Sample records for implants aerospace fasteners

  1. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crane, Randolph W.; Marts, Donna J.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  2. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crane, Randolph W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  3. Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation with Solid Targets for Space and Aerospace Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, R. M.; Goncalves, J. A. N.; Ueda, M.; Silva, G. [National Institute for Space Research, PO Box 515, ZIP 12227-010 Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, 2-1303-8, Ikeda, Omura Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan)

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes successful results obtained by a new type of plasma source, named as Vaporization of Solid Targets (VAST), for treatment of materials for space and aerospace applications, by means of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D). Here, the solid element is vaporized in a high pressure glow discharge, being further ionized and implanted/deposited in a low pressure cycle, with the aid of an extra electrode. First experiments in VAST were run using lithium as the solid target. Samples of silicon and aluminum alloy (2024) were immersed into highly ionized lithium plasma, whose density was measured by a double Langmuir probe. Measurements performed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed clear modification of the cross-sectioned treated silicon samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that lithium was implanted/deposited into/onto the surface of the silicon. Implantation depth profiles may vary according to the condition of operation of VAST. One direct application of this treatment concerns the protection against radiation damage for silicon solar cells. For the case of the aluminum alloy, X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the appearance of prominent new peaks. Surface modification of A12024 by lithium implantation/deposition can lower the coefficient of friction and improve the resistance to fatigue of this alloy. Recently, cadmium was vaporized and ionized in VAST. The main benefit of this element is associated with the improvement of corrosion resistance of metallic substrates. Besides lithium and cadmium, VAST allows to performing PIII and D with other species, leading to the modification of the near-surface of materials for distinct purposes, including applications in the space and aerospace areas.

  4. Self-locking threaded fasteners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glovan, R.J.; Tierney, J.C.; McLean, L.L.; Johnson, L.L.

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A threaded fastener with a shape memory alloy (SMA) coatings on its threads is disclosed. The fastener has special usefulness in high temperature applications where high reliability is important. The SMA coated fastener is threaded into or onto a mating threaded part at room temperature to produce a fastened object. The SMA coating is distorted during the assembly. At elevated temperatures the coating tries to recover its original shape and thereby exerts locking forces on the threads. When the fastened object is returned to room temperature the locking forces dissipate. Consequently the threaded fasteners can be readily disassembled at room temperature but remains securely fastened at high temperatures. A spray technique is disclosed as a particularly useful method of coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. 13 figs.

  5. Self-locking threaded fasteners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glovan, Ronald J. (Butte, MT); Tierney, John C. (Butte, MT); McLean, Leroy L. (Butte, MT); Johnson, Lawrence L. (Butte, MT)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A threaded fastener with a shape memory alloy (SMA) coatings on its threads is disclosed. The fastener has special usefulness in high temperature applications where high reliability is important. The SMA coated fastener is threaded into or onto a mating threaded part at room temperature to produce a fastened object. The SMA coating is distorted during the assembly. At elevated temperatures the coating tries to recover its original shape and thereby exerts locking forces on the threads. When the fastened object is returned to room temperature the locking forces dissipate. Consequently the threaded fasteners can be readily disassembled at room temperature but remains securely fastened at high temperatures. A spray technique is disclosed as a particularly useful method of coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy.

  6. Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Parts (AMD-704) Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium...

  7. Gutierrez et al 1 Advancements in Fastening System Design for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    -haul railroads. Reducing life cycle costs of concrete crosstie fastening systems is of paramount importance the development of high-speed passenger rail systems; the need for improved concrete crossties and fasteningGutierrez et al 1 Advancements in Fastening System Design for North American Concrete Crossties

  8. FacultyofAerospaceEngineering Aerospace Masterweeks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindken, Ralph

    faster. The technological demands of larger wind turbines, wind farms, integration in the electricity · Wind farm aerodynamics Rotor Design · Aerodynamics · Structure & Composites Electrical Power SystemsFacultyofAerospaceEngineering Aerospace Masterweeks Aerospace Engineering & European Wind Energy

  9. The effects of fastener hole defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Scot D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) August 1991 ABSTRACT The Effects of Fastener Hole Defects. (August 1991) Scot D. Andrews, B. S. , Texas A8rM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Orden O. Ochoa The influence of drilling-induced defects, such as delamination, on the fatigue... ambient and elevated temperature wet conditions. Specimens were tested in a bearing tension frame to static failure in order to measure the failure load and to calculate pin bearing stress. From static test results, a fatigue load was selected as 66...

  10. Comparison of Slender DowelComparison of Slender Dowel--TypeType Fasteners for SlottedFasteners for Slotted--inin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasteners for Slotted--inin Steel Plate Connections underSteel Plate Connections under Monotonic and Cyclic Loading

  11. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering It is a new beginning for innovative fundamental and applied and consolidation of bulk nanocrystalline materials using mechanical alloying, the alloy development and synthesis

  12. Korea Parts and Fasteners KPF Plextronics JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKorea Parts and Fasteners KPF Plextronics JV Jump

  13. Korea Parts and Fasteners KPF | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKorea Parts and Fasteners KPF Plextronics JV

  14. Faculty of Engineering Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Engineering Aerospace Engineering Canada's aerospace industry is one of the largest. One of the key factors that will continue this success is a steady stream of engineering talent.uwindsor.ca/mame Rigorous, Enriching Programs Our new Aerospace Engineering program at Windsor is an optional stream within

  15. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integration Specialist in the Smart Grid Technologies and Strategy Division of the California IndependentMechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar The Challenges of Renewable Energy Integration into the CAISO Grid Abstract I will be presenting who the CAISO is and what we do. We will also discuss where we

  16. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Abstract Solid materials used in energy conversion and storage Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University April 6, 2012 at 2:00pm in SCOB 252 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport & Energy #12;

  17. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering An experimental methodology is presented for mechanism Yang is a second graduate student in the department of mechanical engineering of ASU. He received his Jian Yang School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy Arizona State University October 5

  18. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering The development of high-energy storage devices has been one energy capacity over 500 cycles. Teng Ma received his BS degree in Thermal and Power Engineering from Xi and Technology of China in 2009. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Mechanical Engineering at School

  19. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Mechanical Engineering at the School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, working in Dr. MarcusMechanical & Aerospace Engineering The atomization of a liquid jet by a high speed cross.S.E. degree in mechanical engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology in 2006 and M.S. degree

  20. aerospace engineering students: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerospace Lindken, Ralph 2 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Postgraduate Student Physics Websites Summary: & Aerospace Engineering and Naval Architecture & Marine...

  1. Aerospace Applications for OLED Lighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Boeing. All rights reserved. Export Controlled ECCN: 9E991 NLR Aerospace economics drive long development cycles and even longer product lifecycles * Development of a...

  2. Comparison of Slender Dowel-Type Fasteners for Slotted-in Steel Plate Connections under Monotonic and Cyclic Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with threads, nuts and washers on either end, and c) two types of a new commercially available self-drilling on the monotonic and cyclic behavior of dowel-type fasteners, b) compare a new type of fastener, the self- drilling Materials and Wood Technology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA mail@alexschreyer.de Mr

  3. Lateral Load Path Analysis FRA Concrete Tie and Fastener BAA Industry Partners Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    concrete crossties are in use on North American heavy haul freight railroads · Industry trends: ­ ManyLateral Load Path Analysis FRA Concrete Tie and Fastener BAA ­ Industry Partners Meeting Incline Standards Current Industry Practices AREMA Chapter 30 Finite Element Model Laboratory Experimentation Field

  4. Page 1 of 7 Modeling and simulation of sparking in fastening assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these mechanisms depends on the material used for the assembly (for example, metal rib with carbon composite of the bolt and a possible sparking occurrence. INTRODUCTION The massive use of composite materials in modern the electric conductivity of metallic fasteners and the conductivity of composite materials increases

  5. Considerations for Mechanistic Design of Concrete Sleepers and Elastic Fastening Systems in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    practices for concrete sleeper and fastening system design and improving safety, reliability, and rail America B.J. Van Dyk, J.R. Edwards, C.J. Ruppert, Jr., C.P.L. Barkan Rail Transportation & Engineering not achieve their design life. While initially functional, they ultimately require more frequent maintenance

  6. MACHINING ELIMINATION THROUGH APPLICATION OF THREAD FORMING FASTENERS IN NET SHAPED CAST HOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleaver, Ryan J.; Cleaver, Todd H.; Talbott, Richard

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate objective of this work was to eliminate approximately 30% of the machining performed in typical automotive engine and transmission plants by using thread forming fasteners in as-cast holes of aluminum and magnesium cast components. The primary issues at the source of engineers???????????????¢???????????????????????????????? reluctance to implementing thread forming fasteners in lightweight castings are: * Little proof of consistency of clamp load vs. input torque in either aluminum or magnesium castings. * No known data to understand the effect on consistency of clamp load as casting dies wear. The clamp load consistency concern is founded in the fact that a portion of the input torque used to create clamp load is also used to create threads. The torque used for thread forming may not be consistent due to variations in casting material, hole size and shape due to tooling wear and process variation (thermal and mechanical). There is little data available to understand the magnitude of this concern or to form the basis of potential solutions if the range of clamp load variation is very high (> +/- 30%). The range of variation that can be expected in as-cast hole size and shape over the full life cycle of a high pressure die casting die was established in previous work completed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, (PNNL). This established range of variation was captured in a set of 12 cast bosses by designing core pins at the size and draft angles identified in the sited previous work. The cast bosses were cut into ???????????????¢????????????????????????????????nuts???????????????¢??????????????????????????????? that could be used in the Ford Fastener Laboratory test-cell to measure clamp load when a thread forming fastener was driven into a cast nut. There were two sets of experiments run. First, a series of cast aluminum nuts were made reflecting the range of shape and size variations to be expected over the life cycle of a die casting die. Taptite thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for aluminum applications), were driven into the various cored, as-cast nuts at a constant input torque and resulting clamp loads were recorded continuously. The clamp load data was used to determine the range of clamp loads to be expected. The bolts were driven to failure. The clamp load corresponding to the target input of 18.5 Nm was recorded for each fastener. In a like fashion, a second set of experiments were run with cast magnesium nuts and ALtracs thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for magnesium applications). Again all clamp loads were recorded and analyzed similarly to the Taptites in aluminum cast nuts. Results from previous work performed on the same test cell for a Battelle project using standard M8 bolts into standard M8 nuts were included as a comparator for a standard bolt and nut application. The results for the thread forming fasteners in aluminum cast holes were well within industry expectations of +/- 30% for out of the box and robustness range te

  7. aerospace industries division: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Aerospace Survey & Earth Rossiter, D G "David" 31 AEROSPACE SAFETY ADVISORY PANEL Geosciences Websites Summary: AEROSPACE SAFETY ADVISORY PANEL ANNUAL...

