United States, 1985-1995 P A U L, ambient groundwater of the conterminous United States was conducted based on samples collected from 2948-chloropropane, which had a reporting level of 1.0 µg/L. Because ambient groundwater was targeted, areas of known

  5. Gasoline price volatility and the elasticity of demand for gasoline1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    - 1 - Gasoline price volatility and the elasticity of demand for gasoline1 C.-Y. Cynthia Lina, California Abstract We examine how gasoline price volatility impacts consumers' price elasticity of demand for gasoline. Results show that volatility in prices decreases consumer demand for gasoline in the intermediate

  6. Statistics and Its Interface Volume 1 (2008) 279288 Spot volatility estimation for high-frequency data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jianqing

    2008-01-01

    Statistics and Its Interface Volume 1 (2008) 279­288 Spot volatility estimation for high-frequency data Jianqing Fan and Yazhen Wang The availability of high-frequency intraday data allows us and volatility of an asset and investigates kernel type estimators of spot volatility based on high-frequency

  7. Volatility and Risk Estimation with Linear and Nonlinear Methods Based on High Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehlmann, Peter

    Volatility and Risk Estimation with Linear and Nonlinear Methods Based on High Frequency Data of risk management. The use of high frequency data approximately renders volatility from a latent: (i) to select an accurate forecasting procedure for predicting volatilities based on high frequency

  8. ELSEVIER Physica A 245 (1997) 441445 Volatility distribution in the S&P500 stock index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01

    Cizeau a, Yanhui Liu a, Martin Meyer a, C.-K. Peng b,a, H. Eugene Stanley a,. aCenter Jbr Polymer Studies Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA Received 15 August 1997 Abstract We study the volatility; Volatility; S&P500; Multiplicative processes The volatility is a measure of the mean fluctuation of a market

  9. Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brizard, A. J. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, Vermont 05439 (United States); Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Duthoit, F.-X. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France)

    2009-10-15

    A general orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator suitable for the numerical analysis of transport processes in axisymmetric magnetized plasmas is presented. The orbit-averaged guiding-center operator describes transport processes in a three-dimensional guiding-center invariant space: the orbit-averaged magnetic-flux invariant {psi}, the minimum-B pitch-angle coordinate {xi}{sub 0}, and the momentum magnitude p.

  10. "Table 2. Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Real Average Annual Coal Transportation Costs, By Primary Transport Mode and Supply Region" "(2013 dollars per ton)" "Coal Supply Region",2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "Railroad"...

  11. LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION BARRELS) FILE UPDATED April 2004 Line Month Low High Number Product Name Geography...

  12. The global warming signal is the average of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    The global warming signal is the average of years 70-80 in the increasing CO2 run minus the average represent significant uncertainty in the global warming signal (Fig. 5). The differences at high latitudes, uncertainty in the isopycnal diffusivity causes uncertainty of up to 50% in the global warming signal

  13. Morgantown Slightly Exceeds National Average for Cost of Living

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    (an index value of 100 reflects the national average). The index expresses the cost of living, health care, and miscellaneous goods and services. The index is designed to reflect the cost of living Relative to National Average by Category In Figure 2, we illustrate how the cost of living index has

  14. Microstructure Noise in the Continuous Case: The Pre-Averaging Approach -JLMPV-9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mykland, Per A.

    volatility. We show that our approach, which possess an intuitive transparency, can generate rate optimal goes back to the work on rounding by Jacod (199

  15. Leading particle effect, inelasticity and the connection between average multiplicities in {\\bf $e^+e^-$} and {\\bf $pp$} processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Batista; R. J. M. Covolan

    1998-11-20

    The Regge-Mueller formalism is used to describe the inclusive spectrum of the proton in $p p$ collisions. From such a description the energy dependences of both average inelasticity and leading proton multiplicity are calculated. These quantities are then used to establish the connection between the average charged particle multiplicities measured in {\\bf $e^+e^-$} and {\\bf $pp/{\\bar p}p$} processes. The description obtained for the leading proton cross section implies that Feynman scaling is strongly violated only at the extreme values of $x_F$, that is at the central region ($x_F \\approx 0$) and at the diffraction region ($x_F \\approx 1$), while it is approximately observed in the intermediate region of the spectrum.

  16. Method for refreshing a non-volatile memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riekels, James E. (New Hope, MN); Schlesinger, Samuel (Aventura, FL)

    2008-11-04

    A non-volatile memory and a method of refreshing a memory are described. The method includes allowing an external system to control refreshing operations within the memory. The memory may generate a refresh request signal and transmit the refresh request signal to the external system. When the external system finds an available time to process the refresh request, the external system acknowledges the refresh request and transmits a refresh acknowledge signal to the memory. The memory may also comprise a page register for reading and rewriting a data state back to the memory. The page register may comprise latches in lieu of supplemental non-volatile storage elements, thereby conserving real estate within the memory.

  17. Occupational hygiene in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols at two solid waste management plants in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehtinen, Jenni; Tolvanen, Outi; Nivukoski, Ulla; Veijanen, Anja; Hänninen, Kari

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Odorous VOCs: acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene. ? VOC concentrations did not exceed occupational exposure limit concentrations. ? 2,3-Butanedione as the health effecting compound is discussed. ? Endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems in waste treatment. - Abstract: Factors affecting occupational hygiene were measured at the solid waste transferring plant at Hyvinkää and at the optic separation plant in Hämeenlinna. Measurements consisted of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols including microbes, dust and endotoxins. The most abundant compounds in both of the plants were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, esters of carboxylic acids, ketones and terpenes. In terms of odour generation, the most important emissions were acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene due to their low threshold odour concentrations. At the optic waste separation plant, limonene occurred at the highest concentration of all single compounds of identified VOCs. The concentration of any single volatile organic compound did not exceed the occupational exposure limit (OEL) concentration. However, 2,3-butanedione as a health risk compound is discussed based on recent scientific findings linking it to lung disease. Microbe and dust concentrations were low at the waste transferring plant. Only endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems; the average concentration inside the plant was 425 EU/m{sup 3} which clearly exceeded the threshold value of 90 EU/m{sup 3}. In the wheel loader cabin the endotoxin concentrations were below 1 EU/m{sup 3}. High microbial and endotoxin concentrations were measured in the processing hall at the optic waste separation plant. The average concentration of endotoxins was found to be 10,980 EU/m{sup 3}, a concentration which may cause health risks. Concentrations of viable fungi were quite high in few measurements in the control room. The most problematic factor was endotoxins whose average measured concentrations was 4853 EU/m{sup 3}.

  18. Summary Report for the Development of Materials for Volatile Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Henager, Charles H.; Matyas, Josef; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2010-11-22

    The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2010, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogenides. For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated.

  19. Volatility of Power Grids under Real-Time Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roozbehani, Mardavij; Mitter, Sanjoy K

    2011-01-01

    The paper proposes a framework for modeling and analysis of the dynamics of supply, demand, and clearing prices in power system with real-time retail pricing and information asymmetry. Real-time retail pricing is characterized by passing on the real-time wholesale electricity prices to the end consumers, and is shown to create a closed-loop feedback system between the physical layer and the market layer of the power system. In the absence of a carefully designed control law, such direct feedback between the two layers could increase volatility and lower the system's robustness to uncertainty in demand and generation. A new notion of generalized price-elasticity is introduced, and it is shown that price volatility can be characterized in terms of the system's maximal relative price elasticity, defined as the maximal ratio of the generalized price-elasticity of consumers to that of the producers. As this ratio increases, the system becomes more volatile, and eventually, unstable. As new demand response technolo...

  20. Climate change will bring economic, social and environmental costs at scales beyond any other human experience (IARU, 2009). Studies imply that humanity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    experience (IARU, 2009). Studies imply that humanity must reduce CO2 below its current atmosphericClimate change will bring economic, social and environmental costs at scales beyond any other human

  1. Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Timothy Onasch

    2009-09-09

    This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements due to coatings on soot particles). The successfully completed Phase I project included construction of a prototype design for the TD with detailed physical modeling, testing with laboratory and ambient aerosol particles, and the initiation of a detailed microphysical model of the aerosol particles passing through the TD to extract vapor pressure distributions. The objective of the microphysical model is to derive vapor pressure distributions (i.e. vapor pressure ranges, including single chemical compounds, mixtures of known compounds, and complex ‘real-world’ aerosols, such as SOA, and soot particles with absorbing and nonabsorbing coatings) from TD measurements of changes in particle size, mass, and chemical composition for known TD temperatures and flow rates (i.e. residence times). The proposed Phase II project was designed to optimize several TD systems for different instrument applications and to combine the hardware and modeling into a robust package for commercial sales.

  2. Fact #870: April 27, 2015 Corporate Average Fuel Economy Progress...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress, 1978-2014 The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) is the sales-weighted harmonic mean fuel economy of a manufacturer's fleet of new cars or light trucks in a certain...

  3. Fact #624: May 24, 2010 Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by the fleet of each manufacturer will be determined by computing the sales-weighted harmonic average of the targets applicable to each of the manufacturer's passenger cars and...

  4. On the Choice of Average Solar Zenith Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Timothy W.

    Idealized climate modeling studies often choose to neglect spatiotemporal variations in solar radiation, but doing so comes with an important decision about how to average solar radiation in space and time. Since both ...

  5. Does anyone have access to 2012 average residential rates by...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Does anyone have access to 2012 average residential rates by utility company? I'm seeing an inconsistency between the OpenEI website and EIA 861 data set. Home > Groups > Utility...

  6. INDIVIDUAL REFORM ELEMENTS .63Average course exam score

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    INDIVIDUAL REFORM ELEMENTS .63Average course exam score .11In class clicker score .02Lecture: · Correlations with effort/curricular elements are positive but not high, indicating no individual course reform

  7. Fact #889: September 7, 2015 Average Diesel Price Lower than...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Average Diesel Price Lower than Gasoline for the First Time in Six Years fotw889web.xlsx More Documents & Publications Fact 859 February 9, 2015 Excess Supply is the Most Recent...

  8. Bounded Parameter Markov Decision Processes with Average Reward Criterion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tewari, Ambuj

    Bounded Parameter Markov Decision Processes with Average Reward Criterion Ambuj Tewari1 and Peter L, pp. 263­277, 2007. c Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007 #12;264 A. Tewari and P.L. Bartlett

  9. Recovery of semi-volatile organic compounds during sample preparation: Compilation for characterization of airborne particulate matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartz, Erick; Stockburger, Leonard; Gundel, Lara

    2002-05-01

    Semi-volatile compounds present special analytical challenges not met by conventional methods for analysis of ambient particulate matter (PM). Accurate quantification of PM-associated organic compounds requires validation of the laboratory procedures for recovery over a wide volatility and polarity range. To meet these challenges, solutions of n-alkanes (nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 40}) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs (naphthalene to benzo[ghi]perylene) were reduced in volume from a solvent mixture (equal volumes of hexane, dichloromethane and methanol), to examine recovery after reduction in volume. When the extract solution volume reached 0.5 mL the solvent was entirely methanol, and the recovery averaged 60% for n-alkanes nC{sub 12} to nC{sub 25} and PAHs from naphthalene to chrysene. Recovery of higher MW compounds decreased with MW, because of their insolubility in methanol. When the walls of the flasks were washed with 1 mL of equal parts hexane and dichloromethane (to reconstruct the original solvent composition), the recovery of nC{sub 18} and higher MW compounds increased dramatically, up to 100% for nC{sub 22}-nC{sub 32} and then slowly decreasing with MW due to insolubility. To examine recovery during extraction of the components of the High Capacity Integrated Gas and Particle Sampler, the same standards were used to spike its denuders and filters. For XAD-4 coated denuders and filters, normalized recovery was > 95% after two extractions. Recovery from spiked quartz filters matched the recovery from the coated surfaces for alkanes nC{sub 18} and larger, and for fluoranthene and larger PAHs. Lower MW compounds evaporated from the quartz filter with the spiking solvent. This careful approach allowed quantification of organics by correcting for volatility- and solubility-related sample preparation losses. This method is illustrated for an ambient sample collected with this sampler during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000.

  10. Averaged null energy condition violation in a conformally flat spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, Douglas; Olum, Ken D.

    2010-01-15

    We show that the averaged null energy condition can be violated by a conformally coupled scalar field in a conformally flat spacetime in 3+1 dimensions. The violation is dependent on the quantum state and can be made as large as desired. It does not arise from the presence of anomalies, although anomalous violations are also possible. Since all geodesics in conformally flat spacetimes are achronal, the achronal averaged null energy condition is likewise violated.

  11. Flavor Physics Data from the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) was established at the May 2002 Flavor Physics and CP Violation Conference in Philadelphia, and continues the LEP Heavy Flavor Steering Group's tradition of providing regular updates to the world averages of heavy flavor quantities. Data are provided by six subgroups that each focus on a different set of heavy flavor measurements: B lifetimes and oscillation parameters, Semi-leptonic B decays, Rare B decays, Unitarity triangle parameters, B decays to charm final states, and Charm Physics.

  12. Improved land cover and emission factors for modeling biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions from Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, DYC; Wong, P; Cheung, BKH; Guenther, A

    2010-01-01

    organic compounds emissions in Hong Kong. Atmosphericvolatile organic compounds emission inventory for Beijing.volatile organic compound emissions. Journal of Geophysical

  13. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Chemistry and Physics Vehicular emission of volatile organicY. , and Huang, Y. S. : Emission factors and characteristicslight-duty vehicle emissions, Environ. Sci. Technol. , 30,

  14. Efficient growth of HTS films with volatile elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegal, Michael P. (Albuquerque, NM); Overmyer, Donald L. (Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Frank (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A system for applying a volatile element-HTS layer, such as Tl-HTS, to a substrate in a multiple zone furnace, said method includes heating at higher temperature, in one zone of the furnace, a substrate and adjacent first source of Tl-HTS material, to sublimate Tl-oxide from the source to the substrate; and heating at lower temperature, in a separate zone of the furnace, a second source of Tl-oxide to replenish the first source of Tl-oxide from the second source.

  15. Efficient growth of HTS films with volatile elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Dominguez, F.

    1998-12-22

    A system is disclosed for applying a volatile element-HTS layer, such as Tl-HTS, to a substrate in a multiple zone furnace, said method includes heating at higher temperature, in one zone of the furnace, a substrate and adjacent first source of Tl-HTS material, to sublimate Tl-oxide from the source to the substrate; and heating at lower temperature, in a separate zone of the furnace, a second source of Tl-oxide to replenish the first source of Tl-oxide from the second source. 3 figs.

  16. High average power scaleable thin-disk laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Honea, Eric C. (Sunol, CA); Bibeau, Camille (Dublin, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Powell, Howard (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Sutton, Steven B. (Manteca, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Using a thin disk laser gain element with an undoped cap layer enables the scaling of lasers to extremely high average output power values. Ordinarily, the power scaling of such thin disk lasers is limited by the deleterious effects of amplified spontaneous emission. By using an undoped cap layer diffusion bonded to the thin disk, the onset of amplified spontaneous emission does not occur as readily as if no cap layer is used, and much larger transverse thin disks can be effectively used as laser gain elements. This invention can be used as a high average power laser for material processing applications as well as for weapon and air defense applications.

  17. The High Average Power Laser Program 15th HAPL meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2006 #12;2 The HAPL team is developing the science, technology and architecture needed for a laser1 The High Average Power Laser Program 15th HAPL meeting Aug 8 & 9, 2006 General Atomics Scientific Inst 16. Optiswitch Technology 17. ESLI Electricity Generator Electricity Generator Reaction

  18. FOCI RESEARCH BENEFITS FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 1993 Recruitment Forecast -Average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) advises the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council using a "stock data but addresses the autocorrelation of recruitment. In addition, it directly predicts recruitment to average 1991 year class, and a strong 1992 year class. In 1993 the transfer function model predicted

  19. Parity-violating anomalies and the stationarity of stochastic averages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.

    1988-01-15

    Within the framework of stochastic quantization the parity-violating anomalies in odd space-time dimensions are derived from the asymptotic stationarity of the stochastic average of a certain fermion bilinear. Contrary to earlier attempts, this method yields the correct anomalies for both massive and massless fermions.

  20. Probabilistic Wind Vector Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftery, Adrian

    Probabilistic Wind Vector Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging J. MCLEAN 2011, in final form 26 May 2012) ABSTRACT Probabilistic forecasts of wind vectors are becoming critical with univariate quantities, statistical approaches to wind vector forecasting must be based on bivariate

  1. Probabilistic Wind Speed Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftery, Adrian

    Probabilistic Wind Speed Forecasting Using Ensembles and Bayesian Model Averaging J. Mc in the context of wind power, where under- forecasting and overforecasting carry different financial penal- ties, calibrated and sharp probabilistic forecasts can help to make wind power a more financially competitive alter

  2. Fact #693: September 19, 2011 Average Vehicle Footprint for Cars...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    information below. Supporting Information Average Vehicle Footprint, 2008-2010 Model Year Car Light Truck All Light Vehicles 2008 45.4 53.0 49.0 2009 45.2 52.7 48.2 2010 45.2 54.0...

  3. Prediction in moving average processes Anton Schick and Wolfgang Wefelmeyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wefelmeyer, Wolfgang

    Prediction in moving average processes Anton Schick and Wolfgang Wefelmeyer Abstract(y + (x1, . . . , xr)) dF(y) The research of A. Schick was partially supported by NSF Grant DMS0405791. 1 #12;2 ANTON SCHICK AND WOLFGANG WEFELMEYER can be estimated at the "parametric" root-n rate

  4. Optimal Control with Weighted Average Costs and Temporal Logic Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    Optimal Control with Weighted Average Costs and Temporal Logic Specifications Eric M. Wolff Control and Dynamical Systems California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 91125 Email: ewolff@caltech.edu Ufuk Topcu Control and Dynamical Systems California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 91125

  5. Volatile snowlines in embedded disks around low-mass protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged*) Models of the young solar nebula assume a hot initial disk with most volatiles are in the gas phase. The question remains whether an actively accreting disk is warm enough to have gas-phase water up to 50 AU radius. No detailed studies have yet been performed on the extent of snowlines in an embedded accreting disk (Stage 0). Quantify the location of gas-phase volatiles in embedded actively accreting disk system. Two-dimensional physical and radiative transfer models have been used to calculate the temperature structure of embedded protostellar systems. Gas and ice abundances of H$_2$O, CO$_2$, and CO are calculated using the density-dependent thermal desorption formulation. The midplane water snowline increases from 3 to 55 AU for accretion rates through the disk onto the star between $10^{-9}$-$10^{-4} \\ M_{\\odot} \\ {\\rm yr^{-1}}$. CO$_2$ can remain in the solid phase within the disk for $\\dot{M} \\leq 10^{-5} \\ M_{\\odot} \\ {\\rm yr^{-1}}$ down to $\\sim 20$ AU. Most of the CO is in the gas phase w...

  6. Meta-analysis of high-latitude nitrogen-addition and warming studies imply ecological mechanisms overlooked by land models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bouskill, N. J.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.

    2014-08-18

    Accurate representation of ecosystem processes in land models is crucial for reducing predictive uncertainty in energy and greenhouse gas feedbacks with the atmosphere. Here we describe an observational and modeling meta-analysis approach to benchmark land models, and apply the method to the land model CLM4.5 with two versions of belowground biogeochemistry. We focused our analysis on the above and belowground high-latitude ecosystem responses to warming and nitrogen addition, and identified mechanisms absent, or poorly parameterized in CLM4.5. While the two model versions predicted similar trajectories for soil carbon stocks following both types of perturbation, other variables (e.g., belowground respiration) differedmore »from the observations in both magnitude and direction, indicating the underlying mechanisms are inadequate for representing high-latitude ecosystems. The observational synthesis attribute these differences to missing representations of microbial dynamics, characterization of above and belowground functional processes, and nutrient competition. We use the observational meta-analyses to discuss potential approaches to improving the current models (e.g., the inclusion of dynamic vegetation or different microbial functional guilds), however, we also raise a cautionary note on the selection of data sets and experiments to be included in a meta-analysis. For example, the concentrations of nitrogen applied in the synthesized field experiments (average =72 kg ha-1 yr-1) are many times higher than projected soil nitrogen concentrations (from nitrogen deposition and release during mineralization), which preclude a rigorous evaluation of the model responses to nitrogen perturbation. Overall, we demonstrate here that elucidating ecological mechanisms via meta-analysis can identify deficiencies in both ecosystem models and empirical experiments.« less

  7. Meta-analysis of high-latitude nitrogen-addition and warming studies implies ecological mechanisms overlooked by land models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bouskill, N. J.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J. Y.

    2014-12-11

    Accurate representation of ecosystem processes in land models is crucial for reducing predictive uncertainty in energy and greenhouse gas feedbacks with the climate. Here we describe an observational and modeling meta-analysis approach to benchmark land models, and apply the method to the land model CLM4.5 with two versions of belowground biogeochemistry. We focused our analysis on the aboveground and belowground responses to warming and nitrogen addition in high-latitude ecosystems, and identified absent or poorly parameterized mechanisms in CLM4.5. While the two model versions predicted similar soil carbon stock trajectories following both warming and nitrogen addition, other predicted variables (e.g., belowgroundmore »respiration) differed from observations in both magnitude and direction, indicating that CLM4.5 has inadequate underlying mechanisms for representing high-latitude ecosystems. On the basis of observational synthesis, we attribute the model–observation differences to missing representations of microbial dynamics, aboveground and belowground coupling, and nutrient cycling, and we use the observational meta-analysis to discuss potential approaches to improving the current models. However, we also urge caution concerning the selection of data sets and experiments for meta-analysis. For example, the concentrations of nitrogen applied in the synthesized field experiments (average = 72 kg ha-1 yr-1) are many times higher than projected soil nitrogen concentrations (from nitrogen deposition and release during mineralization), which precludes a rigorous evaluation of the model responses to likely nitrogen perturbations. Overall, we demonstrate that elucidating ecological mechanisms via meta-analysis can identify deficiencies in ecosystem models and empirical experiments.« less

  8. Risk Management Based on Stochastic Volatility Ernst Eberlein, Jan Kallsen, Jrn Kristen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallsen, Jan

    Risk Management Based on Stochastic Volatility Ernst Eberlein, Jan Kallsen, Jörn Kristen University of Freiburg Abstract Risk management approaches that do not incorporate randomly changing volatility tend (1995) can be applied quite easily for risk management purposes. Moreover, we compare their relative

  9. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Metabolic engineering of plant volatiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichersky, Eran

    for plant improvement because of the great contribution of volatile secondary metabolites to reproduction organic compounds known as secondary or specialized metabolites [1]. More than 1% of these metabolitesAvailable online at www.sciencedirect.com Metabolic engineering of plant volatiles Natalia Dudareva

  10. LETTER Volatile communication between plants that affects herbivory: a meta-analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    LETTER Volatile communication between plants that affects herbivory: a meta-analysis Richard Karban,1 * Louie H. Yang,1 and Kyle F. Edwards2 Abstract Volatile communication between plants causing of habitat and plant growth form were undetectable. In most cases, the mechanisms of resistance

  11. House Flies andPigManureVolatiles: Wind TunnelBehavioral Studiesand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    House Flies andPigManureVolatiles: Wind TunnelBehavioral Studiesand Electrophysiological pig manure were identified as electrophysiologically active on virgin female house fly (Muscadomstica of standards, and wind tunnel behavioral studies The pig manure volatiles eliciting responses from female

  12. RECONSTRUCTING THE UNKNOWN LOCAL VOLATILITY FUNCTION THOMAS F. COLEMAN, YUYING LI, AND ARUN VERMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuying

    Abstract. Using market European option prices, a method for computing a smooth local volatility function, and pricing exotic options. A spline functional approach is used: the local volatility function is represented. Accuracy of pricing and hedging is also illustrated. Moreover, it is demonstrated that, using different

  13. Determining the Volatility of Ultrafine (UF) PM Emissions from CNG Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Determining the Volatility of Ultrafine (UF) PM Emissions from CNG Vehicles Contract#: 500. Limited research has been done to characterize compressed natural gas (CNG) mass emissions and practically no work focused on the determination of the size- segregated volatility of UF particles from CNG engines

  14. Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1 Kazuko interval between price volatilities that are above a certain threshold q for 31 intraday data sets Yamasaki,1,2 Shlomo Havlin,1,3 and H. Eugene Stanley1 1 Center for Polymer Studies and Department

  15. A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A comparison of option prices under different pricing measures in a stochastic volatility model option prices in an incomplete stochastic volatility model with correlation. In a general setting, we prove an ordering result which says that prices for European options with convex payoffs are decreasing

  16. Volatile organic acids and microbial processes in the Yegua formation, east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    , 1982). Volatile organic acids such as acetic, propionic, iso- butyric, n-butyric, iso-valeric, and n volatile organic acids (VOA) in the Yegua formation. Acetic and propionic acid concentrations in mudstones modeled to estimate acetic acid transport from aquitard to aquifer. Assuming that SRB completely respire

  17. Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Temperature dependence of volatile organic compound evaporative emissions from motor vehicles Juli tailpipe sources to motor vehicle volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Contributions were determined in a highway tunnel were used to define the composition of running vehicle emissions. The chemical mass balance

  18. An Analysis of Air Passenger Average Trip Lengths and Fare Levels in US Domestic Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Sheng-Chen Alex

    2000-01-01

    California at Berkeley An Analysis of Air Passenger AverageCalifornia at Berkeley An Analysis of Air Passenger Average

  19. Gas-phase chemistry dominates O3 loss to a forest, implying a source of aerosols and hydroxyl radicals to the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Gas-phase chemistry dominates O3 loss to a forest, implying a source of aerosols and hydroxyl into its major loss pathways; stomatal uptake, non-stomatal surface deposition, and gas-phase chemistry. Total O3 flux was dominated by gas-phase chemistry during the summer and by stomatal uptake during

  20. top of the logistical problems implied by waging war in such a landlocked, mountainous country, this decision was due to the continuously poor performance of the Royal Lao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solovey, Mark

    top of the logistical problems implied by waging war in such a landlocked, mountainous country Cravens (eds.), Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), xv þ270 pp. About 20 years ago an orthodoxy about `Cold War social

  1. Anomalous transport and observable average in the standard map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lydia Bouchara; Ouerdia Ourrad; Sandro Vaienti; Xavier Leoncini

    2015-09-02

    The distribution of finite time observable averages and transport in low dimensional Hamiltonian systems is studied. Finite time observable average distributions are computed, from which an exponent $\\alpha$ characteristic of how the maximum of the distributions scales with time is extracted. To link this exponent to transport properties, the characteristic exponent $\\mu(q)$ of the time evolution of the different moments of order $q$ related to transport are computed. As a testbed for our study the standard map is used. The stochasticity parameter $K$ is chosen so that either phase space is mixed with a chaotic sea and islands of stability or with only a chaotic sea. Our observations lead to a proposition of a law relating the slope in $q=0$ of the function $\\mu(q)$ with the exponent $\\alpha$.

