National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for implied stock change

  1. Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility James Preciado October 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. WORKING PAPER SERIES October 2012 James

  2. Jim Stock

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     James H. Stock is a member of the Council of Economic Advisers and is responsible for offering the President objective advice on the formulation of economic policy.  Stock was previously...

  3. Stock Photos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stock-Photos Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Policy & Reporting Expand Policy & Reporting EE Sectors Expand EE Sectors Technology & Innovation...

  4. ,"Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks ...

  5. ,"Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type",6,"Monthly","82015","1151956"...

  6. Analysis of Federal Subsidies: Implied Price of Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Craig Cooper; Thomas Foulke

    2010-10-01

    For informed climate change policy, it is important for decision makers to be able to assess how the costs and benefits of federal energy subsidies are distributed and to be able to have some measure to compare them. One way to do this is to evaluate the implied price of carbon (IPC) for a federal subsidy, or set of subsidies; where the IPC is the cost of the subsidy to the U.S. Treasury divided by the emissions reductions it generated. Subsidies with lower IPC are more cost effective at reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while subsidies with a negative IPC act to increase emissions. While simple in concept, the IPC is difficult to calculate in practice. Calculation of the IPC requires knowledge of (i) the amount of energy associated with the subsidy, (ii) the amount and type of energy that would have been produced in the absence of the subsidy, and (iii) the greenhouse gas emissions associated with both the subsidized energy and the potential replacement energy. These pieces of information are not consistently available for federal subsidies, and there is considerable uncertainty in cases where the information is available. Thus, exact values for the IPC based upon fully consistent standards cannot be calculated with available data. However, it is possible to estimate a range of potential values sufficient for initial comparisons. This study has employed a range of methods to generate “first order” estimates for the IPC of a range of federal subsidies using static methods that do not account for the dynamics of supply and demand. The study demonstrates that, while the IPC value depends upon how the inquiry is framed and the IPC cannot be calculated in a “one size fits all” manner, IPC calculations can provide a valuable perspective for climate policy analysis. IPC values are most useful when calculated within the perspective of a case study, with the method and parameters of the calculation determined by the case. The IPC of different policy measures can

  7. Implied Dynamic Feedback of 3D IR Radiative Transfer on Simulated Cloud Fields

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implications of changing correlations between WTI and other commodities, asset classes, and implied volatility James Preciado October 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. WORKING PAPER SERIES October 2012 James

  8. Recent Trends in Crude Oil Stock Levels

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    This article, the third in a series of three on petroleum stocks, attempts to identify the components of the decline in the EIA crude oil stock data.

  9. Property:StockSymbol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    StockSymbol Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:StockSymbol&oldid173773...

  10. Stock Assessment of Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids : Final Report, Volume II, Steelhead Stock Summaries, Stock Transfer Guidelines, Information Needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Philip J.

    1985-07-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of wild and hatchery-raised steelhead trout stocks in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

  11. "ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)" "Sourcekey","WCESTP11","WCESTP11","WCESTP21","... 1) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly East Coast ...

  12. Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Census Division June 30, 2014 March 31, 2014 June 30, 2013 Percent Change (June 30) 2014 versus 2013 Middle Atlantic 547 544 857 -36.2 East North Central 1,130 963 1,313 -13.9 South

  13. CBECS 2012: Building Stock Results

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A Look at the U.S. Commercial Building Stock: Results from EIA's 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) CBECS 2012 - Release date: March 4, 2015 What is a commercial building? The CBECS includes buildings greater than 1,000 square feet that devote more than half of their floorspace to activity that is not residential, manufacturing, industrial, or agricultural. The 2012 CBECS collected building characteristics data from more than 6,700 U.S. commercial buildings. This report

  14. Commercial Building Stock Assessment: Findings and Opportunities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NORTHWEST ENERGY EFFICIENCY ALLIANCE 2014 Commercial Building Stock Assessment: BPA Brown Bag May 20, 2015 Christopher Frye Senior Manager, Market Research and Evaluation Aaron...

  15. Scaling impacts on environmental controls and spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon stocks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mishra, U.; Riley, W. J.

    2015-07-02

    The spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces affects energy, moisture, and greenhouse gas exchanges with the atmosphere. However, representing the heterogeneity of terrestrial hydrological and biogeochemical processes in Earth system models (ESMs) remains a critical scientific challenge. We report the impact of spatial scaling on environmental controls, spatial structure, and statistical properties of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks across the US state of Alaska. We used soil profile observations and environmental factors such as topography, climate, land cover types, and surficial geology to predict the SOC stocks at a 50 m spatial scale. These spatially heterogeneous estimates provide a data setmore » with reasonable fidelity to the observations at a sufficiently high resolution to examine the environmental controls on the spatial structure of SOC stocks. We upscaled both the predicted SOC stocks and environmental variables from finer to coarser spatial scales (s = 100, 200, and 500 m and 1, 2, 5, and 10 km) and generated various statistical properties of SOC stock estimates. We found different environmental factors to be statistically significant predictors at different spatial scales. Only elevation, temperature, potential evapotranspiration, and scrub land cover types were significant predictors at all scales. The strengths of control (the median value of geographically weighted regression coefficients) of these four environmental variables on SOC stocks decreased with increasing scale and were accurately represented using mathematical functions (R2 = 0.83–0.97). The spatial structure of SOC stocks across Alaska changed with spatial scale. Although the variance (sill) and unstructured variability (nugget) of the calculated variograms of SOC stocks decreased exponentially with scale, the correlation length (range) remained relatively constant across scale. The variance of predicted SOC stocks decreased with spatial scale over the range of 50 m to ~ 500 m

  16. Scaling impacts on environmental controls and spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon stocks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mishra, U.; Riley, W. J.

    2015-01-27

    The spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces affects energy, moisture, and greenhouse gas exchanges with the atmosphere. However, representing heterogeneity of terrestrial hydrological and biogeochemical processes in earth system models (ESMs) remains a critical scientific challenge. We report the impact of spatial scaling on environmental controls, spatial structure, and statistical properties of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks across the US state of Alaska. We used soil profile observations and environmental factors such as topography, climate, land cover types, and surficial geology to predict the SOC stocks at a 50 m spatial scale. These spatially heterogeneous estimates provide a dataset with reasonablemore » fidelity to the observations at a sufficiently high resolution to examine the environmental controls on the spatial structure of SOC stocks. We upscaled both the predicted SOC stocks and environmental variables from finer to coarser spatial scales (s = 100, 200, 500 m, 1, 2, 5, 10 km) and generated various statistical properties of SOC stock estimates. We found different environmental factors to be statistically significant predictors at different spatial scales. Only elevation, temperature, potential evapotranspiration, and scrub land cover types were significant predictors at all scales. The strengths of control (the median value of geographically weighted regression coefficients) of these four environmental variables on SOC stocks decreased with increasing scale and were accurately represented using mathematical functions (R2 = 0.83–0.97). The spatial structure of SOC stocks across Alaska changed with spatial scale. Although the variance (sill) and unstructured variability (nugget) of the calculated variograms of SOC stocks decreased exponentially with scale, the correlation length (range) remained relatively constant across scale. The variance of predicted SOC stocks decreased with spatial scale over the range of 50 to ~ 500 m, and remained

  17. A quantum mechanical model for the relationship between stock price and stock ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotfas, Liviu-Adrian

    2012-11-01

    The trade of a fixed stock can be regarded as the basic process that measures its momentary price. The stock price is exactly known only at the time of sale when the stock is between traders, that is, only in the case when the owner is unknown. We show that the stock price can be better described by a function indicating at any moment of time the probabilities for the possible values of price if a transaction takes place. This more general description contains partial information on the stock price, but it also contains partial information on the stock owner. By following the analogy with quantum mechanics, we assume that the time evolution of the function describing the stock price can be described by a Schroedinger type equation.

  18. Ryazan Metal Ceramics Instrumentation Plant Joint Stock Co RMCIP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ryazan Metal Ceramics Instrumentation Plant Joint Stock Co RMCIP JSC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ryazan Metal Ceramics Instrumentation Plant Joint Stock Co (RMCIP JSC) Place:...

  19. Hubei Shenzhou New Energy Power Generation Stock Co Ltd | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hubei Shenzhou New Energy Power Generation Stock Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hubei Shenzhou New Energy Power Generation Stock Co Ltd Place: Hubei Province, China...

  20. Tianjin Lishen Battery Joint stock Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lishen Battery Joint stock Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tianjin Lishen Battery Joint-stock Co Ltd Place: Tianjin, Tianjin Municipality, China Zip: 300384 Product:...

  1. Shandong Jinjing Science Technology Stock Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jinjing Science Technology Stock Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shandong Jinjing Science & Technology Stock Co Ltd Place: Zibo, Shandong Province, China Zip: 255200...

  2. Effect of hydroprocessing on lubricant base stock composition and product performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galiano-Roth, A.S.; Page, N.M.

    1994-08-01

    Conventional lubricant base stock manufacture via solvent refining involves the physical separation of lube molecules while hydroprocessing changes the chemical structures of these molecules. Sulfur, nitrogen, and aromatic compounds are reduced to very low levels, compared to conventional refining. These changes in composition naturally affect product performance. Lube oil oxidation stability is increased but inferior solvency characteristics are apparent. This paper summarizes the effect of hydroprocessing unit configuration (one vs. two stage), hydrogen pressure, and hydrotreating temperature on lube base stock composition (sulfur, nitrogen and aromatics). Base stock aromatic composition, as evaluated by ultraviolet spectroscopy, is related to lube oil oxidation stability in a phenol-based antioxidant formulation. Solvency problems observed for the formulated products can be improved with additive modifications. 8 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Tianjin B M Science Technology Joint Stock Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Science Technology Joint Stock Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tianjin B&M Science & Technology Joint Stock, Ltd Place: China Product: China-based maker of cathode material...

  4. Table 2. U.S. Biodiesel production, sales, and stocks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Biodiesel production, sales, and stocks" "million gallons" "Period","B100 production",,"Sales of B100",,"Sales of B100 included in biodiesel blends",,"Ending stocks of ...

  5. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.; Rowe, Penny M.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2015-12-10

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Ourmore » findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10Wm 2. With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1–5Wm 2 in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5–15Wm 2 by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds.« less

  6. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.; Rowe, Penny M.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2015-12-10

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Our findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10Wm 2. With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1–5Wm 2 in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5–15Wm 2 by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds.

  7. Crude oil as refinery feed stock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boduszynski, M.M.; Farrell, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper gives a brief overview of the integrated oil refinery. It illustrates that crude oil refining involves {open_quotes}molecular tailoring,{close_quotes} where feed stock molecules are {open_quotes}tailored{close_quotes} through catalytic processing to make products with the most desirable composition. Chemical composition of crude oil as refinery feed stock is discussed. The emphasis is on the understanding of molecular transformations which occur in refinery processes to manufacture light transportation fuels. Diesel fuel manufacturing is used as an example. Recent environmental legislation in the United States has necessitated a significant upgrade in the quality of diesel fuel used for highway transportation. Examples are given to illustrate the impact that petroleum chemistry may have on the industry`s response to government regulations.

  8. RenewableEnergyStocks com | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Washington State Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Investor and industry portal for the renewable energy sector. References: RenewableEnergyStocks.com1 This article...

  9. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition...

  10. Heavy crudes, stocks pose desalting problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartley, D.

    1982-02-02

    The design of electrostatic desalters for crudes lighter than 30 API is well established and is no longer considered a problem. However, since 1970, the number of desalting applications involving heavy crudes (less than 20 API), syncrudes, and residual fuels has increased markedly. These stocks present unique problems that require additional design considerations. All produced crude oils, including synthetic crude from shale, tar sands, and coal liquefaction, contain impurities that adversely affect production and refining processes, the equipment used in these processes, and the final products. The most common of these impurities are water, salt, solids, metals, and sulfur. The desalting process consists of (1) adding water with a low salt content (preferably fresh) to the feedstock; (2) adequately mixing this added water with the feedstock, which already contains some quantities of salty water, sediment, and/or crystalline salt; and (3) extracting as much water as possible from the feedstock.

  11. iStock_000018654807XSmall.jpg | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information iStock_000018654807XSmall

  12. Revised Propane Stock Levels for 6/7/13

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Revised Propane Stock Levels for 6713 Release Date: June 19, 2013 Following the release of the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) for the week ended June 7, 2013, EIA...

  13. Advisory on the reporting error in the combined propane stocks...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Advisory on the reporting error in the combined propane stocks for PADDs 4 and 5 Release Date: June 12, 2013 The U.S. Energy Information Administration issued the following...

  14. Meta-analysis of high-latitude nitrogen-addition and warming studies implies ecological mechanisms overlooked by land models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bouskill, N. J.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J. Y.