  8. Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Interdisciplinary Programs Master of Science in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering with specialization in Energy/Environment/Economics (E3 ) Master of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering with specialization in EnergyMechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace

  9. New environmental regulation for the aerospace industry: The aerospace NESHAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, J.P.; Gampper, B.P. [Brusn and McDonnell Waste Consultants, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States); Baker, J.M. [Raytheon Aircraft Co., Wichita, KS (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    40 CFR Part 63, Subpart GG, the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facilities, commonly referred to as the Aerospace NESHAP, was issued on September 1, 1995 and requires compliance by September 1, 1998. The regulation affects any facility that manufactures or reworks commercial, civil, or military aircraft vehicles or components and is a major source of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs). The regulation targets reducing Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) and Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) emissions to the atmosphere. Processes affected by the new regulation include aircraft painting, paint stripping, chemical milling masking, solvent cleaning, and spray gun cleaning. Regulatory requirements affecting these processes are summarized, and different compliance options compared in terms of cost-effectiveness and industry acceptance. Strategies to reduce compliance costs and minimize recordkeeping burdens are also presented.

  10. Effect of conductivity between fasteners and aluminum skin on eddy current specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hutchinson, M.C. [Boeing Co., Seattle, WA (United States). Commercial Airplane Group

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance Nondestructive Inspection Validation Center (FAA-AANC) and Boeing Commercial Airplane Group are currently developing a study pertaining to the detection of cracks in multi-layered aluminum sheets. The specimen panels model pertinent aspects of the lap splice joints for Boeing 737 aircraft, Line Numbers 292 - 2565. Upon initial characterization of the specimen panels, it became clear that signals produced from a sliding probe at fastener sites were not representative of an in-service lap splice, and therefore, could not be used in a probability of detection experiment. This paper discusses specimen characterization and steps taken to make the specimens useful for nondestructive technology assessment.

  11. GRADUATE STUDIES IN MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    A Guide to GRADUATE STUDIES IN MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING at Department of Mechanical...................................................................................................... 3 2. Master of Science in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering ........................................................................................................................ 6 4. Master of Science in Energy Systems Engineering (MSESE

  12. Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering with specialization in Energy/Environment/Economics (E3 ) Master of Mechanical and Aerospace Enginering with specialization in Energy/Environment/Economics (E3 ) CertificateDepartment of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials

  13. Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 Satellite Attitude Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 Satellite Attitude Control System Design;3Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 ADCS ADCS: Attitude Determination and Control subsystem Attitude Determination - Using sensors Attitude Control - Using actuators #12;4Aerospace Power

  14. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at the University of Florida invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    and aerospace sciences, (4) cellular mechanics and engineering, (5) energy, with emphasis on renewable Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering The Department of Mechanical of the above areas. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in mechanical or aerospace engineering

  15. aerospace team online: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Aerospace Engineering Online by the SEAS Materials Science Websites Summary: Aerospace Engineering Online by the SEAS UCLA MS Engineering Online, msenrgol.seas.ucla.edu Area is...

  16. aerospace pyrotechnic systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering Websites Summary: High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Scott A. Lintelman1 of this next-generation aerospace CPS. This paper...

  17. aerospace technology development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Master of Science Gallo, Linda C. 280 High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Engineering Websites Summary: High Assurance Aerospace CPS &...

  18. advanced aerospace systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Master of Science Gallo, Linda C. 300 High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Engineering Websites Summary: High Assurance Aerospace CPS &...

  19. Faculty Positions Department of Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Positions Department of Aerospace Engineering Dwight Look College of Engineering Texas A&M University The Department of Aerospace Engineering in the Dwight Look College of Engineering is continuing for qualified students to pursue engineering education at Texas A&M University (http://engineering.tamu.edu/25by

  20. STUDY FOR THE DESIGN OF AN EDDY CURRENT ARRAY PROBE FOR THE IMAGING OF AERONAUTICAL FASTENER HOLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    STUDY FOR THE DESIGN OF AN EDDY CURRENT ARRAY PROBE FOR THE IMAGING OF AERONAUTICAL FASTENER HOLES Wilson, 94230 Cachan France (joubert@satie.ens-cachan.fr) Abstract: The design of an eddy current imaging, eddy currents, imaging probe, finite element modelling, pickup coil array, printed-circuit- board coil

  1. ANALYSIS OF THE SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF RAIL PAD ASSEMBLIES AS A COMPONENT OF THE CONCRETE SLEEPER FASTENING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Fastening System RAIL PAD ASSEMBLY LATERAL DISPLACEMENT FAILURE MODE AND EFFECT ANALYSIS (FMEA) INTRODUCTION life FMEA is used to define, identify, evaluate and eliminate potential failures from the system FMEA was used to guide the process of answering questions related to the component behavior and also

  2. Integrated analysis procedure of aerospace composite structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Junghyun

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of composite material application in major commercial aircraft design, represented by the Boeing 787 and Airbus A350-XWB, signals a new era in the aerospace industry. The high stiffness to weight ratio of ...

  3. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor The School (6) tenure-track faculty positions at the Assistant Professor rank. Exceptional candidates in all precision manufacturing, HVAC&R, vibrations, aircraft and spacecraft, robotics, unmanned systems, autonomy

  4. Inventory optimization in an aerospace supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Billy S. (Billy Si Yee)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic inventory management has become a major focus for Honeywell Aerospace as the business unit challenged itself to meeting cost reduction goals while maintaining a high level of service to its customers. This challenge ...

  5. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing Author: Avila,in the Aerospace and Automotive Industry, SAE Transactionsin the aerospace and automotive industries has become

  6. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing Miguel vila, Joelin the aerospace and automotive industries has becomes in the aerospace and automotive industry, only during the

  7. Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

  8. Aerospace Engineering Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Engineering Analysis MAE 2323 Dynamics MAE 3330 Matrices Lin Alg Prerequisite Prerequisite or Concurrent Enrollment MAE 3309 Thermo Engineering MAE 2301 Intro to A&A MAE 2312 Solid Mech Concurrent EnrollmentConcurrentAerospace Engineering Pre-Professional Courses Degree Plan for Bachelor of Science in Aerospace

  9. aerospace vehicle development: Topics by E-print Network

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    A350-XWB, signals a new era in the aerospace industry. The high stiffness to weight ratio of ... Ahn, Junghyun 2008-01-01 214 Steven H. Collins Mechanical and Aerospace...

  10. aerospace tools faast: Topics by E-print Network

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    and laboratory facilities unsurpassed in Europe: low-speed (35msec) and high-speed wind in aerospace technology in all of Europe. The Faculty of Aerospace Engineering draws...

  11. auxiliary aerospace power: Topics by E-print Network

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    Magnetic Solar Simulation Workshop 2004 Spacecraft control type Passive control - Gravity gradient control - Spin controlAerospace Power & Electronics...

  12. aerospace battery workshop: Topics by E-print Network

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    Magnetic Solar Simulation Workshop 2004 Spacecraft control type Passive control - Gravity gradient control - Spin controlAerospace Power & Electronics...

  13. Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Traditionally, parts fabrication in the aerospace and automotive industries has been associated with a number for the aerospace and automotive industries. The thesis lays out a set of generic flexibility strategies and sets I could receive an impression of manufacturing in today's automotive and aerospace industry

  14. Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saniie, Jafar

    instrumentation, com- bustion, internal combustion engines, two-phase flow and heat-transfer, electrohydrodynamics mobile and stationary combustion sources. Materials science and engineering laboratories includeDepartment of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials

  15. Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonassar, Larry

    design; sustainable design; additive manufacturing; manufacturing of advanced and multifunctional 607 255-0813 mc288@cornell.edu October 2014 Faculty Position in Design and Manufacturing Mechanical and Manufacturing, as related strongly to the disciplines within Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Candidates

  16. FacultyofAerospace Engineering MSc Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    as Nuna 6, the solar- powered car that won second place in the 2011 World Solar Challenge in Australia in aircraft and propulsion system design. Aerodynamics and Wind Energy The MSc track in Aerodynamics and Wind Energy combines fundamental and applied research disciplines of aerospace and wind-power systems

  17. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Turning Ideas into Reality EnErgy Environ m Ent HEaltH mat Overview The Courses Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) Mechanical Engineering With International Study (MEng / BEng) Aero-Mechanical Engineering (MEng / BEng) E N T r y F A Q S A p p l y i n g C a m p u

  18. Single Ion Implantation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas Schenkel

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

  19. Single Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Schenkel

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

  20. ageless aerospace vehicles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in SCOB 228 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport & Energy 12; 49 Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel Geosciences Websites Summary: Joseph W. Dyer, USN (Ret.), Chair Dr....

  1. aerospace sciences meeting: Topics by E-print Network

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    School of Engineering and Applied Science Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Materials Science Websites Summary: Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied...

  2. aerospace medicine vol: Topics by E-print Network

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    ON AEROSPACE AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS, VOL. XX, NO. Y, MONTH 2006 1 Knowledge-based system for multi-target tracking Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites...

  3. aerospace expeditionary force: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important as matrix materials for the advanced composites used in aerospace, electronics, automotive and other industries. (more) Subramaniam, C 1994-01-01 257 The influence of...

  4. aerospace research establishment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important as matrix materials for the advanced composites used in aerospace, electronics, automotive and other industries. (more) Subramaniam, C 1994-01-01 371 Microscale...

  5. aging aerospace structures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and improving performance are two key factors in structural design. In the aerospace and automotive industries, this is particularly true with respect to design criteria such as...

  6. aerospace medicine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    important as matrix materials for the advanced composites used in aerospace, electronics, automotive and other industries. (more) Subramaniam, C 1994-01-01 244 The influence of...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Aerospace Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home DistributionTransportationVice-President ofScience &AboutAerospace

  8. Career Map: Aerospace Engineer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Change RequestFirst Report to the PrimePilotAwardsCareerAerospace

  9. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Aerospace and Automotive Industry, SAE Transactions J.aerospace and automotive industries has become increasinglyaerospace and automotive industries has become increasingly

  10. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aerospace and automotive industries has become increasinglythe aerospace and automotive industry, only during the pastLMA partners in the automotive industry. formation and crown

  11. aerospace systems test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace systems test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 26th Aerospace Testing Seminar,...