  2. A New World Average Value for the Neutron Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Serebrov; A. K. Fomin

    2010-05-27

    The analysis of the data on measurements of the neutron lifetime is presented. A new most accurate result of the measurement of neutron lifetime [Phys. Lett. B 605 (2005) 72] 878.5 +/- 0.8 s differs from the world average value [Phys. Lett. B 667 (2008) 1] 885.7 +/- 0.8 s by 6.5 standard deviations. In this connection the analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of experiments [Phys. Lett. B 483 (2000) 15] and [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 (1989) 593] is carried out. Systematic errors of about -6 s are found in each of the experiments. The summary table for the neutron lifetime measurements after corrections and additions is given. A new world average value for the neutron lifetime 879.9 +/- 0.9 s is presented.

  3. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  4. Average Interpolating Wavelets on Point Clouds and Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rustamov, Raif M

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new wavelet transform suitable for analyzing functions on point clouds and graphs. Our construction is based on a generalization of the average interpolating refinement scheme of Donoho. The most important ingredient of the original scheme that needs to be altered is the choice of the interpolant. Here, we define the interpolant as the minimizer of a smoothness functional, namely a generalization of the Laplacian energy, subject to the averaging constraints. In the continuous setting, we derive a formula for the optimal solution in terms of the poly-harmonic Green's function. The form of this solution is used to motivate our construction in the setting of graphs and point clouds. We highlight the empirical convergence of our refinement scheme and the potential applications of the resulting wavelet transform through experiments on a number of data stets.

  5. Average dynamics of a finite set of coupled phase oscillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dima, Germán C. Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2014-06-15

    We study the solutions of a dynamical system describing the average activity of an infinitely large set of driven coupled excitable units. We compared their topological organization with that reconstructed from the numerical integration of finite sets. In this way, we present a strategy to establish the pertinence of approximating the dynamics of finite sets of coupled nonlinear units by the dynamics of its infinitely large surrogate.

  6. Averaging cross section data so we can fit it

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.

    2014-10-23

    The 56Fe cross section we are interested in have a lot of fluctuations. We would like to fit the average of the cross section with cross sections calculated within EMPIRE. EMPIRE is a Hauser-Feshbach theory based nuclear reaction code, requires cross sections to be smoothed using a Lorentzian profile. The plan is to fit EMPIRE to these cross sections in the fast region (say above 500 keV).

  7. Using futures prices to filter short-term volatility and recover a latent, long-term price series for oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herce, Miguel Angel

    2006-01-01

    Oil prices are very volatile. But much of this volatility seems to reflect short-term,transitory factors that may have little or no influence on the price in the long run. Many major investment decisions should be guided ...

  8. Power-law correlations in finance-related Google searches, and their cross-correlations with volatility and traded volume: Evidence from the Dow Jones Industrial components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    We study power-law correlations properties of the Google search queries for Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) component stocks. Examining the daily data of the searched terms with a combination of the rescaled range and rescaled variance tests together with the detrended fluctuation analysis, we show that the searches are in fact power-law correlated with Hurst exponents between 0.8 and 1.1. The general interest in the DJIA stocks is thus strongly persistent. We further reinvestigate the cross-correlation structure between the searches, traded volume and volatility of the component stocks using the detrended cross-correlation and detrending moving-average cross-correlation coefficients. Contrary to the universal power-law correlations structure of the related Google searches, the results suggest that there is no universal relationship between the online search queries and the analyzed financial measures. Even though we confirm positive correlation for a majority of pairs, there are several pairs with insign...

  9. Averaged equilibrium and stability in low-aspect-ratio stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, L.; Carreras, B.A.; Dominguez, N.

    1989-01-01

    The MHD equilibrium and stability calculations or stellarators are complex because of the intrinsic three-dimensional (3-D) character of these configurations. The stellarators expansion simplifies the equilibrium calculation by reducing it to a two-dimensional (2-D) problem. The classical stellarator expansion includes terms up to order epsilon/sup 2/, and the vacuum magnetic field is also included up to this order. For large-aspect-ratio configurations, the results of the stellarator expansion agree well with 3-D numerical equilibrium results. But for low-aspect-ratio configurations, these are significant discrepancies with 3-D equilibrium calculations. The main reason for these discrepancies is the approximation in the vacuum field contributions. This problem can be avoided by applying the average method in a vacuum flux coordinate system. In this way, the exact vacuum magnetic field contribution is included and the results agree well with 3-D equilibrium calculations even for low-aspect-ratio configurations. Using the average method in a vacuum flux coordinate system also permit the accurate calculation of local stability properties with the Mercier criterion. The main improvement is in the accurate calculation of the geodesic curvature term. In this paper, we discuss the application of the average method in flux coordinates to the calculation of the Mercier criterion for low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Standard test method for total mass loss and collected volatile condensable materials from outgassing in a vacuum environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    Standard test method for total mass loss and collected volatile condensable materials from outgassing in a vacuum environment

  11. Airborne flux measurements of methane and volatile organic compounds over the Haynesville and Marcellus shale gas production regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    natural gas extraction can lead to signi?cant emissions of methane (CH 4 ), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and nitrogen

  12. In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varvel, Mark Darrell (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-12-27

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  13. Apparatus for sensing volatile organic chemicals in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert C.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Kottenstette, Richard; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2005-06-07

    A chemical-sensing apparatus is formed from the combination of a chemical preconcentrator which sorbs and concentrates particular volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and one or more chemiresistors that sense the VOCs after the preconcentrator has been triggered to release them in concentrated form. Use of the preconcentrator and chemiresistor(s) in combination allows the VOCs to be detected at lower concentration than would be possible using the chemiresistor(s) alone and further allows measurements to be made in a variety of fluids, including liquids (e.g. groundwater). Additionally, the apparatus provides a new mode of operation for sensing VOCs based on the measurement of decay time constants, and a method for background correction to improve measurement precision.

  14. Volatility return intervals analysis of the Japanese market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Woo-Sung; Havlin, Shlomo; Kaizoji, Taisei; Moon, Hie-Tae; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-01-01

    We investigate scaling and memory effects in return intervals between price volatilities above a certain threshold $q$ for the Japanese stock market using daily and intraday data sets. We find that the distribution of return intervals can be approximated by a scaling function that depends only on the ratio between the return interval $\\tau$ and its mean $$. We also find memory effects such that a large (or small) return interval follows a large (or small) interval by investigating the conditional distribution and mean return interval. The results are similar to previous studies of other markets and indicate that similar statistical features appear in different financial markets. We also compare our results between the period before and after the big crash at the end of 1989. We find that scaling and memory effects of the return intervals show similar features although the statistical properties of the returns are different.

  15. In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varvel, Mark Darrell

    2005-12-27

    The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

  16. (Approximate) Low-Mode Averaging with a new Multigrid Eigensolver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunnar Bali; Sara Collins; Andreas Frommer; Karsten Kahl; Issaku Kanamori; Benjamin Müller; Matthias Rottmann; Jakob Simeth

    2015-09-23

    We present a multigrid based eigensolver for computing low-modes of the Hermitian Wilson Dirac operator. For the non-Hermitian case multigrid methods have already replaced conventional Krylov subspace solvers in many lattice QCD computations. Since the $\\gamma_5$-preserving aggregation based interpolation used in our multigrid method is valid for both, the Hermitian and the non-Hermitian case, inversions of very ill-conditioned shifted systems with the Hermitian operator become feasible. This enables the use of multigrid within shift-and-invert type eigensolvers. We show numerical results from our MPI-C implementation of a Rayleigh quotient iteration with multigrid. For state-of-the-art lattice sizes and moderate numbers of desired low-modes we achieve speed-ups of an order of magnitude and more over PARPACK. We show results and develop strategies how to make use of our eigensolver for calculating disconnected contributions to hadronic quantities that are noisy and still computationally challenging. Here, we explore the possible benefits, using our eigensolver for low-mode averaging and related methods with high and low accuracy eigenvectors. We develop a low-mode averaging type method using only a few of the smallest eigenvectors with low accuracy. This allows us to avoid expensive exact eigensolves, still benefitting from reduced statistical errors.

  17. Averaged null energy condition and quantum inequalities in curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleni-Alexandra Kontou

    2015-07-22

    The Averaged Null Energy Condition (ANEC) states that the integral along a complete null geodesic of the projection of the stress-energy tensor onto the tangent vector to the geodesic cannot be negative. ANEC can be used to rule out spacetimes with exotic phenomena, such as closed timelike curves, superluminal travel and wormholes. We prove that ANEC is obeyed by a minimally-coupled, free quantum scalar field on any achronal null geodesic (not two points can be connected with a timelike curve) surrounded by a tubular neighborhood whose curvature is produced by a classical source. To prove ANEC we use a null-projected quantum inequality, which provides constraints on how negative the weighted average of the renormalized stress-energy tensor of a quantum field can be. Starting with a general result of Fewster and Smith, we first derive a timelike projected quantum inequality for a minimally-coupled scalar field on flat spacetime with a background potential. Using that result we proceed to find the bound of a quantum inequality on a geodesic in a spacetime with small curvature, working to first order in the Ricci tensor and its derivatives. The last step is to derive a bound for the null-projected quantum inequality on a general timelike path. Finally we use that result to prove achronal ANEC in spacetimes with small curvature.

  18. Averaged null energy condition and quantum inequalities in curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontou, Eleni-Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Averaged Null Energy Condition (ANEC) states that the integral along a complete null geodesic of the projection of the stress-energy tensor onto the tangent vector to the geodesic cannot be negative. ANEC can be used to rule out spacetimes with exotic phenomena, such as closed timelike curves, superluminal travel and wormholes. We prove that ANEC is obeyed by a minimally-coupled, free quantum scalar field on any achronal null geodesic (not two points can be connected with a timelike curve) surrounded by a tubular neighborhood whose curvature is produced by a classical source. To prove ANEC we use a null-projected quantum inequality, which provides constraints on how negative the weighted average of the renormalized stress-energy tensor of a quantum field can be. Starting with a general result of Fewster and Smith, we first derive a timelike projected quantum inequality for a minimally-coupled scalar field on flat spacetime with a background potential. Using that result we proceed to find the bound of a qu...

  19. Plasma dynamics and a significant error of macroscopic averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek A. Szalek

    2005-05-22

    The methods of macroscopic averaging used to derive the macroscopic Maxwell equations from electron theory are methodologically incorrect and lead in some cases to a substantial error. For instance, these methods do not take into account the existence of a macroscopic electromagnetic field EB, HB generated by carriers of electric charge moving in a thin layer adjacent to the boundary of the physical region containing these carriers. If this boundary is impenetrable for charged particles, then in its immediate vicinity all carriers are accelerated towards the inside of the region. The existence of the privileged direction of acceleration results in the generation of the macroscopic field EB, HB. The contributions to this field from individual accelerated particles are described with a sufficient accuracy by the Lienard-Wiechert formulas. In some cases the intensity of the field EB, HB is significant not only for deuteron plasma prepared for a controlled thermonuclear fusion reaction but also for electron plasma in conductors at room temperatures. The corrected procedures of macroscopic averaging will induce some changes in the present form of plasma dynamics equations. The modified equations will help to design improved systems of plasma confinement.

  20. Ethanol as Internal Standard for Quantitative Determination of Volatile Compounds in Spirit Drinks by Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Kulevich, Nikita V; Makoed, Nicolai M; Mazanik, Arkadzi L; Sytova, Svetlana N

    2012-01-01

    The new methodical approach of using ethanol as internal standard in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile compounds in spirit drinks in daily practice of testing laboratories is proposed. This method provides determination of volatile compounds concentrations in spirit drinks directly expressed in milligrams per liter (mg/L) of absolute alcohol according to official methods without measuring of alcohol strength of analyzed sample. The experimental demonstration of this method for determination of volatile compounds in spirit drinks by gas chromatography is described. Its validation was carried out by comparison with experimental results obtained by internal standard method and external standard method.

  1. Average vertical and zonal F region plasma drifts over Jicamarca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fejer, B.G.; Gonzalez, S.A. (Utah State Univ., Logan (United States)); de Paula, E.R. (Inst. de Pesquisas Espaciais-INPE, Sao Paulo (Brazil) Utah State Univ., Logan (United States)); Woodman, R.F. (Inst. Geofisico del Peru, Lima (Peru))

    1991-08-01

    The seasonal averages of the equatorial F region vertical and zonal plasma drifts are determined using extensive incoherent scatter radar observations from Jicamarca during 1968-1988. The late afternoon and nighttime vertical and zonal drifts are strongly dependent on the 10.7-cm solar flux. The authors show that the evening prereversal enhancement of vertical drifts increases linearly with solar flux during equinox but tends to saturate for large fluxes during southern hemisphere winter. They examine in detail, for the first time, the seasonal variation of the zonal plasma drifts and their dependence on solar flux and magnetic activity. The seasonal effects on the zonal drifts are most pronounced in the midnight-morning sector. The nighttime eastward drifts increase with solar flux for all seasons but decrease slightly with magnetic activity. The daytime westward drifts are essentially independent of season, solar cycle, and magnetic activity.

  2. Average System Cost Methodology : Administrator's Record of Decision.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-06-01

    Significant features of average system cost (ASC) methodology adopted are: retention of the jurisdictional approach where retail rate orders of regulartory agencies provide primary data for computing the ASC for utilities participating in the residential exchange; inclusion of transmission costs; exclusion of construction work in progress; use of a utility's weighted cost of debt securities; exclusion of income taxes; simplification of separation procedures for subsidized generation and transmission accounts from other accounts; clarification of ASC methodology rules; more generous review timetable for individual filings; phase-in of reformed methodology; and each exchanging utility must file under the new methodology within 20 days of implementation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission of the ten major participating utilities, the revised ASC will substantially only affect three. (PSB)

  3. Volatile organic acids and microbial processes in the Yegua formation, east-central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Routh, J.; Grossman, E. L.; Ulrich, G. A.; Suflita, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Geochemical and microbiological evidence indicates that viable microorganisms produce and consume volatile organic acids (VOA) in the Yegua formation. Acetic and propionic acid concentrations in mudstones range from 200 ...

  4. Understanding the Impact of Emerging Non-Volatile Memories on High-Performance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajesh

    practical solution, but it is expensive and energy-intensive. Non-volatile, solid-state storage technologies to advanced phase-change memories attached to a DDR3 memory bus. We evaluate the impact of these technologies

  5. Exploring volatile fatty acids (VFAs) as a novel substrate for microbial oil production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Sagar, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Cost effective production of biofuels depends critically on feedstock cost and availability. As such, volatile fatty acids (VFAs) can play an important role in advancing sustainable biofuel production since they can be ...

  6. A statistical analysis of the natural gas futures market : the interplay of sentiment, volatility and prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fazzio, Thomas J. (Thomas Joseph)

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to understand the price dynamics of the North American natural gas market through a statistical survey that includes an analysis of the variables influencing the price and volatility of this energy ...

  7. Electrospun Polyurethane Fibers for Absorption of Volatile Organic Compounds from Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholten, Elke

    Electrospun polyurethane fibers for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from air with rapid VOC absorption and desorption have been developed. Polyurethanes based on 4,4-methylenebis(phenylisocyanate) (MDI) and ...

  8. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Using Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry during the MILAGRO 2006 Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortner, E. C.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by proton transfer reaction – mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) on a rooftop in the urban mixed residential and industrial area North Northeast of downtown Mexico City as part of ...

  9. Comparative forecasting performance of symmetric and asymmetric conditional volatility models of an exchange rate. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaban, Ercan

    2002-01-01

    The relative out-of-sample forecasting quality of symmetric and asymmetric conditional volatility models of an exchange rate differs according to the symmetric and asymmetric evaluation criteria as well as a regression-based ...

  10. Natural formation and degradation of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soil: challenges to understanding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laturnus, Frank; Fahimi, Isabelle; Gryndler, Milan; Hartmann, Anton; Heal, Mathew R; Matucha, Miroslav; Schoeler, Heinfried; Schroll, Reiner; Svensson, Teresia

    2005-01-01

    Goal, Scope and Background. The anthropogenic environmental emissions of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines have been under scrutiny in recent years because the two compound groups are suspected to contribute ...

  11. Method and apparatus for regenerating activated carbon containing an adsorbed volatile organic absorbate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiggelbeck, D.D.; Goyak, G.M.

    1993-07-27

    A method is described for regenerating spent activated carbon containing adsorbed volatile organic adsorbate comprising: establishing a confined downwardly moving bed of activated carbon; adding spent carbon to the top of said bed; introducing superheated steam into the bottom of said bed in contact with said carbon; recovering exit gas including predominantly superheated steam and volatilized adsorbate from the top of said bed; circulating a portion of said exit gas through a superheater and compressor to the bottom of said bed; withdrawing a portion of said exit gas through a cooler to condense steam and volatile adsorbate; continuously circulating superheated steam in a closed loop through said downwardly moving bed, said compressor and said superheater; recovering partially regenerated activated carbon containing residual volatile adsorbate from the bottom of said bed.

  12. Volatilization of selected organic compounds from a creosote-waste land-treatment facility. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the emissions of volatile and semi-volatile compounds which are constituents of a complex creosote waste from laboratory simulations of a land treatment system to assess the potential human exposure to hazardous compounds from this source. In addition, the Thibodeaux-Hwang Air Emission Release Rate (AERR) model was evaluated for its use in predicting emission rates of hazardous constituents of creosote wood preservative waste from land treatment facilities. A group of hazardous volatile and semi-volatile constituents present in the creosote waste was selected for evaluation in this study and included a variety of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA's), phenol, and chlorinated and substituted phenols.

  13. Volatile depletion in the TW Hydrae disk atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Fujun; Hogerheijde, Michiel R

    2015-01-01

    An abundance decrease in carbon- and oxygen-bearing species relative to dust has been frequently found in planet-forming disks, which can be attributed to an overall reduction of gas mass. However, in the case of TW Hya, the only disk with gas mass measured directly with HD rotational lines, the inferred gas mass ($\\lesssim$0.005 solar mass) is significantly below the directly measured value ($\\gtrsim$0.05 solar mass). We show that this apparent conflict can be resolved if the elemental abundances of carbon and oxygen are reduced in the upper layers of the outer disk but are normal elsewhere (except for a possible enhancement of their abundances in the inner disk). The implication is that in the outer disk, the main reservoir of the volatiles (CO, water, ...) resides close to the midplane, locked up inside solid bodies that are too heavy to be transported back to the atmosphere by turbulence. An enhancement in the carbon and oxygen abundances in the inner disk can be caused by inward migration of these solid ...

  14. Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

  15. Ammonia volatilization and nitrogen transformations in high pH soils used for beef manure disposal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Robert Edgar

    1972-01-01

    AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION AND NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS IN HIGH pH SOILS USED FOR BEEF MANURE DISPOSAL A Thesis by ROBERT EDGAR PETERS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION AND NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS IN HIGH pH SOILS USED FOR BEEF MANURE DISPOSAL A Thesis by ROBERT EDGAR PETERS Approved as to style and content...

  16. Ammonia volatilization from surface application of ammonium sulfate to carbonate systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feagley, Sam Edward

    1976-01-01

    AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION FROM SURFACE APPLICATION OF AMMONIUM SULFATE TO CARBONATE SYSTEMS A Thesis by SAM EDWARD FEAGLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject; Soil Science AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION FROM SURFACE APPLICATIONS OF AMMONIUM SULFATE TO CARBONATE SYSTEMS A Thesis SAM EDWARD FEAGLEY Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Dep...

  17. The performance of a volatile oil reservoir overlain by a gas cap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Joseph Ralph, Jr

    1960-01-01

    THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1960 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: hairxnan of Coxnxnittee) (Head...

  18. Modified Force-Directed Scheduling for Peak and Average Power Optimization using Multiple Supply-Voltages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanujam, J. "Ram"

    - and a is the average number of transitions per clock phase heuristic for peak and average power cycle at the gate

  19. Combustion of volatile matter during the initial stages of coal combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlow, D.; Niksa, S.; Kruger, C.H.

    1990-08-01

    Both the secondary pyrolysis and combustion of the volatiles from a bituminous coal will be studied. Devolatilization and secondary pyrolysis experiments will be conducted in a novel flow reactor in which secondary pyrolysis of the volatiles occurs after devolatilization is complete. This allows unambiguous measurements of the yields from both processes. Measurements will be made for reactor temperatures from 1500 to 1700 K, and a nominal residence time of 200 msec. These conditions are typical of coal combustion. Yields of tar, soot, H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} hydrocarbons will be determined as a function of reactor temperature. The yields will be reported as a function of the temperature of the reactor. The instrumentation for temperature measurements will be developed during future studies. Combustion studies will be conducted in a constant volume bomb, which will be designed and constructed for this study. Tar and soot will be removed before introducing the volatiles to the bomb, so that only the combustion of the light gas volatiles will be considered. The burning velocities of light gas volatiles will be determined both as functions of mixture stoichiometry and the temperature at which the volatiles are pyrolysed. 90 refs., 70 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Terminality implies non-signalling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bob Coecke

    2014-12-30

    A 'process theory' is any theory of systems and processes which admits sequential and parallel composition. `Terminality' unifies normalisation of pure states, trace-preservation of CP-maps, and adding up to identity of positive operators in quantum theory, and generalises this to arbitrary process theories. We show that terminality and non-signalling coincide in any process theory, provided one makes causal structure explicit. In fact, making causal structure explicit is necessary to even make sense of non-signalling in process theories. We conclude that because of its much simpler mathematical form, terminality should be taken to be a more fundamental notion than non-signalling.

  1. Dosimetry in Mammography: Average Glandular Dose Based on Homogeneous Phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benevides, Luis A. [Naval Sea Systems Command,1333 Isaac Hull Avenue, Washington Navy Yard, DC 20376 (United States); Hintenlang, David E. [University of Florida, 202 Nuclear Sciences Center, P.O. Box 1183, Gainesville Florida 32611 (United States)

    2011-05-05

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 and 46 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. The clinical dosimetry protocol developed in this study can reliably predict the AGD imparted to an individual patient during a routine screening mammogram.

  2. Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, R.; Gaul, H.W.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

    1980-03-01

    Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. The difficulty of achieving these improvements varies as does their potential for increasing parabolic trough performance. The purpose of this analysis is to quantify the relative merit of various technology advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors. The performance benefits of improvements are determined as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. The results are presented graphically to allow a quick determination of the performance merits of particular improvements. Substantial annual energy gains are shown to be attainable. Of the improvements evaluated, the development of stable back-silvered glass reflective surfaces offers the largest performance gain for operating temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. Above 150/sup 0/C, the development of trough receivers that can maintain a vacuum is the most significant potential improvement. The reduction of concentrator slope errors also has a substantial performance benefit at high operating temperatures.

  3. Ensemble bayesian model averaging using markov chain Monte Carlo sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrugt, Jasper A; Diks, Cees G H; Clark, Martyn P

    2008-01-01

    Bayesian model averaging (BMA) has recently been proposed as a statistical method to calibrate forecast ensembles from numerical weather models. Successful implementation of BMA however, requires accurate estimates of the weights and variances of the individual competing models in the ensemble. In their seminal paper (Raftery etal. Mon Weather Rev 133: 1155-1174, 2(05)) has recommended the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for BMA model training, even though global convergence of this algorithm cannot be guaranteed. In this paper, we compare the performance of the EM algorithm and the recently developed Differential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for estimating the BMA weights and variances. Simulation experiments using 48-hour ensemble data of surface temperature and multi-model stream-flow forecasts show that both methods produce similar results, and that their performance is unaffected by the length of the training data set. However, MCMC simulation with DREAM is capable of efficiently handling a wide variety of BMA predictive distributions, and provides useful information about the uncertainty associated with the estimated BMA weights and variances.

  4. High average power magnetic modulator for copper lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, E.G.; Ball, D.G.; Birx, D.L.; Branum, J.D.; Peluso, S.E.; Langford, M.D.; Speer, R.D.; Sullivan, J.R.; Woods, P.G.