    2014-12-11

    Accurate representation of ecosystem processes in land models is crucial for reducing predictive uncertainty in energy and greenhouse gas feedbacks with the climate. Here we describe an observational and modeling meta-analysis approach to benchmark land models, and apply the method to the land model CLM4.5 with two versions of belowground biogeochemistry. We focused our analysis on the aboveground and belowground responses to warming and nitrogen addition in high-latitude ecosystems, and identified absent or poorly parameterized mechanisms in CLM4.5. While the two model versions predicted similar soil carbon stock trajectories following both warming and nitrogen addition, other predicted variables (e.g., belowgroundmore » respiration) differed from observations in both magnitude and direction, indicating that CLM4.5 has inadequate underlying mechanisms for representing high-latitude ecosystems. On the basis of observational synthesis, we attribute the model–observation differences to missing representations of microbial dynamics, aboveground and belowground coupling, and nutrient cycling, and we use the observational meta-analysis to discuss potential approaches to improving the current models. However, we also urge caution concerning the selection of data sets and experiments for meta-analysis. For example, the concentrations of nitrogen applied in the synthesized field experiments (average = 72 kg ha-1 yr-1) are many times higher than projected soil nitrogen concentrations (from nitrogen deposition and release during mineralization), which precludes a rigorous evaluation of the model responses to likely nitrogen perturbations. Overall, we demonstrate that elucidating ecological mechanisms via meta-analysis can identify deficiencies in ecosystem models and empirical experiments.« less

  15. Meta-analysis of high-latitude nitrogen-addition and warming studies imply ecological mechanisms overlooked by land models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bouskill, N. J.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.

    2014-08-18

    Accurate representation of ecosystem processes in land models is crucial for reducing predictive uncertainty in energy and greenhouse gas feedbacks with the atmosphere. Here we describe an observational and modeling meta-analysis approach to benchmark land models, and apply the method to the land model CLM4.5 with two versions of belowground biogeochemistry. We focused our analysis on the above and belowground high-latitude ecosystem responses to warming and nitrogen addition, and identified mechanisms absent, or poorly parameterized in CLM4.5. While the two model versions predicted similar trajectories for soil carbon stocks following both types of perturbation, other variables (e.g., belowground respiration) differedmore » from the observations in both magnitude and direction, indicating the underlying mechanisms are inadequate for representing high-latitude ecosystems. The observational synthesis attribute these differences to missing representations of microbial dynamics, characterization of above and belowground functional processes, and nutrient competition. We use the observational meta-analyses to discuss potential approaches to improving the current models (e.g., the inclusion of dynamic vegetation or different microbial functional guilds), however, we also raise a cautionary note on the selection of data sets and experiments to be included in a meta-analysis. For example, the concentrations of nitrogen applied in the synthesized field experiments (average =72 kg ha-1 yr-1) are many times higher than projected soil nitrogen concentrations (from nitrogen deposition and release during mineralization), which preclude a rigorous evaluation of the model responses to nitrogen perturbation. Overall, we demonstrate here that elucidating ecological mechanisms via meta-analysis can identify deficiencies in both ecosystem models and empirical experiments.« less

  16. Wuhan Linuo Solar Energy Group Stock Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Linuo Solar Energy Group Stock Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Wuhan Linuo Solar Energy Group Stock Co Ltd Place: Wuhan, Hubei Province, China Zip: 430015 Sector: Solar...

  17. Stocks, Flows, and Prospects of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loschel, Andrea; Johnston, John; Delucchi, Mark A; Demayo, Trevor N; Gautier, Donald L; Greene, David L; Ogden, Joan; Rayner, Steve; Worrell, Ernst

    2010-01-01

    Analyses of future energy systems have typically focused on energy sufficiency and climate change issues. While the potential supply of energy services will probably not constrain us in the immediate future, there are limits imposed on the energy system by climate change considerations, which, in turn, are inextricably bound up with land, water, and nonrenewable mineral resources issues. These could pose constraints to energy systems that may not have been fully accounted for in current analyses. There is a pressing lack of knowledge on the boundaries that will impact a sustainable energy system. A more integrated view of energy sustainability is necessary to ensure the well-being of current and future generations. This chapter proposes a set of measures related to sustainability within the context of selected energy scenarios and develops a methodology to define and measure relevant quantities and important links to other resource areas.

  18. Stocks, Flows, and Prospects of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loschel, Andrea; Johnston, John; Delucchi, Mark A; Demayo, Trevor N; Gautier, Donald L; Greene, David L; Ogden, Joan; Rayner, Steve; Worrell, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of future energy systems have typically focused on energy suffi ciency and climate change issues. While the potential supply of energy services will probably not constrain us in the immediate future, there are limits imposed on the energy system by climate change considerations, which, in turn, are inextricably bound up with land, water, and nonrenewable mineral resources issues. These could pose constraints to energy systems that may not have been fully accounted for in current analyses. There is a pressing lack of knowledge on the boundaries that will impact a sustainable energy system. A more integrated view of energy sustainability is necessary to ensure the well-being of current and future generations. This chapter proposes a set of measures related to sustainability within the context of selected energy scenarios and develops a methodology to define and measure relevant quantities and important links to other resource areas.

  19. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Haowei; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiping; Gilbert, Jack A.; Sun, Xin; Wu, Linwei; Lin, Qiaoyan; Hu, Yigang; Li, Xiangzhen; He, Zhili; et al

    2015-02-17

    Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition that offsets increased grass productivity. Yet, a multi-decadal survey indicated that the surface soil C stock in Tibetan alpine grasslands remained relatively stable. To investigate this inconsistency, we analyzed the feedback responses of soil microbial communities to simulated warming by soil transplant in Tibetan grasslands. Microbial functional diversity decreased in response to warming, whereas microbial community structure did not correlate with changes in temperature. The relative abundance of catabolic genes associated with nitrogen (N) and C cycling decreased with warming, most notablymore » in genes encoding enzymes associated with more recalcitrant C substrates. By contrast, genes associated with C fixation increased in relative abundance. The relative abundance of genes associated with urease, glutamate dehydrogenase and ammonia monoxygenase (ureC, gdh and amoA) were significantly correlated with N2O efflux. These results suggest that unlike arid/semiarid grasslands, Tibetan grasslands maintain negative feedback mechanisms that preserve terrestrial C and N pools. To examine whether these trends were applicable to the whole plateau, we included these measurements in a model and verified that topsoil C stocks remained relatively stable. Thus, by establishing linkages between microbial metabolic potential and soil biogeochemical processes, we conclude that long-term C loss in Tibetan grasslands is ameliorated by a reduction in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant C substrates.« less

  20. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, Haowei; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiping; Gilbert, Jack A.; Sun, Xin; Wu, Linwei; Lin, Qiaoyan; Hu, Yigang; Li, Xiangzhen; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-02-17

    Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition that offsets increased grass productivity. Yet, a multi-decadal survey indicated that the surface soil C stock in Tibetan alpine grasslands remained relatively stable. To investigate this inconsistency, we analyzed the feedback responses of soil microbial communities to simulated warming by soil transplant in Tibetan grasslands. Microbial functional diversity decreased in response to warming, whereas microbial community structure did not correlate with changes in temperature. The relative abundance of catabolic genes associated with nitrogen (N) and C cycling decreased with warming, most notably in genes encoding enzymes associated with more recalcitrant C substrates. By contrast, genes associated with C fixation increased in relative abundance. The relative abundance of genes associated with urease, glutamate dehydrogenase and ammonia monoxygenase (ureC, gdh and amoA) were significantly correlated with N2O efflux. These results suggest that unlike arid/semiarid grasslands, Tibetan grasslands maintain negative feedback mechanisms that preserve terrestrial C and N pools. To examine whether these trends were applicable to the whole plateau, we included these measurements in a model and verified that topsoil C stocks remained relatively stable. Thus, by establishing linkages between microbial metabolic potential and soil biogeochemical processes, we conclude that long-term C loss in Tibetan grasslands is ameliorated by a reduction in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant C substrates.

  1. Method and apparatus for forming flues on tubular stock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beck, D.E.; Carson, C.

    1979-12-21

    The present invention is directed to a die mechanism utilized for forming flues on long, relatively narrow tubular stock. These flues are formed by displacing a die from within the tubular stock through perforations previously drilled through the tubular stock at selected locations. The drawing of the die upsets the material to form the flue of the desired configuration. The die is provided with a lubricating system which enables the lubricant to be dispensed uniformly about the entire periphery of the die in contact with the material being upset so as to assure the formation of the flues. Further, the lubricant is dispensed from within the die onto the peripheral surface of the latter at pressures in the range of about 2000 to 10,000 psi so as to assure the adequate lubrication of the die during the drawing operation. By injecting the lubricant at such high pressures, low viscosity liquid, such as water and/or alcohol, may be efficiently used as a lubricant and also provides a mechanism by which the lubricant may be evaporated from the surface of the flues at ambient conditions so as to negate the cleansing operations previously required prior to joining the flues to other conduit mechanisms by fusion welding and the like.

  2. Process for hydrocracking carbonaceous material to provide fuels or chemical feed stock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Dennis A.

    1980-01-01

    A process is disclosed for hydrocracking coal or other carbonaceous material to produce various aromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, phenol and cresols in variable relative concentrations while maintaining a near constant maximum temperature. Variations in relative aromatic concentrations are achieved by changing the kinetic severity of the hydrocracking reaction by altering the temperature profile up to and quenching from the final hydrocracking temperature. The relative concentration of benzene to the alkyl and hydroxyl aromatics is increased by imposing increased kinetic severity above that corresponding to constant heating rate followed by immediate quenching at about the same rate to below the temperature at which dehydroxylation and dealkylation reactions appreciably occur. Similarly phenols, cresols and xylenes are produced in enhanced concentrations by adjusting the temperature profile to provide a reduced kinetic severity relative to that employed when high benzene concentrations are desired. These variations in concentrations can be used to produce desired materials for chemical feed stocks or for fuels.

  3. The rule of the stock distribution with large bell in blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yuncai

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes in detail, starting from the basic equation of materials falling from a two bell furnace top system, how a number of mathematical expressions which govern the stock distribution of the throat were derived. An analysis was then made by applying these equations on topics, such as stockline levels, charging sequences, stock grain size, large bell angle and batch weight. This demonstrates that a reasonable two bells top charging system and practice could be established theoretically. Furthermore, character numbers for stock distribution, such as E{sub B} and D{sub K}, were developed for a possible computer application.

  4. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million square feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.

  5. 120 Years of U.S. Residential Housing Stock and Floor Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinto de Moura, Maria C.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.

    2015-08-11

    Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO2 emissions. Floor space is a major driver of building energy demand. This paper develops a historical time series of total residential floor space for 1891-2010 and examines the role of socio-economic drivers GDP, population and household size on floor space. Using primarily data from the U.S. Census Bureau, we develop new construction and vintage-disaggregated housing stock for three building types, and address various data inconsistency issues. An examination of the long-term relationship of GDP and total residential floor space shows a remarkably constant trend over the period. While population increases five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributes towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. Total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years.

  6. The accretion of solar material onto white dwarfs: No mixing with core material implies that the mass of the white dwarf is increasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starrfield, Sumner

    2014-04-15

    Cataclysmic Variables (CVs) are close binary star systems with one component a white dwarf (WD) and the other a larger cooler star that fills its Roche Lobe. The cooler star is losing mass through the inner Lagrangian point of the binary and some unknown fraction of this material is accreted by the WD. One consequence of the WDs accreting material, is the possibility that they are growing in mass and will eventually reach the Chandrasekhar Limit. This evolution could result in a Supernova Ia (SN Ia) explosion and is designated the Single Degenerate Progenitor (SD) scenario. This paper is concerned with the SD scenario for SN Ia progenitors. One problem with the single degenerate scenario is that it is generally assumed that the accreting material mixes with WD core material at some time during the accretion phase of evolution and, since the typical WD has a carbon-oxygen CO core, the mixing results in large amounts of carbon and oxygen being brought up into the accreted layers. The presence of enriched carbon causes enhanced nuclear fusion and a Classical Nova explosion. Both observations and theoretical studies of these explosions imply that more mass is ejected than is accreted. Thus, the WD in a Classical Nova system is losing mass and cannot be a SN Ia progenitor. However, the composition in the nuclear burning region is important and, in new calculations reported here, the consequences to the WD of no mixing of accreted material with core material have been investigated so that the material involved in the explosion has only a Solar composition. WDs with a large range in initial masses and mass accretion rates have been evolved. I find that once sufficient material has been accreted, nuclear burning occurs in all evolutionary sequences and continues until a thermonuclear runaway (TNR) occurs and the WD either ejects a small amount of material or its radius grows to about 10{sup 12} cm and the evolution is ended. In all cases where mass ejection occurs, the

  7. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly

    2003-03-01

    Lake Whatcom, Washington kokanee have been stocked in Lake Roosevelt since 1987 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining fishery. Success has been limited by low recruitment to the fishery, low adult returns to hatcheries, and a skewed sex ratio. It was hypothesized that a stock native to the upper Columbia River might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom stock. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Post smolts from each stock were released from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance was evaluated using three measures; (1) number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to 86 tributaries sampled and, (3) the number of returns to the creel. In two repeated experiments, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appeared to be capable of providing a run of three-year old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. Less than 10 three-years olds from either stock were collected during the study period. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek and to other tributaries in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Lake Whatcom stock in both 2000 and 2001. However, preliminary data from the Spokane Tribe of Indians indicated that a large number of both stocks were precocial before they were stocked. The small number of hatchery three-year olds collected indicated that the current hatchery rearing and stocking methods will continue to produce a limited jacking run largely composed of precocious males and a small number of three-year olds. No kokanee from the study were collected during standard lake wide creel surveys. Supplemental creel data, including fishing derbies, test fisheries, and angler diaries, indicated anglers harvested two-year-old hatchery kokanee a month after release. The majority of the two-year old kokanee harvested