  12. 34 McCormick / spring Lead mechanical engineer, Titan Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    and solar panels. Anyway, I learned about the job through a solar car listserv. I contacted him and becameCormick: What does Titan Aerospace do? Cornew: Titan Aerospace is a startup that designs and builds solar-powered unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones. Our long-term goal is to build solar-powered UAVs that could stay

  13. aerospace nuclear safety: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace nuclear safety First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AEROSPACE SAFETY ADVISORY...

  14. High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Scott A. Lintelman1 assurance CPS can mutually benefit aerospace and automotive industries. I. INTRODUCTION Commercial aviation]. In the automotive industry, recent trends in intelligent transportation systems can be evidently mapped to e

  15. T. G. Bifano Department of Aerospace and Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. G. Bifano Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 T. A. Dow Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Precision Engineering Center, North stress, the mechanism of deformation will change from one of re- versible energy storage via elastic

  16. BS in Aerospace Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Aerospace Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context (iBS in Aerospace Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Aerospace Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http

  17. BS in Aerospace Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Aerospace Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context (iBS in Aerospace Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Aerospace Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET

  18. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. qAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation

  19. aerospace mechanisms symposium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Aerospace Engineering We present an arbitrary high-order quadrature- free, Runge for Engineering of Matter, Transport, and Energy. He received his B.S. in physics from Arizona...

  20. adaptive aerospace tools: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Airbus is the main Euro- pean aerospace company in the civil sector, however a large part of the work is performed at various...

  1. aerospace medical panel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Rprint & Copyright @ by Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, V A w. P. ROACH, M.S., Ph.D., M, B.S., and CRAIG M. BRAMLETTE, A.S. ROACH WP, ROGERS ME, ROCKWELL BA,...

  2. Aerospace mergers and acquisitions from a lean enterprise perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Junhong, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past twenty years, companies in the aerospace industry experienced major transitions: mergers and acquisitions, and lean transformation initiatives. This thesis presents research about the relation of lean efforts ...

  3. aerospace personal cooling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a reliable and fast NDT-technique that can be applied for a wide range of testing problems in aerospace applications. It is robust and sensitive enough to be used in...

  4. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Updated: Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Updated: Spring 2012 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Mechanical Engineering Majors are required to complete four (4) Technical Electives Century Energy Technologies II MAE 135 Computational Mechanics MAE 180A Spacecraft Guidance MAE 181 Space

  5. West Virginia University 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , solid mechanics, energy systems, engineering materials, automatic controls, mechatronicsWest Virginia University 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Degrees Offered Master of science in mechanical engineering Master of science in engineering with a major in mechanical

  6. Risk from network disruptions in an aerospace supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bryan K. (Bryan Keith)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents methods for determining the effects of risk from disruptions using an aerospace supply chain as the example, primarily through the use of a computer simulation model. Uncertainty in the current marketplace ...

  7. CARLETON UNIVERSITY Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    ............................................................................................................................................... 3 FLUID MECHANICS, COMBUSTION AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING................................... 6 HEATCARLETON UNIVERSITY Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Funded Graduate Research - Graduate students under the direction of Prof. T. Pearce from Systems and Computer Engineering department

  8. Reduction of rework at a large aerospace manufacturer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Jeremy A. (Jeremy Alan)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is an axiom of the manufacturing of any complex product that errors will occur that require repair or discard of said product. In building aircraft, Raptor Aerospace encounters and repairs numerous deviations from the ...

  9. Development of alternate parts for the aerospace industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapley, James Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the topic of the development of alternate parts for the aerospace industry, drawing on industry examples to demonstrate methods and approaches and the benefits to firms engaged in these activities. I ...

  10. Solid state power bus controllers for aerospace applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villarreal, Terry Joseph

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOLID STATE POWER BUS CONTROLLERS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS A Thesis by TERRY JOSEPH VILLARREAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Electrical Eny'neering SOLID STATE POWER BUS CONTROLLERS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATIONS A Thesis TERRY JOSEPH VILLARREAL Approved as to style and content by: Mehrdad Ehsani (Chairman of Committee) Robert D. Nevels...

  11. Fire fighting in aerospace product development : a study of project capacity and resource planning in an aerospace enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuarrie, Allan J. (Allan John), 1963-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is broadly recognized in the aerospace industry, as well as many others, that organizations which effectively execute development projects to meet desired cost, schedule, and performance targets for their customers ...

  12. New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these innovations. Keywords: Thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine. This work is presented as paper AIAA-2006-7225 to Space-2006 Conference, 19-21 September, 2006, San Jose, CA, USA.

  13. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, Barry A. [Isys, 2727 Walsh Ave., Suite 103, Santa Clara, CA 95051 (United States); Ruffell, John P. [Group 3, LLC, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  14. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  15. Multistate analysis and design : case studies in aerospace design and long endurance systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agte, Jeremy S. (Jeremy Sundermeyer)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research contributes to the field of aerospace engineering by proposing and demonstrating an integrated process for the early-stage, multistate design of aerospace systems. The process takes into early consideration ...

  16. Service bulletin inventory management and modeling for aerospace parts in customer service organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardede, Erna K. (Erna Kertasasmita)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Customer Service department of United Technology Corporation (UTC) Aerospace System is primarily responsible for providing spare parts, repair services, training, and technical support for products that UTC Aerospace ...

  17. 2001 -4380 -0 Aerospace EngineeringIto, Ward, and Valasek ROBUST DYNAMIC INVERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    2001 - 4380 - 0 Aerospace EngineeringIto, Ward, and Valasek ROBUST DYNAMIC INVERSION CONTROLLER DESIGN FOR THE X-38 AIAA-2001-4380 Dai Ito, Dr. Donald T. Ward, and Dr. John Valasek Aerospace Engineering AIAA GN&C Conference, Montreal, Canada 9 August 2001 #12;2001 - 4380 - 1 Aerospace Engineering

  18. 1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory RPI LINAC Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Conference April 27, 2011 #12;2Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory RPI LINAC Facility Nuclear Criticality Safety1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory RPI LINAC Facility

  19. UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE Lecturer/Senior Lecturer/Reader in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas: space/aerospace systems; micro/nano fluids and flows; energy engineering; or the mechanicsUNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE Lecturer/Senior Lecturer/Reader in Mechanical or Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Salary range: 33,320 - 58,157, open contract (with 3-year

  20. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. q As a consequence plasmaAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation codes are based on the magnetohydrodynamic

  1. Applying Semantic Web Technologies to Knowledge Sharing in Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciravegna, Fabio

    Applying Semantic Web Technologies to Knowledge Sharing in Aerospace Engineering A.-S. Dadzie , R. This paper details an integrated methodology to optimise Knowledge reuse and sharing, illustrated with a use of Knowledge from legacy documents via automated means, or directly in systems interfacing with Knowledge

  2. advanced aerospace materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Recent Advances in the Analysis and...

  3. aerospace structural materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace structural materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. aerospace materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL,...

  5. PROPULSION AND ENERGY 54 AEROSPACE AMERICA/DECEMBER 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    PROPULSION AND ENERGY 54 AEROSPACE AMERICA/DECEMBER 2005 Electric propulsion Several significant advancements in electric propulsion (EP) systems and related technolo- gies occurred this year. Flight programs throughout the discharge and includes the effects of magnetic fields on the primary electrons. PRIMA is used

  6. Honors and Awards 2008-2009 Department of Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Honors and Awards 2008-2009 Department of Aerospace Engineering D. Chimenti: Invited plenary Base, Florida H. Hu: 2009 AIAA Best Paper Award, AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Technical Committee A. Laws: Deans' Staff Excellence Award, College of Engineering, ISU V. Levitas: Einstein Award for Scientific

  7. Herek Clack Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saniie, Jafar

    Herek Clack Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering You could say, Clack has developed a new combustion laboratory at IIT and established a research group focusing on reacting, multiphase, and turbulent flows; and mitigation of toxic products of combustion. An expert

  8. Reprint & Copyright by Aerospace Medical Association, Washington, DC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reprint & Copyright by Aerospace Medical Association, Washington, DC TECHNICAL NOTE Reflectance.EPICS Biomedical Engineering and Science Institute and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Drexel and pulsatile and mean Doppler velocities were examined as predictors of impending peripheral light loss (PLL

  9. Wireless power transfer for scaled electronic biomedical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theilmann, Paul Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implantable Micro Oxygen Generator (IMOG)," BiomedicalImplantable Micro Oxygen Generator (IMOG)," Biomedical

  10. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  11. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa- PolarizationgovCampaignsSummer Single Column ModelRSPgovCampaignsUnmanned Aerospace

  13. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  14. An Assessment of the Degree of Implementation of the Lean Aerospace Initiative Principles and Practices within the US Aerospace and Defense Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Thomas E.

    This report is a formal documentation of the results of an assessment of the degree to which Lean Principles and Practices have been implemented in the US Aerospace and Defense Industry. An Industry Association team prepared ...

  15. JOURNAL OF AEROSPACE COMPUTING, INFORMATION, AND COMMUNICATION Vol. 6, March 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    control the shape of aerospace structures has spawned the use of shape memory alloy actuatorsJOURNAL OF AEROSPACE COMPUTING, INFORMATION, AND COMMUNICATION Vol. 6, March 2009 Reinforcement Learning for Characterizing Hysteresis Behavior of Shape Memory Alloys Kenton Kirkpatrick and John Valasek

  16. Health Monitoring of Aging Aerospace Structures using the Electro-Mechanical Impedance Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Health Monitoring of Aging Aerospace Structures using the Electro- Mechanical Impedance Method-mechanical (E/M) impedance method for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures. As a nondestructive aircraft, health monitoring, statistics, neural networks, 1. INTRODUCTION Structural health monitoring (SHM

  17. Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering IIT Graduate Bulletin 2006-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    , and thermal sciences. The department also offers programs in materials science and engineering241 Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering IIT Graduate Bulletin 2006-2008 Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering 243 Engineering 1 Building 10 W. 32nd St

  18. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Dept. West Virginia University, Oct. 2nd, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Dept. West Virginia University, Oct. 2nd, 2008 www STUDENTS in MECHANICAL and AEROSPACE ENGINEERING #12;OBJECTIVES Overview of Departmental Policies M.S. & Ph.D. Degrees in Energy Materials Multidisciplinary program based in the MAE dept Five

  19. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  20. Department Name Degrees Phone Email Website Aerospace Engineering MS, PhD 303-492-6416 aerograd@colorado.edu http://www.colorado.edu/aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Jane

    Department Name Degrees Phone Email Website Aerospace Engineering MS, PhD 303-492-6416 aerograd@colorado.edu http://www.colorado.edu/aerospace Anthropology MA, PhD 303-492-7947 anthro@colorado.edu http://www.colorado.edu/anthropology Applied Mathematics MS, PhD 303-492-1238 amgradco@colorado.edu http://amath.colorado.edu Art and Art

  1. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  2. A low-power cochlear implant system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Michael W. (Michael Warren), 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cochlear implants, or bionic ears, restore hearing to the profoundly deaf by bypassing missing inner-ear hair cells in the cochlea and electrically stimulating the auditory nerve. For miniaturized cochlear implants, including ...