    1991-06-14

    Magnetic compression circuits show the promise of long life for operation at high average powers and high repetition rates. When the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory needed new modulators to drive their higher power copper lasers in the Laser Demonstration Facility (LDF), existing technology using thyratron switched capacitor inversion circuits did not meet the goal for long lifetimes at the required power levels. We have demonstrated that magnetic compression circuits can achieve this goal. Improving thyratron lifetime is achieved by increasing the thyratron conduction time, thereby reducing the effect of cathode depletion. This paper describes a three stage magnetic modulator designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper laser at a 4. 5 kHz repetition rate. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power and has exhibited MTBF of {approx}1000 hours when using thyratrons and even longer MTBFs with a series of stack of SCRs for the main switch. Within this paper, the electrical and mechanical designs for the magnetic compression circuits are discussed as are the important performance parameters of lifetime and jitter. Ancillary circuits such as the charge circuit and reset circuit are shown. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Can investor profit from the daily timing strategy? Average Stock Variance and Market Returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    we explore the forecasting power on industry classification portfolios other than the market. Further-Series Trading Strategy...........................................10 3.1 Trading Strategies.............................................22 4.2 Volatility of Assets and Speculative Bubbles............................22 4.3 Non-Traded

  6. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from ?-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A.; Daumit, K.; Hunter, J.; et al

    2015-02-18

    We measured a large suite of gas and particle phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gasmore »and particle phases, the latter being detected upon temperature programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50% of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e. multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50% of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption temperature based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas–particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of lower volatility components into the detected higher volatility compounds.« less

  7. Phase partitioning and volatility of secondary organic aerosol components formed from ?-pinene ozonolysis and OH oxidation: the importance of accretion products and other low volatility compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Hunter, J. F.; et al

    2015-07-16

    We measured a large suite of gas- and particle-phase multi-functional organic compounds with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington. The instrument was deployed on environmental simulation chambers to study monoterpene oxidation as a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source. We focus here on results from experiments utilizing an ionization method most selective towards acids (acetate negative ion proton transfer), but our conclusions are based on more general physical and chemical properties of the SOA. Hundreds of compounds were observed in both gas andmore »particle phases, the latter being detected by temperature-programmed thermal desorption of collected particles. Particulate organic compounds detected by the FIGAERO–HR-ToF-CIMS are highly correlated with, and explain at least 25–50 % of, the organic aerosol mass measured by an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Reproducible multi-modal structures in the thermograms for individual compounds of a given elemental composition reveal a significant SOA mass contribution from high molecular weight organics and/or oligomers (i.e., multi-phase accretion reaction products). Approximately 50 % of the HR-ToF-CIMS particle-phase mass is associated with compounds having effective vapor pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. The relative importance of these accretion-type and other extremely low volatility products appears to vary with photochemical conditions. We present a desorption-temperature-based framework for apportionment of thermogram signals into volatility bins. The volatility-based apportionment greatly improves agreement between measured and modeled gas-particle partitioning for select major and minor components of the SOA, consistent with thermal decomposition during desorption causing the conversion of lower volatility components into the detected higher volatility compounds.« less

  8. Environmental Aspects of Two Volatile Organic Compound Groundwater Treatment Designs at the Rocky Flats Site - 13135

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, Casey C.; DiSalvo, Rick; Boylan, John

    2013-07-01

    DOE's Rocky Flats Site in Colorado is a former nuclear weapons production facility that began operations in the early 1950's. Because of releases of hazardous substances to the environment, the federally owned property and adjacent offsite areas were placed on the CERCLA National Priorities List in 1989. The final remedy was selected in 2006. Engineered components of the remedy include four groundwater treatment systems that were installed before closure as CERCLA-accelerated actions. Two of the systems, the Mound Site Plume Treatment System and the East Trenches Plume Treatment System, remove low levels of volatile organic compounds using zero-valent iron media, thereby reducing the loading of volatile organic compounds in surface water resulting from the groundwater pathway. However, the zero-valent iron treatment does not reliably reduce all volatile organic compounds to consistently meet water quality goals. While adding additional zero-valent iron media capacity could improve volatile organic compound removal capability, installation of a solar powered air-stripper has proven an effective treatment optimization in further reducing volatile organic compound concentrations. A comparison of the air stripper to the alternative of adding additional zero-valent iron capacity to improve Mound Site Plume Treatment System and East Trenches Plume Treatment System treatment based on several key sustainable remediation aspects indicates the air stripper is also more 'environmentally friendly'. These key aspects include air pollutant emissions, water quality, waste management, transportation, and costs. (authors)

  9. General-relativistic constraints on the equation of state of dense matter implied by kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in neutron-star X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Kluzniak

    1997-12-18

    If the observed millisecond variability in the X-ray flux of several neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) is interpreted within a general-relativistic framework (Kluzniak, Michelson \\& Wagoner 1990) extant at the time of discovery, severe constraints can be placed on the equation of state (e.o.s.) of matter at supranuclear densities. The reported maximum frequency (1.14 +- 0.01 kHz) of quasiperiodic oscillations observed in sources as diverse as Sco X-1 and 4U 1728-34 would imply that the neutron star masses in these LMXBs are M > 1.9 M_solar, and hence many equations of state would be excluded. Among the very few still viable equations of state are the e.o.s. of Phandaripande and Smith (1975), and e.o.s. AV14 + UVII of Wiringa, Fiks \\& Fabrocini (1988).

  10. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighte d Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted

  11. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Average of Unweighted

  12. Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Average Stumpage Prices Measured in Price per Ton for Forest Products Large Pine Sawtimber Small Pine Sawtimber Hardwood Sawtimber Year Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Simple average of Unweighted and Weighted Prices Unweighted Average Prices Weighted Average Prices Simple average of Unweighted

  13. Vapor Transport of a Volatile Solvent for a Multicomponent Aerosol Droplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, James Q

    2015-01-01

    This work presents analytical formulas derived for evaluating vapor transport of a volatile solvent for an isolated multicomponent droplet in a quiescent environment, based on quasi-steady-state approximation. Among multiple solvent components, only one component is considered to be much more volatile than the rest such that other components are assumed to be nonvolatile remaining unchanged in the droplet during the process of (single-component) volatile solvent evaporation or condensation. For evaporating droplet, the droplet size often initially decreases following the familiar "d^2 law" at an accelerated rate. But toward the end, the rate of droplet size change diminishes due to the presence of nonvolatile cosolvent. Such an acceleration-deceleration reversal behavior is unique for evaporating multicomponent droplet, while the droplet of pure solvent has an accelerated rate of size change all the way through the end. This reversal behavior is also reflected in the droplet surface temperature evolution as "...

  14. Vapor Transport of a Volatile Solvent for a Multicomponent Aerosol Droplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Q. Feng

    2015-07-19

    This work presents analytical formulas derived for evaluating vapor transport of a volatile solvent for an isolated multicomponent droplet in a quiescent environment, based on quasi-steady-state approximation. Among multiple solvent components, only one component is considered to be much more volatile than the rest such that other components are assumed to be nonvolatile remaining unchanged in the droplet during the process of (single-component) volatile solvent evaporation or condensation. For evaporating droplet, the droplet size often initially decreases following the familiar "d^2 law" at an accelerated rate. But toward the end, the rate of droplet size change diminishes due to the presence of nonvolatile cosolvent. Such an acceleration-deceleration reversal behavior is unique for evaporating multicomponent droplet, while the droplet of pure solvent has an accelerated rate of size change all the way through the end. This reversal behavior is also reflected in the droplet surface temperature evolution as "S-shaped" curves. However, a closer mathematical examination of conditions for acceleration-deceleration reversal indicates that the acceleration phase may disappear when the amount of nonvolatile cosolvent is relatively small and ambient vapor pressure is relatively high. Because the net effect of adding nonvolatile cosolvent is to reduce the mole fraction of the volatile solvent such that the saturation vapor pressure is lowered, vapor condensation onto the multicomponent droplet is predicted to occur when the ambient vapor pressure is subsaturated with respect to that for the pure volatile solvent. In this case, the droplet will grow asymptotically toward a finite size. But when the ambient vapor pressure becomes supersaturated with respect to that for the pure volatile solvent, the condensation growth of droplet can continue indefinitely without bound.

  15. Method for removing volatile components from a ceramic article, and related processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klug, Frederic Joseph (Schenectady, NY); DeCarr, Sylvia Marie (Waterford, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  16. Method For Removing Volatile Components From A Gel-Cast Ceramic Article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klug, Frederic Joseph (Schenectady, NY); DeCarr, Sylvia Marie (Schenectady, NY)

    2004-09-07

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  17. The effect of chemical dispersants on the solution of volatile liquid hydrocarbons from spilled crude oil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Thomas Joseph

    1982-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS ON THE SOLUTION OF VOLATILE LIQUID HYDROCARBONS FROM SPILLED CRUDE OIL A Thesis by THOMAS JOSEPH McDONALD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Oceanography THE EFFECT OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS ON THE SOLUTION OF VOLATILE LIQUID HYDROCARBONS FROM SPILLED CRUDE OIL A Thesis by THOMAS JOSEPH McDONALD Approved as to style and content by...

  18. Thermal engine driven heat pump for recovery of volatile organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drake, Richard L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for separating volatile organic compounds from a stream of process gas. An internal combustion engine drives a plurality of refrigeration systems, an electrical generator and an air compressor. The exhaust of the internal combustion engine drives an inert gas subsystem and a heater for the gas. A water jacket captures waste heat from the internal combustion engine and drives a second heater for the gas and possibly an additional refrigeration system for the supply of chilled water. The refrigeration systems mechanically driven by the internal combustion engine effect the precipitation of volatile organic compounds from the stream of gas.

  19. Fact #794: August 26, 2013 How Much Does an Average Vehicle Owner...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Each Year? Fact 794: August 26, 2013 How Much Does an Average Vehicle Owner Pay in Fuel Taxes Each Year? According to the Federal Highway Administration, the average fuel economy...

  20. Model comparison for automatic characterization and classification of average ERPs using visual oddball paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polikar, Robi

    Model comparison for automatic characterization and classification of average ERPs using visual December 2008 Keywords: EEG ERP Attention P300 N200 Oddball Pattern recognition Linear discriminant responses from averaged event-related potentials (ERPs) along with identifying appropriate features

  1. Fact #638: August 30, 2010 Average Expenditure for a New Car...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: August 30, 2010 Average Expenditure for a New Car Declines in Relation to Family Earnings Fact 638: August 30, 2010 Average Expenditure for a New Car Declines in Relation to...

  2. Fact #715: February 20, 2012 The Average Age of Light Vehicles Continues to Rise

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The average age for cars and light trucks continues to rise as consumers hold onto their vehicles longer. Between 1995 and 2011, the average age for cars increased by 32% from 8.4 years to 11.1...

  3. TIME-AVERAGING IN THE MARINE FOSSIL RECORD: OVERVIEW OF STRATEGIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , PALEOECOLOGY, BENTHIC, MARINE, TIME-AVERAGING. Rl~SUM]~ - Le raisonnement pal~ontologique qui a conduit ~ la

  4. Cold-Storage Potential of Four Yellow-Fleshed Peach Cultivars Defined by Their Volatile Compounds Emissions, Standard Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    Cold-Storage Potential of Four Yellow-Fleshed Peach Cultivars Defined by Their Volatile Compounds in firmness during both storage and commercialization periods. In contrast, the SSC, TA, and color remained constant during storage. Ten days of cold storage produced the highest total volatile emissions

  5. Induced Release of a Plant-Defense Volatile `Deceptively' Attracts Insect Vectors to Plants Infected with a Bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    , and pathogen. Pathogen-induced plant responses can include changes in volatile and nonvolatile secondary metabolites as well as major plant nutrients. Experiments were conducted to understand how a plant pathogenicInduced Release of a Plant-Defense Volatile `Deceptively' Attracts Insect Vectors to Plants

  6. Space-based formaldehyde measurements as constraints on volatile organic compound emissions in east and south Asia and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    Space-based formaldehyde measurements as constraints on volatile organic compound emissions in east a continuous 6-year record (1996­2001) of GOME satellite measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO) columns over east (2007), Space-based formaldehyde measurements as constraints on volatile organic compound emissions

  7. PII S0016-7037(01)00802-X Volatilization kinetics of silicon carbide in reducing gases: An experimental study with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PII S0016-7037(01)00802-X Volatilization kinetics of silicon carbide in reducing gases August 21, 2001) Abstract--The volatilization kinetics of single crystal -SiC, polycrystalline -Si in terrestrial rocks (Bauer et al., 1963; Marshint- sev et al., 1982; Leung, 1990; Filippidis, 1993), although

  8. A structural analysis of vehicle design responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    A structural analysis of vehicle design responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy policy Ching 2009 Accepted 29 August 2009 Keywords: Corporate Average Fuel Economy Energy policy Oligopolistic market Game theory Vehicle design a b s t r a c t The US Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE

  9. The accretion of solar material onto white dwarfs: No mixing with core material implies that the mass of the white dwarf is increasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starrfield, Sumner

    2014-04-15

    Cataclysmic Variables (CVs) are close binary star systems with one component a white dwarf (WD) and the other a larger cooler star that fills its Roche Lobe. The cooler star is losing mass through the inner Lagrangian point of the binary and some unknown fraction of this material is accreted by the WD. One consequence of the WDs accreting material, is the possibility that they are growing in mass and will eventually reach the Chandrasekhar Limit. This evolution could result in a Supernova Ia (SN Ia) explosion and is designated the Single Degenerate Progenitor (SD) scenario. This paper is concerned with the SD scenario for SN Ia progenitors. One problem with the single degenerate scenario is that it is generally assumed that the accreting material mixes with WD core material at some time during the accretion phase of evolution and, since the typical WD has a carbon-oxygen CO core, the mixing results in large amounts of carbon and oxygen being brought up into the accreted layers. The presence of enriched carbon causes enhanced nuclear fusion and a Classical Nova explosion. Both observations and theoretical studies of these explosions imply that more mass is ejected than is accreted. Thus, the WD in a Classical Nova system is losing mass and cannot be a SN Ia progenitor. However, the composition in the nuclear burning region is important and, in new calculations reported here, the consequences to the WD of no mixing of accreted material with core material have been investigated so that the material involved in the explosion has only a Solar composition. WDs with a large range in initial masses and mass accretion rates have been evolved. I find that once sufficient material has been accreted, nuclear burning occurs in all evolutionary sequences and continues until a thermonuclear runaway (TNR) occurs and the WD either ejects a small amount of material or its radius grows to about 10{sup 12} cm and the evolution is ended. In all cases where mass ejection occurs, the mass of the ejecta is far less than the mass of the accreted material. Therefore, all the WDs are growing in mass. It is also found that the accretion time to explosion can be sufficiently short for a 1.0M{sub ?} WD that recurrent novae can occur on a low mass WD. This mass is lower than typically assumed for the WDs in recurrent nova systems. Finally, the predicted surface temperatures when the WD is near the peak of the explosion imply that only the most massive WDs will be significant X-ray emitters at this time.

  10. QUANTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STORMWATER FROM A PARKING LOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 QUANTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STORMWATER FROM A PARKING LOT (VOCs) in stormwater from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g. gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important non-point sources of VOCs, with each being important

  11. Risk Management Based on Stochastic Volatility Ernst Eberlein, Jan Kallsen, Jrn Kristen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallsen, Jan

    Risk Management Based on Stochastic Volatility Ernst Eberlein, Jan Kallsen, Jörn Kristen #3; University of Freiburg Abstract Risk management approaches that do not incorporate randomly changing and Keller (1995) can be applied quite easily for risk management purposes. Moreover, we compare

  12. Analysis of the atmospheric distribution, sources, and sinks of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    chemicals based on measurements over the Pacific during TRACE-P H. B. Singh,1 L. J. Salas,1 R. B. Chatfield measurements of a large number of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals (OVOC) were carried out in the Pacific of OVOC is comparable to that of methane and far exceeds that of NMHC. A comparison of these data

  13. Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Cliff

    1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

  14. Accurate dispensing of volatile reagents on demand for chemical reactions in EWOD chips{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accurate dispensing of volatile reagents on demand for chemical reactions in EWOD chips{ Huijiang the use of a filler liquid (e.g., oil). These properties pose challenges for delivering controlled volumes are introduced to the chip, independent of time delays between dispensing operations. On-demand dispensing

  15. On the volatile inventory of Titan from isotopic abundances in nitrogen and methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    On the volatile inventory of Titan from isotopic abundances in nitrogen and methane Jonathan I enhancement. The enrichment in deuterated methane is now much better determined than it was when Pinto et al dissociation rates of normal and deuterated methane. We utilize the improved data and models to compute initial

  16. Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 429..447

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agriculture and Trade Opportunities for Tanzania: Past Volatility and Future Climate Changerode_672 global heterogeneity in climate-induced agricultural variability,Tanzania has the potential to substan owing to supply shocks in major exporting regions, Tanzania may be able to export more maize at higher

  17. Biogenic volatile emissions from the soil J. Peuelas1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tholl, Dorothea

    Review Biogenic volatile emissions from the soil J. Peñuelas1,2 , D. Asensio1,2 , D. Tholl3 , K emissions to the atmosphere are often 1­2 (0­3) orders of magnitude lower than those from aboveground of microbial and root VOC emissions. Furthermore, VOC profiles are discussed as non-destructive fingerprints

  18. Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis Choong-Min Ryu*, Mohamed A. Farag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    Bacterial volatiles promote growth in Arabidopsis Choong-Min Ryu*, Mohamed A. Farag , Chia-Hui Hu of agricultural species for the purposes of growth enhance- ment, including increased seed emergence, plant weight when seeds were coated with PGPR before planting (1), and plant weight of tuber-treated potatoes

  19. An empirical behavioral model of liquidity and volatility Szabolcs Mike and J. Doyne Farmer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    develop a behavioral model for liquidity and volatility based on empirical reg- ularities in trading order interesting regularities in the way trading orders are placed and cancelled. The resulting simple model of absolute returns |r| are well described by a power law of the form P(|r| > R) R-r , with a value of r

  20. Detecting Turning Points of Trading Price and Return Volatility for Market Surveillance Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Longbing

    Trading agent concept is very useful for trading strategy design and market mechanism design for trading strategy design and market mechanism design [2]. Besides that, we are also particularly interestedDetecting Turning Points of Trading Price and Return Volatility for Market Surveillance Agents

  1. Seasonal Variation in Volatile Compound Profiles of Preen Gland Secretions of the Dark-eyed Junco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketterson, Ellen D.

    (Junco hyemalis) Helena A. Soini & Sara E. Schrock & Kevin E. Bruce & Donald Wiesler & Ellen D. Ketterson (AED) were utilized to analyze seasonal changes in volatile components of preen oil secretions in Junco . Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry J Chem Ecol DOI 10.1007/s10886-006-9210-0 H. A. Soini :K. E

  2. Zero-Carbon Cloud: A Volatile Resource for High-Performance Computing Andrew A. Chien

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krintz, Chandra

    to exploit the volatile power efficiently. Keywords-Data Center; Stranded Power; Green computing; sustainable deployment of renewable power generation creates a growing opportunity in "stranded power", power that is generated a close to zero-cost, but not usable by the power grid. We propose to use this stranded power

  3. Acquisition and analysis of volatile memory from android devices Joe Sylve a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard III, Golden G.

    Acquisition and analysis of volatile memory from android devices Joe Sylve a , Andrew Case b 24 October 2011 Keywords: Android Memory forensics Memory analysis Linux Mobile device forensics a b s t r a c t The Android operating system for mobile phones, which is still relatively new, is rapidly

  4. Thursday, March 15, 2007 POSTER SESSION II: MOON: SOILS, POLES, AND VOLATILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Thursday, March 15, 2007 POSTER SESSION II: MOON: SOILS, POLES, AND VOLATILES 6:30 p.m. Fitness Center Schultz R. A. Siddharthan R. Strength of Lunar Soil Using the Cam Cap Approach [#1127] We use a standard Cam Cap approach to model the strength of returned Apollo 12 lunar soil. Cohesion, friction

  5. Multi-scale Jump and Volatility Analysis for High-Frequency Financial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jianqing

    Multi-scale Jump and Volatility Analysis for High-Frequency Financial Data Jianqing Fan and Yazhen Wang Version of May 2007 Abstract The wide availability of high-frequency data for many financial-diffusion processes observed with market microstructure noise are frequently used to model high-frequency financial

  6. Large Volatility Matrix Inference via Combining Low-Frequency and High-Frequency Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yazhen

    Large Volatility Matrix Inference via Combining Low-Frequency and High-Frequency Approaches Minjing adequate estimates and forecasts. Furthermore, since high-frequency financial data for different assets applicable. To overcome those difficulties we explore a novel approach that combines high-frequency

  7. Effects of NOx on the volatility of secondary organic aerosol from isoprene photooxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Lu; Kollman, Matthew S.; Song, Chen; Shilling, John E.; Ng, L. N.

    2014-01-28

    The effects of NOx on the volatility of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from isoprene photooxidation are investigated in environmental chamber experiments. Two types of experiments are performed. In HO2-dominant experiments, organic peroxy radicals (RO2) primarily react with HO2. In mixed experiments, RO2 reacts through multiple pathways. The volatility and oxidation state of isoprene SOA is sensitive to and displays a non-linear dependence on NOx levels. When initial NO/isoprene ratio is approximately 3 (ppbv:ppbv), SOA are shown to be most oxidized and least volatile, associated with the highest SOA yield. A High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is applied to characterize the key chemical properties of aerosols. While the composition of SOA in mixed experiments does not change substantially over time, SOA become less volatile and more oxidized as oxidation progresses in HO2-dominant experiments. Analysis of the SOA composition suggests that the further reactions of organic peroxides and alcohols may produce carboxylic acids, which might play a strong role in SOA aging.

  8. ESTIMATING THE VOLATILITY OF SPOT PRICES IN RESTRUCTURED ELECTRICITY MARKETS AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR OPTION VALUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft 1e ESTIMATING THE VOLATILITY OF SPOT PRICES IN RESTRUCTURED ELECTRICITY MARKETS depends critically on the specification and estimation of the stochastic process that describes the price path. Accurate valuation of claims based on competitive electricity prices has proved problematic

  9. Sulfur Volatiles in Guava (Psidium guajava L.) Leaves: Possible Defense Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Jacqueline K.

    dioxide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide (DMS), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), methional, and dimethyl-Wax, and PLOT columns and MS spectra in the case of DMDS and DMS. DMDS is an insect toxic, defensive volatile for the protective effect of guava against the HLB vector. DMDS is formed immediately after crushing, becoming

  10. Experimental studies of actinide volatilities with application to mixed waste oxidation processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krikorian, O.H.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Condit, R.H.; Adamson, M.G.; Fontes, A.S. Jr.; Fleming, D.L.

    1993-04-30

    The transpiration technique is used to measure volatilities of U from U{sub 3}O{sub 8}(s), Pu from PuO{sub 2}(s) and Pu and Am from PuO{sub 2}/2%AmO{sub 2}(s) in the presence of steam and oxygen at temperatures ranging from 900 to 1300{degree}C.

  11. Volatile fatty acid fermentation of AFEX-treated newspaper and bagasse by rumen microorganisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blasig, Jorge Dari?o

    1991-01-01

    production vatied between 6. 6 and 8. 2 mmoles/g volatile solids (VS) digested and biogas (approximately 40% methane ranged from 0. 18 and 0. 29 L/g VS digested for organic waste materials of various origin and composition. The loading rates varied between...

  12. Solutions to the Exercises of Section 1.6. 1.6.1. If 0 is minimax, then by definition, sup R(, 0) = infD sup R(, ). This implies that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    Solutions to the Exercises of Section 1.6. 1.6.1. If 0 is minimax, then by definition, sup R(, 0) = infD sup R(, ). This implies that sup R(, 0) sup R(, ) for all D . This in turn implies that R( , 0) sup R(, ) for all and for all D . Conversely, if R( , 0) sup R(, ) for all and for all D

  13. The Impact of Clustering on the Average Path Length in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

    , it is crucial to measure the efficiency of the generated backbone in information transport. Failure to do so-cost and small-size; allowing them to be used in large numbers to accomodate for any failures during de- ployment failures, mobility or energy depletion. Also, the small-size nodes imply that their energy, processing

  14. Time-averaged quantum dynamics and the validity of the effective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    develop a technique for finding the dynamical evolution in time of an averaged density matrix. The result is an equation of evolution that includes an effective Hamiltonian, as...

  15. Measurement of plutonium and americium volatilities under thermal process conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krikorian, O.H.; Condit, R.H.; Fontes, A.S. Jr.; Fleming, D.L.; Magana, J.W.; Morris, W.F.; Adamson, M.G.

    1993-04-28

    We have used the transpiration method to measure volatilities of Pu and Am from PuO{sub 2}(s) and PuO{sub 2}/2% AmO{sub 2}(s) in the presence of steam and oxygen at temperatures of 1230--1430 K. We find the volatile species to be PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) and AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g) at vapor pressures on the order of 10{sup {minus}10} atm and 10 {sup {minus}12} atm respectively under measurement conditions. For the Pu volatilization reaction, PuO{sub 2}(s) + 1/2 0{sub 2}(9) + H{sub 2}0(g) = PuO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g), we obtain a free energy of reaction of {Delta}G{sup O}{sub T} = 231.3--0.0109 T in kj/mol, and for the Am volatilization reaction, AmO{sub 2}(s.s. in PuO{sub 2}) + 1/2 0{sub 2}(9) + H{sub 2}0(g) = AmO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}(g), we obtain AG{sup O}{sub T} = 223.9--0.0109 T in kj/mol. We apply these results to the Rocky Flats Plant Fluidized Bed Incinerator to assess the amount of volatile Pu and Am produced in the secondary combustor chamber. Taking operating conditions of 550C combustor temperature, 40 kmols/h of total gas flow at 1 atm pressure, 0.1 atm 0{sub 2}(9), 0.05 atm H{sub 2}0(g), PuO{sub 2} (s) containing 200 ppm AmO{sub 2} in the bed, and 6000 h of operating time per year, gives volatilization rates of 7 {times} 10 {sup {minus}6}g Pu and 4 {times} 10 {sup {minus}9}g Am/y.