  8. 120 years of U.S. residential housing stock and floor space

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.; Belzer, David B.; Zhou, Wei -Xing

    2015-08-11

    Residential buildings are a key driver of energy consumption and also impact transportation and land-use. Energy consumption in the residential sector accounts for one-fifth of total U.S. energy consumption and energy-related CO₂ emissions, with floor space a major driver of building energy demands. In this work a consistent, vintage-disaggregated, annual long-term series of U.S. housing stock and residential floor space for 1891–2010 is presented. An attempt was made to minimize the effects of the incompleteness and inconsistencies present in the national housing survey data. Over the 1891–2010 period, floor space increased almost tenfold, from approximately 24,700 to 235,150 million squaremore » feet, corresponding to a doubling of floor space per capita from approximately 400 to 800 square feet. While population increased five times over the period, a 50% decrease in household size contributed towards a tenfold increase in the number of housing units and floor space, while average floor space per unit remains surprisingly constant, as a result of housing retirement dynamics. In the last 30 years, however, these trends appear to be changing, as household size shows signs of leveling off, or even increasing again, while average floor space per unit has been increasing. GDP and total floor space show a remarkably constant growth trend over the period and total residential sector primary energy consumption and floor space show a similar growth trend over the last 60 years, decoupling only within the last decade.« less

  9. Calibrated Blade-Element/Momentum Theory Aerodynamic Model of the MARIN Stock Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goupee, A.; Kimball, R.; de Ridder, E. J.; Helder, J.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2015-04-02

    In this paper, a calibrated blade-element/momentum theory aerodynamic model of the MARIN stock wind turbine is developed and documented. The model is created using open-source software and calibrated to closely emulate experimental data obtained by the DeepCwind Consortium using a genetic algorithm optimization routine. The provided model will be useful for those interested in validating interested in validating floating wind turbine numerical simulators that rely on experiments utilizing the MARIN stock wind turbine—for example, the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30’s Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continued, with Correlation project.

  10. EM Rockets Past Target for Donations to Stock Food Banks | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Rockets Past Target for Donations to Stock Food Banks EM Rockets Past Target for Donations to Stock Food Banks November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis EMCBC Director Jack Craig, left to right, EM Executive Assistant Jillian Carter, who is EM's Feds Feed Families representative, and Senior Advisor for Environmental Management David Huizenga pause for a photo Nov. 8. Craig holds the "Teamwork Award" he and his staff received. EMCBC Director Jack Craig, left to right, EM Executive

  11. DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 984,253 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Awardee Amount Morgan Stanley 500,000 barrels Shell Trading U.S. Company 250,000 barrels George E. Warren Corporation 234,253

  12. DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Completes Sale of Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to four companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 1,000,000 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve storage sites in Groton and New Haven, CT. Hess Groton Terminal, Groton, CT Shell Trading U.S. Company 150,000 barrels Sprague

  13. Stock Assessment of Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids : Final Report, Volume I, Chinook, Coho, Chum and Sockeye Salmon Summaries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Philip J.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose was to identify and characterize the wild and hatchery stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River Basin on the basis of currently available information. This report provides a comprehensive compilation of data on the status and life histories of Columbia Basin salmonid stocks.

  14. CS Chang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CS Chang CS Chang FES Requirements Worksheet 1.1. Project Information - Center for Plasma Edge Simulation Document Prepared By CS Chang Project Title Center for Plasma Edge...

  15. The utilization of excess wind-electric power from stock water pumping systems to heat a sector of the stock tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nydahl, J.E.; Carlson, B.O.

    1996-12-31

    On the high plains, a wind-electric stock water pumping system produces a significant amount of excess power over the winter months due to intense winds and the decreased water consumption by cattle. The University of Wyoming is developing a multi-tasking system to utilize this excess energy to resistively heat a small sector of the stock tank at its demonstration/experimental site. This paper outlines the detailed heat transfer analysis that predicted drinking water temperature and icing conditions. It also outlines the optimization criteria and the power produced by the Bergey 1500 wind electric system. Results show that heating a smaller insulated tank inserted into the larger tank would raise the drinking water temperature by a maximum of 6.7 {degrees}C and eliminate icing conditions. The returns associated with the additional cattle weight gain, as a result of the consumption of warmer water, showed that system modification costs would be recovered the first year. 12 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. U.S. stock market interaction network as learned by the Boltzmann machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Roudi, Yasser; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2015-12-07

    Here, we study historical dynamics of joint equilibrium distribution of stock returns in the U.S. stock market using the Boltzmann distribution model being parametrized by external fields and pairwise couplings. Within Boltzmann learning framework for statistical inference, we analyze historical behavior of the parameters inferred using exact and approximate learning algorithms. Since the model and inference methods require use of binary variables, effect of this mapping of continuous returns to the discrete domain is studied. The presented results show that binarization preserves the correlation structure of the market. Properties of distributions of external fields and couplings as well as the market interaction network and industry sector clustering structure are studied for different historical dates and moving window sizes. We demonstrate that the observed positive heavy tail in distribution of couplings is related to the sparse clustering structure of the market. We also show that discrepancies between the model’s parameters might be used as a precursor of financial instabilities.

  17. Estimating Monthly 1989-2000 Data for Generation, Consumption, and Stocks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly Energy Review, Section 7: Estimating Monthly 1989-2000 Data for Generation, Consumption, and Stocks For 1989-2000, monthly and annual data were collected for electric utilities; however, during this time period, only annual data were collected for independent power producers, commercial plants, and industrial plants. To obtain 1989-2000 monthly estimates for the Electric Power, Commercial, and Industrial Sectors, electric utility patterns were used for each energy source (MonthX =

  18. Annual Stock Assessment - CWT [Coded Wire Tag program] (USFWS), Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M.

    2009-07-21

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the 'Missing Production Groups'. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. This program is now referred to as 'Annual Stock Assessment - CWT'. The objectives of the 'Annual Stock Assessment' program are to: (1) estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) estimate the contribution of each production group to fisheries, and (3) prepare an annual report for USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC. This report has been prepared annually starting with the report labeled 'Annual Report 1994'. Although the current report has the title 'Annual Report 2007', it was written in fall of 2008 using data available from RMIS that same year, and submitted as final in January 2009. The main objective of the report is to evaluate survival of groups which have been tagged under this ongoing project.

  19. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plateau 376-7435 Class of Change I - Signatories X II - Executive Manager III - Project Manager Change Title Modify Tri-Party Agreement Milestone Series M-015 in...

  20. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plateau 376-7435 Class of Change X I - Signatories II - Executive Manager III - Project Manager Change Title Modify Tri-Party Agreement Milestone Series M-020 in...

  1. Resource recovery from urban stock, the example of cadmium and tellurium from thin film module recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, F.-G.; Holm, O.; Berger, W.

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► The semiconductor layer on thin-film photovoltaic modules can be removed from the glass-plate by vacuum blast cleaning. ► The separation of blasting agent and semiconductor can be performed using flotation with a valuable yield of 55%. ► PV modules are a promising source for the recovery of tellurium in the future. - Abstract: Raw material supply is essential for all industrial activities. The use of secondary raw material gains more importance since ore grade in primary production is decreasing. Meanwhile urban stock contains considerable amounts of various elements. Photovoltaic (PV) generating systems are part of the urban stock and recycling technologies for PV thin film modules with CdTe as semiconductor are needed because cadmium could cause hazardous environmental impact and tellurium is a scarce element where future supply might be constrained. The paper describes a sequence of mechanical processing techniques for end-of-life PV thin film modules consisting of sandblasting and flotation. Separation of the semiconductor material from the glass surface was possible, however, enrichment and yield of valuables in the flotation step were non-satisfying. Nevertheless, recovery of valuable metals from urban stock is a viable method for the extension of the availability of limited natural resources.

  2. U.S. Climate Change Science Program Scientific Assessment of...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... stocks dominate (e.g., Chavez et al., 2003). * ENSO events negatively affect zooplankton and fish stocks, resulting in a collapse of anchovy stocks in offshore ecosystems of Peru. ...

  3. CS Chang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CS Chang CS Chang FES Requirements Worksheet 1.1. Project Information - Center for Plasma Edge Simulation Document Prepared By CS Chang Project Title Center for Plasma Edge Simulation Principal Investigator CS Chang Participating Organizations New York University, ORNL, PPPL, LBNL, MIT, Columbia U., Rutgers U. Lehigh U., Georgia Tech, Auburn U., U. Colorado, U. California at Irvine, Caltech, Hinton Associates Funding Agencies DOE SC DOE NSA NSF NOAA NIH Other: 2. Project Summary & Scientific

  4. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6-02-01 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form Do not use blue ink. Type or print using black ink. Date 2/11/2002 Originator Phone P. M. Knollmeyer, Assistant Manager Central Plateau 376-7435 Class of Change [X] I - Signatories [ ] II - Executive Manager [ ] III - Project Manager Change Title Modification of the M-016 Series Milestones Description/Justification of Change The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) contains commitments for the U.S.

  5. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13-02-01 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form Do not use blue ink. Type or print using black ink. Date 2/11/2002 Originator Phone P. M. Knollmeyer, Assistant Manager Central Plateau 376-7435 Class of Change [X] I - Signatories [ ] II - Executive Manager [ ] III - Project Manager Change Title Modification of the Central Plateau 200 Area Non-Tank Farm Remedial Action Work Plans (M-013 Series Milestones) Description/Justification of Change The Hanford Federal Facility

  6. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim

    2009-05-11

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality

  7. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim

    2009-05-11

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

  8. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Scholz, Allan

    2002-03-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Lake Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 with the primary objective of creating a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a stock of kokanee, native to the upper Columbia River, might perform better than the coastal Lake Whatcom strain. Kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek Hatchery in late June 2000 and repeated in 2001. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated using three performance measures; (1) the number of returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) the number of returns to other tributaries and (3) the number of returns to the creel. Kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir via electrofishing, which included 87 tributary mouths during the fall of 2000 and 2001. Chi-square analysis indicated age two Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers when compared to the Whatcom stock in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 736.6; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 156.2; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries of age two kokanee had similar results in 2000 ({chi}{sup 2} = 735.3; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01) and 2001 ({chi}{sup 2} = 150.1; d.f. = 1; P < 0.01). Six Lake Whatcom and seven Meadow Creek three year olds were collected in 2001. The sample size of three year olds was too small for statistical analysis. No kokanee were collected during creel surveys in 2000, and two (age three kokanee) were collected in 2001. Neither of the hatchery kokanee collected were coded wire tagged, therefore stock could not be distinguished. After two years of monitoring, neither Meadow Creek or Lake Whatcom kokanee appear to be capable of providing a run of three-year-old spawners to sustain stocking efforts. The small number of

  9. Growth in global oil inventories slows, drawdown in stocks expected in late 2017

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Growth in global oil inventories slows, drawdown in stocks expected in late 2017 The growth in global oil inventories is expected to slow in response to stronger growth in world oil demand, with inventories now expected to be drawn down during the second half of next year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said oil inventories will grow by just under 1 million barrels per day this year. Inventories will continue to grow during the first half of 2017 though

  10. Technology Prioritization: Transforming the U.S. Building Stock to Embrace Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Farese, Philip; Abramson, Alexis; Phelan, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Buildings sector is responsible for about 40% of the national energy expenditures. This is due in part to wasteful use of resources and limited considerations made for energy efficiency during the design and retrofit phases. Recent studies have indicated the potential for up to 30-50% energy savings in the U.S. buildings sector using currently available technologies. This paper discusses efforts to accelerate the transformation in the U.S. building energy efficiency sector using a new technology prioritization framework. The underlying analysis examines building energy use micro segments using the Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook and other publically available information. The tool includes a stock-and-flow model to track stock vintage and efficiency levels with time. The tool can be used to investigate energy efficiency measures under a variety of scenarios and has a built-in energy accounting framework to prevent double counting of energy savings within any given portfolio. This tool is developed to inform decision making and estimate long term potential energy savings for different market adoption scenarios.

  11. U.S. stock market interaction network as learned by the Boltzmann machine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Roudi, Yasser; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2015-12-07

    Here, we study historical dynamics of joint equilibrium distribution of stock returns in the U.S. stock market using the Boltzmann distribution model being parametrized by external fields and pairwise couplings. Within Boltzmann learning framework for statistical inference, we analyze historical behavior of the parameters inferred using exact and approximate learning algorithms. Since the model and inference methods require use of binary variables, effect of this mapping of continuous returns to the discrete domain is studied. The presented results show that binarization preserves the correlation structure of the market. Properties of distributions of external fields and couplings as well as themore » market interaction network and industry sector clustering structure are studied for different historical dates and moving window sizes. We demonstrate that the observed positive heavy tail in distribution of couplings is related to the sparse clustering structure of the market. We also show that discrepancies between the model’s parameters might be used as a precursor of financial instabilities.« less

  12. Survey of Potential Glass Compositions for the Immobilisation of the UK's Separated Plutonium Stocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Mike T.; Scales, Charlie R.; Bingham, Paul A.; Hand, Russell J.