  3. Positron annihilation study of P implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Au, H.L.; Lynn, K.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sferlazzo, P. [Eaton Corp., Beverly, MA (United States). SED Division

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy ion implantation (above 200 keV) is now commonly used in a variety of VLSI processes. The high energy required for these implants is often achieved by implanting multiply charged ions, which inevitably brings in the problem of low-energy ion contamination. The low-energy contamination is difficult to diagnose and detect. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is used to examine the defect distributions in these high energy implants with varying degrees of contamination.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic implantable cardioverter Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2. Other... Implant Devices Examples: Cochlear implant or implanted hearing aid, drug-infusion pump (including Insulin... infusion pump), any other electronic implant ... Source:...

  5. An examination of Boeing's supply chain management practices within the context of the global aerospace industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    izmeci, DaŸ lar

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the supply chain management practices of the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company within the context of the global aerospace industry. The methodology used for this study includes a study of emerging ...

  6. Doctor of Engineering internship experience at Ball Aerospace Systems Division, Boulder, Colorado: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Wiley J.

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This monograph describes the author's internship experiences at Ball Aerospace Systems Division, Boulder, Colorado. A system-level spacecraft design procedure is presented. It describes a spacecraft design flow with emphasis...

  7. Implementation Planning for the Introduction of Knowledge Management in an Aerospace Engineering Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Neil

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of information within an aerospace organization is required for engineers to perform activities. As information is considered, its the experience of the engineer that allows information to become knowledge for use. Knowledge...

  8. An Approach to Analyze Tradeoffs for Aerospace System Design and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Gregory

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important tradeoffs that need to be considered for the design and operation of aerospace systems. In addition to tradeoffs, there may also be multiple stakeholders of interest to the system and each may have ...

  9. An approach to analyze tradeoffs for aerospace system design and operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are important tradeoffs that need to be considered for the design and operation of aerospace systems. In addition to tradeoffs, there may also be multiple stakeholders of interest to the system and each may have ...

  10. Raman P. Singh School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Phone (Tulsa): 918.594.8155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    Raman P. Singh School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Phone (Tulsa): 918.594.8155 Oklahoma State University Phone (Stillwater): 405.744.1825 700 N. Greenwood Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74106 raman

  11. Design of a small fast steering mirror for airborne and aerospace applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulet, Michael Thomas

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the analysis and design of a small advanced fast steering mirror (sAFSM) for airborne and aerospace platforms. The sAFSM provides feedback-controlled articulation of two rotational axes for precision ...

  12. Design for affordability in defense and aerospace systems using tradespace-based methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Marcus Shihong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program failures have plagued the defense and aerospace industry for decades, as unanticipated cost and schedule overruns have rendered the development of systems ineffective in terms of time and cost considerations. This ...

  13. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical, and electronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    20 Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical Engineering students conduct extensive basic and applied research within and crossing usual disciplinary vehicle aerodynamics, combustion, robotics, heat transfer and nonlinear dynamics. In addition, recent

  14. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    20 Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical Engineering students conduct extensive basic and applied research within and crossing usual disciplinary vehicle aerodynamics, combustion, robotics, heat transfer and nonlinear dynamics. In addition, recent

  15. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., George W. (Tijeras, NM); Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Brannon, Paul J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  16. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

  17. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

  18. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of...

  19. The University's Aerospace Engineering Research Centre was established in 2007 and has since made a significant contribution to research and development in the aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    The aerospace industry is increasingly using composite materials, such as carbon fibre, in the building damage from an impact forms in composite aircraft materials, with the aim of assisting designers to power them. However, the difficulty with these new materials is that a low velocity impact

  20. Source/drain profile engineering with plasma implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.C.; Cheung, N.W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jiqun Shao; Denholm, A.S. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow junction profiles are controlled by the variable implant profile, implant damage profile and annealing cycle. For plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) systems, the dopant and damage profiles vary with plasma source conditions and implanter waveforms. These can lead to different implant profiles for the same dose and energy, and different junction profiles after annealing. In the low energy regime, the as-implanted profiles resemble those from conventional implanters. In the Berkeley PIH system, a 55 mn p{sup +} junction is formed by 1 kV BF{sub 3} PIII implantation and a two-step rapid thermal annealing cycle.

  1. aluminium ions implanted: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties of ion implanted ceramics are primarily a function of the radiation damage produced by the implantation process. For crystalline ceramics this damage is chiefly...

  2. arc ion implantation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties of ion implanted ceramics are primarily a function of the radiation damage produced by the implantation process. For crystalline ceramics this damage is chiefly...

  3. Resistivity changes in carbon-implanted Teflon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . e Figure 10: Carbon Distribution vs Depth for 50 kV/140 kV Dual Implantation Based on the simulation results above, it was determined that using dual energies would maximize the concentration of carbon in the implanted area. Consequently carbon...

  4. Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997. DSS2 6 0 1 2 3 0 2 1 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Steven

    Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997. DSS2 6 0 1 #12; Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997

  5. Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997. DSS-2 6 0 1 2 3 0 2 1 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Steven

    Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997. DSS-2 6 0 1 #12;Appears in Proceedings of the 1997 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Aspen, CO, February 1997

  6. To be published in IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings, 2003, Cat No. 0-7803-7651-X/03/$17.00 2003 IEEE Planar REDOX and Conductivity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    To be published in IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings, 2003, Cat No. 0-7803-7651-X/03 are AeroRedox2C14 - 1 #12;To be published in IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings, 2003, Cat No. 0. BIOGRAPHIES 1. INTRODUCTION This paper extends the work reported at last year's IEEE Aerospace conference

  7. A miniature, implantable wireless neural stimulation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arfin, Scott K. (Scott Kenneth)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present the design of a wireless neural stimulation system. The system consists of an external transmitter, controllable through a computer interface, and a miniature, implantable wireless receiver and ...

  8. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  9. EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Study on the eddy current damping of the spin dynamics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    4TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Study on the eddy current damping of the spin consideration in this article, are impacted by torques generated by eddy currents as the conducting non, the permanent magnetic field from the magnetosphere generates eddy current in the spinning, conducting body

  10. FOB Undergoing Test and Alignment in FAS at Ball Aerospace OPTICAL TESTS AND ALIGNMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Glenn

    FOB Undergoing Test and Alignment in FAS at Ball Aerospace OPTICAL TESTS AND ALIGNMENTS After the FOB alignment is complete, and it passes environmental tests, it will be checked out in a second HST. The NICMOS FOB will relay simulated images from RAS/HOMS to a Photometrics CCD camera placed where the three

  11. Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences 20th ASME Wind Energy Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences 20th ASME Wind Energy Symposium January 811, 2001, Reno, NV or implicitly, for a number of design codes--especially Copyright 2001 by The American Institute of Aeronautics, 1999) have begun to adopt these code formats, in analogy with long-standing practice in the building

  12. October 24, 2000 13:32 Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    October 24, 2000 13:32 Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences 20th ASME Wind Energy Symposium, either explicitly or implicitly, for a number of design codes---especially Copyright 2001 by The American turbine standards (e.g., IEC, 1999) have begun to adopt these code formats, in analogy with long

  13. aerospace materials aluminum-lithium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aerospace materials aluminum-lithium First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The effect of...

  14. R~print & Copyright @ by Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, V A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boppart, Stephen

    R~print & Copyright @ by Aerospace Medical Association, Alexandria, V A w. P. ROACH, M.S., Ph.D., M, B.S., and CRAIG M. BRAMLETTE, A.S. ROACH WP, ROGERS ME, ROCKWELL BA, BOPPART SA, STEIN CD, BRAMLETTE

  15. Dr. Brian L. Wardle Director, Nano-Engineered Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    are in the areas of nano-engineered advanced composites, bulk nanostructured materials, carbon-based material applications. Such hybrid advanced composites employ aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance laminate Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium and has served as the materials/structures lead on MIT

  16. 1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory Nuclear Data Research at RPI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory Nuclear Data Research at RPI Y. Danon Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 12180 RPI Nuclear Data (RND) 2011 Symposium for Criticality Safety and Reactor Applications Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, April 27, 2011 #12;2Mechanical

  17. Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering -Graduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipson, Michal

    for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 69 Number Responded: 55 Response Rate: 80% (-N & Control Engineer (3) El Segundo CA Canadian Center for Aerospace* - N Test Engineer Calgary, Alberta Design Eng Lynn MA General Motors Fuel Cell Systems Analyst Honeoye Falls NY Gotham Consulting Partners

  18. EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Semi-intrusive and non-intrusive stochastic methods for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    4TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Semi-intrusive and non-intrusive stochastic methods, 33400 Talence, France Abstract In this work we present semi-intrusive and non-intrusive techniques and non-intrusive. The intrusive technique consist to write an ad-hoc code by modifying an existing

  19. ME/AE 381 Mechanical and Aerospace Control Systems TWO FLYWHEEL SYSTEM LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landers, Robert G.