  16. Response of fine particulate matter to emission changes of oxides of nitrogen and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds in the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandra P. Tsimpidi; Vlassis A. Karydis; Spyros N. Pandis

    2008-11-15

    A three-dimensional chemical transport model (Particulate Matter Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions) is used to investigate changes in fine particle (PM2.5) concentrations in response to 50% emissions changes of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during July 2001 and January 2002 in the eastern United States. The reduction of NOx emissions by 50% during the summer results in lower average oxidant levels and lowers PM2.5 (8% on average), mainly because of reductions of sulfate (9-11%), nitrate (45-58%), and ammonium (7-11%). The organic particulate matter (PM) slightly decreases in rural areas, whereas it increases in cities by a few percent when NOx is reduced. Reduction of NOx during winter causes an increase of the oxidant levels and a rather complicated response of the PM components, leading to small net changes. Sulfate increases (8-17%), nitrate decreases (18-42%), organic PM slightly increases, and ammonium either increases or decreases a little. The reduction of VOC emissions during the summer causes on average a small increase of the oxidant levels and a marginal increase in PM2.5. This small net change is due to increases in the inorganic components and decreases of the organic ones. Reduction of VOC emissions during winter results in a decrease of the oxidant levels and a 5-10% reduction of PM2.5 because of reductions in nitrate (4-19%), ammonium (4-10%), organic PM (12-14%), and small reductions in sulfate. Although sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) reduction is the single most effective approach for sulfate control, the coupled decrease of SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions in both seasons is more effective in reducing total PM2.5 mass than the SO{sub 2} reduction alone. 34 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Effects of volatiles on melt production and reactive flow in the mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Magmatism in the Earth interior has a significant impact on its dynamic, thermal and compositional evolution. Experimental studies of petrology of mantle melting find that small concentrations of water and carbon dioxide have a significant effect on the solidus temperature and distribution of melting in the upper mantle. However, it has remained unclear what effect small fractions of deep, volatile-rich melts have on melting and melt transport in the shallow asthenosphere. We present a method to simulate the thermochemical evolution of the upper mantle in the presence of volatiles. The method is based on a novel, thermodynamically consistent framework for reactive, disequilibrium, multi-component melting/crystallisation. This is coupled with a system of equations representing conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for a partially molten grain aggregate. Application of this method to upwelling-column models demonstrates that it captures leading-order features of hydrated and carbonated peridotite melting. ...

  18. Measurement of surface emission flux rates for volatile organic compounds at Technical Area 54

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trujillo, V.; Morgenstern, M.; Krier, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Gilkeson, R. [Weirich and Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The survey described in this report was conducted to estimate the mass of volatile organic compounds venting to the atmosphere from active and inactive waste disposal sites at Technical Area 54. A large number of nonintrusive passive sample collection devices were placed on the ground surface for 72 hours to characterize an area of approximately 150 acres. Results provided an indication of the boundary location of the known volatile organic plume, plume constituents, and isolated high concentration areas. The data from this survey enhanced existing data from a limited number of monitor wells currently used for plume surveillance. Results indicate that the estimated mass emission to the atmosphere is orders of magnitude lower than what is considered a small flux rate at a spill site or a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act landfill and is far below the threshold limit established by the State of New Mexico as an air quality concern.

  19. Volatile transport on inhomogeneous surfaces: II. Numerical calculations (VT3D)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Leslie A

    2015-01-01

    Several distant icy worlds have atmospheres that are in vapor-pressure equilibrium with their surface volatiles, including Pluto, Triton, and, probably, several large KBOs near perihelion. Studies of the volatile and thermal evolution of these have been limited by computational speed, especially for models that treat surfaces that vary with both latitude and longitude. In order to expedite such work, I present a new numerical model for the seasonal behavior of Pluto and Triton which (i) uses initial conditions that improve convergence, (ii) uses an expedient method for handling the transition between global and non-global atmospheres, (iii) includes local conservation of energy and global conservation of mass to partition energy between heating, conduction, and sublimation or condensation, (iv) uses time-stepping algorithms that ensure stability while allowing larger timesteps, and (v) can include longitudinal variability. This model, called VT3D, has been used in Young (2012), Young (2013), Olkin et al. (201...

  20. The impact of crude-oil price volatility on agricultural employment in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uri, N.D. [Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This study focuses on the impact of fluctuations in the price of crude oil on agricultural employment in the United States. After reviewing previous assessments of the issue, the existence of an empirical relationship between agricultural employment and crude oil price volatility is established using Granger causality. Subsequently, the nature of the relationship is estimated with the results suggesting that at least three full years are required before the measurable impacts of a percentage change in the real price of crude oil on the change in agricultural employment are exhausted. Finally, the structural stability of the functional relationship between the change in agricultural employment and the volatility of the price of crude oil, the percentage changes in expected net farm income, realized technological innovation, and the wage rate is examined.

  1. DISTRIBUTED POSE AVERAGING IN CAMERA NETWORKS VIA CONSENSUS ON SE(3) Roberto Tron, Rene Vidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISTRIBUTED POSE AVERAGING IN CAMERA NETWORKS VIA CONSENSUS ON SE(3) Roberto Tron, Ren´e Vidal distributed algorithms for esti- mating the average pose of an object viewed by a localized network of camera networks; pose estimation; consensus; optimization on manifolds. 1. INTRODUCTION Recent hardware

  2. Pipeline for the Creation of Surface-based Averaged Brain Atlases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menzel, Randolf - Institut für Biologie

    Pipeline for the Creation of Surface-based Averaged Brain Atlases Anja Kuß Hans-Christian Hege from different image modalities and experiments. In this paper we describe a standardized pipeline of individuals. The pipeline consists of the major steps imaging and preprocessing, segmentation, averaging

  3. Measuring second-order time-average pressure B. L. Smith and G. W. Swift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    , 43.25.Zx, 43.25.Gf MFH I. INTRODUCTION In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, streaming can , generate both harmonics such as p2,2 and time- averaged phenomena such as streaming and the time- averaged and p1 . The nature and magnitude of p2,0 have generated activity and controversy in the acoustics

  4. A comparison of spatial averaging and Cadzow's method for array wavenumber estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.B.; Clark, G.A.

    1989-10-31

    We are concerned with resolving superimposed, correlated seismic waves with small-aperture arrays. The limited time-bandwidth product of transient seismic signals complicates the task. We examine the use of MUSIC and Cadzow's ML estimator with and without subarray averaging for resolution potential. A case study with real data favors the MUSIC algorithm and a multiple event covariance averaging scheme.

  5. Allowed mesoscopic point group symmetries in domain average engineering of perovskite ferroelectric crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Allowed mesoscopic point group symmetries in domain average engineering of perovskite ferroelectric average engineering in proper ferroelectric systems arising from the cubic Pm3¯m symmetry perovskite­4 Both solid solution systems have a perovskite structure. Poling along one of the pseudocubic axes

  6. StructuralHammingDistance Average SHD Results -Child -Sample Size 500

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Laura E.

    , and Hailfinder10 Networks. C22_complete_shd_results.tex; 5/08/2005; 16:24; p.2 #12;0 500 1000 1500 x MMHC OR1k=5 GES StructuralHammingDistance Average SHD Results - Child - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std TPDA GES StructuralHammingDistance Average SHD Results - Child3 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std

  7. A Structural Analysis of Vehicle Design Responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    09-0588 A Structural Analysis of Vehicle Design Responses to Corporate Average Fuel Economy Policy, Michalek, and Hendrickson 1 ABSTRACT The U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations, which aim fuel economy; Energy policy; Oligopolistic market; Mixed logit #12;Shiau, Michalek, and Hendrickson 2 1

  8. Surface-based display of volume-averaged cerebellar imaging data Jrn Diedrichsen & Ewa Zotow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    Surface-based display of volume-averaged cerebellar imaging data Jörn Diedrichsen & Ewa Zotow representation of the cerebellum as a visualization tool for volume-averaged cerebellar data. Volume-based) Data projected onto a surface- based representation based on a single anatomy [2] displays single

  9. ON THE SELF-AVERAGING OF WAVE ENERGY IN RANDOM GUILLAUME BAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bal, Guillaume

    ON THE SELF-AVERAGING OF WAVE ENERGY IN RANDOM MEDIA GUILLAUME BAL Abstract. We consider the stabilization (self-averaging) and destabilization of the energy of waves propagating in random media transport equations for arbitrary statistical moments of the wave field is used to show that wave energy

  10. Statewide average major timber product prices started the year on a decline except

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statewide average major timber product prices started the year on a decline except for a slight rise in hardwood pulpwood price. Pine sawlog price continued to fall during the January/February 2008 period. State- wide pine sawlog averaged $35.20/ton, the lowest price since January 2006. This was a 5

  11. Timber prices remained sluggish during May/June 2009. Statewide average stump-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timber prices remained sluggish during May/June 2009. Statewide average stump- age prices of all on hous- ing starts and lumber prices nationally at the end of the period. Statewide pine sawlog prices. The average pine sawlog price was $20.41 per ton for Northeast Texas and $22.60 per ton for Southeast Texas

  12. Reaction-time binning: A simple method for increasing the resolving power of ERP averages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poli, Riccardo

    Reaction-time binning: A simple method for increasing the resolving power of ERP averages RICCARDO-locked, response-locked, and ERP-locked averaging are effective methods for reducing artifacts in ERP analysis. However, they suffer from a magnifying-glass effect: they increase the resolution of specific ERPs

  13. Ordinary kriging for on-demand average wind interpolation of in-situ wind sensor data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middleton, Stuart E.

    1 Ordinary kriging for on-demand average wind interpolation of in-situ wind sensor data Zlatko comes from wind in-situ observation stations in an area approximately 200km by 125km. We provide on-demand average wind interpolation maps. These spatial estimates can then be compared with the results of other

  14. Tradeoffs and Average-Case Equilibria in Selfish Routing Martin Hoefer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    the expected price of anarchy of the game for various social cost functions. For total latency social cost cost in polyno- mial time. Furthermore, our analyses of the expected prices are average-case analyses, 2007 Abstract We consider the price of selfish routing in terms of tradeoffs and from an average

  15. A spatiotemporal auto-regressive moving average model for solar radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasbey, Chris

    A spatiotemporal auto-regressive moving average model for solar radiation C.A. Glasbey and D 1). Solar radiation, averaged over ten minute intervals, was recorded at each site for two years otherwise there are too many parameters to be estimated. As we wish to simulate solar radiation on a network

  16. The Impact of Tax Shocks and Oil Price Volatility on Risk - A Study of North Sea Oilfield Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kretzschmar, Gavin Lee; Moles, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We examine the impact of market volatility and increased fiscal take on risk in strategic natural resource projects. An increase in 2006 UK oilfield taxation is used as a natural experiment for assessing the impact of a ...

  17. Airborne and ground based measurements of volatile organic compounds using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry in Texas and Mexico City 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortner, Edward Charles

    2009-05-15

    Measurements of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) are reported from recent airborne and surface based field campaigns. The Southeast Texas Tetroon Study (SETTS) ...

  18. Quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil via passive sampling : polyethylene sampler design and optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, David G. (David Gannon)

    2015-01-01

    The potential for the release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to our natural environment is pervasive. However, the ability to accurately measure and predict VOC soil vapor concentrations is still limited. A polyethylene ...

  19. Benchtop testing of polyethylene passive sampling towards a quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil vapours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soo, Yu Xiang Jaren

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of polyethylene (PE) as a passive sampler for quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was analysed in this work by means of a benchtop testing. A benchtop physical model was setup, which ...

  20. Evaluation of the colossal electroresistance (CER) effect and its application in the non-volatile Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicaksono, Aulia Tegar

    2009-01-01

    Flash memory, the current leading technology for non-volatile memory (NVM), is projected by many to run obsolete in the face of future miniaturization trend in the semiconductor devices due to some of its technical ...

  1. Evaluation of a Rice/Soy Fermentate on Broiler Performance, Litter Characteristics, and Fecal Odorant Volatilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Mallori

    2012-10-19

    , 2000). As manure decomposes, as many as 80 to 200 odorous compounds can be produced. Some of the principle classes of odorous compounds include amines, sulfides, volatile fatty acids, indoles, skatoles, mercaptans, alcohols, and carbonyls (Choi et...; Vomitus 0.19 ? Isobutyric Acid Rancid; Butter; Cheese 1.5 ? Valeric Acid Foul 0.037 ? Isovaleric Acid Fatty Acid; Sweat; Buttery 0.078 ? Indole Piggy; Mothball; Burnt; Musty 0.3 ? Skatole Outhouse; Fecal 0.0056 ? Dimethyl Sulfide Decayed Cabbage 3 ?...

  2. The role of non-volatile memory from an application perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettering, Brett M; Nunez, James A

    2010-09-16

    Current, emerging, and future NVM (non-volatile memory) technologies give us hope that we will be able to architect HPC (high performance computing) systems that initially use them in a memory and storage hierarchy, and eventually use them as the memory and storage for the system, complete with ownership and protections as a HDD-based (hard-disk-drive-based) file system provides today.

  3. Electron impact and chemical ionization mass spectral analysis of a volatile uranyl derivative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reutter, D.J.; Hardy, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quadrupole mass spectral analysis of the volatile uranium ligand complex bis (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato) dioxouranium-di-n-butyl sulfoxide is described utilizing electron impact (EI) and methane chemical ionization (CI) ion sources. All major ions are tentatively identified and the potential usefulness of this complex for determining uranium isotope /sup 235/U//sup 238/U abundance is demonstrated.

  4. Field measurements of ammonia volatilization from surface applications of nitrogen fertilizers to a calcareous soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, W. L

    1977-01-01

    , according to Mortland (1958), ". . . the conflicting nature of the data on losses of ammonia from soils. . . does not necessarily represent in- consistency but arises from the multitude of variables affecting ammonia sorption. Variations in techniques...FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF AMMONIA VOLATILIZATION FROM SURFACE APPLICATIONS OF NITROGEN FERTILIZERS TO A CALCAREOUS SOIL A Thesis by WILLIAM LEONARD HARGROVE, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment...

  5. Sensitivity of Investor Reaction to Market Direction and Volatility: The Case of Dividend Change Announcements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Paul D.; Docking, Diane Scott

    2004-02-01

    outliers (greater than five standard deviations from the mean). These screens yield a final sample of 4,336 regular announcements: 1,436 dividend increases and 2900 dividend decreases. 14 B. Sample Partitioning Suppose that investors price assets... partition the 4,336 announcements according to the underlying market direction and volatility experienced during the 30 trading day interval (approximately six weeks) preceding the event date [days -31, 13...

  6. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, Curtis Dale (Albuquerque, NM); Thornberg, Steven Michael (Peralta, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A system for on-line quantitative monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) includes pressure reduction means for carrying a gaseous sample from a first location to a measuring input location maintained at a low pressure, the system utilizing active feedback to keep both the vapor flow and pressure to a chemical ionization mode mass spectrometer constant. A multiple input manifold for VOC and gas distribution permits a combination of calibration gases or samples to be applied to the spectrometer.

  7. Stochastic volatility models with persistent latent factors: theory and its applications to asset prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hyoung Il

    2008-10-10

    filter. See, e.g., Tanizaki (1996) for a general introduction to the density-based Kalman fil- ter. The second approach applies the standard Bayesian procedure and estimates the unknown parameters and latent factor by their posterior means, which... transition and persistent la- tent factors. We argue that this model has advantages over theconventional stochastic model for the persistent volatility factor. Though the linear filtering is widely used in the state space model, the simulation result, as well...

  8. Performance specifications for technology development: Application for characterization of volatile organic compounds in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, S.E.; Doskey, P.V.; Erickson, M.D.; Lindahl, P.C.

    1994-07-01

    This report contains information about technology development for the monitoring and remediation of environmental pollution caused by the release of volatile organic compounds. Topics discussed include: performance specification processes, gas chromatography, mass spectrometer, fiber-optic chemical sensors, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, piezoelectric sensors and electrochemical sensors. These methods are analyzed for their cost efficiency, accuracy, and the ability to meet the needs of the customer.

  9. Southern California Edison's (SCE) Research Program for Industrial Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Emissions Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, R. D.; Cascone, R.; Reese, J.

    1990-01-01

    EDISON'S (SCE) RESEARCH PROGRAM FOR INDUSTRIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) EMISSIONS CONTROL ROGER D. SUNG RON CASCONE JIM REESE Program Manager Senior Consultant Manager Southern California Edison Chem Systems, Inc. Applied Utility Systems... Rosemead, California Tarrytown, New York Santa Ana, California ABSTRACT SCE has developed and implemented a research program for customer retention through VOC emission control. Following characterization of problematic emission sources, SCE has...

  10. A new volatility term in the theory of options with transaction costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Morozovsky

    2000-04-03

    The introduction of transaction costs into the theory of option pricing could lead not only to the change of return for options, but also to the change of the volatility. On the base of assumption of the portfolio analysis, a new equation for option pricing with transaction costs is derived. A new solution for the option price is obtained for the time close to expiration date.

  11. Effect of moisture on air stripping of non volatile organic contaminants from soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Roberto

    1991-01-01

    of the unsaturated soil zone by organic chemicals has been receiving considerable attention recently since it is the major source of ground water pollution. The main objective of this work was to study the viability of air stripping non volatile organic... in the solid phase. Phenol, an EPA priority pollutant which has been identified in ground water supplies, was the model contaminant. Studies involved stripping the contaminant from a column of Norwood/Westwood soil under several moisture conditions. Removal...

  12. What does the 2°C Target Imply for a Global Climate Agreement in 2020? The LIMITS Study on Durban Action Platform Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Tavoni, Massimo; Aboumahboub, Tino; Luderer, Gunnar; Calvin, Katherine V.; DeMaere, Gauthier; Krey, Volker; Riahi, Keywan; Rosler, Hilke; Schaeffer, Michiel; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    This paper provides a novel and comprehensive model?based assessment of possible outcomes of the Durban Platform negotiations with a focus on emissions reduction requirements, the consistency with the 2°C target and global economic impacts. The Durban Action scenarios investigated in the LIMITS study—all assuming the implementation of comprehensive global emission reductions after 2020, but assuming different 2020 emission reduction levels and different long?term stabilization targets—show that the probability of exceeding the 2°C limit increases with stabilization target from below one third for 450?470 ppm to 40?60% for 490?510 ppm in 2100. Global time?averaged economic costs of the Durban Action scenarios are limited across models, and are largely unaffected by the stringency of 2020 pledges. By contrast, the economic impact of delaying action beyond 2030 is much stronger on transitional costs. The main significance of short term action in the period 2010?2030 lies in preparing the ground for steep emissions reductions thereafter by inducing global emissions to peak and decline. The institutional challenges of all scenarios with fragmented near?term climate policy can be expected to be high as reflected in a steep rise of carbon prices and decarbonization rates until 2040. We conclude that an agreement on comprehensive emissions reductions to be implemented from 2020 onwards has particular significance for meeting long term climate policy objectives.

  13. 1. The 600 pound pumpkin had 99% water. This implies that it had 594 pounds of water. Let x be the weight of the pumpkin after it loses water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, John

    1. The 600 pound pumpkin had 99% water. This implies that it had 594 pounds of water. Let x be the weight of the pumpkin after it loses water and has 98.5% percent water. Then, we have that 1.5% of x = 6 surface in Beti's cup and hb be the depth after half of Alphonse's cup's contents have been transferred

  14. Fact #870: April 27, 2015 Corporate Average Fuel Economy Progress, 1978-2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) is the sales-weighted harmonic mean fuel economy of a manufacturer’s fleet of new cars or light trucks in a certain model year (MY). First enacted by...

  15. Giant aeolian dune size determined by the average depth of the atmospheric boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tlemcen, Algeria. 3 Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Center for Nonlinear be related to statistically averaged quantities. The detailed modelling of the atmospheric processes is very

  16. The averaging process in permeability estimation from well-test data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, D.S. (Saudi Aramco (SA))

    1990-09-01

    Permeability estimates from the pressure derivative or the slope of the semilog plot usually are considered to be averages of some large ill-defined reservoir volume. This paper presents results of a study of the averaging process, including identification of the region of the reservoir that influences permeability estimates, and a specification of the relative contribution of the permeability of various regions to the estimate of average permeability. The diffusion equation for the pressure response of a well situated in an infinite reservoir where permeability is an arbitrary function of position was solved for the case of small variations from a mean value. Permeability estimates from the slope of the plot of pressure vs. the logarithm of drawdown time are shown to be weighted averages of the permeabilities within an inner and outer radius of investigation.

  17. Fact #693: September 19, 2011 Average Vehicle Footprint for Cars and Light Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vehicle footprint is the area defined by the four points where the tires touch the ground. It is calculated as the product of the wheelbase and the average track width of the vehicle. The...

  18. System average rates of U.S. investor-owned electric utilities : a statistical benchmark study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berndt, Ernst R.

    1995-01-01

    Using multiple regression methods, we have undertaken a statistical "benchmark" study comparing system average electricity rates charged by three California utilities with 96 other US utilities over the 1984-93 time period. ...

  19. AVERAGES ALONG POLYNOMIAL SEQUENCES IN DISCRETE NILPOTENT GROUPS: SINGULAR RADON TRANSFORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magyar, Akos

    AVERAGES ALONG POLYNOMIAL SEQUENCES IN DISCRETE NILPOTENT GROUPS: SINGULAR RADON TRANSFORMS can consider discrete maximal Radon transforms, which have applications to pointwise ergodic theo- rems, and discrete singular Radon transforms. In this paper we prove L2 boundedness of discrete

  20. Fact #624: May 24, 2010 Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards, Model Years 2012-2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The final rule for the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards was published in March 2010. Under this rule, each light vehicle model produced for sale in the United States will have a fuel...

  1. Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The average trip length (one-way) is 9.7 miles according to the 2009 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey. Trip lengths vary by the purpose of the trip. Shopping and family/personal business...

  2. Advancing the Theoretical Foundation of the Partially-averaged Navier-Stokes Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes, Dasia Ann

    2013-05-06

    computational technologies. Low-fidelity approaches such as Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), although widely used, are inherently inadequate for turbulent flows with complex flow features. VR bridging methods fill the gap between DNS and RANS by allowing...

  3. Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Experiments with a time-dependent, zonally averaged, seasonal, enery balance climatic model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Starley Lee

    1977-01-01

    EXPERIMENTS WITH A TI&E-DEPENDENT, ZONALLY AVERAGED, SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the decree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology EXPERIMENTS WITH A TIME DEPENDENT~ ZONALLY AVERAGED~ SEASONAL, ENERGY BALANCE CLIMATIC MODEL A Thesis by STARLEY LEE THOMPSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee...

  5. k=10 GS PC TPDA GES Average SHD Results -Child -Sample Size 500

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Laura E.

    TPDA GES Structural Hamming Distance Average SHD Results - Child - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std GS PC TPDA GES Structural Hamming Distance Average SHD Results - Child3 - Sample Size 500 Error Bars = +/- Std.Dev. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 MMHC OR1 k=5 OR1 k=10 OR1 k=20 OR2 k=5 OR2 k=10 OR2 k=20 SC k=5 SC

  6. Revision of the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation - 12510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Maurice; Kennedy, James E.; Ridge, Christianne; Lowman, Donald [U.S. NRC, Washington, DC, 20555-0001 (United States); Cochran, John [Sandia National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation governing low-level waste (LLW) disposal, 'Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste', 10 CFR Part 61, establishes a waste classification system based on the concentration of specific radionuclides contained in the waste. The regulation also states, at 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8), that, 'the concentration of a radionuclide (in waste) may be averaged over the volume of the waste, or weight of the waste if the units are expressed as nanocuries per gram'. The NRC's Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation provides guidance on averaging radionuclide concentrations in waste under 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8) when classifying waste for disposal. In 2007, the NRC staff proposed to revise the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is an NRC guidance document for averaging and classifying wastes under 10 CFR 61. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is used by nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensees and sealed source users, among others. In addition, three of the four U.S. LLW disposal facility operators are required to honor the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation as a licensing condition. In 2010, the Commission directed the staff to develop guidance regarding large scale blending of similar homogenous waste types, as described in SECY-10-0043 as part of its Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation revision. The Commission is improving the regulatory approach used in the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation by moving towards a making it more risk-informed and performance-based approach, which is more consistent with the agency's regulatory policies. Among the improvements to the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation are more risk-informed limits for the sizes of sealed sources for safe disposal. Using more realistic intruder exposure scenarios, the suggested limits for Class B and C waste disposal of sealed sources, particularly Cs-137 and Co-60, have been increased. These suggested changes, and others in the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation, if adopted by Agreement States, have the potential to eliminate numerous orphan sources (i.e., sources that currently have no disposal pathway) that are now being stored. Permanent disposal of these sources, rather than temporary storage, will help reduce safety and security risks. The revised Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation has an alternative approach section which provides flexibility to generators and processors, while also ensuring that intruder protection will be maintained. Alternative approaches provide flexibility by allowing for consideration of likelihood of intrusion, the possibility of averaging over larger volumes and allowing for disposal of large activity sources. The revision has improved the organization of the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation, improved its clarity, better documented the bases for positions, and made the positions more risk informed while also maintaining protection for intruder as required by 10 CFR Part 61. (authors)

  7. Oxidation of volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. Final technical report, September 1980-February 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malte, P.C.; Thornton, M.M.; Kamber, P.D.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this project are to measure, through the use of laboratory combustors, those conditions which promote complete combustion of wood volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. The conditions of interest are combustion temperature, residence time, stoichiometry, and air mixing. The project objectives are met through two laboratory approaches: (1) model compound studies: in order to measure the overall rates of oxidative pyrolysis of biomass volatiles, and to determine the types of intermediate organic species which are likely to form as part of this process, model compounds have been reacted in a specialized jet-stirred reactor, which has been developed as part of this research. (2) high-intensity wood combustion: in order to study the clean combustion of wood, that is, to investigate the conceptual design features required for clean burning, and to ascertain the levels and types of pollutant and condensible species which are most difficult to oxidize, a high-intensity, research wood combustor has been developed and examined for the different phases of the wood burning cycle. Although the objectives of the project have been met, it has not been possible, because of support limitations, to thoroughly explore several interesting aspects which have arisen because of this research. For example, a third laboratory system in which wood pyrolysis gas is injected directly into the a well characterized reactor, so that the kinetics and mechanisms of the gas-phase reaction of the actual biomass volatiles can be studied, could not be thoroughly developed. Refinements in the high-intensity wood combustor, which would bring its design features closer to practicality for the industry, could not be considered. 32 references, 37 figures, 10 tables.