    2007-07-01

    The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has taken over ownership of the majority of the UK's separated civil plutonium stocks, which are expected to exceed 100 metric tons by 2010. Studies to technically underpin options development for the disposition of these stocks, for example by immobilization or re-use as fuel, are being carried out by Nexia Solutions on behalf of NDA. Three classes of immobilization matrices have been selected for investigation by means of previous studies and stakeholder dialogue: ceramic or crystalline waste-forms, storage MOx, and vitreous or glass-based waste-forms. This paper describes the preliminary inactive experimental program for the vitrification option, with results from a wide range of glass compositions along with conclusions on their potential use for plutonium immobilization. Following review, four glass systems were selected for preliminary investigation: borosilicate, lanthanide borosilicate, aluminosilicate and phosphate glasses. A broad survey of glass properties was completed in order to allow meaningful evaluation, e.g. glass formulation, waste loading, chemical durability, thermal properties, and viscosity. The program was divided into two parts, with silicate and phosphate glasses being investigated by Nexia Solutions and the Immobilisation Science Laboratory (ISL) at the University of Sheffield respectively. (authors)

  13. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change Log Change Log NERSC-8 / Trinity Benchmarks Change Log 09/03/2013 Correction applied to MiniDFT web-page (to remove inconsistency with MiniDFT README). Capability Improvement measurements do not require 10,000 MPI ranks per k-point. 08/06/2013 Various pages have changed to remove "draft" status 08/02/2013 Correction added to FLOP Counts for "Small" Single-Node Miniapplication Tests page 07/12/2013 README files updated for IOR benchmark to correct an error in wording

  14. Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is fighting climate change with research, clean fossil energy technology, domestic renewable energy development and more energy efficient appliances, homes, businesses and vehicles.

  15. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC-8 Trinity Benchmarks Change Log 09032013 Correction applied to MiniDFT web-page ... results spreadsheet (linked on SSP web page); clarification to benchmark run rules ...

  16. Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ecause it takes time to establish institutional change, federal agencies need multiyear plans that continuously work to achieve, reinforce, and improve significant and persistent sustainability goals.

  17. Change Log

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change Log Change Log Crossroads/NERSC-9 Benchmarks Change Log 05/25/2016 Updated to latest version 3.0 release of the HPCG distribution. For the APEX benchmark, the -DHPCG_CONTIGUOUS_ARRAYS flag is now used which improves the baseline performance on Edison significantly. Please refer to the updated SSI spreadsheet for the new baseline value. 05/17/2016 Updated source distribution. README.APEX now states to use "Grind Time" as the figure of merit. Failed to do this on the 5/10/2016

  18. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol

    2009-02-20

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality

  19. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Date: M-16-04-04 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form Do not use blue ink. Type or print using black ink. May 27, 2004 Originator: K. A. Klein Phone:...

  20. Geology of the Source Physics Experiment Site, Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, M., Prothro, L. B., Obi, C.

    2012-03-15

    A test bed for a series of chemical explosives tests known as Source Physics Experiments (SPE) was constructed in granitic rock of the Climax stock, in northern Yucca Flat at the Nevada National Security Site in 2010-2011. These tests are sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration's National Center for Nuclear Security. The test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves, and will provide data that will improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. Abundant geologic data are available for the area, primarily as a result of studies performed in conjunction with the three underground nuclear tests conducted in the Climax granite in the 1960s and a few later studies of various types. The SPE test bed was constructed at an elevation of approximately 1,524 meters (m), and consists of a 91.4-centimeter (cm) diameter source hole at its center, surrounded by two rings of three 20.3-cm diameter instrument holes. The inner ring of holes is positioned 10 m away from the source hole, and the outer ring of holes is positioned 20 m from the source hole. An initial 160-m deep core hole was drilled at the location of the source hole that provided information on the geology of the site and rock samples for later laboratory testing. A suite of geophysical logs was run in the core hole and all six instruments holes to obtain matrix and fracture properties. Detailed information on the character and density of fractures encountered was obtained from the borehole image logs run in the holes. A total of 2,488 fractures were identified in the seven boreholes, and these were ranked into six categories (0 through 5) on the basis of their degree of openness and continuity. The analysis presented here considered only the higher-ranked fractures (ranks 2 through 5), of which there were 1,215 (approximately 49 percent of all fractures identified from

  1. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2003-09-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  2. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2006-02-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  3. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; O'Connor, Dick

    2003-01-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998

  4. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2005-11-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  5. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crossley, Brian; Lockwood, Jr., Neil W.; McLellan, Jason G.

    2001-01-01

    The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project

  6. Asset Recovery of Hazardous Materials Beneficial Reuse of Radiologically Encumbered Lead Stocks ''Getting the Lead Out''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2003-01-23

    Underutilized and surplus lead stocks and leaded components are a common legacy environmental problem across much of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. While seeking to dispose of these items through its Environmental Management Program, DOE operational programs continue to pursue contemporary mission requirements such as managing and/or storing radioactive isotopes that require lead materials for shielding. This paradox was identified in late 1999 when DOES policies for managing scrap metal were assessed. In January 2000, the Secretary of Energy directed the National Center of Excellence for Materials Recycle (NMR) to develop and implement a comprehensive lead reuse program for all of DOE. Fluor Hanford, contractor for DOE Richland Operations, subsequently contacted NMR to pilot lead reclamation and reuse at the Hanford Site, This relationship resulted in the development of a beneficial reuse pathway for lead reclaimed from spent fuel transport railcars being stored at Hanford. The 1.3 million pounds of lead in the railcars is considered radiologically encumbered due to its prior use. Further, the material was considered a mixed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) low-level radioactive waste that would require expensive storage or macro encapsulation to meet land disposal restrictions prior to burial. Working closely with Flour Hanford and the Office of Air, Water, and Radiation (EH-412), NMR developed a directed reuse pathway for this and other radiologically encumbered lead When derived supplemental release limits were used, the lead recovered from these railcars became eligible for reuse in shielding products to support DOE and commercial nuclear industry operations. Using this disposition pathway has saved Hanford one third of the cost of disposing of the lead and the cost of acquiring additional lead for nuclear shielding applications. Furthermore, the environmental costs associated with mining and producing new lead for shielding products and

  7. Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the U.S. Commercial Building Sector to Support Policy and Innovation Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffey, Brian; Borgeson, Sam; Selkowitz, Stephen; Apte, Josh; Mathew, Paul; Haves, Philip

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the origin, structure and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock. The model is based on a flexible structure that disaggregates the stock into various categories (e.g. by building type, climate, vintage and life-cycle stage) and assigns attributes to each of these (e.g. floor area and energy use intensity by fuel type and end use), based on historical data and user-defined scenarios for future projections. In addition to supporting the interactive exploration of building stock dynamics, the model has been used to study the likely outcomes of specific policy and innovation scenarios targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale of the challenge of meeting targets stated by various government and professional bodies, and the importance of considering both new construction and existing buildings.

  8. STOCK: Structure mapper and online coarse-graining kit for molecular simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevc, Staš; Junghans, Christoph; Praprotnik, Matej

    2015-03-15

    We present a web toolkit STructure mapper and Online Coarse-graining Kit for setting up coarse-grained molecular simulations. The kit consists of two tools: structure mapping and Boltzmann inversion tools. The aim of the first tool is to define a molecular mapping from high, e.g. all-atom, to low, i.e. coarse-grained, resolution. Using a graphical user interface it generates input files, which are compatible with standard coarse-graining packages, e.g. VOTCA and DL_CGMAP. Our second tool generates effective potentials for coarse-grained simulations preserving the structural properties, e.g. radial distribution functions, of the underlying higher resolution model. The required distribution functions can be provided by any simulation package. Simulations are performed on a local machine and only the distributions are uploaded to the server. The applicability of the toolkit is validated by mapping atomistic pentane and polyalanine molecules to a coarse-grained representation. Effective potentials are derived for systems of TIP3P (transferable intermolecular potential 3 point) water molecules and salt solution. The presented coarse-graining web toolkit is available at http://stock.cmm.ki.si.

  9. STOCK: Structure mapper and online coarse-graining kit for molecular simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bevc, Staš; Junghans, Christoph; Praprotnik, Matej

    2015-03-15

    We present a web toolkit STructure mapper and Online Coarse-graining Kit for setting up coarse-grained molecular simulations. The kit consists of two tools: structure mapping and Boltzmann inversion tools. The aim of the first tool is to define a molecular mapping from high, e.g. all-atom, to low, i.e. coarse-grained, resolution. Using a graphical user interface it generates input files, which are compatible with standard coarse-graining packages, e.g. VOTCA and DL_CGMAP. Our second tool generates effective potentials for coarse-grained simulations preserving the structural properties, e.g. radial distribution functions, of the underlying higher resolution model. The required distribution functions can be providedmore » by any simulation package. Simulations are performed on a local machine and only the distributions are uploaded to the server. The applicability of the toolkit is validated by mapping atomistic pentane and polyalanine molecules to a coarse-grained representation. Effective potentials are derived for systems of TIP3P (transferable intermolecular potential 3 point) water molecules and salt solution. The presented coarse-graining web toolkit is available at http://stock.cmm.ki.si.« less

  10. Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooley, Sharon

    2009-03-20

    A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March

  11. Tribal Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Energy System Vulnerabilities to Climate Change and Extreme Weather ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use

  12. Utilities Power Change: Engaging Commercial Customers in Workplace Charging

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Utilities Power Change: Engaging Commercial Customers in Workplace Charging S. Lommele, National Renewable Energy Laboratory W. Dafoe, National Renewable Energy Laboratory June 2016 DRAFT REPORT Workplace ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for

  13. Forecast Change

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Forecast Change 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 from 2015 United States Usage (kWh) 3,444 3,354 3,129 3,037 3,151 3,302 4.8% Price (cents/kWh) 12.06 12.09 12.58 13.04 12.95 12.84 -0.9% Expenditures $415 $405 $393 $396 $408 $424 3.9% New England Usage (kWh) 2,122 2,188 2,173 1,930 1,992 2,082 4.5% Price (cents/kWh) 15.85 15.50 16.04 17.63 18.64 18.37 -1.5% Expenditures $336 $339 $348 $340 $371 $382 3.0% Mid-Atlantic Usage (kWh) 2,531 2,548 2,447 2,234 2,371 2,497 5.3% Price (cents/kWh) 16.39 15.63

  14. Investigation of structural changes in residential electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chern, W.S.; Bouis, H.E.

    1982-09-23

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of aggregate national residential electricity demand coefficients over time. The hypothesis is maintained that the aggregate residential demand is the sum of various end-use demand components. Since the end-use composition changes over time, the demand relationship may change as well. Since the end-use composition differs among regions, the results obtained from this study can be used for making inferences about regional differences in electricity demand relationships. There are two additional sources for a possible structural change. One is that consumers may react differently to declining and rising prices, secondly, the impact of the 1973 oil embargo may have shifted demand preferences. The electricity demand model used for this study is presented. A moving regression method was employed to investigate changes in residential electricity demand over time. The statistical results show a strikingly consistent pattern of change for most of the structural variables. The most important finding of this study is that the estimated structure of residential electricity demand changes systematically over time as a result of changes in the characteristics (both durability and saturation level) of the stock of appliances. Furthermore, there is not strong evidence that the structural changes in demand occurred due to either the reversal of the declining trend of electricity prices or the impact of the 1973 oil embarge. (LCL)

  15. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

    2001-07-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when

  16. Influences of Stocking Salmon Carcass Analogs on Salmonids in Yakima River Tributaries, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.

    2003-04-01

    The benefits that marine derived nutrients from adult salmon carcasses provide to juvenile salmonids are increasingly being recognized. Current estimates suggest that only 6-7% of marine-derived nitrogen and phosphorus that were historically available to salmonids in the Pacific Northwest are currently available. Food limitation may be a major constraint limiting the restoration of salmonids. A variety of methods have been proposed to offset this nutrient deficit including: allowing greater salmon spawning escapement, stocking hatchery salmon carcasses, and stocking inorganic nutrients. Unfortunately, each of these methods has some ecological or socio-economic shortcoming. We intend to overcome many of these shortcomings by making and evaluating a pathogen free product that simulates a salmon carcass (analog). Abundant sources of marine derived nutrients are available such as fish offal from commercial fishing and salmon carcasses from hatcheries. However, a method for recycling these nutrients into a pathogen free analog that degrades at a similar rate as a natural salmon carcass has never been developed. We endeavored to (1) develop a salmon carcass analog that will increase the food available to salmonids, (2) determine the pathways that salmonids use to acquire food from analogs, and (3) determine the benefits to salmonids and the potential for application to salmonid restoration. We used a before-after-control-impact-paired design in six tributaries of the upper Yakima basin to determine the utility of stocking carcass analogs. Our preliminary results suggest that the introduction of carcass analogs into food-limited streams can be used to restore food pathways previously provided by anadromous salmon. The analogs probably reproduced both of the major food pathways that salmon carcasses produce: direct consumption and food chain enhancement. Trout and salmon fed directly on the carcass analogs during the late summer and presumably benefited from the increased

  17. change_address_111609

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHANGE OF ADDRESS and EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION TO: HUMAN RESOURCES DATE: Z# Social Security # Print First Name Print Middle Name or Initial Print Last Name (Currently in Payroll System) Complete appropriate changes: NAME CHANGE: Print Name Change to ADDRESS CHANGE: Mailing Address City State Zip TELEPHONE NUMBER CHANGE: FROM Area Code and # TO Area Code and # Cell Area Code and # Home phone Message phone EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION CHANGE: Name Relationship Day Phone Evening Phone Address City State

  18. A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating andcooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

    2000-08-01

    A recently completed project for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Building Equipment combined DOE-2 results for a large set of prototypical commercial and residential buildings with data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) residential and commercial energy consumption surveys (RECS, CBECS) to estimate the total heating and cooling loads in U.S. buildings attributable to different shell components such as windows, roofs, walls, etc., internal processes, and space-conditioning systems. This information is useful for estimating the national conservation potentials for DOE's research and market transformation activities in building energy efficiency. The prototypical building descriptions and DOE-2 input files were developed from 1986 to 1992 to provide benchmark hourly building loads for the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and include 112 single-family, 66 multi-family, and 481 commercial building prototypes. The DOE study consisted of two distinct tasks : (1) perform DOE-2 simulations for the prototypical buildings and develop methods to extract the heating and cooling loads attributable to the different building components; and (2) estimate the number of buildings or floor area represented by each prototypical building based on EIA survey information. These building stock data were then multiplied by the simulated component loads to derive aggregated totals by region, vintage, and building type. The heating and cooling energy consumption of the national building stock estimated by this bottom-up engineering approach was found to agree reasonably well with estimates from other sources, although significant differences were found for certain end-uses. The main added value from this study, however, is the insight it provides about the contributing factors behind this energy consumption, and what energy savings can be expected from efficiency improvements for different building components by region, vintage, and building type.