    ME/AE 381 Mechanical and Aerospace Control Systems TWO FLYWHEEL SYSTEM LABORATORY The objective of this laboratory is to design controllers that will regulate the angular position of a twoflywheel system (see tasks: 1. Ignoring Coulomb friction, determine a statespace description of the two flywheel system

  20. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical, optical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    , and electronic systems, ranging in scale from the International Space Station to micro-scale electric generators undergraduate research and student projects have included the creation of a composite material violin, electric airplanes, and formula race cars for competition. aerospace & mechanical ame overview programs available

  1. Aerospace and Mechanical Engineers design and build unique, complex mechanical-optical-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    -optical- electronic systems, ranging in scale from the International Space Station to micro-scale electric generators undergraduate research and student projects have included the creation of a composite material violin, electric airplanes, formula race cars for competition, and custom wave-tanks for testing surfboards. AEROSPACE

  2. CIRQ: Qualitative fluid flow modelling for aerospace FMEA applications Neal Snooke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snooke, Neal

    M2 CIRQ: Qualitative fluid flow modelling for aerospace FMEA applications Neal Snooke Department- oped on top of the MCIRQ simulator with the aim to produce an automated FMEA for aircraft fuel systems similar to pre- viously developed automated electrical FMEA. Introduction This paper describes a circuit

  3. 46th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, January 7-10, 2008, Reno, Nevada A Smart Wind Turbine Blade Using Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Robert C.

    46th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, January 7-10, 2008, Reno, Nevada A Smart Wind Turbine Blade Using of "smart" wind turbine blades with integrated sensor-actuator-controller modules to im- prove

  4. Photoresist integrity during high energy implant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrill, T.M. [Texas Instruments Productization, Dallas, TX (United States); Jones, M. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Jain, A. [Texas Indstruments Semiconductor Process and Development Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoresist integrity was evaluated on a commercial high-energy ion implanter operated up to the specified energy (1.7 MeV B or 3.0 MeV P) and power (1.0 MeV B at 1000 p{mu}A or 2.0 MeV P at 500 p{mu}A) limits. SEM Cross-sectional analysis of several photoresists showed that the proper cooling was maintained to avoid significant photoresist degradation. Photoresist shrinkage was observed, resulting in thickness reductions up to 22% and significant changes in sidewall slope. Little asymmetry was observed when photoresist was implanted at a 7{degrees} tilt. At the specified power limits, photoresist outgassing prevented smooth implant operation unless pressure compensation was implemented.

  5. Sound localization and interaural time sensitivity with bilateral cochlear implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Becky Bikkei

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bilateral cochlear implantation is becoming more common as clinicians attempt to provide better sound-source localization and speech reception in noise for cochlear implant (CI) users. While some improvement over the ...

  6. Ultrasound image guided acetabular implant orientation during total hip replacement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, John; Haddad, Waleed; Kluiwstra, Jan-Ulco; Matthews, Dennis; Trauner, Kenneth

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for assisting in precise location of the acetabular implant during total hip replacement. The system uses ultrasound imaging for guiding the placement and orientation of the implant.

  7. Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongbiao

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous silicon has become potentially important material for microelectronics applications. By using low energy implantation and energy scan implantation, a stable silicide with good electrical conductivity can be formed, and can be used...

  8. Micro Raman Spectroscopy of Annealed Erbium Implanted GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajpeyi, Agam P.

    Wurtzite GaN epilayers grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on sapphire substrates were subsequently ion implanted with Er to a dose of 510? cm?. The implanted samples were annealed in nitrogen atmosphere ...

  9. Plasma etching of ion-implanted polysilicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karulkar, P.C.; Wirzbicki, M.A.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation is increasingly used to dope polysilicon gates to obtain lower resistivities and also to control the cumulative time-temperature cycling of VLSI wafers. Dry etching of polysilicon doped with phosphorus by ion implantation was studied using a parallel-plate etcher and two different etch chemistries sulfur haxafluoride-O{sub 2}-argon and SF6-CCl2F2-Ar. These two etch procedures were previously found to result in excellent etching of polysilicon which was doped with phosphorus by solid-source diffusion. Large differences in the cross-sectional profiles of ion-implanted polysilicon were found while using the two chemistries. SF6-dichlorodifluoromethane-Ar chemistry caused sharp notch-like undercuts, while the SF6-O2-Ar chemistry exhibited linewidth loss without any notching. Examples of the cross sections of ion-implanted polysilicon are presented along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms that cause the different cross-sectional profiles in the two etch chemistries. The notching is explained in terms of the variation in the dopant concentration and in the structure of ion-implanted polysilicon at different depths. The absence of notching in the cross section of ion-implanted polysilicon etched in the SF6-O2-Ar chemistry is explained by proposing that the interaction of oxygen in the SF6-O2-Ar chemistry with the etched surface makes the chemistry less sensitive to the dopant concentration in the etched material. Results of a simple experiment which support the proposed explanation are presented.

  10. An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring Sara Ghoreishizadeh, Enver G. Kilinc, Camilla of the implantable monitoring system for long- term duration has many challenges. First, a multi-target biosen- sor coil; (ii) A power manage- ment IC dealing with the energy source of the implantable microsystem

  11. ON DEVELOPMENT OF TOTALLY IMPLANTABLE VESTIBULAR PROSTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, William C

    ON DEVELOPMENT OF TOTALLY IMPLANTABLE VESTIBULAR PROSTHESIS Andrei M. Shkel 1 Department vestibular prosthesis. The sensing element of the prosthesis is a custom designed one-axis MEMS gyroscope of the prosthesis on a rate table indicate that the device's output matches the average firing rate of vestibular

  12. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  13. 2001 4232 -0 Aerospace EngineeringBokadia and Valasek SEV ER E W EATH ER AV O ID AN C E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    2001 4232 -0 Aerospace EngineeringBokadia and Valasek SEV ER E W EATH ER AV O ID AN C E U SIN G IN FO R M ED H EU R ISTIC SEAR C H AIAA-2001-4232 Sangeeta Bokadia and Dr. John Valasek Aerospace Engineering AIAA GN&C Conference, Montreal, Canada 7 August 2001 #12;2001 4232 -1 Aerospace Engineering

  14. Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hampikian, Janet M (Decatur, GA); Hunt, Eden M (Atlanta, GA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

  15. Permanent Breast Seed Implant Dosimetry Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Brian M., E-mail: Brian.Keller@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Carlo Fidani Regional Cancer Center, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant is a novel method of accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with early-stage breast cancer. This article presents pre- and post-implant dosimetric data, relates these data to clinical outcomes, and makes recommendations for those interested in starting a program. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 consecutive patients were accrued into one of three clinical trials after breast-conserving surgery: a Phase I/II trial (67 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); a Phase II registry trial (25 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); or a multi-center Phase II trial for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (3 patients). Contouring of the planning target volume (PTV) was done on a Pinnacle workstation and dosimetry calculations, including dose-volume histograms, were done using a Variseed planning computer. Results: The mean pre-implant PTV coverage for the V{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200} were as follows: 98.8% {+-} 1.2% (range, 94.5-100%); 97.3% {+-} 2.1% (range, 90.3-99.9%), 68.8% {+-} 14.3% (range, 32.7-91.5%); and 27.8% {+-} 8.6% (range, 15.1-62.3%). The effect of seed motion was characterized by post-implant dosimetry performed immediately after the implantation (same day) and at 2 months after the implantation. The mean V{sub 100} changed from 85.6% to 88.4% (p = 0.004) and the mean V{sub 200} changed from 36.2% to 48.3% (p < 0.001). Skin toxicity was associated with maximum skin dose (p = 0.014). Conclusions: Preplanning dosimetry should aim for a V{sub 90} of approximately 100%, a V{sub 100} between 95% and 100%, and a V{sub 200} between 20% and 30%, as these numbers are associated with no local recurrences to date and good patient tolerance. In general, the target volume coverage improved over the duration of the seed therapy. The maximum skin dose, defined as the average dose over the hottest 1 Multiplication-Sign 1-cm{sup 2} surface area, should be limited to 90% of the prescription dose to minimize delayed skin toxicity.

  16. Single Ion Implantation and Deterministic Doping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenkel, Thomas

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of single atoms, e.g. dopant atoms, in sub-100 nm scale electronic devices can affect the device characteristics, such as the threshold voltage of transistors, or the sub-threshold currents. Fluctuations of the number of dopant atoms thus poses a complication for transistor scaling. In a complementary view, new opportunities emerge when novel functionality can be implemented in devices deterministically doped with single atoms. The grand price of the latter might be a large scale quantum computer, where quantum bits (qubits) are encoded e.g. in the spin states of electrons and nuclei of single dopant atoms in silicon, or in color centers in diamond. Both the possible detrimental effects of dopant fluctuations and single atom device ideas motivate the development of reliable single atom doping techniques which are the subject of this chapter. Single atom doping can be approached with top down and bottom up techniques. Top down refers to the placement of dopant atoms into a more or less structured matrix environment, like a transistor in silicon. Bottom up refers to approaches to introduce single dopant atoms during the growth of the host matrix e.g. by directed self-assembly and scanning probe assisted lithography. Bottom up approaches are discussed in Chapter XYZ. Since the late 1960's, ion implantation has been a widely used technique to introduce dopant atoms into silicon and other materials in order to modify their electronic properties. It works particularly well in silicon since the damage to the crystal lattice that is induced by ion implantation can be repaired by thermal annealing. In addition, the introduced dopant atoms can be incorporated with high efficiency into lattice position in the silicon host crystal which makes them electrically active. This is not the case for e.g. diamond, which makes ion implantation doping to engineer the electrical properties of diamond, especially for n-type doping much harder then for silicon. Ion implantation is usually a highly statistical process, where high fluences of energetic ions, ranging from {approx}10{sup 9} to >10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} are implanted. For single atom device development, control over the absolute number of ions is needed and ions have to be placed with high spatial resolution. In the following sections we will discuss a series of approaches to single ion implantation with regard to single ion impact sensing and control of single ion positioning.

  17. Production of Endohedral Fullerenes by Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diener, M.D.; Alford, J. M.; Mirzadeh, S.