  8. Uncorrelated volatile behavior during the 2011 apparition of comet C/2009 P1 Garradd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feaga, Lori M.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Farnham, Tony L.; Bodewits, Dennis; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Gersch, Alan M.; Protopapa, Silvia [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Yang, Bin [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Drahus, Michal [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schleicher, David G., E-mail: feaga@astro.umd.edu [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The High Resolution Instrument Infrared Spectrometer (HRI-IR) on board the Deep Impact Flyby spacecraft detected H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and CO in the coma of the dynamically young Oort Cloud comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd) post-perihelion at a heliocentric distance of 2 AU. Production rates were derived for the parent volatiles, Q {sub H2O} = 4.6 ± 0.8 × 10{sup 28}, Q {sub CO2} = 3.9 ± 0.7 × 10{sup 27}, and Q {sub CO} = 2.9 ± 0.8 × 10{sup 28} molecules s{sup –1}, and are consistent with the trends seen by other observers and within the error bars of measurements acquired during a similar time period. When compiled with other observations of Garradd's dominant volatiles, unexpected behavior was seen in the release of CO. Garradd's H{sub 2}O outgassing, increasing and peaking pre-perihelion and then steadily decreasing, is more typical than that of CO, which monotonically increased throughout the entire apparition. Due to the temporal asymmetry in volatile release, Garradd exhibited the highest CO to H{sub 2}O abundance ratio ever observed for any comet inside the water snow line at ?60% during the HRI-IR observations. Also, the HRI-IR made the only direct measurement of CO{sub 2}, giving a typical cometary abundance ratio of CO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}O of 8% but, with only one measurement, no sense of how it varied with orbital position.

  9. Field evaluation of ground water sampling devices for volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muska, C F; Colven, W P; Jones, V D; Scogin, J T; Looney, B B; Price, V Jr

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies conducted under laboratory conditions demonstrated that the type of device used to sample ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds can significantly influence and analytical results. The purpose of this study was to evaluate, under field conditions, both commercial and developmental ground water sampling devices as part of an ongoing ground water contamination investigation and remediation program at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Ground water samples were collected using six types of sampling devices in monitoring wells of different depths and concentrations of volatile organic contaminants (primarily trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene). The study matrix was designed to statistically compare the reuslts of each sampling device under the test conditions. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation criteria were used to determine the relative performance of each device. Two categories of sampling devices were evaluated in this field study, positive displacement pumps and grab samplers. The positive displacement pumps consisted of a centrifugal (mechanical) pump and a bladder pump. The grab samples tested were a syringe sampler, a dual-check valve bailer, a surface bomb sampler, and a pressurized bailer. Preliminary studies were conducted to establish the analytical and sampling variability associated with each device. All six devices were then used to collect ground water samples in water table (unconfined), semi-confined aquifer, and confined aquifer monitoring wells. Results were evaluated against a set of criteria that included intrasampling device variability (precision), volatile organic concentration (accuracy), sampling and analytical logistics, and cost. The study showed that, by using careful and reproducible procedures, overall sampling variability is low regardless of sampling device.

  10. Improved land cover and emission factors for modeling biogenic volatile organic compounds emissions from Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, DYC; Wong, P; Cheung, BKH; Guenther, A

    2010-01-01

    c Yearly Variation of Solar Radiation Data Solar Radiation (data Hourly averages of air temperature and solar radiationof temperature data. c. Annual variation of solar radiation

  11. Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: Measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bon, D.M.; Springston, S.; M.Ulbrich, I.; de Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, W. C.; Alexander, M. L.; Baker, A.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D.; Fall, R.; Jimenez, J. L., Herndon, S. C.; Huey, L. G.; Knighton, W. B.; Ortega, J.; Vargas, O.

    2011-03-16

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) mixing ratios were measured with two different instruments at the T1 ground site in Mexico City during the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign in March of 2006. A gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID) quantified 18 light alkanes, alkenes and acetylene while a proton-transfer-reaction ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) quantified 12 VOC species including oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) and aromatics. A GC separation system was used in conjunction with the PIT-MS (GC-PIT-MS) to evaluate PIT-MS measurements and to aid in the identification of unknown VOCs. The VOC measurements are also compared to simultaneous canister samples and to two independent proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometers (PTR-MS) deployed on a mobile and an airborne platform during MILAGRO. VOC diurnal cycles demonstrate the large influence of vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissions during the night and photochemical processing during the afternoon. Emission ratios for VOCs and OVOCs relative to CO are derived from early-morning measurements. Average emission ratios for non-oxygenated species relative to CO are on average a factor of {approx}2 higher than measured for US cities. Emission ratios for OVOCs are estimated and compared to literature values the northeastern US and to tunnel studies in California. Positive matrix factorization analysis (PMF) is used to provide insight into VOC sources and processing. Three PMF factors were distinguished by the analysis including the emissions from vehicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of secondary VOCs + long-lived species. Emission ratios to CO calculated from the results of PMF analysis are compared to emission ratios calculated directly from measurements. The total PIT-MS signal is summed to estimate the fraction of identified versus unidentified VOC species.

  12. Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, T.V.

    1996-06-11

    A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate there through to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex. 23 figs.

  13. Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Tuan V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate therethrough to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex.

  14. Spatial resolution and the geologic interpretation of Martian morphology - implications for subsurface volatiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimbelman, J.R.

    1987-08-01

    Viking Orbiter images of the Acheron Fossae on Mars are presented and analyzed, with an emphasis on the impact of image resolution on the interpretation. High-resolution (less than 10 m/pixel) images reveal small mounds which can be interpreted as aeolian dunes, but these features are not evident on images with resolution of 50 m/pixel or greater. Also reported are the results of a visual inspection of 527 usable high-resolution images: it is found that all of the morphological features identified can arise in the absence of subsurface volatiles. 21 references.

  15. Sorption and permeation of low molecular weight volatile compounds in polypropylene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Antonio Ramiro Santiago

    1991-01-01

    the vapor permeation through the wall of the polypropylene containers. Sorption was calculated by subtracting the estimated permeation from the total loss. The effect of type of volatile compound, composition of polymer, and thickness of the container... LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Treatment setup 12 2 Effect of wall thickness on total loss to the container 33 3 Effect of composition of polymer on total loss to the container 36 4 Effect of type of resin on total loss to the container 38 5...

  16. Identification and evaluation of volatile compounds associated with vacuum and modified atmosphere packaged fresh red meats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Timothy Court

    1989-01-01

    loins were packaged and stored for up to 28 days at 3'C in high- oxygen barrier film under vacuum and in 100% CO~ 40% CO/60% Ns and 20% COs/80% Os. A procedure was developed by which large volumes of headspace gases could be removed from the packaged... with Lacrobacillus planrarum or Leuconostoc mesenteroides and stored for 28 days at 3'C included acetone, toluene, acetic acid, ethyl acetate, a hydrocarbon and CHCls. The profile of volatiles in packaged sterile loin tissue stored for 28 days was very similar...

  17. Average M shell fluorescence yields for elements with 70?Z?92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Aylikci, V.; Aylikci, N. K.; Nekkab, M.

    2015-03-30

    The theoretical, experimental and analytical methods for the calculation of average M-shell fluorescence yield (?{sup ¯}{sub M}) of different elements are very important because of the large number of their applications in various areas of physical chemistry and medical research. In this paper, the bulk of the average M-shell fluorescence yield measurements reported in the literature, covering the period 1955 to 2005 are interpolated by using an analytical function to deduce the empirical average M-shell fluorescence yield in the atomic range of 70?Z?92. The results were compared with the theoretical and fitted values reported by other authors. Reasonable agreement was typically obtained between our result and other works.

  18. Reconstruction of ionization probabilities from spatially averaged data in N dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strohaber, J.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2010-07-15

    We present an analytical inversion technique, which can be used to recover ionization probabilities from spatially averaged data in an N-dimensional detection scheme. The solution is given as a power series in intensity. For this reason, we call this technique a multiphoton expansion (MPE). The MPE formalism was verified with an exactly solvable inversion problem in two dimensions, and probabilities in the postsaturation region, where the intensity-selective scanning approach breaks down, were recovered. In three dimensions, ionization probabilities of Xe were successfully recovered with MPE from simulated (using the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov tunneling theory) ion yields. Finally, we tested our approach with intensity-resolved benzene-ion yields, which show a resonant multiphoton ionization process. By applying MPE to this data (which were artificially averaged), the resonant structure was recovered, which suggests that the resonance in benzene may have been observed in spatially averaged data taken elsewhere.

  19. Metal-organic molecular device for non-volatile memory storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radha, B., E-mail: radha.boya@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in; Sagade, Abhay A.; Kulkarni, G. U., E-mail: radha.boya@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in [Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit and DST Unit on Nanoscience, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2014-08-25

    Non-volatile memory devices have been of immense research interest for their use in active memory storage in powered off-state of electronic chips. In literature, various molecules and metal compounds have been investigated in this regard. Molecular memory devices are particularly attractive as they offer the ease of storing multiple memory states in a unique way and also represent ubiquitous choice for miniaturized devices. However, molecules are fragile and thus the device breakdown at nominal voltages during repeated cycles hinders their practical applicability. Here, in this report, a synergetic combination of an organic molecule and an inorganic metal, i.e., a metal-organic complex, namely, palladium hexadecylthiolate is investigated for memory device characteristics. Palladium hexadecylthiolate following partial thermolysis is converted to a molecular nanocomposite of Pd(II), Pd(0), and long chain hydrocarbons, which is shown to exhibit non-volatile memory characteristics with exceptional stability and retention. The devices are all solution-processed and the memory action stems from filament formation across the pre-formed cracks in the nanocomposite film.

  20. An advanced hybrid reprocessing system based on UF{sub 6} volatilization and chromatographic separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yuezhou; Liu, Ruiqin; Wu, Yan; Zu, Jianhua; Zhao, Long; Mimura, Hitoshi; Shi, Weiqun; Chai, Zhifang; Yang, Jinling; Ding, Youqian

    2013-07-01

    To recover U, Pu, MA (Np, Am, Cm) and some specific fission products FPs (Cs, Sr, Tc, etc.) from various spent nuclear fuels (LWR/FBR: Oxide, Metal Fuels), we are studying an advanced hybrid reprocessing system based on UF6 volatilization (Pyro) and chromatographic separation (Aqueous). Spent fuels are de-cladded by means of thermal and mechanical methods and then applied to the fluorination/volatilization process, which selectively recovers the most amount of U. Then, the remained fuel components are converted to oxides and dissolved by HNO{sub 3} solution. Compared to U, since Pu, MA and FPs are significantly less abundant in spent fuels, the scale of the aqueous separation process could become reasonably small and result in less waste. For the chromatographic separation processes, we have prepared different types of porous silica-based organic/inorganic adsorbents with fast diffusion kinetics, improved chemical stability and low pressure drop in a packed column. So they are advantageously applicable to efficient separation of the actinides and FP elements from the fuel dissolved solution. In this work, adsorption and separation behavior of representative actinides and FP elements was studied. Small scale separation tests using simulated and genuine fuel dissolved solutions were carried out to verify the feasibility of the proposed process. (authors)

  1. Combustion rates of chars from high-volatile fuels for FBC application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masi, S.; Salatino, P.; Senneca, O.

    1997-12-31

    The fluidized bed combustion of high volatile fuels is often associated with huge occurrence of comminution phenomena. These result into in-bed generation of substantial amounts of carbon fines which further undergo competitive processes of combustion and elutriation. The small size of carbon fines generated by comminution is such that their further combustion is largely controlled by the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation, alone or in combination with intraparticle diffusion. The competition between fine combustion and elutriation strongly affects the efficiency of fixed carbon conversion and calls for thorough characterization of the combustion kinetics and of residence times of fines in a fluidized bed of coarse solids. In this paper a collection of intrinsic combustion kinetic and porosimetric data for chars from three high-volatile fuels suitable for FBC application is presented. Chars from a Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF), a Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) and a biomass (Robinia Pseudoacacia) are obtained from devolatilization, in fluidized bed, of fuel samples. Thermogravimetric analysis, mercury porosimetry and helium pycnometry are used to characterize the reactivity and the pore structure of the chars. Combustion rates are characterized over a wide range of temperatures (320--850 C) and oxygen partial pressures, covering the entire range of interest in fluidized bed combustion. Analysis of thermogravimetric and porosimetric data is directed to obtaining the parameters (pre-exponential factors, reaction orders, activation energies, intraparticle diffusivities) of combustion kinetic submodels for application in fluidized bed combustor modeling.

  2. Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, F; Stanley, H E; Yamasaki, K; Havlin, Shlomo; Wang, Fengzhong; Yamasaki, Kazuko

    2006-01-01

    We study the return interval $\\tau$ between price volatilities that are above a certain threshold $q$ for 31 intraday datasets, including the Standard & Poor's 500 index and the 30 stocks that form the Dow Jones Industrial index. For different threshold $q$, the probability density function $P_q(\\tau)$ scales with the mean interval $\\bar{\\tau}$ as $P_q(\\tau)={\\bar{\\tau}}^{-1}f(\\tau/\\bar{\\tau})$, similar to that found in daily volatilities. Since the intraday records have significantly more data points compared to the daily records, we could probe for much higher thresholds $q$ and still obtain good statistics. We find that the scaling function $f(x)$ is consistent for all 31 intraday datasets in various time resolutions, and the function is well approximated by the stretched exponential, $f(x)\\sim e^{-a x^\\gamma}$, with $\\gamma=0.38\\pm 0.05$ and $a=3.9\\pm 0.5$, which indicates the existence of correlations. We analyze the conditional probability distribution $P_q(\\tau|\\tau_0)$ for $\\tau$ following a certa...

  3. Implementation of a solvent management program to control paint shop volatile organic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floer, M.M.; Hicks, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    The majority of automobile assembly plant volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are generated from painting operations. Typical paint operations generate more than 90 percent of the total plant emissions and, up to, 50 percent can be released by cleaning sources. Plant practices which contribute to the release of VOC emissions include the cleaning of paint lines and equipment, tanks, spray booths, floors and vehicles. Solvents continue to be the largest contributing source of VOC emissions in an automotive paint shop. To reduce overall VOC emissions, environmental regulations and guidelines were introduced under the Clean Air Act; Pollution Prevention and Waste Minimization programs, Control Techniques, and special air permit conditions. The introduction of these regulations and guidelines has driven industry toward continual refinement of their present cleaning methods while pursuing new techniques and technologies. Industry has also shown a proactive approach by introducing new waterborne and powder coating paint technologies to reduce overall emissions. As new paint technologies are developed and introduced, special attention must be given to the types of materials utilized for cleaning. The development and implementation of a solvent management program allows a facility to standardize a program to properly implement materials, equipment, technologies and work practices to reduce volatile organic compound emissions, meet strict cleaning requirements posed by new paint technologies and produce a vehicle which meets the high quality standards of the customer. This paper will assess the effectiveness of a solvent management program by examining pollution prevention initiatives and data from four different painting operations.

  4. Comparison of average and point capillary pressure-saturation functions determined by steady-state centrifugation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cropper, Clark; Perfect, Edmund; van den Berg, Dr. Elmer; Mayes, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    The capillary pressure-saturation function can be determined from centrifuge drainage experiments. In soil physics, the data resulting from such experiments are usually analyzed by the 'averaging method.' In this approach, average relative saturation, , is expressed as a function of average capillary pressure, <{psi}>, i.e., (<{psi}>). In contrast, the capillary pressure-saturation function at a physical point, i.e., S({psi}), has been extracted from similar experiments in petrophysics using the 'integral method.' The purpose of this study was to introduce the integral method applied to centrifuge experiments to a soil physics audience and to compare S({psi}) and (<{psi}>) functions, as parameterized by the Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten equations, for 18 samples drawn from a range of porous media (i.e., Berea sandstone, glass beads, and Hanford sediments). Steady-state centrifuge experiments were performed on preconsolidated samples with a URC-628 Ultra-Rock Core centrifuge. The angular velocity and outflow data sets were then analyzed using both the averaging and integral methods. The results show that the averaging method smoothes out the drainage process, yielding less steep capillary pressure-saturation functions relative to the corresponding point-based curves. Maximum deviations in saturation between the two methods ranged from 0.08 to 0.28 and generally occurred at low suctions. These discrepancies can lead to inaccurate predictions of other hydraulic properties such as the relative permeability function. Therefore, we strongly recommend use of the integral method instead of the averaging method when determining the capillary pressure-saturation function by steady-state centrifugation. This method can be successfully implemented using either the van Genuchten or Brooks-Corey functions, although the latter provides a more physically precise description of air entry at a physical point.

  5. Note on an integral expression for the average lifetime of the bound state in 2D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsten Prustel; Martin Meier-Schellersheim

    2012-10-04

    Recently, an exact Green's function of the diffusion equation for a pair of spherical interacting particles in two dimensions subject to a backreaction boundary condition was used to derive an exact expression for the average lifetime of the bound state. Here, we show that the corresponding divergent integral may be considered as the formal limit of a Stieltjes transform. Upon analytically calculating the Stieltjes transform one can obtain an exact expression for the finite part of the divergent integral and hence for the average lifetime.

  6. Performance and production requirements for the optical components in a high-average-power laser system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R.; Doss, F.W.; Taylor, J.R.; Wong, J.N.

    1999-07-02

    Optical components needed for high-average-power lasers, such as those developed for Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS), require high levels of performance and reliability. Over the past two decades, optical component requirements for this purpose have been optimized and performance and reliability have been demonstrated. Many of the optical components that are exposed to the high power laser light affect the quality of the beam as it is transported through the system. The specifications for these optics are described including a few parameters not previously reported and some component manufacturing and testing experience. Key words: High-average-power laser, coating efficiency, absorption, optical components

  7. Assessing the U.S. Senate Vote on the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston, Scott

    classify cars as light trucks to "bend" the restrictions set by the standard. (Vehicles classified as light reclassified as a light truck, Subaru was able to add weight to the vehicle without making expenditures Kerry proposed raising the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standard for cars and trucks. On March

  8. Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling tidal flow in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, using a depth averaged flooding, University of New Hampshire, USA. 2 Numerical Methods Lab., Dartmouth College, USA. 3 Ocean Process Analysis Lab., University of New Hampshire, USA. Abstract Current, sea level and bed load transport

  9. High Average Power Operation of a Scraper-Outcoupled Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle D. Shinn; Chris Behre; Stephen Vincent Benson; Michael Bevins; Don Bullard; James Coleman; L. Dillon-Townes; Tom Elliott; Joe Gubeli; David Hardy; Kevin Jordan; Ronald Lassiter; George Neil; Shukui Zhang

    2004-08-01

    We describe the design, construction, and operation of a high average power free-electron laser using scraper outcoupling. Using the FEL in this all-reflective configuration, we achieved approximately 2 kW of stable output at 10 um. Measurements of gain, loss, and output mode will be compared with our models.

  10. Average-case analysis of perfect sorting by reversals Mathilde Bouvel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    genomics, is the process of sorting a signed permutation to either the identity or to the reversed identity example here: we perform an average case analysis of a sorting algorithm from computational genomics by generating function analysis of a family of trees. Motivation: a computational genomics problem

  11. POLYMER END-GROUP ANALYSIS: THE DETERMINATION OF AVERAGE MOLECULAR WEIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    POLYMER END-GROUP ANALYSIS: THE DETERMINATION OF AVERAGE MOLECULAR WEIGHT Background reading. 11. Skoog, West, Holler and Crouch, 7th ed., Chap. 14. Introduction Polymers Polymers are a special in this experiment, or may be of different types. Polymers are very important in biological systems. For example

  12. Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haran, Murali

    Climate Projections Using Bayesian Model Averaging and Space-Time Dependence K. Sham Bhat, Murali Haran, Adam Terando, and Klaus Keller. Abstract Projections of future climatic changes are a key input to the design of climate change mitiga- tion and adaptation strategies. Current climate change projections

  13. Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. K. Sinclair; P. A. Adderley; B. M. Dunham; J. C. Hansknecht; P. Hartmann; M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; M. Steigerwald

    2007-02-01

    Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2?105???C/cm2 and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

  14. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Averaging method for nonlinear laminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lautrup, Benny

    Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Averaging method for nonlinear laminar Copenhagen Ã?, Denmark (Received October 10, 2002) We study laminar Ekman boundary layers in rotating systems method to describe laminar and turbulent boundary layers in rotating fluids. They used a self

  15. Power dissipation and time-averaged pressure in oscillating flow through a sudden area change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    that abrupt changes in geometry are ubiquitous in Stirling engines, thermoacoustics, and res- piratory flows Barton L. Smith Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-averaged pressure gradient has been used to counteract streaming flows in a thermoacoustic Stirling refrigerator1

  16. Self-guided enhanced sampling methods for thermodynamic averages Ioan Andricioaeia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    such systems have energetic and entropic barriers that are higher than the thermal energy at tempera- turesSelf-guided enhanced sampling methods for thermodynamic averages Ioan Andricioaeia) Department 2002; accepted 22 October 2002 In the self-guided molecular dynamics SGMD simulation method

  17. Averaging out Inhomogeneous Newtonian Cosmologies: I. Fluid Mechanics and the Navier-Stokes Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roustam Zalaletdinov

    2002-12-18

    The basic concepts and equations of classical fluid mechanics are presented in the form necessary for the formulation of Newtonian cosmology and for derivation and analysis of a system of the averaged Navier-Stokes-Poisson equations. A special attention is paid to the analytic formulation of the definitions and equations of moving fluids and to their physical content.

  18. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first is a coordinated effort to develop laser inertial fusion energy [1]. The first stage of the HAPL program

  19. Bias Correction and Bayesian Model Averaging for Ensemble Forecasts of Surface Wind Direction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raftery, Adrian

    Bias Correction and Bayesian Model Averaging for Ensemble Forecasts of Surface Wind Direction LE proposes an effective bias correction technique for wind direction forecasts from numerical weather forecasts. These techniques are applied to 48-h forecasts of surface wind direction over the Pacific

  20. Real-valued average consensus over noisy quantized channels Andrea Censi Richard M. Murray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    mechanism which can be interpreted as a self-inhibitory action. The result is that the average of the nodes of the graph and can be proved by employing elementary techniques of LTI systems analysis. I. INTRODUCTION. Yet we do not have, in our control-systems toolbox, design methods that can work on this computational

  1. Averages along polynomial sequences in discrete nilpotent groups: singular Radon transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ionescu, Alexandru D; Wainger, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of operators defined by taking averages along polynomial sequences in discrete nilpotent groups. In this paper we prove $L^2$ boundedness of discrete singular Radon transforms along general polynomial sequences in discrete nilpotent groups of step 2.

  2. Seasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    of indoor air pollution sources. Concurrently, great efforts are made to make buildings energy efficient 1970s, while less attention has been paid to IAQ. Insufficient venting of indoor air pollutantsSeasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements Marie

  3. Efficient computation of robust average in wireless sensor networks using compressive sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    compressive sensing. Instead of sending a block of sensor readings to the data fusion centre, each sensor of the projections (which we will refer to as the compressed data) to the data fusion centre. At the data fusion of the robust average of the original sensor readings. This means that the data fusion centre will only need

  4. Enhanced interleaved partitioning PTS for peak-to-average power ratio reduction in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -PTS is proposed that can be used to produce fully independent candidates so that IP-PTS can achieve similar perforEnhanced interleaved partitioning PTS for peak-to-average power ratio reduction in OFDM systems G. Lu, P. Wu and C. Carlemalm-Logothetis The independence of the candidates generated in the existing

  5. Impacts of different data averaging times on statistical analysis of distributed domestic photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widen, Joakim; Waeckelgaard, Ewa; Paatero, Jukka; Lund, Peter

    2010-03-15

    The trend of increasing application of distributed generation with solar photovoltaics (PV-DG) suggests that a widespread integration in existing low-voltage (LV) grids is possible in the future. With massive integration in LV grids, a major concern is the possible negative impacts of excess power injection from on-site generation. For power-flow simulations of such grid impacts, an important consideration is the time resolution of demand and generation data. This paper investigates the impact of time averaging on high-resolution data series of domestic electricity demand and PV-DG output and on voltages in a simulated LV grid. Effects of 10-minutely and hourly averaging on descriptive statistics and duration curves were determined. Although time averaging has a considerable impact on statistical properties of the demand in individual households, the impact is smaller on aggregate demand, already smoothed from random coincidence, and on PV-DG output. Consequently, the statistical distribution of simulated grid voltages was also robust against time averaging. The overall judgement is that statistical investigation of voltage variations in the presence of PV-DG does not require higher resolution than hourly. (author)

  6. Functional convergence and optimality of plug-in estimators for stationary densities of moving average processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wefelmeyer, Wolfgang

    average processes By Anton Schick1 and Wolfgang Wefelmeyer Binghamton University and University of CologneSupported in part by NSF Grant DMS 0072174 1 #12;2 ANTON SCHICK AND WOLFGANG WEFELMEYER first-order moving of functions ui(X1) + · · · + um(Xm) at a point. Schick and Wefelmeyer (2004b) obtain functional central limit

  7. Estimation of Average Switching Activity in Combinational Logic Circuits Using Symbolic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devadas, Srinivas

    ­held mobile telephones, low­power dissipation may be the tightest con­ straint in the design. More generally of power estimation methods the reader is referred to [?]. Our work on switching activity estimationEstimation of Average Switching Activity in Combinational Logic Circuits Using Symbolic Simulation

  8. Averaged dynamics of two-phase media in a vibration field Arthur V. Straubea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straube, Arthur V.

    to astronomic scales. Vibration is a mechanical oscillatory process with an amplitude that is small compared of the system is much larger than the period of the oscillation. Vibration mechanics has been studied for a longAveraged dynamics of two-phase media in a vibration field Arthur V. Straubea Department of Physics

  9. Seminario de Estadstica e Investigacin Operativa "Tree, web and average web value for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tradacete, Pedro

    Seminario de Estadística e Investigación Operativa "Tree, web and average web value for cycle solution concepts, called web values, are introduced axiomatically, each one with respect to some specific recursive algorithms to calculate them. Additionally the efficiency and stability of web values are studied

  10. Asymptotic scaling corrections in QCD with Wilson fermions from the 3-loop average plaquette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alles; A. Feo; H. Panagopoulos

    1998-01-23

    We calculate the 3-loop perturbative expansion of the average plaquette in lattice QCD with N_f massive Wilson fermions and gauge group SU(N). The corrections to asymptotic scaling in the corresponding energy scheme are also evaluated. We have also improved the accuracy of the already known pure gluonic results at 2 and 3 loops.