  19. Energy Markets Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Markets Outlook For National Association for Business Economics March 7, 2016 | Washington, D.C. By Adam Sieminski, Administrator Forecast -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 2011-Q1 2012-Q1 2013-Q1 2014-Q1 2015-Q1 2016-Q1 2017-Q1 Implied stock change and balance (right axis) World production (left axis) World consumption (left axis) world supply and demand million barrels per day implied stock change million barrels per day Global oil inventories are forecast to

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    market outlook and drivers for Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum (OMFIF) July 14, 2016 | St. Louis, MO by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Forecast -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 2011-Q1 2012-Q1 2013-Q1 2014-Q1 2015-Q1 2016-Q1 2017-Q1 Implied stock change and balance (right axis) World production (left axis) World consumption (left axis) world supply and demand million barrels per day implied stock change million barrels per day OMFIF l Third Main

  1. Selected U.S. energy issues: a view from the Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oil market outlook and drivers for Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum (OMFIF) July 14, 2016 | St. Louis, MO by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator Forecast -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 100 2011-Q1 2012-Q1 2013-Q1 2014-Q1 2015-Q1 2016-Q1 2017-Q1 Implied stock change and balance (right axis) World production (left axis) World consumption (left axis) world supply and demand million barrels per day implied stock change million barrels per day OMFIF l Third

  2. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

    2012-01-01

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink

  3. Notes and Definitions

    Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (EIA)

    Notes and Definitions This report tracks U.S. natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities. The weekly stocks generally are the volumes of working gas as of the report date. The "net change" in reported stock levels reflects all events affecting working gas in storage, including injections, withdrawals, and reclassifications between base and working gas. The "implied flow" estimate represents movements of working natural gas into or out of underground

  4. CONFIGURATION CHANGE PROPOSAL (CCP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Change Request | Domain Name Server (DNS) Change | | This change request form is to share information on domain name server changes, new requirements, modifications, or enhancements within the DOE Headquarters programmatic and office management areas. This change request should be forwarded to the Domain Management Team (DL-Domain.Management@hq.doe.gov) for validation, review and discussion. Detailed instructions are available at https://powerpedia.energy.gov/wiki/Domain_change_process. |

  5. Climatic change due to solar irradiance changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Raper, S.C.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Solar irradiance reconstructions back to 1874 are used to estimate the effect of the Sun on global-mean temperature. The importance of the history effect of the Sun on global-mean temperature. The importance of the history effect, whereby recent temperature changes may be influenced significantly by past forcing changes, is evaluated. Modelled temperature changes are shown to be relatively insensitive to model uncertainties. The overall range of modelled temperature variations is extremely small, 0.05C.

  6. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality ...

  7. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing the Impact of Climate Change on America's Water, Land, and Other Natural and Cultural Resources Energy and Climate Change Council DOI Climate Science Centers ...

  8. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  9. Bioenergy and Land Use Change

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-07-26

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratoy has developed a new system dynamics global LUC model intended to examine LUC attributed to biofuel production. The model represents major global, stocks, flows and produces results under different food and biofuel demand assumptions, with flexible regional divisions. This model is not intended to generate precise numerical estimates, but instead to provide insights into the drivers and dynamic interactions of LUC, population, dietary choices, and biofuel policy.

  10. SPRUCE: Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    SPRUCE is an experiment to assess the response of northern peatland ecosystems to increases in temperature and exposures to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. It is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] - Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems.[copied from http://mnspruce.ornl.gov/] While some data files are restricted to access by project members only, others are available for public download now, even as research is being actively conducted.

  11. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. ... and variability in clouds14, water vapour15,16 and surface emission16,17 all ...

  12. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. ...

  13. Heat Flow Determinations and Implied Thermal Regime of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hydrothermally altered rocks. Abundant Pleistocene volcanic rocks, including a cluster of thirty-seven rhyolite domes, occupy a north-trending structural and topographic...

  14. Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hydrothermally altered rocks. Abundant Pleistocene volcanic rocks, including a cluster of thirty-seven rhyolite domes, occupy a north-trending structural and topographic...

  15. Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive Award Process Overview Tribal Climate Change Webinars: BIA's Climate Change Competitive Award Process Overview...

  16. ARM - Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Climate Change A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change ...

  17. Infrastructure Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Research shows that changes in infrastructure prompt changes in behavior (for better or worse). Federal agencies can modify their infrastructure to promote sustainability-oriented behavior change, ideally in ways that make new behaviors easier and more desirable to follow than existing patterns of behavior.

  18. Recent DOE Directives Changes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 1, 2009, the Department of Energy (DOE) manuals were revised and issued to correspond with the following recent Contractor Requirements Documents (CRDs) changes to the following Directives: DOE M 205.1-8 Administrative Change 1—Cyber Security Incident Management Manual; DOE M 205.1-7 Administrative Change 1—Security Controls for Unclassified Information Systems Manual; DOE M 205.1-6 Administrative Change 1—Media Sanitization Manual; DOE M 205.1-5 Administrative Change 1—Cyber Security Process Requirements Manual

  19. The Unified North American Soil Map and Its Implication on the Soil Organic Carbon Stock in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Shishi; Wei, Yaxing; Post, Wilfred M; Cook, Robert B; Schaefer, Kevin; Thornton, Michele M

    2013-01-01

    The Unified North American Soil Map (UNASM) was developed to provide more accurate regional soil information for terrestrial biosphere modeling. The UNASM combines information from state-of-the-art U.S. STATSGO2 and Soil Landscape of Canada (SLCs) databases. The area not covered by these datasets is filled with the Harmonized World Soil Database version 1.1 (HWSD1.1). The UNASM contains maximum soil depth derived from the data source as well as seven soil attributes (including sand, silt, and clay content, gravel content, organic carbon content, pH, and bulk density) for the top soil layer (0-30 cm) and the sub soil layer (30-100 cm) respectively, of the spatial resolution of 0.25 degrees in latitude and longitude. There are pronounced differences in the spatial distributions of soil properties and soil organic carbon between UNASM and HWSD, but the UNASM overall provides more detailed and higher-quality information particularly in Alaska and central Canada. To provide more accurate and up-to-date estimate of soil organic carbon stock in North America, we incorporated Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) into the UNASM. The estimate of total soil organic carbon mass in the upper 100 cm soil profile based on the improved UNASM is 347.70 Pg, of which 24.7% is under trees, 14.2% is under shrubs, and 1.3% is under grasses and 3.8% under crops. This UNASM data will provide a resource for use in land surface and terrestrial biogeochemistry modeling both for input of soil characteristics and for benchmarking model output.

  20. Climate Change Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Interior Climate Change Response "From the Everglades to the Great Lakes to Alaska and everywhere in between, climate change is a leading threat to natural and cultural resources across America, and tribal communities are often the hardest hit by severe weather events such as droughts, floods and wildfires" - Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell "Impacts of climate change are increasingly evident for American Indian and Alaska Native communities and, in some cases, threaten

  1. Lab announces security changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab announces security changes Lab announces security changes The Laboratory is implementing several changes to its security procedures as the result of a recent security assessment conducted jointly by the Department of Defense and Department of Energy. February 23, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, February 23, 2012-Los Alamos National

  2. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  3. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  4. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  5. Change Control Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-29

    The Guide provides a suggested approach and uniform guidance for managing project and contract changes through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3B. No cancellation.

  6. Understanding Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... vapor, changing the impact of the atmosphere on the propagation of radiant energy, particularly radiant energy propagating upwards from the surface, and on the performance of some ...

  7. Sea level changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, R.W.

    1987-08-21

    The paper develops an approach to the issues relating to sea level change that will assist the non-scientist and the applied scientist in making the most effective use of our existing and developing knowledge. The human perception of ''sea level'' and how that changes as societies change and develop are discussed. After some practical perspectives on the relationships between societies and sea levels are developed, an approach to developing the best available local prediction of sea level changes is outlined, and finally present knowledge and uncertainties about the future course of events that will influence ''sea level'' as defined in the practical sense is discussed.

  8. Climate Change Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Experts will provide findings from the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) and outline federal energy policy objectives, proposals, and actions as they relate to climate change and resilience for...

  9. Climate change and health: Indoor heat exposure in vulnerable populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Jolliet, Olivier; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Parker, Edith A.; Timothy Dvonch, J.; O'Neill, Marie S.

    2012-01-15

    Introduction: Climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves and hot weather in many urban environments. Older people are more vulnerable to heat exposure but spend most of their time indoors. Few published studies have addressed indoor heat exposure in residences occupied by an elderly population. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures in homes occupied by the elderly and determine other predictors of indoor temperature. Materials and methods: We collected hourly indoor temperature measurements of 30 different homes; outdoor temperature, dewpoint temperature, and solar radiation data during summer 2009 in Detroit, MI. We used mixed linear regression to model indoor temperatures' responsiveness to weather, housing and environmental characteristics, and evaluated our ability to predict indoor heat exposures based on outdoor conditions. Results: Average maximum indoor temperature for all locations was 34.85 Degree-Sign C, 13.8 Degree-Sign C higher than average maximum outdoor temperature. Indoor temperatures of single family homes constructed of vinyl paneling or wood siding were more sensitive than brick homes to outdoor temperature changes and internal heat gains. Outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and dewpoint temperature predicted 38% of the variability of indoor temperatures. Conclusions: Indoor exposures to heat in Detroit exceed the comfort range among elderly occupants, and can be predicted using outdoor temperatures, characteristics of the housing stock and surroundings to improve heat exposure assessment for epidemiological investigations. Weatherizing homes and modifying home surroundings could mitigate indoor heat exposure among the elderly.

  10. Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to

  11. Commitment Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Commitment can be a crucial element that helps federal agencies inject and emphasize sustainability in their organizational culture. Institutions and people change when they have made definite commitments to change, especially when those commitments relate to future conditions. Research shows that explicit commitments improve the rate at which people adopt energy-efficient behaviors.

  12. Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of 1100 AREA, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's proposed action: the transfer of the 1100 Area, southern rail connection and rolling stock to a non-federal entity. Impact information contained herein will be used by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1508.27. This EA was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The following is a description of each section of the EA. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S. Department of Energy is addressing with the proposed action. As necessary, background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. A description with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts is provided. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. Reasonable alternative actions, which would address the Purpose and Need, are described. A no action alternative, as required by 10 CFR 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This provides a brief description of the locale in which the proposed action takes place, and which may be environmentally impacted. (5) Environmental

  13. Stocks of Conventional Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nuclear & Uranium Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Status of U.S. nuclear outages (interactive) Nuclear power plants Uranium & nuclear fuel Spent nuclear fuel All nuclear data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Nuclear plants and reactors Projections Recurring Uranium All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud ‹ See all Nuclear Reports State Nuclear Profiles Data for 2010 (See also State Electricity Profiles) | Release Date: April 26, 2012 |

  14. Stocks of Fuel Ethanol

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Weekly Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 07/22/16 07/29/16 08/05/16 08/12/16 08/19/16 08/26/16 View History U.S. 20,390 20,603 20,460 20,425 20,817 20,926 2010-2016 PADD 1 7,399 7,375 6,918 7,488 7,170 7,365 2010-2016 PADD 2 6,478 6,366 6,777 6,754 6,880 6,894 2010-2016 PADD 3 3,713 4,036 3,792 3,201 3,718 3,648 2010-2016 PADD 4 321 330 321 343 346 359 2010-2016 PADD 5 2,479 2,495

  15. Stocks of Reformulated Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    89,599 89,865 91,903 93,744 96,135 98,510 1993-2016 PADD 1 5,149 5,056 5,686 6,572 7,067 6,896 1993-2016 New England 594 594 594 594 594 595 1993-2016 Central Atlantic 2,904 2,774 3,360 3,613 4,088 3,871 1993-2016 Lower Atlantic 1,652 1,687 1,733 2,365 2,385 2,430 1993-2016 PADD 2 28,758 28,751 28,701 28,846 29,088 28,803 1993-2016 PADD 3 52,770 53,081 54,223 54,959 56,526 59,073 1993-2016 PADD's 4 & 5 2,922 2,978 3,293 3,367 3,454 3,738

    39 40 45 40 40 45 1993-2016 PADD 1 21 21 29 28 29

  16. Changing Climate Doug Sisterson Environmental ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change Minds about our Changing Climate Doug Sisterson Environmental Science Division, ... We are regularly confronted with arguments that deny climate change is happening or is a ...