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The empty interior cavity of fullerenes has long been touted for containment of radionuclides during in vivo transport, during radioimmunotherapy (RIT) and radioimaging for example. As the chemistry required to open a hole in fullerene is complex and exceedingly unlikely to occur in vivo, and conformational stability of the fullerene cage is absolute, atoms trapped within fullerenes can only be released during extremely energetic events. Encapsulating radionuclides in fullerenes could therefore potentially eliminate undesired toxicity resulting from leakage and catabolism of radionuclides administered with other techniques. At the start of this project however, methods for production of transition metal and p-electron metal endohedral fullerenes were completely unknown, and only one method for production of endohedral radiofullerenes was known. They therefore investigated three different methods for the production of therapeutically useful endohedral metallofullerenes: (1) implantation of ions using the high intensity ion beam at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Surface Modification and Characterization Research Center (SMAC) and fullerenes as the target; (2) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following alpha decay; and (3) implantation of ions using the recoil energy following neutron capture, using ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) as a thermal neutron source. While they were unable to obtain evidence of successful implantation using the ion beam at SMAC, recoil following alpha decay and neutron capture were both found to be economically viable methods for the production of therapeutically useful radiofullerenes. In this report, the procedures for preparing fullerenes containing the isotopes {sup 212}Pb, {sup 212}Bi, {sup 213}Bi, and {sup 177}Lu are described. None of these endohedral fullerenes had ever previously been prepared, and all of these radioisotopes are actively under investigation for RIT. Additionally, the chemistry for derivatizing the radiofullerenes for water-solubility and a method for removing exohedral radionuclides are reported. The methods and chemistry developed during this CRADA are the crucial first steps for the development of fullerenes as a method superior to existing technologies for in vivo transport of radionuclides.

  18. Resistivity changes in carbon-implanted Teflon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW April 2004 Major: Nuclear Engineering RESISTIVITY CHANGES IN CARBON-IMPLANTED TEFLON A Senior Honors Thesis by MATTHEW R. JACKSON Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs k Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University... In partial fulfillment of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOW Approved as to style and content by: Ron Hart (Fellows Advisor) April 2004 Edward A. Funkhouser (Executive Director) Major: Nuclear Engineering ABSTRACT...

  19. Ultrafine-grained titanium for medical implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T. (Los Alamos, NM); Lowe, Terry C. (Santa Fe, NM); Valiev, Ruslan Z. (Ufa, RU); Stolyarov, Vladimir V. (Ufa, RU); Latysh, Vladimir V. (Ufa, RU); Raab, Georgy J. (Ufa, RU)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We disclose ultrafine-grained titanium. A coarse-grained titanium billet is subjected to multiple extrusions through a preheated equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) die, with billet rotation between subsequent extrusions. The resulting billet is cold processed by cold rolling and/or cold extrusion, with optional annealing. The resulting ultrafine-grained titanium has greatly improved mechanical properties and is used to make medical implants.

  20. Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite materials for aerospace and transportation applications. Polymer composites are inherited lighter than their metallic counterparts resulting in significant weight reduction

  1. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Infotech@Aerospace Conference, Paper No. 2005-7077 A Small Semi-Autonomous Rotary-Wing Unmanned Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -7077 1 A Small Semi-Autonomous Rotary-Wing Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) Scott D. Hanford* , Lyle N. Long System (GPS) will not work indoors, so other sensors will have to be used for indoor flight. The software. * NSF Fellow, Aerospace Engineering, Member AIAA, sdh187@psu.edu. Professor, Aerospace Engineering

  2. Defects and diffusion in MeV implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezia, V. C.; Haynes, T. E.; Agarwal, Aditya; Gossmann, H.-J.; Pelaz, L.; Jacobson, D. C.; Eaglesham, D. J.; Duggan, J. L. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, 55 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76201 (United States)

    1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we demonstrate that the defects that are created by 2-MeV Si ions can interact with dopant atoms both during implantation and during post-implant annealing. We show that the interstitials and vacancies created during MeV Si implantation result in a radiation enhanced diffusion of B and Sb markers, respectively, when the temperature of implantation is above the threshold temperature for formation of mobile dopant complexes. With the use of these dopant markers we also demonstrate that a vacancy-rich near surface region results during post-implant annealing of MeV implanted silicon. The depth distribution and the thermal evolution of clustered vacancies was measured by a Au labeling technique.

  3. Method of electroplating a conversion electron emitting source on implant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Gonzales, Gilbert R. (New York, NY); Adzic, Radoslav (East Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for preparing an implant coated with a conversion electron emitting source (CEES) are disclosed. The typical method includes cleaning the surface of the implant; placing the implant in an activating solution comprising hydrochloric acid to activate the surface; reducing the surface by H.sub.2 evolution in H.sub.2SO.sub.4 solution; and placing the implant in an electroplating solution that includes ions of the CEES, HCl, H.sub.2SO.sub.4, and resorcinol, gelatin, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, before tin plating, a seed layer is formed on the surface. The electroplated CEES coating can be further protected and stabilized by annealing in a heated oven, by passivation, or by being covered with a protective film. The invention also relates to a holding device for holding an implant, wherein the device selectively prevents electrodeposition on the portions of the implant contacting the device.

  4. Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

  5. automatic defibrillator implantation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    som en litteraturversikt, dr (more) Andersson, Kristoffer 2009-01-01 3 Peace of Mind: The Decision to Accept an Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator (ICD): Qualitative...

  6. ace dental implant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31) 1750 Nelson, Tim 23 Comparison of clinically projected and radiographically optimal implant fixture placement. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??M.S....

  7. ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLE NEUROSTIMULATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantchenko, Oxana S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    38 3. Renewable Power for ImplantableCOMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLER, Isaacson M, Shakouri A: A renewable energy power source

  8. Biocompatible implants and methods of making and attaching the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowley, Adrian P; Laude, Lucien D; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lotfi, Atoosa; Markland, Jr., Francis S

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a biocompatible silicone implant that can be securely affixed to living tissue through interaction with integral membrane proteins (integrins). A silicone article containing a laser-activated surface is utilized to make the implant. One example is an implantable prosthesis to treat blindness caused by outer retinal degenerative diseases. The device bypasses damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulates the undamaged neurons of the retina. Electrical stimulation is achieved using a silicone microelectrode array (MEA). A safe, protein adhesive is used in attaching the MEA to the retinal surface and assist in alleviating focal pressure effects. Methods of making and attaching such implants are also provided.

  9. Improving Ion Implanter Productivity with In-situ Cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Steve [ATMI Inc., 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury CT (United States); Perry, Alfred [Analog Devices, 804 Woburn Street, Wilmington, MA (United States)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion source lifetime is generally a critical factor in overall implanter productivity. However, extended ion source life only provides value in a manufacturing environment if the ion beam remains stable. As an ion source ages, apertures and insulators become coated with conductive dopant residues which cause beam instabilities, resulting in implant stoppages. These stoppages create failures and/or assists which are logged in the implanter's data files. Analog Devices has recently evaluated in-situ ion source cleaning based on use of xenon difluoride chemistry. The paper will describe how the in-situ cleaning decreased logged failures/assists, resulting in increased implanter productivity.

  10. actuales del implante: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purpose: Permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) as a treatment option for prostate cancer requires implantation of 80-150 radioactive iodine-125 (I-125) "seeds" into the...

  11. alejados del implante: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Purpose: Permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) as a treatment option for prostate cancer requires implantation of 80-150 radioactive iodine-125 (I-125) "seeds" into the...

  12. THE AEROSPACE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1 \.

  13. THE AEROSPACE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1 \.Suile

  14. Electrical activation and spin coherence of ultra low dose antimony implants in silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and spin coherence of ultra low dose antimony implants inClara, CA 95054 We implanted ultra low doses (0.2 to 210 11100 nm, corresponding to ultra low ion implantation doses of

  15. An extensive analysis of modified nanotube surfaces for next-generation orthopedic implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Christine Jeanette

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of cemented versus cementless press-fit condylar total kneecemented implants or press-fit implants. For cemented boneThe second approach is to use press-fit implants, which are

  16. Damage Evolution in GaN Under MeV Heavy Ion Implantation. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evolution in GaN Under MeV Heavy Ion Implantation. Damage Evolution in GaN Under MeV Heavy Ion Implantation. Abstract: Damage evaluation processes in patterned GaN implanted by 3...

  17. Smart Materials and Adaptive Systems (3 Credits) Instructor Gregory Washington, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC Irvine (gnwashin@uci.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materials. Each subsection will result in a mini-design project. Text Course Notes preparedSmart Materials and Adaptive Systems (3 Credits) Instructor Gregory Washington, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UC Irvine (gnwashin@uci.edu) Synopsis Modeling and control of smart materials

  18. Experimental and computational analysis of toughness anisotropy in an AA2139 Al-alloy for aerospace applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Experimental and computational analysis of toughness anisotropy in an AA2139 Al-alloy for aerospace applications T.F. Morgeneyer1,3 , J. Besson1 , H. Proudhon1 , M.J. Starink2 and I. Sinclair2 1

  19. AIAA Paper No. 2005-6982 InfoTech@Aerospace Conference, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Sept., 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Astronautics, Sept., 2005 1 An Undergraduate Course in Unmanned Air Vehicles Lyle N. Long* , Scott D. Hanford of unmanned air vehicles. A two semester course at the senior-level in the Aerospace Engineering Department wing loading. In the second semester, teams of students worked together to build a larger aircraft from

  20. 44th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 9-12, 2006, Reno, Nevada Turbine Tip Clearance Flow Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Scott C.

    clearance between the rotor blade tips and outer casing. For a turbine, this clearance is on the order in an engine. In a turbine stage, blade rotation is caused by work extraction through turning of the post44th Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 9-12, 2006, Reno, Nevada Turbine Tip Clearance

  1. The CU Aerospace / VACCO Propulsion Unit for CubeSats (PUC) is a complete high-performance and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    such as solar panels and magnetic torquers. For increased performance, or to meet customer specific missionThe CU Aerospace / VACCO Propulsion Unit for CubeSats (PUC) is a complete high necessary propulsion subsystems, including controller, power processing unit, micro-cavity discharge

  2. ESA Workshop on Aerospace EMC Florence, Italy / 30 March 1 April 2009 A NOVEL WAY OF USING REVERBERATION CHAMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ESA Workshop on Aerospace EMC Florence, Italy / 30 March ­ 1 April 2009 A NOVEL WAY OF USING of facility, among others, are often used nowadays for high frequency EMC radiated-immunity tests of using RCs for EMC testing with the generation of high-intensity deterministic temporal wavefronts inside

  3. An Algorithm for Computing Customized 3D Printed Implants with Curvature Constrained Channels for Enhancing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    An Algorithm for Computing Customized 3D Printed Implants with Curvature Constrained Channels results in 3D printing and steerable needle motion planning to create customized implants containing

  4. The Effect of Titanium Implants on the Peripheral Circadian Rhythm of Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarville, Kirstin Ty

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    treatment promotes titanium implant osseointegration inSurface treatments of titanium dental implants for rapidmarrow stromal cells to titanium surfaces. Journal of Oral