  11. Effects of nuclear structure on average angular momentum in subbarrier fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin; J. R. Bennett; S. Kuyucak

    1994-07-21

    We investigate the effects of nuclear quadrupole and hexadecapole couplings on the average angular momentum in sub-barrier fusion reactions. This quantity could provide a probe for nuclear shapes, distinguishing between prolate vs. oblate quadrupole and positive vs. negative hexadecapole couplings. We describe the data in the O + Sm system and discuss heavier systems where shape effects become more pronounced.

  12. Contribution of gas phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds to atmospheric carbon monoxide levels in two areas of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    - house gas, but also the hydroperoxide radical (HO2). HO2 converts nitric oxide to nitrogen dioxideContribution of gas phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds to atmospheric carbon monoxide. Chen, K. Carmody, S. Vutukuru, and D. Dabdub (2007), Contribution of gas phase oxidation of volatile

  13. New determination of the D0?K??+?0 and D0?K??+?+?? coherence factors and average strong-phase differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, J.; Malde, S.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G.; Asner, David M.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Briere, R. A.; Gershon, T.; Naik, P.; Pedlar, Todd K.; Rademacker, J.; Ricciardi, S.; Thomas, C.

    2014-07-14

    New determination of the D0!K?!+!0 and D0!K?!+!+!? coherence factors and average strong-phase differences

  14. Position Paper on Practicable Performance Criteria for the Removal Efficiency of Volatile Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. T. Jubin; N. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan

    2012-03-01

    As a result of fuel reprocessing, volatile radionuclides may be released from the facility stack if no processes are put in place to remove them. The radionuclides that are of concern in this document are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. The question we attempted to answer is how efficient must this removal process be for each of these radionuclides? To answer this question, we examined the three regulations that may impact the degree to which these radionuclides must be reduced before process gases can be released from the facility. These regulations are 40 CFR 61 (EPA 2010a), 40 CFR 190(EPA 2010b), and 10 CFR 20 (NRC 2012). These regulations apply to the total radionuclide release and to a particular organ - the thyroid. Because these doses can be divided amongst all the radionuclides in different ways and even within the four radionuclides in question, we provided several cases. We first looked at the inventories for these radionuclides for three fuel types (PWR UOX, PWR MOX, and AHTGR), several burn-up values, and time out of reactor extending to 200 y. We calculated doses to the maximum exposed individual (MEI) with the EPA code CAP-88 (Rosnick 1992). Finally, we looked at two dose cases. Allocating all of the allowable dose to be used by the volatile radionuclides is one case, but, perhaps, unrealistic. In lieu of this, we arbitrarily selected a value of 10% of the allowable dose to be assigned to the volatile radionuclides. We calculated the required decontamination factors (DFs) for both of these cases, including the case for the thyroid dose for which 14C and 129I were the main contributors. With respect to 129I doses, we found that the highest dose was calculated with iodine as a fine particulate. The dose scaled as the fraction of the total 129I that was particulate. Therefore, we assumed for all of our calculations that 100% of the 129I was particulate and allow the user of the results given here to scale our calculated doses to their needs.

  15. Abstract--Job monitoring in Grid systems presents an important challenge due to Grid environments are volatile,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbalan, Julita

    1 Abstract--Job monitoring in Grid systems presents an important challenge due to Grid environments show all the features that user can use in the portal to personalize his/her monitoring environment are volatile, heterogeneous, not reliable and are managed by different middlewares and monitoring tools. We

  16. GCMS SPME profiling of rhizobacterial volatiles reveals prospective inducers of growth promotion and induced systemic resistance in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paré, Paul W.

    Abstract Chemical and plant growth studies of Bacilli strains GB03 and IN937a revealed that the volatile in chemical signaling for these two bacterial strains. To provide a comprehensive chemical profile chemical signals via airborne transmission. Mounting chemical and biochemical data indicate that plants

  17. Volatility of Unit Commitment in Competitive Electricity Markets1 Shmuel S. Oren, Alva J. Svoboda, Raymond B. Johnson,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Volatility of Unit Commitment in Competitive Electricity Markets1 Shmuel S. Oren, Alva J. Svoboda resources are centrally owned. We pelfomz a simulation case study using a Lagrangian relaxation-based unit system marginal costs). Specifically, we show that variations in near optimal unit commitments that have

  18. Comparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    is traditionally treated as the dominant mechanism of gas transport in unsaturated zones under natural conditionsComparisons of diffusive and advective fluxes of gas phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones under natural conditions Kehua You a , Hongbin Zhan a,b, a Department of Geology

  19. An Analysis of Price Volatility in Different Spot Markets for Electricity in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Analysis of Price Volatility in Different Spot Markets for Electricity in the U.S.A. by Tim University e-mail: tdm2@cornell.edu Abstract Earlier research has shown that the behavior of spot prices. This model captures the observed price spikes that occur in these markets, particularly during the summer

  20. Estimation of Volatility The values of the parameters r, t, St, T, and K used to price a call op-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Privault, Nicolas

    sweet crude oil futures traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), based on contract specificaChapter 7 Estimation of Volatility The values of the parameters r, t, St, T, and K used to price in the stock price model dSt St = µdt + dBt. A natural estimator for the trend parameter µ can be written as ^µ

  1. Volatile Element Chemistry during Metamorphism of Ordinary Chondritic Material and Some of its Implications for the Composition of Asteroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Schaefer; Bruce Fegley Jr

    2008-01-07

    We used chemical equilibrium calculations to model thermal metamorphism of ordinary chondritic material as a function of temperature, pressure, and trace element abundance and use our results to discuss volatile mobilization during thermal metamorphism of ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The calculations include ~1,700 solids and gases of 40 elements. We compiled trace element abundances in H-, L-, and LL-chondrites for the elements Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Cs, Cu, Ga, Ge, In, Pb, Rb, Sb, Se, Sn, Te, Tl, and Zn, and identified abundance trends as a function of petrographic type within each class. We found that abundance patterns within the H- and L- chondrites are consistent with mobilization of volatile elements in an onionshell-type parent body. LL-chondrites have more complex abundance patterns that may support a rubble-pile model for the LL-chondrite parent body. We calculated volatility sequences for the trace elements in the ordinary chondritic material, which differs significantly from the solar nebula volatility sequence.

  2. Modeling Volatile Species Retention Experiments: Interim Progress Report (M3FT-12LA0202053)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Neil N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-06

    Metal nuclear fuel is a candidate transmutation fuel form for advanced fuel cycles. One constituent of the fuel, americium, has a high vapor pressure, and there is a concern that excessive volatility losses of americium will occur during casting of the metal. A number of experiments have been performed using americium and surrogate metals, including experiments slated for FY12, to address the concern. The present task is to model and numerically simulate these experiments. This report describes a system-level model of the relevant experiments that has been developed together with some results. It also describes some initial 3D, full-physics simulations of portions of the experiments that have been performed.

  3. Volatile Delivery to Planets from Water-rich Planetesimals around Low Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciesla, Fred J; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Most models of volatile delivery to accreting terrestrial planets assume that the carriers for water are similar in water content to the carbonaceous chondrites in our Solar System. Here we suggest that the water content of primitive bodies in many planetary systems may actually be much higher, as carbonaceous chondrites have lost some of their original water due to heating from short-lived radioisotopes that drove parent body alteration. Using N-body simulations, we explore how planetary accretion would be different if bodies beyond the water line contained a water mass fraction consistent with chemical equilibrium calculations, and more similar to comets, as opposed to the more traditional water-depleted values. We apply this model to consider planet formation around stars of different masses and identify trends in the properties of Habitable Zone planets and planetary system architecture which could be tested by ongoing exoplanet census data collection. Comparison of such data with the model predicted tren...

  4. VOLATILE TRANSPORT INSIDE SUPER-EARTHS BY ENTRAPMENT IN THE WATER-ICE MATRIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, A.; Podolak, M.; Sasselov, D.

    2013-05-20

    Whether volatiles can be entrapped in a background matrix composing planetary envelopes and be dragged via convection to the surface is a key question in understanding atmospheric fluxes, cycles, and composition. In this paper, we consider super-Earths with an extensive water mantle (i.e., water planets), and the possibility of entrapment of methane in their extensive water-ice envelopes. We adopt the theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw for modeling solid solutions, often used for modeling clathrate hydrates, and modify it in order to estimate the thermodynamic stability field of a new phase called methane filled ice Ih. We find that in comparison to water ice VII the filled ice Ih structure may be stable not only at the high pressures but also at the high temperatures expected at the core-water mantle transition boundary of water planets.

  5. Abundance ratios of volatile vs. refractory elements in planet-harbouring stars: hints of pollution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ecuvillon; G. Israelian; N. C. Santos; M. Mayor; G. Gilli

    2005-12-08

    We present the [X/H] trends as function of the elemental condensation temperature Tc in 88 planet host stars and in a volume-limited comparison sample of 33 dwarfs without detected planetary companions. We gathered homogeneous abundance results for many volatile and refractory elements spanning a wide range of Tc, from a few dozens to several hundreds kelvin. We investigate possible anomalous trends of planet hosts with respect to comparison sample stars in order to detect evidence of possible pollution events. No significant differences are found in the behaviour of stars with and without planets. This result is in agreement with a ``primordial'' origin of the metal excess in planet host stars. However, a subgroup of 5 planet host and 1 comparison sample stars stands out for having particularly high [X/H] vs. Tc slopes.

  6. ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARUSICH, R.M.

    2006-07-10

    Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

  7. Revisiting benzene cluster cations for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide and select volatile organic compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, M. J.; Zoerb, M. C.; Campbell, N. R.; Zimmermann, K. J.; Blomquist, B. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Bertram, T. H.

    2015-10-01

    Benzene cluster cations were revisited as a sensitive and selective reagent ion for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and a select group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Laboratory characterization was performed using both a new set of compounds (i.e. DMS, ?-caryophyllene) as well as previously studied VOCs (i.e., isoprene, ?-pinene). Using a field deployable chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToFMS), benzene cluster cations demonstrated high sensitivity (> 1 ncps ppt?1) to DMS, isoprene, and ?-pinene standards. Parallel measurements conducted using a chemical-ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, with a weaker electric field, demonstrated that ion-molecule reactions likely proceed through amore »combination of ligand-switching and direct charge transfer mechanisms. Laboratory tests suggest that benzene cluster cations may be suitable for the selective ionization of sesquiterpenes, where minimal fragmentation (R2=0.80) over a wide range of sampling conditions.« less

  8. Correct quantitative determination of ethanol and volatile compounds in alcohol products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charapitsa, Siarhei; Sytova, Svetlana; Yakuba, Yurii

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the volume content of ethanol in the alcohol products in practice is usually determined by pycnometry, electronic densimetry, or densimetry using a hydrostatic balance in accordance with Commission Regulation No 2870/2000. However, these methods determine directly only density of the tested liquid sample and does not take into account the effects of other volatile components such as aldehydes, esters and higher alcohols. So they are appropriate only for binary water-ethanol solutions in accordance with international table adopted by the International Legal Metrology Organization in its Recommendation No 22. Availability notable concentrations of the higher alcohols and ethers in different alcohol-based products, e. g. in whisky, cognac, brandy, wine as well as in waste alcohol and alcohol beverage production, leads to the significant contribution of these compounds in the value of the density of tested alcohol-containing sample. As a result, determination of the volume of ethanol content for ...

  9. VOLATILE-RICH CIRCUMSTELLAR GAS IN THE UNUSUAL 49 CETI DEBRIS DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberge, Aki; Grady, Carol A.; Welsh, Barry Y.; Kamp, Inga; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2014-11-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph far-UV spectra of the edge-on disk around 49 Ceti, one of the very few debris disks showing submillimeter CO emission. Many atomic absorption lines are present in the spectra, most of which arise from circumstellar gas lying along the line-of-sight to the central star. We determined the line-of-sight C I column density, estimated the total carbon column density, and set limits on the O I column density. Surprisingly, no line-of-sight CO absorption was seen. We discuss possible explanations for this non-detection, and present preliminary estimates of the carbon abundances in the line-of-sight gas. The C/Fe ratio is much greater than the solar value, suggesting that 49 Cet harbors a volatile-rich gas disk similar to that of ? Pictoris.

  10. Methods for characterizing subsurface volatile contaminants using in-situ sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-21

    An inverse analysis method for characterizing diffusion of vapor from an underground source of volatile contaminant using data taken by an in-situ sensor. The method uses one-dimensional solutions to the diffusion equation in Cartesian, cylindrical, or spherical coordinates for isotropic and homogenous media. If the effective vapor diffusion coefficient is known, then the distance from the source to the in-situ sensor can be estimated by comparing the shape of the predicted time-dependent vapor concentration response curve to the measured response curve. Alternatively, if the source distance is known, then the effective vapor diffusion coefficient can be estimated using the same inverse analysis method. A triangulation technique can be used with multiple sensors to locate the source in two or three dimensions. The in-situ sensor can contain one or more chemiresistor elements housed in a waterproof enclosure with a gas permeable membrane.

  11. Volatilization and redox testing in a DC arc melter: FY-93 and FY-94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grandy, J.D.; Sears, J.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Reimann, G.A.; McIlwain, M.E.

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to study the dissolution, retention, volatilization, and trapping of transuranic radionuclide elements (TRUs), mixed fission and activation products, and high vapor pressure metals (HVPMS) during processing in a high temperature arc furnace. In all cases, surrogate elements (lanthanides) were used in place of radioactive ones. The experiments were conducted utilizing a small DC arc melter developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Research Center (IRC). The small arc melter was originally developed in 1992 and has been used previously for waste form studies of iron enriched basalt (IEB) and IEB with zirconium and titanium additions (IEB4). Section 3 contains a description of the small arc melter and its operational capabilities are discussed in Chapter 4. The remainder of the document describes each testing program and then discusses results and findings.

  12. Assumptions that imply quantum dynamics is linear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Jordan

    2006-01-26

    A basic linearity of quantum dynamics, that density matrices are mapped linearly to density matrices, is proved very simply for a system that does not interact with anything else. It is assumed that at each time the physical quantities and states are described by the usual linear structures of quantum mechanics. Beyond that, the proof assumes only that the dynamics does not depend on anything outside the system but must allow the system to be described as part of a larger system. The basic linearity is linked with previously established results to complete a simple derivation of the linear Schrodinger equation. For this it is assumed that density matrices are mapped one-to-one onto density matrices. An alternative is to assume that pure states are mapped one-to-one onto pure states and that entropy does not decrease.

  13. Imply vs. infer V.S. Sunder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunder, V S

    cerebral palsy and was considered mentally disabled. In his autobiography My Left Foot (also a film), he

  14. Liberal political equality implies proportional representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hout, Eliora; McGann, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    n] A . The seat share allocation function E maps the ballotwith coalitions. A seat allocation function E is anonymous (Hout, A. J. McGann allocation function F derived from it is

  15. Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Science Resources - National Library of Energy Beta SciTech Connect DOE PAGESBeta DOE Data Explorer ScienceCinema DOepatents DOE R&D Accomplishments Energy Science and...

  16. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds during composting of municipal solid waste (MSW)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Schuchardt, Frank; Li, Guoxue; Yang, Jinbing; Yang, Qingyuan

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? We compare the volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) emissions during three types of municipal solid wastes (MSWs) composting. ? The VSCs released from the kitchen waste composting was significantly higher than that from 15–80 mm fraction of MSW. ? Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. ? Addition of 20% cornstalks could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions during kitchen waste composting. - Abstract: Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are the main source for malodor from composting plants. In this study, the VSCs generated from composting of 15–80 mm municipal solid waste (T0), kitchen waste (T1) and kitchen waste mixed dry cornstalks (T2) were measured in 60 L reactors with forced aeration for a period of 30 days. The VSCs detected in all treatments were hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), methyl mercaptan (MM), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbon bisulfide (CS{sub 2}) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS). Over 90% of the VSCs emissions occurred during the first 15 days, and reached their peak values at days 4–7. The emission profiles of five VSCs species were significantly correlated with internal materials temperature and outlet O{sub 2} concentration (p < 0.05). Total emissions of the VSCs were 216.1, 379.3 and 126.0 mg kg{sup ?1} (dry matter) for T0, T1 and T2, respectively. Among the five VSCs, H{sub 2}S was the most abundant compound with 39.0–43.0% of total VSCs released. Composting of kitchen waste from separate collection posed a negative influence on the VSC and leachate production because of its high moisture content. An addition of dry cornstalks at a mixing ratio of 4:1 (wet weight) could significantly reduce the VSCs emissions and avoid leachate. Compared to pure kitchen waste, VSCs were reduced 66.8%.

  17. Methodology for Formulating Diesel Surrogate Fuels with Accurate Compositional, Ignition-Quality, and Volatility Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C. J.; Cannella, W. J.; Bruno, T. J.; Bunting, B.; Dettman, H. D.; Franz, J. A.; Huber, M. L.; Natarajan, M.; Pitz, W. J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Wright, K.

    2012-06-21

    In this study, a novel approach was developed to formulate surrogate fuels having characteristics that are representative of diesel fuels produced from real-world refinery streams. Because diesel fuels typically consist of hundreds of compounds, it is difficult to conclusively determine the effects of fuel composition on combustion properties. Surrogate fuels, being simpler representations of these practical fuels, are of interest because they can provide a better understanding of fundamental fuel-composition and property effects on combustion and emissions-formation processes in internal-combustion engines. In addition, the application of surrogate fuels in numerical simulations with accurate vaporization, mixing, and combustion models could revolutionize future engine designs by enabling computational optimization for evolving real fuels. Dependable computational design would not only improve engine function, it would do so at significant cost savings relative to current optimization strategies that rely on physical testing of hardware prototypes. The approach in this study utilized the state-of-the-art techniques of {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the advanced distillation curve to characterize fuel composition and volatility, respectively. The ignition quality was quantified by the derived cetane number. Two well-characterized, ultra-low-sulfur No.2 diesel reference fuels produced from refinery streams were used as target fuels: a 2007 emissions certification fuel and a Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel fuel. A surrogate was created for each target fuel by blending eight pure compounds. The known carbon bond types within the pure compounds, as well as models for the ignition qualities and volatilities of their mixtures, were used in a multiproperty regression algorithm to determine optimal surrogate formulations. The predicted and measured surrogate-fuel properties were quantitatively compared to the measured target-fuel properties, and good agreement was found.

  18. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; et al

    2015-08-28

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 ?m) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the sources of OA are distinctly different. The concentration ofmore »solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC, measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for « less

  19. Renormalization, averaging, conservation laws and AdS (in)stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Craps; Oleg Evnin; Joris Vanhoof

    2015-01-19

    We continue our analytic investigations of non-linear spherically symmetric perturbations around the anti-de Sitter background in gravity-scalar field systems, and focus on conservation laws restricting the (perturbatively) slow drift of energy between the different normal modes due to non-linearities. We discover two conservation laws in addition to the energy conservation previously discussed in relation to AdS instability. A similar set of three conservation laws was previously noted for a self-interacting scalar field in a non-dynamical AdS background, and we highlight the similarities of this system to the fully dynamical case of gravitational instability. The nature of these conservation laws is best understood through an appeal to averaging methods which allow one to derive an effective Lagrangian or Hamiltonian description of the slow energy transfer between the normal modes. The conservation laws in question then follow from explicit symmetries of this averaged effective theory.

  20. Gatling gun: high average polarized current injector for eRHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V.N.

    2010-01-01

    This idea was originally developed in 2001 for, at that time, an ERL-based (and later recirculating-ring) electron-ion collider at JLab. Naturally the same idea is applicable for any gun requiring current exceeding capability of a single cathode. ERL-based eRHIC is one of such cases. This note related to eRHIC was prepared at Duke University in February 2003. In many case photo-injectors can have a limited average current - it is especially true about polarized photo-guns. It is know that e-RHIC requires average polarized electron current well above currently demonstrated by photo-injectors - hence combining currents from multiple guns is can be useful option for eRHIC.

  1. Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator for numerical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Duthoit, F.-X. [IRFM, CEA, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Brizard, A. J. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, Vermont 05439 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    A guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator is derived in a coordinate system that is well suited for the implementation in a numerical code. This differential operator is transformed such that it can commute with the orbit-averaging operation. Thus, in the low-collisionality approximation, a three-dimensional Fokker-Planck evolution equation for the orbit-averaged distribution function in a space of invariants is obtained. This transformation is applied to a collision operator with nonuniform isotropic field particles. Explicit neoclassical collisional transport diffusion and convection coefficients are derived, and analytical expressions are obtained in the thin orbit approximation. To illustrate this formalism and validate our results, the bootstrap current is analytically calculated in the Lorentz limit.

  2. Ick! The average person sheds 1.5 lbs of skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    . Be nice to your head.Be nice to your head.Be nice to your head.Be nice to your head. Fight Frizz: Tame dry; pale, whitish nails could be a sign of anemia (low iron level in the blood). · Ingrown toenails may or her head! Most people lose 50-100 hairs per day. - Hair grows an average of 9 inches per year. - Hair

  3. Coupling of an average-atom model with a collisional-radiative equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.

    2014-11-15

    We present a method to combine a collisional-radiative equilibrium model and an average-atom model to calculate bound and free electron wavefunctions in hot dense plasmas by taking into account screening. This approach allows us to calculate electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity as well as pressure in non local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas. Illustrations of the method are presented for dilute titanium plasma.

  4. Near-UV to near-IR disk-averaged Earth's reflectance spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hamdani; L. Arnold; C. Foellmi; J. Berthier; D. Briot; P. Francois; P. Riaud; J. Schneider

    2005-10-20

    We report 320 to 1020nm disk-averaged Earth reflectance spectra obtained from Moon's Earthshine observations with the EMMI spectrograph on the NTT at ESO La Silla (Chile). The spectral signatures of Earth atmosphere and ground vegetation are observed. A vegetation red-edge of up to 9% is observed on Europe and Africa and ~2% upon Pacific Ocean. The spectra also show that Earth is a blue planet when Rayleigh scattering dominates, or totally white when the cloud cover is large.

  5. Development and Application of A Membrane-Based Thermodenuder for Measurement of Volatile Particles Emitted by A Jet Turbine Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Mengdawn

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of volatile particles emitted by modern jet engines is a daunting task. Besides the complexity in sampling jet aircraft exhaust, the main difficulty lies at how to faithfully capture the phase-partition dynamics of volatile particles as they travel downstream from the engine exhaust nozzle. As a result, the physico-chemical properties of the exhaust are also transformed. We have developed a sampling instrument that aims at enabling study of the phase-partition dynamics. The objective of this research project was to design and evaluate a new thermodenuder for performing phase separation of the engine-emitted volatile particles. The backbone of the new thermodenuder is a thin metallic membrane. The membrane enables extraction of molecules that can be thermally desorbed from the condensed particulate phases and collected for subsequent chemical analysis. Toward realization of the technique in the future field aircraft emissions measurement we tested this new thermo-denuding device using laboratory-generated particles that were made of non-volatile or semi-volatile chemicals. The particle penetration efficiency, a measure of the device performance, of this thermodenuder was found to be better than 99%. Results obtained from the tests executed at a number of operating temperature conditions show reasonably good thermal separation. We have scheduled to apply this new device to characterize emissions from a T63 turboshaft engine in the spring of 2010 and are expecting to show the engine results at the conference. The test results based on the laboratory-generated particles were encouraging for the intended application. With excellent particle transmission efficiency and an ability to simultaneously measure the composition in the gas and particle phases of the engine particles, we believe the new technology will make a great contribution to measurement research of engine emissions.

  6. Average balance equations, scale dependence, and energy cascade for granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Artoni; Patrick Richard

    2015-03-09

    A new averaging method linking discrete to continuum variables of granular materials is developed and used to derive average balance equations. Its novelty lies in the choice of the decomposition between mean values and fluctuations of properties which takes into account the effect of gradients. Thanks to a local homogeneity hypothesis, whose validity is discussed, simplified balance equations are obtained. This original approach solves the problem of dependence of some variables on the size of the averaging domain obtained in previous approaches which can lead to huge relative errors (several hundred percentages). It also clearly separates affine and nonaffine fields in the balance equations. The resulting energy cascade picture is discussed, with a particular focus on unidirectional steady and fully developed flows for which it appears that the contact terms are dissipated locally unlike the kinetic terms which contribute to a nonlocal balance. Application of the method is demonstrated in the determination of the macroscopic properties such as volume fraction, velocity, stress, and energy of a simple shear flow, where the discrete results are generated by means of discrete particle simulation.