  17. Enforcement Process Overview Changes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SAFETY AND SECURITY ENFORCEMENT PROCESS OVERVIEW CHANGES JULY 2016  The excerpts below show the changes made, in redline/strikeout, from the April 2015 version to the July 2016 version of the Enforcement Process Overview.  The page numbers below refer to page numbers of the July 2016 version of the document.  In the July 2016 version of the document on this website, the areas where these changes have been made are marked by a vertical line in the left margin. Page 25 Interview

  18. Oversight and Change

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Oversight and Change http:www.nnsa.energy.govourmissionoversightandchange

    Page...

  19. Oversight and Change

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Oversight and Change http:nnsa.energy.govourmissionoversightandchange

    Page...

  20. Climate Change Adaptation Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This course provides an introduction to planning for climate change impacts, with examples of tribes that have been going through the adaptation planning process. The course is intended for tribal...

  1. Change Control Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-29

    The Guide provides a suggested approach and uniform guidance for managing project and contract changes through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3B. Admin Chg 1 dated 10-22-2015.

  2. Chang-F-L

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effect of Droplet Size Distribution on the Determination of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius F.-L. Chang and Z. Li ESSIC/Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland F.-L. Chang Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Cloud microphysical processes can provide links between cloud radiative effect and hydrological cycle and create several feedback mechanisms linking clouds and climate. For instance, the aerosols can affect the climate through

  3. Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Institutional Change » Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle Because it takes time to establish institutional change, federal agencies need multiyear plans that continuously work to achieve, reinforce, and improve significant and persistent sustainability goals. Sustainability efforts ultimately may fail unless organizational change becomes "the way we do business." This principle is in line with organization research showing

  4. CHANGES IN POLARIZATION POSITION ANGLE ACROSS THE ECLIPSE IN THE DOUBLE PULSAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuen, R.; Manchester, R. N.; Burgay, M.; Camilo, F.; Kramer, M.; Melrose, D. B.; Stairs, I. H.

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the changes in polarization position angle in radiation from pulsar A around the eclipse in the Double Pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B at the 20 cm and 50 cm wavelengths using the Parkes 64 m telescope. The changes are {approx}2{sigma} during and shortly after the eclipse at 20 cm but less significant at 50 cm. We show that the changes in position angle during the eclipse can be modeled by differential synchrotron absorption in the eclipse regions. Position angle changes after the eclipse are interpreted as Faraday rotation in the magnetotail of pulsar B. Implied charge densities are consistent with the Goldreich-Julian density, suggesting that the particle energies in the magnetotail are mildly relativistic.

  5. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2010-03-03

    Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to 12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30% by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. The risks of nuclear power should be compared with the risks of the estimated 0.64oC long-term global surface-average temperature rise predicted if nuclear power were replaced with coal-fired power plants without carbon sequestration. Fusion energy, if developed, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

  6. Climate Change, Nuclear Power and Nuclear Proliferation: Magnitude Matters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-28

    Integrated energy, environment and economics modeling suggests that worldwide electrical energy use will increase from 2.4 TWe today to ~12 TWe in 2100. It will be challenging to provide 40% of this electrical power from combustion with carbon sequestration, as it will be challenging to provide 30% from renewable energy sources derived from natural energy flows. Thus nuclear power may be needed to provide ~30%, 3600 GWe, by 2100. Calculations of the associated stocks and flows of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides indicate that the proliferation risks at mid-century, using current light-water reactor technology, are daunting. There are institutional arrangements that may be able to provide an acceptable level of risk mitigation, but they will be difficult to implement. If a transition is begun to fast-spectrum reactors at mid-century, without a dramatic change in the proliferation risks of such systems, at the end of the century global nuclear proliferation risks are much greater, and more resistant to mitigation. Fusion energy, if successfully demonstrated to be economically competitive, would provide a source of nuclear power with much lower proliferation risks than fission.

  7. Leadership Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For changing behavior among employees, leaders in Federal agencies should visibly communicate their own commitments to sustainability in the workplace. Such visible leadership will help achieve sustainability goals in the short term and continue to provide motivation for long-term benefits.

  8. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  9. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  10. ACCO Climate Change Adaptation Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO) is hosting a two-day training workshop titled, "Climate Change Adaptation" to cover climate science, impacts from severe climate events, tools to screen and access vulnerabilities, and strategies to lead organizational change.

  11. ChangePoint

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-10-18

    This software allows one to locate the sudden intensity changes in fluorescence time trajectoreis photon by photon. It also automatically calculate the most probable number of intensity levels in the trajectory according to Bayesian statistics measure. This allows an accurate and unbiased analysis and interpretation of experimental data. The code can be applied to analysis of DNA sequencing data, for example, to allow rapid single-molecule and single-base resolution.

  12. NREL Announces Management Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announces Management Changes For more information contact: Bob Noun (303) 275-3062 Golden, Colo., June 27, 1997 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Director Richard Truly announced a reorganization that creates two new management positions at the laboratory. Effective July 1, 1997, Dr. Stanley Bull becomes Associate Director for Research Operations. He will manage the research and development of more than 30 renewable energy technologies such as solar energy, wind energy, fuels

  13. chang-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Relationship Between TOA Albedo and Cloud Optical Depth as Deduced from Models and Collocated AVHRR and ERBE Satellite Observations F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada S. A. Ackerman Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences University of Wisconsin-Madison Introduction It has long been recognized that clouds have a large influence on the earth's radiation budget and climate. Current cloud and radiation research programs, such as the Clouds and

  14. Project Summary (2012-2015) – Carbon Dynamics of the Greater Everglades Watershed and Implications of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkle, Ross; Benscoter, Brian; Comas, Xavier; Sumner, David; DeAngelis, Donald

    2015-04-07

    Carbon Dynamics of the Greater Everglades Watershed and Implications of Climate Change The objectives of this project are to: 1) quantify above- and below-ground carbon stocks of terrestrial ecosystems along a seasonal hydrologic gradient in the headwaters region of the Greater Everglades watershed; 2) develop budgets of ecosystem gaseous carbon exchange (carbon dioxide and methane) across the seasonal hydrologic gradient; 3) assess the impact of climate drivers on ecosystem carbon exchange in the Greater Everglades headwater region; and 4) integrate research findings with climate-driven terrestrial ecosystem carbon models to examine the potential influence of projected future climate change on regional carbon cycling. Note: this project receives a one-year extension past the original performance period - David Sumner (USGS) is not included in this extension.

  15. Institutional Change Process for Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For establishing institutional change in a federal agency to achieve sustainability or other energy efficiency goals, follow the five-step institutional change process.

  16. Strategies for Achieving Institutional Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Many strategies—including those derived from Institutional Change Principles–may be used to effect institutional change in support of energy and sustainability objectives.

  17. ARM - Engineering Change Request & Engineering Change Order Guidelines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change Request & Engineering Change Order Guidelines Page Contents: Guideline for Starting a Request for a New ARM Product, Capability, or Functionality Engineering Task Tracking Tool Tracking Capabilities Getting Closure, the Baseline Change Request Glossary Engineering Change Request & Engineering Change Order Guidelines Requesting Engineered Products and Services in ARM Guideline for Starting a Request for a New ARM Product, Capability, or Functionality The purpose of this guideline

  18. Progress through change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-11-15

    Merger, acquisitions and name changes - it happens in Germany as well. RAG has been undertaking some streamlining that has already impacted mining equipment and materials supply. It acquired the utilities firm E.ON's holding in Degussa on 1 July 2006. It is uncertain whether RAG may opt to sell DBT, one of the world's leading suppliers of underground mining equipment. DBT itself is undergoing some streamlining having sold DBT Maschinenfabrik Scharf and its subsidiaries to the Aurelius Group. The MAN TAKRAF Group has been sold to TAKRAAF Holding GmbH. These and other recent developments amongst Germany's mining equipment manufacturers suppliers are reported. 2 photos.

  19. Enzymatic temperature change indicator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klibanov, Alexander M.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    1989-01-21

    A temperature change indicator is described which is composed of an enzyme and a substrate for that enzyme suspended in a solid organic solvent or mixture of solvents as a support medium. The organic solvent or solvents are chosen so as to melt at a specific temperature or in a specific temperature range. When the temperature of the indicator is elevated above the chosen, or critical temperature, the solid organic solvent support will melt, and the enzymatic reaction will occur, producing a visually detectable product which is stable to further temperature variation.

  20. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

    2010-12-23

    Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

  1. Beijing ChangLi Union Energy Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Municipality, China Product: China-based technology company that research in zinc-air batteries (fuel cells). References: Beijing ChangLi Union Energy Company1 This article is a...

  2. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Webinar Presentation Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation Regional Climate Change Webinar presentation dated August 6, 2015. Regional Climate Change Webinar ...

  3. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Innovation » Climate Change Climate Change May 31, 2016 Global Energy Leaders Gather in California to Drive Clean Energy Development and Deployment Goal of meetings will be to expand international collaboration in clean energy research, development, demonstration and deployment to combat climate change. May 27, 2016 Secretary Moniz sits with Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans & Atmosphere and NOAA Administrator Dr. Kathy Sullivan (center) and Energy Department Senior

  4. Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Institutional change integrates technology, policy, and behavior to make new sustainability practices and perspectives become a typical part of how an agency operates.

  5. ARM - Baseline Change Request Guidelines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for changes to instruments, data systems, data processes, datastreams, measurement methods, and facilities. They help ensure that all aspects of the ARM Infrastructure are...

  6. Renewable Energy and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy and Climate Change Symposium in Honor of 2009 and 2010 ACS Fellows in ... Engineering Chemistry -- Cellulose and Renewable Materials, Chemicals, Fuels, and Energy ...

  7. Climate Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Highlights substantial growing efforts to support developing countries in the global response to climate change. Also details the financial assistance, education programs, and ...

  8. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  9. Climate Change and National Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2013-02-01

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

  10. Social Empowerment Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    By creating a context in which workers feel empowered to take action, Federal agencies can promote behaviors and behavior changes that support their sustainability goals. When individuals and organizations believe they can reach desirable social goals, they often do—as is shown in research studies of change.

  11. Determine Institutional Change Sustainability Goals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The first step in the institutional change process is defining your federal agency's sustainability goals. That is, decide what outcomes are desired (or required) over what period of time. Behavioral, organizational, and institutional changes typically are means to achieve desired energy, resource, or greenhouse gas emission outcomes. They are not ends in and of themselves.

  12. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    change by sulfur content may not equal total residual fuel oil ending stocks and stock change. LRG Liquefied Refinery Gases. - Not Applicable. Notes: Totals may not equal...

  13. Institutional Change for Sustainability | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Institutional Change » Institutional Change for Sustainability Institutional Change for Sustainability Inspire Change with an Awards Program Inspire Change with an Awards Program Report shares 22 stories of FEMP Federal Energy and Water Management Award winners whose projects fostered institutional change in agencies. Read more Promote Institutional Change Promote Institutional Change This magazine article provides practical, evidence-based strategies to promote institutional change. Read more

  14. Selected U.S. energy issues: a view from the Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2016 Intellectual Capital Conference May 25, 2016 | Baltimore, MD by Howard Gruenspecht, Deputy Administrator world supply and demand million barrels per day implied stock change million barrels per day 2016 Intellectual Capital Conference | Oil and natural gas: market outlook and drivers May 25, 2016 Global supply has consistently exceeded demand since the start of 2014; EIA forecasts a return to market balance in the second half of 2017 Source: EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, May 2016 2

  15. Climate Change Adaptation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Climate Change Adaptation Climate Change Adaptation DOE is adapting to climate change by applying a risk-based resiliency approach to identify and minimize climate-related...

  16. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Regional Climate Change Webinar presentation dated August 6, 2015. Regional Climate Change Webinar Presentation More Documents & Publications Regional Climate Change Webinar...

  17. Office of Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Change Jump to: navigation, search Name: Office of Climate Change Place: United Kingdom Product: UK government organisation that supports analytical work on climate change and the...

  18. Climate Change Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Assessment Climate Change Assessment Climate Change Assessment 66climornlsalev2mjs.ppt (11.1 MB) More Documents & Publications 2014 Water Power Program Peer ...

  19. Climate Change Press Release | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change Press Release Community Leaders Institutes (CLIs) to be conducted to promote awareness of climate change impacts. CLI Climate Change Press Release (118.51 KB) More ...