  5. Beam Profile Disturbances from Implantable Pacemakers or Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gossman, Michael S., E-mail: mgossman@tsrcc.com [Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Medical Physics Section, Ashland, KY (United States); Comprehensive Heart and Vascular Associates, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashland, KY (United States); Medtronic, Inc., External Research Program, Mounds View, MN (United States); Nagra, Bipinpreet; Graves-Calhoun, Alison; Wilkinson, Jeffrey [Tri-State Regional Cancer Center, Medical Physics Section, Ashland, KY (United States); Comprehensive Heart and Vascular Associates, Heart and Vascular Center, Ashland, KY (United States); Medtronic, Inc., External Research Program, Mounds View, MN (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The medical community is advocating for progressive improvement in the design of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and implantable pacemakers to accommodate elevations in dose limitation criteria. With advancement already made for magnetic resonance imaging compatibility in some, a greater need is present to inform the radiation oncologist and medical physicist regarding treatment planning beam profile changes when such devices are in the field of a therapeutic radiation beam. Treatment plan modeling was conducted to simulate effects induced by Medtronic, Inc.-manufactured devices on therapeutic radiation beams. As a continuation of grant-supported research, we show that radial and transverse open beam profiles of a medical accelerator were altered when compared with profiles resulting when implantable pacemakers and cardioverter-defibrillators are placed directly in the beam. Results are markedly different between the 2 devices in the axial plane and the sagittal planes. Vast differences are also presented for the therapeutic beams at 6-MV and 18-MV x-ray energies. Maximum changes in percentage depth dose are observed for the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator as 9.3% at 6 MV and 10.1% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.3 cm and 1.3 cm, respectively. For the implantable pacemaker, the maximum changes in percentage depth dose were observed as 10.7% at 6 MV and 6.9% at 18 MV, with worst distance to agreement of isodose lines at 2.5 cm and 1.9 cm, respectively. No differences were discernible for the defibrillation leads and the pacing lead.

  6. Short communication Ion-implantation modification of lithiumphosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    -implantation. Impedance measurements at 25 8C show that the nitrogen-implanted Lipon films enhance or retard the ionic-film solid-state batteries have received greater attention for the fabrication of batteries that can-large-scale integration (VLSI). The operational accept- ability of such integrated devices is contingent on the high

  7. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muller, R.H.; Zhang, S.

    1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, and sodium sulfur. 6 figs.

  8. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj,1 William Hubbard,2 and J. A. Golovchenko1,2,a demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled

  9. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Page 1 Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj1 , William Hubbard2 , and J. A We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled

  10. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muller, Rolf H. (Berkeley, CA); Zhang, Shengtao (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, end sodium sulfur.

  11. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices A. Zebda1,2 , S. Cosnier1 the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal further developments. Following recent developments in nano- and biotechnology, state-of-the-art biofuel

  12. Neurophysiologic Basis for Cochlear and Auditory Brainstem Implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    subjected 13 individuals with the House type of cochlear implants to an extensive battery of audiologic (Michelson, 1971) and W. House (House & Ur- ban, 1973). But before that, other investigators had shown (Simmons, 1966). It was, however, Dr. William House who intro- duced cochlear implants as a means

  13. Implant for in-vivo parameter monitoring, processing and transmitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ericson, Milton N. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Hylton, James O. (Clinton, TN)

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  14. Method of fabricating optical waveguides by ion implantation doping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appleton, B.R.; Ashley, P.R.; Buchal, C.J.

    1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for fabricating high-quality optical waveguides in optical quality oxide crystals by ion implantation doping and controlled epitaxial recrystallization is provided. Masked LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals are implanted with high concentrations of Ti dopant at ion energies of about 360 keV while maintaining the crystal near liquid nitrogen temperature. Ion implantation doping produces an amorphous, Ti-rich nonequilibrium phase in the implanted region. Subsequent thermal annealing in a water-saturated oxygen atmosphere at up to 1000/degree/C produces solid-phase epitaxial regrowth onto the crystalline substrate. A high-quality crystalline layer results which incorporates the Ti into the crystal structure at much higher concentrations than is possible by standard diffusion techniques, and this implanted region has excellent optical waveguiding properties.

  15. OFFICE OF MATERIALS & LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT Policy for Charge Capture of Implant(s), Instrument(s), Device(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    OFFICE OF MATERIALS & LOGISTICS MANAGEMENT Policy for Charge Capture of Implant(s), Instrument entirety and fax to Materials Management at x1993. 3.0 Materials Management must complete Section 2 Service. Materials Management will provide the product part number, cost and charge code, if applicable

  16. Improved ion implant fluence uniformity in hydrogen enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation into silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, J. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Department of 702, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, L. H., E-mail: liliuhe@buaa.edu.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Liu, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zuo, X. J.; Zhu, P. Z.; Ma, Y. F. [Department of 702, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yu, K. M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K., E-mail: liliuhe@buaa.edu.cn, E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced glow discharge plasma immersion ion implantation does not require an external plasma source but ion focusing affects the lateral ion fluence uniformity, thereby hampering its use in high-fluence hydrogen ion implantation for thin film transfer and fabrication of silicon-on-insulator. Insertion of a metal ring between the sample stage and glass chamber improves the ion uniformity and reduces the ion fluence non-uniformity as the cathode voltage is raised. Two-dimensional multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation confirms that the variation of electric field inside the chamber leads to mitigation of the ion focusing phenomenon and the results are corroborated experimentally by hydrogen forward scattering.

  17. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko [Ruder Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi [Physics Department and Solid State Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Djerdj, Igor [Department of Materials, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Tonejc, Andelka [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Gamulin, Ozren [School of Medicine, Zagreb University, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  18. Glass/ceramic coatings for implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomsia, Antoni P. (Pinole, CA); Saiz, Eduardo (Berkeley, CA); Gomez-Vega, Jose M. (Nagoya, JP); Marshall, Sally J. (Larkspur, CA); Marshall, Grayson W. (Larkspur, CA)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass coatings on metals including Ti, Ti6A14V and CrCo were prepared for use as implants. The composition of the glasses was tailored to match the thermal expansion of the substrate metal. By controlling the firing atmosphere, time, and temperature, it was possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25-150 .mu.m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate. The optimum firing temperatures ranged between 800 and 840.degree. C. at times up to 1 min in air or 15 min in N.sub.2. The same basic technique was used to create multilayered coatings with concentration gradients of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and SiO.sub.2.

  19. Studies of Impurity Deposition/Implantation in JET Divertor Tiles using SIMS and Ion Beam Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studies of Impurity Deposition/Implantation in JET Divertor Tiles using SIMS and Ion Beam Techniques

  20. Using lean enterprise principles to drive quality and on time delivery to customers : a study of the Honeywell Aerospace Engine Assembly and Test Center of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Andrea (Andrea Sieg)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Honeywell Aerospace has been a leader in manufacturing high quality engines to customers for decades. With engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) growth of-9% in 2005, and projected growth similar or greater for 2006, ...

  1. Memory and data communication link architecture for micro-implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khurana, Harneet Singh

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the growing need for the development of smaller implantable monitors, alternative energy storage sources such as high density ultra capacitors are envisioned to replace the bulky batteries in these devices. Ultracapacitors ...

  2. A fully implantable intracochlear drug delivery device : development and characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan, Erin Eileen Leary, 1976-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a collaborative effort with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Draper Laboratory is developing an implantable microfluidic drug delivery system for long-term treatment of inner ear disorders and prevention of ...

  3. Interfacial Interactions between Implant Electrode and Biological Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Cheng-Wei 1979-

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    interactions to the charge transport. The interfacial interactions of an implanted electrode with neural system will be studied in two types of electrodes: silver and graphene coated. The interfacial impedance of both samples will be studied using EIS...

  4. Interfacial Interactions between Implant Electrode and Biological Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Cheng-Wei 1979-

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    at establishing the fundamental knowledge of interfacial interactions between the host biological environment and an implanted electrode. We will identify the dynamic mechanisms of such interfacial interactions. Quantitative analysis of the electrical properties...

  5. Noninvasive quantification of drug delivery from an implantable MEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Audrey M., 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) sensors in vivo in real time and corroborated by scintillation of urine samples. The goal of monitoring drug delivery from an implant in vivo, in real time and without disturbing the tissue environment, was ...

  6. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Kulikov, Stanislav (Sarov, RU); Osorio, Ivan (Leawood, KS); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  7. Ion implanted step recovery diodes - influence of material parameter variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosman, Thomas Michael

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the successful application of ion implantation in the fabrication of an improved step recovery diode (SRD). At the same time a comprehensive account of the actual device processing will bring to light the problems and difficulties that are ordinarily...ION IMPLANTED STEP RECOVERY DIODES ? INFLUENCE OF MATERIAL PARAMETER VARIATIONS A Thesis by THOMAS MICHAEL MOSMAN Submitted to the Craduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  8. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Ions that are implanted include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and a preferred co-implant of Ar/sup +/ and Ne/sup +/. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the band gap energy threshold of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible blue light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to these positive ions of sufficient density and with sufficient energy to provide an image. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%; a lead zirconate content ranging from 62 to 70 mole %; and a lead titanate content ranging from 38 to 30%. The region of ion implantation is in a range from 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate. Density of ions is in the range from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and having an energy in the range from 100 to 500 keV.

  9. Influence of the chemical nature of implanted ions on the structure of a silicon layer damaged by implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shcherbachev, K. D., E-mail: chterb@mail.ru; Voronova, M. I.; Bublik, V. T. [National University of Science and Technology MISIS (Russian Federation); Mordkovich, V. N., E-mail: mord36@mail.ru; Pazhin, D. M.; Zinenko, V. I.; Agafonov, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronic Technology and Ultra-High-Purity Materials (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the implantation of silicon single crystals by fluorine, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon ions on the distribution of strain and the static Debye-Waller factor in the crystal lattice over the implanted-layer depth has been investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. The density depth distribution in the surface layer of native oxide has been measured by X-ray reflectometry. Room-temperature implantation conditions have ensured the equality of the suggested ranges of ions of different masses and the energies transferred by them to the target. It is convincingly shown that the change in the structural parameters of the radiation-damaged silicon layer and the native oxide layer depend on the chemical activity of the implanted ions.