  7. Application of high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry measurements to estimate volatility distributions of ?-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-05

    Recent developments in high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made it possible to directly detect atmospheric organic compounds in real time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low-volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, using ions identified by high-resolution spectra from an HR-ToF-CIMS with acetate reagent ion chemistry, we develop an algorithm to estimate the vapor pressures of measured organic acids. The algorithm uses identified ion formulas and calculated double bond equivalencies, information unavailable in quadrupole CIMS technology, as constraints for the number of possible oxygen-containing functionalmore »groups. The algorithm is tested with acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry (acetate-CIMS) spectra of O3 and OH oxidation products of ?-pinene and naphthalene formed in a flow reactor with integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec s cm?3, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. The predicted condensed-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous chamber and flow reactor measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  8. Effect of vitrification temperature upon the solar average absorptance properties of Pyromark Series 2500 black paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, C.; Mahoney, A.R.

    1986-06-01

    A significant drop in production efficiency has occurred over time at the Solar One facility at Barstow, California, primarily as a result of the degradation of the Pyromark Series 2500 black paint used as the absorptive coating on the receiver panels. As part of the investigation of the problem, the solar-averaged adsorptance properties of the paint were determined as a function of vitrification temperature, since it is known that a significant amount of the panel surface area at Solar One was vitrified at temperatures below those recommended by the paint manufacturer (540/sup 0/C, 1000/sup 0/F). Painted samples initially vitrified at 230/sup 0/C (450/sup 0/F), 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F), 371/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F), and 480/sup 0/C (900/sup 0/F) exhibited significantly lower solar-averaged absorptance values (0.02 absorptance units) compared to samples vitrified at 540/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F). Thus, Solar One began its service life below optimal levels. After 140 h of thermal aging at 370/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F) and 540/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F), all samples regardless of their initial vitrification temperatures, attained the same solar-averaged absorptance value (..cap alpha../sub s/ = 0.973). Therefore, both the long-term low-temperature vitrification and the short-term high-temperature vitrification can be used to obtain optimal or near-optimal absorptance of solar flux. Futher thermal aging of vitrified samples did not result in paint degradation, clearly indicating that high solar flux is required to produce this phenomenon. The panels at Solar One never achieved optimal absorptance because their exposure to high solar flux negated the effect of long-term low-temperature vitrification during operation. On future central receiver projects, every effort should be made to properly vitrify the Pyromark coating before its exposure to high flux conditions.

  9. Average Price (Cents/kilowatthour) by State by Provider, 1990-2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall toUranium MarketingYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear Jan0064772Average

  10. Compact formulas for bounce/transit averaging in axisymmetric tokamak geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duthoit, F -X; Hahm, T S

    2014-01-01

    Compact formulas for bounce and transit orbit averaging of the fluctuation-amplitude eikonal factor in axisymmetric tokamak geometry, which is frequently encountered in bounce-gyrokinetic description of microturbulence, are given in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions and elliptic integrals. These formulas are readily applicable to the calculation of the neoclassical susceptibility in the framework of modern bounce-gyrokinetic theory. In the long-wavelength limit, we recover the expression for the Rosenbluth-Hinton residual zonal flow [Rosenbluth and Hinton, Phys.~Rev.~Lett.~{\\bf 80}, 724 (1998)] accurately.

  11. Method and system for modulation of gain suppression in high average power laser systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayramian, Andrew James (Manteca, CA)

    2012-07-31

    A high average power laser system with modulated gain suppression includes an input aperture associated with a first laser beam extraction path and an output aperture associated with the first laser beam extraction path. The system also includes a pinhole creation laser having an optical output directed along a pinhole creation path and an absorbing material positioned along both the first laser beam extraction path and the pinhole creation path. The system further includes a mechanism operable to translate the absorbing material in a direction crossing the first laser beam extraction laser path and a controller operable to modulate the second laser beam.

  12. Properties of a new average power Nd-doped phosphate laser glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, S.A.; Marshall, C.D.; Bayramian, A.J.; Wilke, G.D.; Hayden, J.S.

    1995-03-09

    The Nd-doped phosphate laser glass described herein can withstand 2.3 times greater thermal loading without fracture, compared to APG-1 (commercially-available average-power glass from Schott Glass Technologies). The enhanced thermal loading capability is established on the basis of the intrinsic thermomechanical properties and by direct thermally-induced fracture experiments using Ar-ion laser heating of the samples. This Nd-doped phosphate glass (referred to as APG-t) is found to be characterized by a 29% lower gain cross section and a 25% longer low-concentration emission lifetime.

  13. Laser properties of an improved average-power Nd-doped phosphate glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, S.A.; Marshall, C.D.; Bayramian, A.J.

    1995-03-15

    The Nd-doped phosphate laser glass described herein can withstand 2.3 times greater thermal loading without fracture, compared to APG-1 (commercially-available average-power glass from Schott Glass Technologies). The enhanced thermal loading capability is established on the basis of the intrinsic thermomechanical properties (expansion, conduction, fracture toughness, and Young`s modulus), and by direct thermally-induced fracture experiments using Ar-ion laser heating of the samples. This Nd-doped phosphate glass (referred to as APG-t) is found to be characterized by a 29% lower gain cross section and a 25% longer low-concentration emission lifetime.

  14. Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay: upgrade'05

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2006-02-17

    All existing ``positive'' results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{150}$Nd, $^{150}$Nd - $^{150}$Sm ($0^+_1$) and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te, $^{130}$Te and $^{130}$Ba are proposed. We recommend the use of these results as presently the most precise and reliable values for half-lives.

  15. Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay: upgrade-09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2009-08-28

    All existing ``positive'' results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{130}$Te, $^{150}$Nd, $^{150}$Nd - $^{150}$Sm ($0^+_1$) and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te, $^{130}$Te and $^{130}$Ba are proposed. We recommend the use of these results as presently the most precise and reliable values for half-lives.

  16. Average (RECOMMENDED) Half-Life Values for Two Neutrino Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Barabash

    2002-03-01

    All existing "positive" results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using procedure recommended by Particle Data Group weighted average values for half-lives of $^{48}$Ca, $^{76}$Ge, $^{82}$Se, $^{96}$Zr, $^{100}$Mo, $^{100}$Mo - $^{100}$Ru ($0^+_1$), $^{116}$Cd, $^{150}$Nd and $^{238}$U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of $^{128}$Te and $^{130}$Te are proposed. We recommend to use these results as most precise and reliable values for half-lives at this moment.

  17. A Complete Cosmological Solution to the Averaged Einstein Field Equations as found in Macroscopic Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. van den Hoogen

    2009-09-01

    A formalism for analyzing the complete set of field equations describing Macroscopic Gravity is presented. Using this formalism, a cosmological solution to the Macroscopic Gravity equations is determined. It is found that if a particular segment of the connection correlation tensor is zero and if the macroscopic geometry is described by a flat Robertson-Walker metric, then the effective correction to the averaged Einstein Field equations of General Relativity i.e., the backreaction, is equivalent to a positive spatial curvature term. This investigation completes the analysis of [Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 95, 151102, (2005)] and the formalism developed provides a possible basis for future studies.

  18. High Average Power Laser Gain Medium With Low Optical Distortion Using A Transverse Flowing Liquid Host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    2005-07-05

    A high average power, low optical distortion laser gain media is based on a flowing liquid media. A diode laser pumping device with tailored irradiance excites the laser active atom, ion or molecule within the liquid media. A laser active component of the liquid media exhibits energy storage times longer than or comparable to the thermal optical response time of the liquid. A circulation system that provides a closed loop for mixing and circulating the lasing liquid into and out of the optical cavity includes a pump, a diffuser, and a heat exchanger. A liquid flow gain cell includes flow straighteners and flow channel compression.

  19. Specification of optical components for a high average-power laser environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J.R.; Chow, R.; Rinmdahl, K.A.; Willis, J.B.; Wong, J.N.

    1997-06-25

    Optical component specifications for the high-average-power lasers and transport system used in the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) plant must address demanding system performance requirements. The need for high performance optics has to be balanced against the practical desire to reduce the supply risks of cost and schedule. This is addressed in optical system design, careful planning with the optical industry, demonstration of plant quality parts, qualification of optical suppliers and processes, comprehensive procedures for evaluation and test, and a plan for corrective action.

  20. Near-UV to near-IR disk-averaged Earth's spectra from Moon's Earthshine observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hamdani; L. Arnold; C. Foellmi; J. Berthier; D. Briot; P. Francois; P. Riaud; J. Schneider

    2005-10-13

    We discuss a series of Earthshine spectra obtained with the NTT/EMMI instrument between 320nm and 1020nm with a resolution of R~450 in the blue and R~250 in the red. These ascending and descending Moon's Earthshine spectra taken from Chile give disk-averaged spectra for two different Earth's phases. The spectra show the ozone (Huggins and Chappuis bands), oxygen and water vapour absorption bands, and also the stronger Rayleigh scattering in the blue. Removing the known telluric absorptions reveals a spectral feature around 700nm which is attributed to the vegetation stronger reflectivity in the near-IR, so-called vegetation red-edge.

  1. Table 7.5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: AlternativeMonthly","10/2015"Monthly","10/2015" ,"Release7CubicthroughtheSeptember 24,4,630.22 Consumption Ratios of4 Average5

  2. Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7,Year Jan995 1555.3 End Uses Average

  3. Table 10. Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices Global Crude Oil Prices Brent396,013 34,4670. Average

  4. Table 5.12. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Household Composition,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 0 1 02. U.S. Average

  5. Table 5.13. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 0 1 02. U.S. Average3.

  6. Table 5.15. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Vehicle

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 0 1 02. U.S. Average3.4.5.

  7. Average U.S. household to spend $710 less on gasoline during 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas ReservesAlabamaAboutTotal Energy GlossaryDepth ofAverage

  8. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apel, Eric; Emmons, L.; Karl, Thomas G.; Flocke, Frank M.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, Alan; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, Dirk; Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Sive, B.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Ortega, John V.; Voss, Paul B.; Blake, D. R.; Baker, Angela K.; Warneke, Carsten; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; de Gouw, Joost A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Renyi; Rudolph, Jochen; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on March 18 and the NCAR C130 one day later on March 19. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the March 19 plume and to help interpret the OH reactivity in the downwind plume. The model results generally showed good agreement with experimental results for the total VOC OH reactivity downwind and gave insight into the distributions of VOC chemical classes downwind. A box model with detailed gas phase chemistry (NCAR Master Mechanism), initialized with concentrations observed at one of the ground sites in the MCMA, was used to examine the expected evolution of specific VOCs over a 1-2 day period. The models clearly supported the experimental evidence for NMHC oxidation leading to the formation of OVOCs downwind, which then become the primary fuel for ozone production far away from the MCMA.

  9. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apel, E.; Springston, S.; Karl, T.; Emmons, L.; Flocke, F.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, D., Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, T.; Sive, B.; Kleinman, L.; Springston, S., Zaveri, R.; deGouw, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Rudolph, J.; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D. D.

    2009-11-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18 March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19 March plume and to help interpret the OH reactivity in the downwind plume. The model results generally showed good agreement with experimental results for the total VOC OH reactivity downwind and gave insight into the distributions of VOC chemical classes downwind. A box model with detailed gas phase chemistry (NCAR Master Mechanism), initialized with concentrations observed at one of the ground sites in the MCMA, was used to examine the expected evolution of specific VOCs over a 1-2 day period. The models clearly supported the experimental evidence for NMHC oxidation leading to the formation of OVOCs downwind, which then become the primary fuel for ozone production far away from the MCMA.

  10. Methodology for Formulating Diesel Surrogate Fuels with Accurate Compositional, Ignition-Quality, and Volatility Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Charles J.; Cannella, William J.; Bruno, Thomas J.; Bunting, Bruce G.; Dettman, Heather; Franz, James A.; Huber, Marcia L.; Natarajan, Mani; Pitz, William J.; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Wright, Ken

    2012-07-26

    In this study, a novel approach was developed to formulate surrogate fuels having characteristics that are representative of diesel fuels produced from real-world refinery streams. Because diesel fuels typically consist of hundreds of compounds, it is difficult to conclusively determine the effects of fuel composition on combustion properties. Surrogate fuels, being simpler representations of these practical fuels, are of interest because they can provide a better understanding of fundamental fuel-composition and property effects on combustion and emissions-formation processes in internal-combustion engines. In addition, the application of surrogate fuels in numerical simulations with accurate vaporization, mixing, and combustion models could revolutionize future engine designs by enabling computational optimization for evolving real fuels. Dependable computational design would not only improve engine function, it would do so at significant cost savings relative to current optimization strategies that rely on physical testing of hardware prototypes. The approach in this study utilized the stateof- the-art techniques of 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the advanced distillation curve to characterize fuel composition and volatility, respectively. The ignition quality was quantified by the derived cetane number. Two wellcharacterized, ultra-low-sulfur #2 diesel reference fuels produced from refinery streams were used as target fuels: a 2007 emissions certification fuel and a Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel fuel. A surrogate was created for each target fuel by blending eight pure compounds. The known carbon bond types within the pure compounds, as well as models for the ignition qualities and volatilities of their mixtures, were used in a multiproperty regression algorithm to determine optimal surrogate formulations. The predicted and measured surrogate-fuel properties were quantitatively compared to the measured target-fuel properties, and good agreement was found. This paper is dedicated to the memory of our friend and colleague Jim Franz. Funding for this research was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Office of Vehicle Technologies, and by the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) and the companies that employ the CRC members. The study was conducted under the auspices of CRC. The authors thank U.S. DOE program manager Kevin Stork for supporting the participation of the U.S. national laboratories in this study.

  11. Averages of B-Hadron, C-Hadron, and tau-lepton properties as of early 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amhis, Y.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports world averages of measurements of b-hadron, c-hadron, and tau-lepton properties obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) using results available through the end of 2011. In some cases results available in the early part of 2012 are included. For the averaging, common input parameters used in the various analyses are adjusted (rescaled) to common values, and known correlations are taken into account. The averages include branching fractions, lifetimes, neutral meson mixing parameters, CP violation parameters, parameters of semileptonic decays and CKM matrix elements.

  12. Fact #851: December 15, 2014 The Average Number of Gears used in Transmissions Continues to Rise – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #851: December 15, 2014 The Average Number of Gears used in Transmissions Continues to Rise

  13. Conditional averaging on volumetric velocity fields for analysis of the pseudo-periodic organization of jet-in-crossflow vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambonie, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric velocimetry measurements have been performed on a round jet in crossflow (JICF). Two kind of conditional averaging process are presented : a global conditional average (GCA) and a local conditional average (LCA). Vortices crossing the JICF symmetry plane are used to quantify the jet pseudo-periodicity leading to the GCA and LCA definitions. Because they make possible to improve the velocity field resolution as well as to significantly reduce the experimental noise, these conditional averages are an interesting and efficient way to study the instantaneous swirling structures of this instantaneous flow.

  14. Reducing volatilization of heavy metals in phosphate-pretreated municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Ying; Zheng Jianchang; Zou Luquan; Liu Qiang; Zhu Ping; Qian Guangren

    2011-02-15

    This research investigated the feasibility of reducing volatilization of heavy metals (lead, zinc and cadmium) in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals via phosphate pre-treatment. To evaluate the evaporation characteristics of three heavy metals from phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash, volatilization tests have been performed by means of a dedicated apparatus in the 100-1000 deg. C range. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test and BCR sequential extraction procedure were applied to assess phosphate stabilization process. The results showed that the volatilization behavior in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash could be reduced effectively. Pyromorphite-like minerals formed in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash were mainly responsible for the volatilization reduction of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash at higher temperature, due to their chemical fixation and thermal stabilization for heavy metals. The stabilization effects were encouraging for the potential reuse of MSWI fly ash.

  15. Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2002-05-31

    Advocates of renewable energy have long argued that wind power and other renewable technologies can mitigate fuel price risk within a resource portfolio. Such arguments--made with renewed vigor in the wake of unprecedented natural gas price volatility during the winter of 2000/2001--have mostly been qualitative in nature, however, with few attempts to actually quantify the price stability benefit that wind and other renewables provide. This paper attempts to quantify this benefit by equating it with the cost of achieving price stability through other means, particularly gas-based financial derivatives (futures and swaps). We find that over the past two years, natural gas consumers have had to pay a premium of roughly 0.50 cents/kWh over expected spot prices to lock in natural gas prices for the next 10 years. This incremental cost is potentially large enough to tip the scales away from new investments in natural gasfired generation and in favor of investments in wind power and other renewable technologies.

  16. Analysis of volatile contaminants in US Navy fleet soda lime. Technical report, August 1992-May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillo, R.S.; Ruby, R.; Gummin, D.D.; Porter, W.R.; Caldwell, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    Contamination was suspected of U.S. Navy Fleet soda lime (High Performance Sodasorb(R)) when an ammonia-like odor was reported during its use in August 1992. This material contained indicator dye and was used for carbon dioxide absorption during diving. This incident had a major impact on the U.S Navy diving program when the Navy temporarily banned use of Sodasorb(R) and authorized Sofnolime(R) as an interim replacement. The Naval Medical Research Institute was immediately assigned to investigate. Testing involved sampling from the headspace (gas space) inside closed buckets and from an apparatus simulating conditions during operational diving. Volatile organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry; ammonia and amines were measured by infrared spectroscopy. Significant amounts of ammonia (up to 30 ppm), ethyl and diethyl amines (up to several ppm), and various aliphatic hydrocarbons (up to 60 ppm) were detected during testing of both Sodasorb(R) and Sofnolime(R). Contaminants were slowly removed by gas flow and did not return. The source(s) of the ammonia and amines are unknown, although they may result from the breakdown of the indicator dye. Hydrocarbon contamination appeared to result from the materials of which the bucket is constructed. Based on these findings, the U.S. Navy is expected to phase in non-indicating soda lime that will be required to meet defined contaminant limits.

  17. Summary Report on the Volatile Radionuclide and Immobilization Research for FY2011 at PNNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Matyas, Josef; Lepry, William C.; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2011-09-01

    The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2011, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogen-based aerogels (i.e., chalcogels). A silica aerogel was tested at ORNL for total I2 sorption capacity. It was determined to have 48 mass% capacity while having little physisorbed I2 (I2 not taken up in the aerogel pores). For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated and a new MOF with about 8 mass% capacity for Xe and Kr. The selectivity can be changed from Xe > Kr to Xe < Kr simply by lowering the temperature below 0 C. A patent disclosure has been filed. Lastly, silicon carbide (SiC) was loaded with Kr. The diffusion of Kr in SiC was found to be less than detectable at 500 C.

  18. Volatile organic compounds: Comparison of two sample collection and preservation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liikala, T.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Teel, S.S.; Lanigan, D.C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Two soil sample collection and preservation methods for volatile organic compounds, used during site characterization activities, were evaluated using standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency analytical methods. A conventional bulk method recommends completely filling a sample container with soil; a less commonly used methanol method recommends placing a soil aliquot into methanol. Analytical results showed large negative biases associated with the bulk samples as compared to the methanol samples for aromatic compounds. Order of magnitude differences in concentrations measured between the methods were observed for benzene and toluene. Lesser differences were noted for xylenes and ethylbenzene. Limited data for chlorinated compounds suggest behavior similar to the aromatic species. A limited spike recovery study was conducted using the methanol method on laboratory and field samples. Samples were analyzed 82 days after spike addition. Poorer spike recoveries were noted from spiked methanol vials transported to the field and used for collection of soil samples. Differences between mean recovery values for the laboratory and field samples appear to be the result of losses during sample collection and transport. Despite the 82-day holding time, spike recoveries were within 70% of initial spike concentrations. These results demonstrate the stability of using methanol as a preservative for soil samples. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring volatile compounds in an aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Tyler J [Pasco, WA; Cantrell, Kirk J [West Richland, WA

    2002-07-16

    The present invention is an improvement to the method and apparatus for measuring volatile compounds in an aqueous solution. The apparatus is a chamber with sides and two ends, where the first end is closed. The chamber contains a solution volume of the aqueous solution and a gas that is trapped within the first end of the chamber above the solution volume. The gas defines a head space within the chamber above the solution volume. The chamber may also be a cup with the second end. open and facing down and submerged in the aqueous solution so that the gas defines the head space within the cup above the solution volume. The cup can also be entirely submerged in the aqueous solution. The second end of the. chamber may be closed such that the chamber can be used while resting on a flat surface such as a bench. The improvement is a sparger for mixing the gas with the solution volume. The sparger can be a rotating element such as a propeller on a shaft or a cavitating impeller. The sparger can also be a pump and nozzle where the pump is a liquid pump and the nozzle is a liquid spray nozzle open, to the head space for spraying the solution volume into the head space of gas. The pump could also be a gas pump and the nozzle a gas nozzle submerged in the solution volume for spraying the head space gas into the solution volume.

  20. Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-01-28

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gasmore »chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC–MS–FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  1. The effect of heat, cysteine, glutathione, and [gamma]-glutamyl transpeptidase on the production of volatile sulfhdryl compounds in cheddar cheese slurries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staff, Cynthia Ann

    1991-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF HEAT, CYSTEINE, GLUTATHIONE, AND V-GLUTAMYL TRANSPEPTIDASE ON THE PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE SULFHYDRYL COMPOUNDS IN CHEDDAR CHEESE SLURRIES A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANN STAFF Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology THE EFFECT OF HEAT, CYSTEINE, GLUTATHIONE, AND Y-GLUTAMYL TRANSPEPTIDASE ON THE PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE...

  2. The sublethal effects of the non volatile water soluble fraction of Southern Louisiana crude oil on the growth of Skeletonema costatum (Greve.) Cleve 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schauffler, Sue Myhre

    1979-01-01

    THE SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF THE NON VOLATILE WATER SOLUBLE FRACTION OF SOUTHERN LOUISIANA CRUDE OIL ON THE GROWTH OF Skeletonema costatum (GREVE. ) CLEVE A Thesis by SUE MYHRE SCHAUFFLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ~I University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Oceanography THE SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF THE NON VOLATILE WATER SOLUBLE FRACTION OF SOUTHERN LOUISIANA CRUDE OIL ON THE GROWTH OF Skeletonema...

  3. Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond pulses with high repetition rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, Anne

    Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond 2002 We have conducted experiments exploring pulsed laser deposition of thin films using the high average power Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Free Electron Laser. The combination

  4. Study of the relationship between indoor daylight environments and patient average length of stay (ALOS) in healthcare facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Joon Ho

    2007-04-25

    of indoor daylight variables in type A from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM. ...........................................................97 xiii TABLE Page 36 Summary of the average values of indoor... daylight variables in type B from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM.............................................................98 37 Significant ALOS comparisons and average illuminance between SE and NW...

  5. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan

    2014-09-12

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

  6. Average and recommended half-life values for two neutrino double beta decay: Upgrade-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabash, A. S. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, B. Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-30

    All existing positive results on two neutrino double beta decay in different nuclei were analyzed. Using the procedure recommended by the Particle Data Group, weighted average values for half-lives of {sup 48}Ca, {sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 100}Mo?{sup 100}Ru (0{sub 1}{sup +}), {sup 116}Cd, {sup 130}Te, {sup 136}Xe, {sup 150}Nd, {sup 150}Nd?{sup 150}Sm (0{sub 1}{sup +}) and {sup 238}U were obtained. Existing geochemical data were analyzed and recommended values for half-lives of {sup 128}Te and {sup 130}Ba are proposed. I recommend the use of these results as the most currently reliable values for half-lives.

  7. The impact of NRC guidance on concentration averaging on low level waste sealed source disposal - 11424

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitworth, Julia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stewart, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuthbertson, Abigail [DOE

    2011-01-20

    As part of its ongoing efforts to revise the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) current position on blending to be risk-informed and performance based and its current review of the low-level waste classification codified in 10 CFR 61.55, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has stated that it may review the 1995 'Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation' (BTP), which is still commonly used today. Such a review will have timely advantages, given the lack of commercial disposal availability within the United States for radioactive sealed sources that are in wide beneficial use across the country. The current application of the BTP guidance has resulted in an effective cap on commercial disposal for sources larger than 1.1 TBq (30 Ci). This paper will analyze how the BTP has been implemented with respect to sealed sources, what the implications have been for commercial disposal availability, and whether alternative packaging configurations could be considered for disposal.

  8. ARECIBO MULTI-FREQUENCY TIME-ALIGNED PULSAR AVERAGE-PROFILE AND POLARIZATION DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hankins, Timothy H. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Rankin, Joanna M. [Physics Department, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05401 (United States)], E-mail: thankins@nrao.edu, E-mail: Joanna.Rankin@uvm.edu

    2010-01-15

    We present Arecibo time-aligned, total intensity profiles for 46 pulsars over an unusually wide range of radio frequencies and multi-frequency, polarization-angle density diagrams, and/or polarization profiles for 57 pulsars at some or all of the frequencies 50, 111/130, 430, and 1400 MHz. The frequency-dependent dispersion delay has been removed in order to align the profiles for study of their spectral evolution, and wherever possible the profiles of each pulsar are displayed on the same longitude scale. Most of the pulsars within Arecibo's declination range that are sufficiently bright for such spectral or single pulse analysis are included in this survey. The calibrated single pulse sequences and average profiles are available by web download for further study.

  9. Measurement of average density and relative volumes in a dispersed two-phase fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sreepada, Sastry R. (Clifton Park, NY); Rippel, Robert R. (late of Scotia, NY)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for measuring the average density and relative volumes in an essentially transparent, dispersed two-phase fluid. A laser beam with a diameter no greater than 1% of the diameter of the bubbles, droplets, or particles of the dispersed phase is directed onto a diffraction grating. A single-order component of the diffracted beam is directed through the two-phase fluid and its refraction is measured. Preferably, the refracted beam exiting the fluid is incident upon a optical filter with linearly varing optical density and the intensity of the filtered beam is measured. The invention can be combined with other laser-based measurement systems, e.g., laser doppler anemometry.