  20. Farming: A Climate Change Culprit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Farming: A Climate Change Culprit Simulations run at NERSC show impact of land-use change on African monsoon precipitation June 7, 2014 SahelMap Africarough The Sahel region is a narrow swath of semi-arid land that spans the African continent, from the Atlantic Ocean in the west to the Red Sea in the east. The low annual precipitation indicates the region is strongly reliant on the monsoon season for water supply. Increased agricultural activity is a rain taker,

  1. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils

  2. Multiple Motivations Institutional Change Principle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The multiple motivations principle suggests that a portfolio approach—rather than a single strategy—may be required to achieve change. Research demonstrates that people and institutions adopt new...

  3. Behavior, Energy and Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Behavior, Energy and Climate Change Conference (BECC) is the premier international conference focused on understanding human behavior and decision making so that this knowledge can accelerate the transition to an energy-efficient and low-carbon future.

  4. Management of change lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakubowski, J.A. [Upjohn Co., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This paper will describe the development of a computer program that was written to assist production units meet the requirements of the management of chance (MOC) section under the OSHA Process Safety Management (PSM) Standard, 29 CFR 1910.119 (1). Areas that will be addressed include: the development of a MOC written policy, pilot testing of change control management procedures, training of operational and maintenance personnel to follow these procedures and final implementation of established chance control measures. Practical {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} will be reviewed and a description of the use of an Access{sup {trademark}}program that was written to enhance daily MOC equipment and process changes will be highlighted. This program was designed to expedite the required PSM review of changes and to simultaneously trigger an update of related change documentation such as piping and instrumentation diagrams, equipment files, regulatory permits, and unit operating procedures.

  5. Audience Categorization and Behavior Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This sheet from the U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is a tool to use for audience brainstorm and categorization, and assessing desired behavior change.

  6. ARM - Predictions of Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TeachersTopic ListPredictions of Climate Change Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Predictions of Climate Change There are no accurate predictions of what will happen to earth's climate with an increase in greenhouse gases. The climate system is very complex, so that scientists

  7. Changes for the 2012 CBECS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for the 2012 CBECS The proposed design, procedures, and forms for the 2012 CBECS reflect a number of changes from the 2007 CBECS. These changes include:  The sample size for the 2012 CBECS will be 50 percent larger relative to the previous CBECS. The increase in sample size will allow for: o Fewer suppressed cells in published tables, o Better capture of emerging energy phenomena, such as new technologies for on- site electricity generation, o Lower relative standard errors for key statistics

  8. Projected Changes in Mean and Interannual Variability of Surface Water over Continental China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, Guoyong; Tang, Qiuhong; Huang, Maoyi; Hong, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-05-01

    Five General Circulation Model (GCM) climate projections under the RCP8.5 emission scenario were used to drive the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model to investigate the impacts of climate change on hydrologic cycle over continental China in the 21st century. The bias-corrected climatic variables were generated for the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5) by the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP). Results showed much larger fractional changes of annual mean Evaportranspiration (ET) per unit warming than the corresponding fractional changes of Precipitation (P) per unit warming across the country especially for South China, which led to notable decrease of surface water variability (P-E). Specifically, negative trends for annual mean runoff up to -0.33%/decade and soil moisture trends varying between -0.02 to -0.13%/decade were found for most river basins across China. Coincidentally, interannual variability for both runoff and soil moisture exhibited significant positive trends for almost all river basins across China, implying an increase in extremes relative to the mean conditions. Noticeably, the largest positive trends for runoff variability and soil moisture variability, which were up to 38 0.41%/decade and 0.90%/decade, both occurred in Southwest China. In addition to the regional contrast, intra-seasonal variation was also large for the runoff mean and runoff variability changes, but small for the soil moisture mean and variability changes. Our results suggest that future climate change could further exacerbate existing water-related risks (e.g. floods and droughts) across China as indicated by the marked decrease of surface water amounts combined with steady increase of interannual variability throughout the 21st century. This study highlights the regional contrast and intra-seasonal variations for the projected hydrologic changes and could provide muti

  9. PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National...

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - Climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate-change Climate change en Using powerful computers, physicists uncover mechanism that stabilizes plasma within tokamaks...

  11. Incorporating Behavior Change Efforts Into Energy Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Behavior Change Efforts Into Energy Efficiency Programs Incorporating Behavior Change Efforts Into Energy Efficiency Programs Better Buildings Residential Network Program ...

  12. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Evaluation of Limiting Factors for Stocked Kokanee and Rainbow Trout in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt

    2009-03-01

    Hatchery supplementation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka and rainbow trout O. mykiss has been the primary mitigation provided by Bonneville Power Administration for loss of anadromous fish to the waters above Grand Coulee Dam (GCD). The hatchery program for rainbow trout has consistently met management goals and provided a substantial contribution to the fishery; however, spawner returns and creel survey results for kokanee have been below management goals. Our objective was to identify factors that limit limnetic fish production in Lake Roosevelt by evaluating abiotic conditions, food limitations, piscivory, and entrainment. Dissolved oxygen concentration was adequate throughout most of the year; however, levels dropped to near 6 mg/L in late July. For kokanee, warm water temperatures during mid-late summer limited their nocturnal distribution to 80-100 m in the lower section of the reservoir. Kokanee spawner length was consistently several centimeters longer than in other Pacific Northwest systems, and the relative weights of rainbow trout and large kokanee were comparable to national averages. Large bodied daphnia (> 1.7 mm) were present in the zooplankton community during all seasons indicating that top down effects were not limiting secondary productivity. Walleye Stizostedion vitreum were the primary piscivore of salmonids in 1998 and 1999. Burbot Lota lota smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis preyed on salmonids to a lesser degree. Age 3 and 4 walleye were responsible for the majority (65%) of the total walleye consumption of salmonids. Bioenergetics modeling indicated that reservoir wide consumption by walleye could account for a 31-39% loss of stocked kokanee but only 6-12% of rainbow trout. Size at release was the primary reason for differential mortality rates due to predation. Entrainment ranged from 2% to 16% of the monthly abundance estimates of limnetic fish, and could account for 30% of total

  13. Stocks of Crude Oil, Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Weekly Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 07/22/16 07/29/16 08/05/16 08/12/16 08/19/16 08/26/16 View History U.S. 521,133 522,546 523,601 521,093 523,594 525,870 1982-2016 PADD 1 16,960 18,485 17,800 17,063 20,116 20,259 1990-2016 PADD 2 150,663 151,513 153,097 153,005 152,435 151,032 1990-2016 Cushing, Oklahoma 65,215 64,092 65,255 64,531 64,906 63,867 2004-2016 PADD 3 271,100 269,785

  14. Connecticut Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - - - - - - 1986-2016 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel (Refiner Sales) NA W W W W W 1984-2016 Kerosene (Refiner Sales) - - - - - - 1984-2016 No. 1 Distillate (Refiner Sales) - - - - - - ...

  15. Stocks of Distillate Fuel Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    153,155 151,196 153,135 153,257 154,753 158,135 1982-2016 PADD 1 58,175 60,720 61,919 61,846 63,491 63,077 1990-2016 New England 10,627 11,547 11,412 11,329 11,828 11,763 1990-2016 Central Atlantic 34,602 35,869 37,219 37,396 37,908 37,951 1990-2016 Lower Atlantic 12,946 13,304 13,288 13,122 13,754 13,363 1990-2016 PADD 2 30,637 30,058 29,641 29,668 30,209 31,542 1990-2016 PADD 3 46,763 43,491 44,527 44,536 43,558 45,155 1990-2016 PADD 4 3,515 3,565 3,342 3,267 3,076 3,256 1990-2016 PADD 5

  16. Stocks of Total Motor Gasoline

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    238,190 235,383 232,659 232,695 232,004 227,793 1990-2016 PADD 1 71,316 70,915 70,125 69,114 67,178 64,894 1990-2016 New England 4,686 4,642 4,674 3,828 4,060 4,067 1990-2016 Central Atlantic 36,633 37,196 36,725 36,533 34,267 33,801 1990-2016 Lower Atlantic 29,996 29,076 28,726 28,752 28,850 27,025 1990-2016 PADD 2 51,564 50,969 48,618 48,362 49,859 51,009 1990-2016 PADD 3 78,585 77,267 76,595 77,958 78,513 76,586 1990-2016 PADD 4 7,648 7,481 7,105 6,973 6,578 6,705 1990-2016 PADD 5 29,077

  17. U.S. Total Stocks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 2,040,557 2,044,571 2,052,479 2,063,340 2,079,200 2,077,498 1956-2016 Crude Oil 1,195,186 1,214,807 1,227,643 1,232,693 1,235,581 1,223,700 1920-2016 All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) 845,371 829,764 824,836 830,647 843,619 853,798 1993-2016 Pentanes Plus 19,657 20,579 20,401 20,248 20,552 20,935 1981-2016 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 145,255 127,182 134,002 149,984 166,533 190,847 1967-2016 Ethane/Ethylene 33,243

  18. U.S. Refinery Stocks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area: U.S. PADD 1 East Coast Appalachian No. 1 PADD 2 Ind., Ill. and Ky. Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. Okla., Kans., Mo. PADD 3 Texas Inland Texas Gulf Coast La. Gulf Coast N. La., Ark New Mexico PADD 4 PADD 5 Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Crude Oil and Petroleum

  19. U.S. Total Stocks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Ethanol) 731 1,085 836 695 1,070 927 2009-2015 MTBE 561 871 605 452 770 829 1993-2015 Other Oxygenates 170 214 231 243 300 98 1993-2015 Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) ...

  20. Stocks of Crude Oil, Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    521,133 522,546 523,601 521,093 523,594 525,870 1982-2016 PADD 1 16,960 18,485 17,800 17,063 20,116 20,259 1990-2016 PADD 2 150,663 151,513 153,097 153,005 152,435 151,032 1990-2016 Cushing, Oklahoma 65,215 64,092 65,255 64,531 64,906 63,867 2004-2016 PADD 3 271,100 269,785 272,342 272,124 272,639 275,550 1990-2016 PADD 4 24,523 25,472 25,564 26,384 26,731 26,974 1990-2016 PADD 5 57,888 57,290 54,798 52,517 51,674 52,055

  1. Stocks of Propane/Propylene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    74,129 75,381 77,294 78,351 79,561 82,073 1993-2016 PADD 1 3,434 3,431 3,685 3,276 3,671 3,887 1993-2016 New England 330 328 328 327 328 327 1993-2016 Central Atlantic 1,700 1,679 ...

  2. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 C by the end of the 21st century.

  3. Global change monitoring with lichens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Insarov, G.

    1997-12-31

    Environmental monitoring involves observations and assessment of changes in ecosystems and their components caused by anthropogenetic influence. An ideal monitoring system enables quantification of the contemporary state of the environment and detect changes in it. An important function of monitoring is to assess environment quality of areas that are not affected by local anthropogenic impacts, i.e. background areas. In background areas terrestrial ecosystems are mainly affected by such anthropogenic factors as lowered air pollution and global climate change. Assessment of biotic responses to altered climatic and atmospheric conditions provides an important basis for ecosystem management and environmental decision making. Without the ability to make such assessment, sustainability of ecosystems as a support system for humans remains uncertain.

  4. Global change: Acronyms and abbreviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodard, C.T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1995-05-01

    This list of acronyms and abbreviations is compiled to provide the user with a ready reference to dicipher the linguistic initialisms and abridgements for the study of global change. The terms included in this first edition were selected from a wide variety of sources: technical reports, policy documents, global change program announcements, newsletters, and other periodicals. The disciplinary interests covered by this document include agriculture, atmospheric science, ecology, environmental science, oceanography, policy science, and other fields. In addition to its availability in hard copy, the list of acronyms and abbreviations is available in DOS-formatted diskettes and through CDIAC`s anonymous File Transfer Protocol (FTP) area on the Internet.

  5. Climate change and the Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change and the Arctic Climate change and the Arctic WHEN: May 19, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Join us for convivial discussion on May 19 at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Cathy Wilson, who heads the Lab's Atmosphere, Climate and Ecosystem Science team, is working to better understand what happens when warming climate

  6. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume III. An analysis of the validity of the utilities' stock-recruitment curve-fitting exercise and prior estimation of beta technique. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 1792

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, S. W.; Goodyear, C. P.; Kirk, B. L.

    1982-03-01

    This report addresses the validity of the utilities' use of the Ricker stock-recruitment model to extrapolate the combined entrainment-impingement losses of young fish to reductions in the equilibrium population size of adult fish. In our testimony, a methodology was developed and applied to address a single fundamental question: if the Ricker model really did apply to the Hudson River striped bass population, could the utilities' estimates, based on curve-fitting, of the parameter alpha (which controls the impact) be considered reliable. In addition, an analysis is included of the efficacy of an alternative means of estimating alpha, termed the technique of prior estimation of beta (used by the utilities in a report prepared for regulatory hearings on the Cornwall Pumped Storage Project). This validation methodology should also be useful in evaluating inferences drawn in the literature from fits of stock-recruitment models to data obtained from other fish stocks.