  10. Average Neutron Total Cross Sections in the Unresolved Energy Range From ORELA High Resolutio Transmission Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, H

    2004-05-27

    Average values of the neutron total cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu have been obtained in the unresolved resonance energy range from high-resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA in the past two decades. The cross sections were generated by correcting the effective total cross sections for the self-shielding effects due to the resonance structure of the data. The self-shielding factors were found by calculating the effective and true cross sections with the computer code SAMMY for the same Doppler and resolution conditions as for the transmission measurements, using an appropriate set of resonance parameters. Our results are compared to results of previous measurements and to the current ENDF/B-VI data.

  11. Angular Averaged Profiling of the Radial Electric Field in Compensated FTICR Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Robinson, Errol W.; Wu, Si; Smith, Richard D.; Futrell, Jean H.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2012-05-08

    A recent publication from this laboratory (1) reported a theoretical analysis comparing approaches for creating harmonic ICR cells. We considered two examples of static segmented cells - namely, a seven segment cell developed in this laboratory (2) and one described by Rempel et al (3), along with a recently described dynamically harmonized cell (4). This conceptual design for a dynamically harmonized cell has now been reduced to practice and first experimental results obtained with this cell were recently reported in this journal (5). This publication reports details of cell construction and describes its performance in a 7 Tesla Fourier Transform mass spectrometer. Herein, we describe the extension of theoretical analysis presented in (1) to include angular-averaged radial electric field calculations and a discussion of the influence of trapping plates.

  12. How to Measure Specific Heat Using Event-by-Event Average $p_T$ Fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Tannenbaum; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2005-12-01

    A simple way to visualize event-by-event average $p_T$ fluctuations is by assuming that each collision has a different temperature parameter (inverse $p_T$ slope) and that the ensemble of events has a temperature distribution about the mean, $$, with standard deviation $\\sigma_T$. PHENIX characterizes the non-random fluctuation of $M_{p_T}$, the event-by-event average $p_T$, by $F_{p_T}$, the fractional difference of the standard deviation of the data from that of a random sample obtained with mixed events. This can be related to the temperature fluctuation: \\[ F_{p_T}=\\sigma^{\\rm data}_{M_{p_T}}/\\sigma^{\\rm random}_{M_{p_T}}-1\\simeq( -1) \\sigma^2_{T}/^2 \\] Combining this with the Gavai, {\\it et al.},\\cite{Gavai05} and Korus, {\\it et al.},\\cite{Korus} definitions of the specific heat per particle, a simple relationship is obtained: \\[ c_v/T^3={\\mean{n}\\over \\mean{N_{tot}}} {1\\over F_{p_T}} \\] $F_{p_T}$ is measured with a fraction $\\mean{n}/\\mean{N_{tot}}$ of the total particles produced, a purely geometrical factor representing the fractional acceptance, $\\sim 1/33$ in PHENIX. Gavai, {\\it et al.} predict that $c_v/T^3=15$, which corresponds to $F_{p_T}\\sim 0.20$% in PHENIX, which may be accessible by measurements of $M_{p_T}$ in the range $0.2\\leq p_T\\leq 0.6$ GeV/c. In order to test the Gavai, {\\it et al.} prediction that $c_v/T^3$ is reduced in a QGP compared to the ideal gas value (15 compared to 21), precision measurements of $F_{p_T}$ in the range 0.20% for $0.2\\leq p_T\\leq 0.6$ GeV/c may be practical.

  13. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennerly, John M. (Knoxville, TN); Lindner, Gordon M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rowe, John C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  14. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennerly, J.M.; Lindner, G.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1981-04-30

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  15. Chemiresistor microsensors for in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Michael Loren; Hughes, Robert Clark; Kooser, Ara S.; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.; Davis, Chad Edward

    2003-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the three-year LDRD (Laboratory Directed Research and Development) project aimed at developing microchemical sensors for continuous, in-situ monitoring of volatile organic compounds. A chemiresistor sensor array was integrated with a unique, waterproof housing that allows the sensors to be operated in a variety of media including air, soil, and water. Numerous tests were performed to evaluate and improve the sensitivity, stability, and discriminatory capabilities of the chemiresistors. Field tests were conducted in California, Nevada, and New Mexico to further test and develop the sensors in actual environments within integrated monitoring systems. The field tests addressed issues regarding data acquisition, telemetry, power requirements, data processing, and other engineering requirements. Significant advances were made in the areas of polymer optimization, packaging, data analysis, discrimination, design, and information dissemination (e.g., real-time web posting of data; see www.sandia.gov/sensor). This project has stimulated significant interest among commercial and academic institutions. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was initiated in FY03 to investigate manufacturing methods, and a Work for Others contract was established between Sandia and Edwards Air Force Base for FY02-FY04. Funding was also obtained from DOE as part of their Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative program from FY01 to FY03, and a DOE EMSP contract was awarded jointly to Sandia and INEEL for FY04-FY06. Contracts were also established for collaborative research with Brigham Young University to further evaluate, understand, and improve the performance of the chemiresistor sensors.

  16. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  17. Position for determining gas phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  18. Does the orbit-averaged theory require a scale separation between periodic orbit size and perturbation correlation length?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wenlu; Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 ; Lin, Zhihong; Fusion Simulation Center, Peking University, Beijing 100871

    2013-10-15

    Using the canonical perturbation theory, we show that the orbit-averaged theory only requires a time-scale separation between equilibrium and perturbed motions and verifies the widely accepted notion that orbit averaging effects greatly reduce the microturbulent transport of energetic particles in a tokamak. Therefore, a recent claim [Hauff and Jenko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 075004 (2009); Jenko et al., ibid. 107, 239502 (2011)] stating that the orbit-averaged theory requires a scale separation between equilibrium orbit size and perturbation correlation length is erroneous.

  19. Fe K Line Profile in Low-redshift Quasars: Average Shape and Eddington Ratio Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirohiko Inoue; Yuichi Terashima; Luis C. Ho

    2007-03-14

    We analyze X-ray spectra of 43 Palomar-Green quasars observed with {\\it XMM-Newton} in order to investigate their mean Fe K line profile and its dependence on physical properties. The continuum spectra of 39 objects are well reproduced by a model consisting of a power law and a blackbody modified by Galactic absorption. The spectra of the remaining four objects require an additional power-law component absorbed with a column density of $\\sim 10^{23} {\\rm cm}^{-2}$. We fit the entire sample simultaneously to derive average Fe line parameters by assuming a common Fe line shape. The Fe line is relatively narrow ($\\sigma=0.36$ keV), with a center energy of 6.48 keV and a mean equivalent width (EW) of 248 eV. By combining black hole masses estimated from the virial method and bolometric luminosities derived from full spectral energy distributions, we examine the dependence of the Fe K line profile on Eddington ratio. As the Eddington ratio increases, the line becomes systematically stronger (EW = 130 to 280 eV), broader ($\\sigma=0.1$ to 0.7 keV), and peaks at higher energies (6.4 to 6.8 keV). This result suggests that the accretion rate onto the black hole directly influences the geometrical structure and ionization state of the accretion disk.

  20. Room temperature quantum memory and scalable single photon source based on motional averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Borregaard; M. Zugenmaier; J. M. Petersen; H. Shen; G. Vasilakis; K. Jensen; E. S. Polzik; A. S. Sørensen

    2015-01-16

    Quantum interfaces between photons and ensembles of atoms have emerged as powerful tools for quantum technologies. High fidelity storage and retrieval of a photon in a collective quantum state of many atoms requires long-lived collective superposition states typically achieved with immobilized atoms. Thermal atomic vapors, which present a simple and scalable resource, have been so far only used for continuous variable processing or for discrete variable processing on short time scales where atomic motion is negligible. We develop a theory based on the concept of motional averaging to enable room temperature discrete variable quantum memories and coherent single photon sources. We show that by choosing the interaction so that atoms can cross the light beam several times during the interaction and by suitable spectral filtering, we erase the "which atom" information and obtain an efficient and homogenous coupling between all atoms and the light. Heralded single excitations can thus be created and stored as collective spinwaves, which can later be read out to produce coherent single photons in a scalable fashion. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach to scalable quantum memories with a proof of principle experiment with room temperature atoms contained in microcells with spin protecting coating, placed inside an optical cavity.

  1. Dynamical interpretation of average fission-fragment kinetic energy systematics and nuclear scission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadtochy, P.N. [GSI, Plankstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation); Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-11-01

    A dynamical interpretation of the well-known systematics for average total kinetic energy of fission fragments over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter (600 on the Coulomb parameter. The results of dynamical calculations of within three-dimensional Langevin dynamics show that the mean distance between the centers of mass of nascent fragments at the scission configuration increases linearly with the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}. This distance changes approximately from 2.35R{sub 0} for {sup 119}Xe to 2.6R{sub 0} for {sup 256}Fm. In spite of this increase in mean distance between future fragments at scission, the linear dependence of on the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3} remains approximately valid over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}.

  2. Twist-averaged boundary conditions for nuclear pasta Hartree-Fock calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2015-10-21

    Nuclear pasta phases, present in the inner crust of neutron stars, are associated with nucleonic matter at subsaturation densities arranged in regular shapes. Those complex phases, residing in a layer which is approximately 100-m thick, impact many features of neutron stars. Theoretical quantum-mechanical simulations of nuclear pasta are usually carried out in finite threedimensional boxes assuming periodic boundary conditions. The resulting solutions are affected by spurious finite-size effects. To remove spurious finite-size effects, it is convenient to employ twist-averaged boundary conditions (TABC) used in condensed matter, nuclear matter, and lattice quantum chromodynamics applications. In this work, we study the effectivenessmore »of TABC in the context of pasta phase simulations within nuclear density functional theory. We demonstrated that by applying TABC reliable results can be obtained from calculations performed in relatively small volumes. By studying various contributions to the total energy, we gain insights into pasta phases in mid-density range. Future applications will include the TABC extension of the adaptive multiresolution 3D Hartree-Fock solver and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov TABC applications to superfluid pasta phases and complex nucleonic topologies as in fission.« less

  3. Measuring the Average Evolution of Luminous Galaxies at zEnergy Distribution, and Stellar Mass Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Rudnick; Ivo Labbe; Natascha M. Foerster Schreiber; Stijn Wuyts; Marijn Franx; Kristian Finlator; Mariska Kriek; Alan Moorwood; Hans-Walter Rix; Huub Roettgering; Ignacio Trujillo; Arjen van der Wel; Paul van der Werf; Pieter G. van Dokkum

    2006-06-21

    (Abridged) We present the evolution of the volume averaged properties of the rest-frame optically luminous galaxy population to z~3, determined from four disjoint deep fields with optical to near-infrared wavelength coverage. We select galaxies above a rest-frame V-band luminosity of 3x10^10 Lsol and characterize their rest-frame UV through optical properties via the mean spectral energy distribution (SED). To measure evolution we apply the same selection criteria to a sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and COMBO-17. The mean rest-frame 2200Ang through V-band SED becomes steadily bluer with increasing redshift but at zluminous galaxies has increased by a factor of 3.5-7.9 from z=3 to z=0.1, including field-to-field variance uncertainties. After correcting to total, the measured mass densities at z2.3) in our LV selected samples contribute 30% and 64% of the stellar mass budget at z~2 and z~ 2.8 respectively. These galaxies are largely absent from UV surveys and this result highlights the need for mass selection of high redshift galaxies.

  4. Method for the evaluation of a average glandular dose in mammography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okunade, Akintunde Akangbe [Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State (Nigeria)

    2006-04-15

    This paper concerns a method for accurate evaluation of average glandular dose (AGD) in mammography. At different energies, the interactions of photons with tissue are not uniform. Thus, optimal accuracy in the estimation of AGD is achievable when the evaluation is carried out using the normalized glandular dose values, g(x,E), that are determined for each (monoenergetic) x-ray photon energy, E, compressed breast thickness (CBT), x, breast glandular composition, and data on photon energy distribution of the exact x-ray beam used in breast imaging. A generalized model for the values of g(x,E) that is for any arbitrary CBT ranging from 2 to 9 cm (with values that are not whole numbers inclusive, say, 4.2 cm) was developed. Along with other dosimetry formulations, this was integrated into a computer software program, GDOSE.FOR, that was developed for the evaluation of AGD received from any x-ray tube/equipment (irrespective of target-filter combination) of up to 50 kVp. Results are presented which show that the implementation of GDOSE.FOR yields values of normalized glandular dose that are in good agreement with values obtained from methodologies reported earlier in the literature. With the availability of a portable device for real-time acquisition of spectra, the model and computer software reported in this work provide for the routine evaluation of AGD received by a specific woman of known age and CBT.

  5. Cylinder-averaged histories of nitrogen oxide in a D.I. diesel with simulated turbocharging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donahue, R.J.; Borman, G.L.; Bower, G.R.

    1994-10-20

    An experimental study was conducted using the dumping technique (total cylinder sampling) to produce cylinder mass-averaged nitric oxide histories. Data were taken using a four stroke diesel research engine employing a quiescent chamber, high pressure direct ijection fuel system, and simulated turbocharging. Two fuels were used to determine fuel cetane number effects. Two loads were run, one at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 and the other at a ratio of 0.3. The engine speed was held constant at 1500 rpm. Under the turbocharged and retarded timing conditions of this study, nitric oxide was produced up to the point of about 85% mass burned. Two different models were used to simulate the engine mn conditions: the phenomenological Hiroyasu spray-combustion model, and the three dimensional, U.W.-ERO modified KIVA-lI computational fluid dynamic code. Both of the models predicted the correct nitric oxide trend. Although the modified KIVA-lI combustion model using Zeldovich kinetics correctly predicted the shapes of the nitric oxide histories, it did not predict the exhaust concentrations without arbitrary adjustment based on experimental values.

  6. Comparison of Two Gas Selection Methodologies: An Application of Bayesian Model Averaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renholds, Andrea S.; Thompson, Sandra E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Chilton, Lawrence K.

    2006-03-31

    One goal of hyperspectral imagery analysis is the detection and characterization of plumes. Characterization includes identifying the gases in the plumes, which is a model selection problem. Two gas selection methods compared in this report are Bayesian model averaging (BMA) and minimum Akaike information criterion (AIC) stepwise regression (SR). Simulated spectral data from a three-layer radiance transfer model were used to compare the two methods. Test gases were chosen to span the types of spectra observed, which exhibit peaks ranging from broad to sharp. The size and complexity of the search libraries were varied. Background materials were chosen to either replicate a remote area of eastern Washington or feature many common background materials. For many cases, BMA and SR performed the detection task comparably in terms of the receiver operating characteristic curves. For some gases, BMA performed better than SR when the size and complexity of the search library increased. This is encouraging because we expect improved BMA performance upon incorporation of prior information on background materials and gases.

  7. A high-order, adaptive, discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Todd A., 1980-

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents high-order, discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretizations of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and an output-based error estimation and mesh adaptation algorithm for these discretizations. ...

  8. Trade in Washington State Since 2001, the value of Washington exports has averaged more than $44 billion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    Trade in Washington State Since 2001, the value of Washington exports has averaged more than $44 billion annually, making Washington the most trade, Washington has the largest locally controlled public port system in the world

  9. Fact #638: August 30, 2010 Average Expenditure for a New Car Declines in Relation to Family Earnings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although the average expenditure for a new car has increased from 1967 to 2009, family earnings have also been on the rise. For this period, new car expenditures went from $3,216 to $23,186, while...

  10. PARTIALLY AVERAGED NAVIER-STOKES METHOD FOR TURBULENCE CLOSURES: CHARACTERIZATION OF FLUCTUATIONS AND EXTENSION TO WALL BOUNDED FLOWS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmipathy, Sunil

    2010-07-14

    The work presented in this dissertation concerns continued development, validation and verification of the partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method - a variable resolution closure model for turbulence. Linear eddy viscosity models (LEVM...

  11. Improved Average-Voice-based Speech Synthesis Using Gender-Mixed Modeling and a Parameter Generation Algorithm Considering GV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamagishi, Junichi; Kobayashi, Takao; Renals, Steve; King, Simon; Zen, Heiga; Toda, Tomoki; Tokuda, Keiichi

    For constructing a speech synthesis system which can achieve diverse voices, we have been developing a speaker independent approach of HMM-based speech synthesis in which statistical average voice models are adapted to ...

  12. A quantitative approach to the characterization of cumulative and average solvent exposure in paint manufacturing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, D.P.; Schwartz, B.S.; Powell, S.; Nelson, T.; Keller, L.; Sides, S.; Agnew, J.; Bolla, K.; Bleecker, M. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous reports have attributed a range of neurobehavioral effects to low-level, occupational solvent exposure. These studies have generally been limited in their exposure assessments and have specifically lacked good estimates of exposure intensity. In the present study, the authors describe the development of two exposure variables that quantitatively integrate industrial hygiene sampling data with estimates of exposure duration--a cumulative exposure (CE) estimate and a lifetime weighted average exposure (LWAE) estimate. Detailed occupational histories were obtained from 187 workers at two paint manufacturing plants. Historic industrial hygiene sampling data for total hydrocarbons (a composite variable of the major neurotoxic solvents present) were grouped according to 20 uniform, temporally stable exposure zones, which had been defined during plant walk-through surveys. Sampling at the time of the study was used to characterize the few zones for which historic data were limited or unavailable. For each participant, the geometric mean total hydrocarbon level for each exposure zone worked in was multiplied by the duration of employment in that zone; the resulting products were summed over the working lifetime to create the CE variable. The CE variable was divided by the total duration of employment in solvent-exposed jobs to create the LWAE variable. The explanatory value of each participant's LWAE estimate in the regression of simple visual reaction time (a neurobehavioral test previously shown to be affected by chronic solvent exposure) on exposure was compared with that of several other exposure variables, including exposure duration and an exposure variable based on an ordinal ranking of the exposure zones.

  13. Best available control technology (BACT) equivalent for the control of volatile organic emissions from paint dipping operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenship, W.R.; Pugh, C.W. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides details of a study conducted to demonstrate an equivalent method of Best Available Control Technology (BACT) compliance for volatile organic emissions from dip coating of certain miscellaneous metal parts. The study was proposed to show that the total volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from 3.8 lb of VOC/gallon coating formulations were no greater than the total VOC emissions from 3.5 lb/gallon formulations used under the same conditions for coating steel joists. The presumptive BACT standard enforced by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for dip coating of steel joists is 3.5 lb/gallon. The requirement of 3.5 lb/gallon was derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency Guideline Series Control of Volatile Organic Emissions from Existing Stationary Sources--Volume 6: Surface Coating of Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products. On June 5, 1998 the source completed a 12 month, full scale comparison study under a consent order with the Virginia DEQ. During the study period, the source made daily measurements of product produced, paint used, and emissions from the control and test paint tanks, and reported data to EPA and the DEQ every two months. The study concluded that a 26 percent reduction in paint usage and a 20 percent reduction in emissions was achieved in the test tanks using a 3.8 lb/gal coating compared to the control tanks using a 3.5 lb/gal coating. This study enables the source to achieve greater emission reductions than the presumptive BACT level and at the same time reduce painting costs by 34%. This study provides positive results for the environment, the steel joist industry, and the construction industry. This study could impact EPA's current Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) rule development for Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products and national VOC rules for this source category under Section 183(e) of the Clean Air Act.

  14. Observations and models of emissions of volatile terpenoid compounds from needles of ponderosa pine trees growing in situ: Controls by light, temperature and stomatal conductance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harley, P.; Eller, Allyson; Guenther, Alex B.; Monson, Russell K.

    2014-07-14

    Terpenoid emissions from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa subsp. scopulorum) were measured in Colorado, USA over two growing seasons to evaluate the role of incident light, needle temperature and stomatal conductance in controlling emissions of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) and several monoterpenes. MBO was the dominant daylight terpenoid emission, comprising on average 87% of the total flux, and diurnal variations were largely determined by light and temperature. During daytime, oxygenated monoterpenes (especially linalool) comprised up to 75% of the total monoterpenoid flux from needles. A significant fraction of monoterpenoid emissions was light dependent and 13CO2 labeling studies confirmed de novo production. Thus, modeling of monoterpenoid emissions required a hybrid model in which a significant fraction of emissions was dependent on both light and temperature, while the remainder was dependent on temperature alone. Experiments in which stomata were forced to close using abscisic acid demonstrated that MBO and a large fraction of the monoterpene flux, presumably linalool, could be limited at the scale of seconds to minutes by stomatal conductance. Using a previously published model of terpenoid emissions which explicitly accounts for the physico-chemical properties of emitted compounds, we are able to simulate these observed stomatal effects, whether induced through experimentation or arising under naturally fluctuation conditions of temperature and light. This study shows unequivocally that, under naturally occurring field conditions, de novo light dependent monoterpenes can comprise a large fraction of emissions. Differences between the monoterpene composition of ambient air and needle emissions imply a significant non-needle emission source enriched in ?-3-carene.

  15. Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, Anna C.; Russell, Marion; Lee, Wen-Yee; Apte, Michael; Maddalena, Randy

    2010-09-20

    The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 mu g/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to>500 mu g/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~;;15 mu g/m2/h while the new wood material emitted>100 mu g/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs.

  16. Infrared Spectroscopy of Wild 2 Particle Hypervelocity Tracks in Stardust Aerogel: Evidence for the presence of Volatile Organics in Comet Dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajt, S; Sandford, S A; Flynn, G J; Matrajt, G; Snead, C J; Westphal, A J; Bradley, J P

    2007-08-28

    Infrared spectroscopy maps of some tracks, made by cometary dust from 81P/Wild 2 impacting Stardust aerogel, reveal an interesting distribution of volatile organic material. Out of six examined tracks three show presence of volatile organic components possibly injected into the aerogel during particle impacts. When particle tracks contained excess volatile organic material, they were found to be -CH{sub 2}-rich. Off-normal particle tracks could indicate impacts by lower velocity particles that could have bounced off the Whipple shield, therefore carry off some contamination from it. However, this theory is not supported by data that show excess organic-rich material in normal and off-normal particle tracks. It is clear that the population of cometary particles impacting the Stardust aerogel collectors also include grains that contained little or none of this volatile organic component. This observation is consistent with the highly heterogeneous nature of the collected grains, as seen by a multitude of other analytical techniques. We propose that at least some of the volatile organic material might be of cometary origin based on supporting data shown in this paper. However, we also acknowledge the presence of carbon (primarily as -CH{sub 3}) in the original aerogel, which complicates interpretation of these results.

  17. Improved volume-averaged model for steady and pulsed-power electronegative discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sungjin; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.; Gudmundsson, J. T.

    2006-11-15

    An improved volume-averaged global model is developed for a cylindrical (radius R, length L) electronegative (EN) plasma that is applicable over a wide range of electron densities, electronegativities, and pressures. It is applied to steady and pulsed-power oxygen discharges. The model incorporates effective volume and surface loss factors for positive ions, negative ions, and electrons combining three electronegative discharge regimes: a two-region regime with a parabolic EN core surrounded by an electropositive edge, a one-region parabolic EN plasma, and a one-region flat-topped EN plasma, spanning the plasma parameters and gas pressures of interest for low pressure processing (below a few hundred millitorr). Pressure-dependent effective volume and surface loss factors are also used for the neutral species. A set of reaction rate coefficients, updated from previous model calculations, is developed for oxygen for the species O{sub 2}, O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}{sub g}), O, O{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +}, and O{sup -}, based on the latest published cross-section sets and measurements. The model solutions yield all of the quantities above together with such important processing quantities such as the neutral/ion flux ratio {gamma}{sub O}/{gamma}{sub i}, with the discharge aspect ratio 2R/L and pulsed-power period and duty ratio (pulse on-time/pulse period) as parameters. The steady discharge results are compared to an experiment, giving good agreement. For steady discharges, increasing 2R/L from 1 to 6 leads to a factor of 0.45 reduction in {gamma}{sub O}/{gamma}{sub i}. For pulsed discharges with a fixed duty ratio, {gamma}{sub O}/{gamma}{sub i} is found to have a minimum with respect to pulse period. A 25% duty ratio pulse reduces {gamma}{sub O}/{gamma}{sub i} by a factor of 0.75 compared to the steady-state case.

  18. A hybrid magnetic/complementary metal oxide semiconductor three-context memory bit cell for non-volatile circuit design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jovanovi?, B. E-mail: lionel.torres@lirmm.fr; Brum, R. M.; Torres, L.

    2014-04-07

    After decades of continued scaling to the beat of Moore's law, it now appears that conventional silicon based devices are approaching their physical limits. In today's deep-submicron nodes, a number of short-channel and quantum effects are emerging that affect the manufacturing process, as well as, the functionality of the microelectronic systems-on-chip. Spintronics devices that exploit both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment, in addition to its fundamental electronic charge, are promising solutions to circumvent these scaling threats. Being compatible with the CMOS technology, such devices offer a promising synergy of radiation immunity, infinite endurance, non-volatility, increased density, etc. In this paper, we present a hybrid (magnetic/CMOS) cell that is able to store and process data both electrically and magnetically. The cell is based on perpendicular spin-transfer torque magnetic tunnel junctions (STT-MTJs) and is suitable for use in magnetic random access memories and reprogrammable computing (non-volatile registers, processor cache memories, magnetic field-programmable gate arrays, etc). To demonstrate the potential our hybrid cell, we physically implemented a small hybrid memory block using 45?nm × 45?nm round MTJs for the magnetic part and 28?nm fully depleted silicon on insulator (FD-SOI) technology for the CMOS part. We also report the cells measured performances in terms of area, robustness, read/write speed and energy consumption.

  19. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-05-04

    Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was the only one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 mu g m-2 h 1 in the morning and 257 to 347 mu g m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 mu g m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 mu g/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 mu g/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (material surface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde.

  20. Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global average since the 1960s Jinlun.203°C. The warming of the world ocean is associated with an increase in global surface air temperature heat flux. Citation: Zhang, J. (2005), Warming of the arctic ice-ocean system is faster than the global