  7. Quick-change filter cartridge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Ortiz, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    A quick-change filter cartridge. In sampling systems for measurement of airborne materials, a filter element is introduced into the sampled airstream such that the aerosol constituents are removed and deposited on the filter. Fragile sampling media often require support in order to prevent rupture during sampling, and careful mounting and sealing to prevent misalignment, tearing, or creasing which would allow the sampled air to bypass the filter. Additionally, handling of filter elements may introduce cross-contamination or exposure of operators to toxic materials. Moreover, it is desirable to enable the preloading of filter media into quick-change cartridges in clean laboratory environments, thereby simplifying and expediting the filter-changing process in the field. The quick-change filter cartridge of the present invention permits the application of a variety of filter media in many types of instruments and may also be used in automated systems. The cartridge includes a base through which a vacuum can be applied to draw air through the filter medium which is located on a porous filter support and held there by means of a cap which forms an airtight seal with the base. The base is also adapted for receiving absorbing media so that both particulates and gas-phase samples may be trapped for investigation, the latter downstream of the aerosol filter.

  8. 12.0 CHANGES TO THE AGREEMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2-1 12.0 CHANGES TO THE AGREEMENT 12.1 INTRODUCTION This section provides the process for changing elements of the Agreement, the Action Plan and its appendices. All changes processed using this section shall be subject to the applicable requirements of Section 10.0 Community Relations/Public Involvement. 12.2 AUTHORITY TO APPROVE CHANGES The appropriate authority level for approval of a change is based on the content of the change as follows. Class I Change--A Class I change is a change to

  9. Simplified air change effectiveness modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rock, B.A.; Anderson, R.; Brandemuehl, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes recent progress in developing practical air change effectiveness modeling techniques for the design and analysis of air diffusion in occupied rooms. The ultimate goal of this continuing work is to develop a simple and reliable method for determining heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system compliance with ventilation standards. In the current work, simplified two-region models of rooms are used with six occupancy patterns to find the air change effectiveness. A new measure, the apparent ACH effectiveness, yields the relative ventilation performance of an air diffusion system. This measure can be used for the prediction or evaluation of outside air delivery to the occupants. The required outside air can be greater or less than that specified by ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62-89.

  10. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change. This two-day conference will discuss climate change impacts, policy on climate change, tribal...

  11. ATNI Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians is hosting the Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change. This two-day conference will discuss climate change impacts, policy on climate change, tribal needs, funding opportunities, and more.

  12. Climate Change Impacts on Fish and Wildlife

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Earth’s climate is changing. In some places such as the Arctic, the change is rapid and profound, while in other areas change has been less dramatic and more gradual. But virtually everywhere,...

  13. Brandon Chang | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brandon Chang Brandon Chang Brandon Chang Alumnus Brandon completed the PARC/I-CARES Certificate of Accomplishment in Renewable Energy & the Environment in 2015. He is currently enrolled in medical school at Case Western Reserve University. Alumni

  14. 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 U.S. Department of Energy June 2014 DOE Climate Change Adaptation Plan Table of Contents Climate Change Adaptation Plan ................................................................................................................................2 Impetus for Action ..................................................................................................................................................2 The DOE Mission and Climate Change Adaptation

  15. chang(1)-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Vertical Profile of Cloud Droplet Effective Radius from Multiple Spectral Channels F.-L. Chang and Z. Li Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environment Service Dowsview, Ontario, Canada Introduction Cloud optical depth and droplet size are two important parameters required for understanding the radiative effects of clouds and their impact on climate (e.g., Fouquart et al. 1990). Numerous efforts have been made to retrieve the two parameters from

  16. chang(2)-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Satellite Inversion of Cloud and Radiation Quantities Using ScaRaB Visible and Shortwave Measurements F.-L. Chang, Z. Li, and A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Cloud and radiation both play important roles in governing the climate (Wielicki et al. 1995). A good knowledge of the two variables and their interactions can help model the climate. Although operational meteorological satellites have provided a wealth of observations, the inversion

  17. Phase change material storage heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goswami, D. Yogi; Hsieh, Chung K.; Jotshi, Chand K.; Klausner, James F.

    1997-01-01

    A storage heater for storing heat and for heating a fluid, such as water, has an enclosure defining a chamber therein. The chamber has a lower portion and an upper portion with a heating element being disposed within the enclosure. A tube through which the fluid flows has an inlet and an outlet, both being disposed outside of the enclosure, and has a portion interconnecting the inlet and the outlet that passes through the enclosure. A densely packed bed of phase change material pellets is disposed within the enclosure and is surrounded by a viscous liquid, such as propylene glycol. The viscous liquid is in thermal communication with the heating element, the phase change material pellets, and the tube and transfers heat from the heating element to the pellets and from the pellets to the tube. The viscous fluid has a viscosity so that the frictional pressure drop of the fluid in contact with the phase change material pellets substantially reduces vertical thermal convection in the fluid. As the fluid flows through the tube heat is transferred from the viscous liquid to the fluid flowing through the tube, thereby heating the fluid.

  18. Climate Change Adaptation Technical Fact Sheet: Contaminated...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of potential climate change vulnerabilities and (2) presenting possible adaptation measures that may be considered to increase a remedy's resilience to climate change impacts. ...

  19. Social Empowerment Institutional Change Principle | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Empowerment Institutional Change Principle Social Empowerment Institutional Change Principle By creating a context in which workers feel empowered to take action, federal agencies ...

  20. Global Change Associates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Change Associates Jump to: navigation, search Name: Global Change Associates Place: New York City, New York Zip: 10025-5657 Product: Consulting firm focusing on the convergence...

  1. Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability...

  2. Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM Climate Change Simulations with CCSM & CESM Key Challenges: Perform fundamental research on the processes that influence the natural...

  3. Committee on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Committee on Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name: Committee on Climate Change Place: United Kingdom Product: String representation "As a key part o ... 2020 and 2050."...

  4. London Climate Change Agency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Agency Jump to: navigation, search Name: London Climate Change Agency Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: SE1 8AA Product: Agency responsible for...

  5. Global Climate Change Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Change Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: Global Climate Change Institute Place: Tsinghua University, Beijing Municipality, China Zip: 100084 Product: Global Climate...

  6. Brazil Interministerial Commission on Global Climate Change ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interministerial Commission on Global Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Name: Brazil Interministerial Commission on Global Climate Change Place: Distrito Federal...

  7. Buildings and Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Buildings and Climate Change AgencyCompany Organization: United Nations Environment Programme...

  8. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector...

  9. Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning: A Guide for Practitioners Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation...

  10. Climate Change: Energy and Community Impacts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Day - Energy Performance Contracting 24 February 2015 Key Points Up Front * Climate change is real and will have significant impacts * The emissions that drive the change - ...

  11. IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IDRISI Land Change Modeler Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IDRISI Land Change Modeler AgencyCompany Organization: Clark Labs Sector: Land Focus Area:...

  12. Institutional Change Process for Sustainability | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process for Sustainability Institutional Change Process for Sustainability For establishing institutional change in a federal agency to achieve sustainability or other energy ...

  13. List of Approved Changes - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Changes Tri-Party Agreement The Agreement Announcements List of Approved Changes TPA Project Manager's Lists Modifications for Public Comment Data Management MP-14 WIDS...

  14. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 205-956-8900 AL Erickson, Eric eerickson@amalsugar.com 208-468-6859 ID F Fernandez, Christopher cfernandez@baseco.com 415-543-1600 x31 CA Fesler, Scott ...

  15. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... OR Wroblewski, Ron info@productiveenergy.com 608-232-1861 WI Z Zhang, Zhiqin (Jeremy) jeremy.zhang@dnvkema.com 510-891-0446 x44245 CA Zhao, Ivan izhao@nexant.com ...

  16. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 404-424-8889 GA Wyant, Christopher cwyant@psn.bz 814-720-3365 PA Z Zhang, Zhiqin (Jeremy) jeremy.zhang@dnvkema.com 510-891-0446 x44245 CA Indicates Qualified Instructor A ...

  17. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 503-579-8984 OR Simon, Tony simont@energy.wsu.edu 360-956-2141 OR Skupien, Nick NSS@Brabazon.com 920-883-7071 WI Smith, Ben benjamin.smith@cp.com 803-817-7128 SC ...

  18. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... gregharrell@emscas.com 865-719-0173 TN Hart, Aaron 312-355-3445 IL Hill, Justin ... 530-304-0195 CA Woodbury, Keith keith.woodbury@ua.edu 205-348-1647 AL ...

  19. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... kbharbin@crimson.ua.edu 205-292-9369 AL Hart, Aaron 312-355-3445 IL Heffner, Craig ... 207-774-5961 ME Woodbury, Keith keith.woodbury@ua.edu 205-348-1647 AL ...

  20. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    919-744-6129 NC Breiling, Jeff jeff.breiling@simplot.com 509-793-1176 WA Brown, Jessica Jessica.brown@innovate.gatech.edu 423-827-6230 GA Brown, Mike...

  1. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 213-244-5375 CA G Gerrish, Mark F. mfgerrish@ecs.umass.edu 413-545-2853 MA Goff, Christopher cgoff@semprautilities.com 213-244-3635 CA Goffinet, Scott ...

  2. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jeff jeff.hare@cascadeenergy.com 801-770-4332 UT Hash IV, Robert bhash@airsystemsales.com 615-373-0039 TN Hunter, Bill bhunter@aircleantech.com 206-860-4930 WA J Jackson, ...

  3. Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aizenman, Michael; Warzel, Simone

    2012-09-15

    We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

  4. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy This month, .EDUconnections, puts the spotlight on the University of Wisconsin. UW-Madison ranks as one of the most prolific research universities in the world, providing a learning environment where faculty, staff and students can critically examine our natural world in a way that will help improve the quality of life for all. Two of their research programs, the Energy Institute and the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, are directly supporting the work of the

  5. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool (PHAST) Qualified Specialists June 2016 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Alaras, Art art_alaras@hillspet.com 785-231-2872 KS Atreya, Arvind aatreya@umich.edu 734-647-4790 MI Avagyan, Ruben ravagyan@mix.wvu.edu 304-906-1401 WV B Baesel, Bryan bbaesel@cec-consultants.com 216-749-2992 OH Baker, Mike mike.baker@hollyfrontier.com 801-643-3770 UT Balster, Nick nbalster@wyman.com 508-839-8103 MA Banta, Larry Larry.Banta@mail.wvu.edu 304-293-3375 WV

  6. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pumping System Assessment Tool (PSAT) Qualified Specialists June 2016 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Adidjaja, Jakub adijakub@gmail.com 951-776-2607 CA Ahlgren, Roy ‡ Royahlgren@comcast.net 847-751-0380 IL Alas, Victor vmalas@crimson.ua.edu 256-473-3486 AL Albright, David david.albright@simplot.com 559-301-8424 CA Altfeather, Nate altfeathern@saic.com 608-443-8458 WI Amundson, Todd tmamundson@bpa.gov 503-230-5491 OR Anderson, Kevin kanderson@us.grundfos.com 913-227-3400 KS Andrus,

  7. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT) Qualified Specialists June 2016 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Alas, Victor vmalas@crimson.ua.edu 256-473-3486 AL Allen, Ron rallen@onsitenergy.com 530-304-4454 CA Altfeather, Nate altfeathern@saic.com 608-443-8458 WI Anderson, Bob randerson@barr.com 952-832-2721 MN Aue, Jerry jaue@charter.net 715-343-6118 WI B Baesel, Bryan bbaesel@cec-consultants.com 216-749-2992 OH Banuri, Nishit nbanuri3@gmail.com 304-685-6247 PA Bartels, Jeff

  8. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or companies identif

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Compressed Air Systems AIRMaster+ Qualified Specialists August 2016 Name E-mail Address Phone Number Location A Abdelrahman, Khaled kzakaria@miami.edu 305-284-3817 FL Aitken, Brandon ba@blackhawkequipment.com 303-242-9325 CO Alam, Ridwan quazi.alam@irco.com 630-441-0317 CA Alas, Victor vmalas@crimson.ua.edu 256-473-3486 AL Allen, Ron rallen@onsitenergy.com 530-304-4454 CA Alofs, Roger roger@acsiaz.com 480-968-4555 AZ Alleman, Brian balleman@leprinofoods.com 303-600-2536 CO Ames, Mark

  9. This list does not imply DOE endorsement of the individuals or...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    le@sullairhouston.com 832-374-9517 TX Clark, Matt matt.clark@pneulogic.com 866-348-5669 Cohen, Josh jcohen@peerlessenergy.com 402-345-8311 NE Collins, Ray rcollins@atlanticcompress...

  10. Nodal to nodeless superconducting energy gap structure change concomitant with Fermi surface reconstruction in the heavy-fermion CeCoIn?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Petrovic, C.; Tanatar, M. A.; Flint, R.; Hu, Rongwei; White, B. D.; Lum, I. K.; Maple, M. B.; Prozorov, R.

    2015-01-15

    The London penetration depth ?(T) was measured in single crystals of Ce1xRxCoIn?, R=La, Nd, and Yb down to Tmin ? 50 mK (Tc/Tmin ~50) using a tunnel-diode resonator. In the cleanest samples ??(T) is best described by the power law, ??(T) ? Tn, with n ~ 1, consistent with line nodes. Substitutions of Ce with La, Nd, and Yb lead to similar monotonic suppressions of Tc, however, the effects on ??(T) differ. While La and Nd dopings lead to increase of the exponent n and saturation at n ~ 2, as expected for a dirty nodal superconductor, Yb doping leadsmoreto n > 3, suggesting a change from nodal to nodeless superconductivity. This superconducting gap structure change happens in the same doping range where changes of the Fermi surface topology were reported, implying that the nodal structure and Fermi surface topology are closely linked.less