  10. Reduction of phosphorus diffusion in germanium by fluorine implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Mubarek, H. A. W. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The control of phosphorus (P) diffusion in germanium (Ge) is essential for the realisation of ultrashallow n-type junctions in Ge. This work reports a detailed study of the effect of fluorine (F) co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge. P and F profiles were characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The ion implantation damage was investigated using cross sectional transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that F co-implantation reduces the implanted P profile width and reduces both intrinsic and extrinsic P diffusion in Ge. A defect mediated mechanism for the strong influence of F co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge is proposed and invokes the formation of F{sub n}V{sub m} clusters in the F-amorphized Ge layer. A fraction of these F{sub n}V{sub m} clusters decorate the interstitial type end-of-range defects in the re-grown Ge layer and the rest react during re-growth with interstitial germanium atoms diffusing back from the amorphous crystalline interface. The Ge vacancies are then annihilated and mobile interstitial F is released and out diffuses from the surface. This results in a re-grown Ge layer which has a low vacancy concentration and in which the P diffusion rate is reduced. These results open the way to the realization of enhanced Ge n-type devices.

  11. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Land, Cecil E. (Albuquerque, NM); Peercy, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Implanted ions include H.sup.+, He.sup.+, Ne.sup.+, Ar.sup.+, as well as chemically reactive ions from Fe, Cr, and Al. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the absorption characteristics of the PLZT material from near-UV light to visible light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to the positive ions at sufficient density, from 1.times.10.sup.12 to 1.times.10.sup.17, and with sufficient energy, from 100 to 500 KeV, to provide photosensitivity enhancement. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%, a lead zirconate content of 62 to 70 mole %, and a lead titanate content of 38 to 30%. The ions are implanted at a depth of 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate.

  12. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conrad, John R. (Madison, WI)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner.

  13. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conrad, J.R.

    1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner. 7 figs.

  14. Mesoporous silica as a membrane for ultra-thin implantable direct glucose Tushar Sharma,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and worldwide.1 Consequently, there is an upsurge in the various novel implantable devices to diag- nose- dioverter defibrillator (AICD) and pacemakers. Implantable direct glucose fuel cells (biofuel cells) provide

  15. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO(110) Rutile. Room-Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-Implanted Co-Doped TiO(110) Rutile. Abstract: Interest in diluted...

  16. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-implanted Co-doped TiO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-implanted Co-doped TiO(110) Rutile. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Ion-implanted Co-doped TiO(110) Rutile. Abstract: Ferromagnetic...

  17. Development of a Novel Piezoelectric Implant to Improve the Success Rate of Spinal Fusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobaben, Nicholas

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................................................................................. 36 Negative Potential Outer Electrode ............................................................................................... 37 Implant Geometry... .............................................................................................................. 91 VIII. Proof of Concept Testing ................................................................................................................... 106 Battery Recharge Tests...

  18. UV curing and photoresist outgassing in high energy implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.A.; Erokhin, Y.; Horsky, T. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thick photoresists, typically 3 microns or more in thickness, necessary for high energy implantation present some unique problems. The outgassing of thick photoresist In high energy applications varies from that of thinner resist and lower energies. It requires appropriate processing to cure without reticulation of field regions deformity of features, or blistering during subsequent processing. This paper examines different resist treatments and their effects on implanter pressure during processing. Data on outgassing of thick photoresist, outgassing effects on absolute dose and dose uniformity as measured by sheet resistance contour maps, and the variation in gas composition are presented.

  19. Microwave annealing of ion implanted 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, J.A.; Rao, M.V.; Tian, Y.L. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Holland, O.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kelner, G.; Freitas, J.A. Jr. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Ahmad, I. [FM Technologies Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave rapid thermal annealing has been utilized to remove the lattice damage caused by nitrogen(N) ion-implantation as well as to activate the dopant in 6H-SiC. Samples were annealed at temperatures as high as 1,400 C, for 10 min. Van der Pauw Hall measurements indicate an implant activation of 36%, which is similar to the value obtained for the conventional furnace annealing at 1,600 C. Good lattice quality restoration was observed in the Rutherford backscattering and photoluminescence spectra.

  20. Microwave annealing of ion implanted 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, J.A.; Rao, M.V.; Tian, Y.L. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Holland, O.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kelner, G.; Freitas, J.A. Jr. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Ahmad, I. [FM Technologies Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave rapid thermal annealing has been utilized to remove the lattice damage caused by nitrogen (N) ion-implantation as well as to activate the dopant in 6H-SiC. Samples were annealed at temperatures as high as 1,400 C, for 10 min. Van der Pauw Hall measurements indicate an implant activation of 36%, which is similar to the value obtained for the conventional furnace annealing at 1,600 C. Good lattice quality restoration was observed in the Rutherford backscattering and photoluminescence spectra.

  1. Design of a nitrogen-implanted titanium-based superelastic alloy with optimized properties for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Design of a nitrogen-implanted titanium-based superelastic alloy with optimized properties-based biomedical alloy was treated in surface by implantation of nitrogen ions for the first time. The N osteoblasts. After implantation, surface analysis methods revealed the formation of a titanium-based nitride

  2. Defects in Ge and Si caused by 1 MeV Si+ implantation*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Defects in Ge and Si caused by 1 MeV Si+ implantation* D. P. Hickeya Department of Materials defect formation and evolution in the 001 Ge and Si wafers implanted with 1 MeV Si+ and 40 keV Si dissolve at the projected range for nonamorphizing implants into Si. However, in Ge, no 311 defect

  3. Proton implanted singlemode holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choquette, Kent

    Proton implanted singlemode holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers P.O. Leisher, A.J. Danner of proton implant confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. The index confinement and selective loss (both fundamental and non-fundamental) operation [9]. Although proton implantation for current

  4. Titanium alloy mini-implants for orthodontic anchorage: Immediate loading and metal ion release q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Marc A.

    Titanium alloy mini-implants for orthodontic anchorage: Immediate loading and metal ion release q 2006 Abstract Removable osseointegrated titanium mini-implants were successfully used as anchorage ion release during the healing pro- cess. Titanium alloy mini-implants were inserted in the tibiae

  5. ROUGH SURFACES OF TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR IMPLANTS AND PROSTHESES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ROUGH SURFACES OF TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS FOR IMPLANTS AND PROSTHESES 1 E. Conforto, 2 B. Abstract Titanium and titanium alloys for dental implants and hip prostheses were surface-treated and and the stability of the implant. The microstructure of titanium and titanium alloys submitted to these treatments

  6. IMAGE: A new type of implantable device uses flexible silicon technology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    generation of active, flexible, implantable devices for applications in many areas of the body," says coIMAGE: A new type of implantable device uses flexible silicon technology. Click here for more-hugging implant maps heart electrical activity in unprecedented detail Next-generation devices pave way

  7. A Glucose Fuel Cell for Implantable BrainMachine Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.

    We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing 3:4 mW cm{2steady-state power and up to 180 mW cm{2 peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, ...

  8. INTRACELLULAR NEURONAL RECORDING WITH FLEXIBLE MICRO-MACHINED PROBE IMPLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , for the first time, an implantable device can record intracellular action potentials from a single neuron (Pd5 electrodes used conventionally for similar intracellular recording purposes. The success of this prototype due to their small dimensions, compact geometry, and the ease with which multi electrode recording

  9. DIFFUSION OF MAGNESIUM AND MICROSTRUCTURES IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Weilin; Edwards, Danny J.; Jung, Hee Joon; Wang, Zheming; Zhu, Zihua; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Following our previous reports [ 1- 3], further isochronal annealing (2 hrs.) of the monocrystalline 6H-SiC and polycrystalline CVD 3C-SiC was performed at 1573 and 1673 K in Ar environment. SIMS data indicate that observable Mg diffusion in 6H-SiC starts and a more rapid diffusion in CVD 3C-SiC occurs at 1573 K. The implanted Mg atoms tend to diffuse deeper into the undamaged CVD 3C-SiC. The microstructure with Mg inclusions in the as-implanted SiC has been initially examined using high-resolution STEM. The presence of Mg in the TEM specimen has been confirmed based on EDS mapping. Additional monocrystalline 3C-SiC samples have been implanted at 673 K to ion fluence 3 times higher than the previous one. RBS/C analysis has been performed before and after thermal annealing at 1573 K for 12 hrs. Isothermal annealing at 1573 K is being carried out and Mg depth profiles being measured. Microstructures in both the as-implanted and annealed samples are also being examined using STEM.

  10. Rutherford backscattering analysis of gallium implanted 316 stainless steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortensi, Javier

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation of Ga ions into 316 stainless steel was performed at fluences ranging from 8x10? to 10? ions/cm. The depth profile of Ga in the steel was analyzed via Rutherford Backscattering and ToFSIMS. The surface effects were...

  11. artificial implantation materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    artificial implantation materials First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 "In Vivo" Pose...

  12. Optima XE Single Wafer High Energy Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, Shu; Ferrara, Joseph; Bell, Edward; Patel, Shital; Sieradzki, Manny [Axcelis Technologies, Inc. 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Optima XE is the first production worthy single wafer high energy implanter. The new system combines a state-of-art single wafer endstation capable of throughputs in excess of 400 wafers/hour with a production-proven RF linear accelerator technology. Axcelis has been evolving and refining RF Linac technology since the introduction of the NV1000 in 1986. The Optima XE provides production worthy beam currents up to energies of 1.2 MeV for P{sup +}, 2.9 MeV for P{sup ++}, and 1.5 MeV for B{sup +}. Energies as low as 10 keV and tilt angles as high as 45 degrees are also available., allowing the implanter to be used for a wide variety of traditional medium current implants to ensure high equipment utilization. The single wafer endstation provides precise implant angle control across wafer and wafer to wafer. In addition, Optima XE's unique dose control system allows compensation of photoresist outgassing effects without relying on traditional pressure-based methods. We describe the specific features, angle control and dosimetry of the Optima XE and their applications in addressing the ever-tightening demands for more precise process controls and higher productivity.

  13. PERCOLATION AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM FILMS (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-435 PERCOLATION AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM FILMS (*) F. MEUNIER and P of Si and Ge in Al thin films at 8 K produces alloys exhibiting enhanced superconducting transition in the superconducting transition temperature Tc of several such alloys [2], [5], [6] : Josephson tunnelling

  14. auditory brain stem implantation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    auditory brain stem implantation First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Auditory Brain Stem...

  15. auditory brain stem implants: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    brain stem implants First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Auditory Brain Stem Response to...

  16. Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongbiao

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as an electrode in field emission applications. In this project, the formation of a CoSi2, conducting layer on porous silicon by high dose ion implantation while preserving the pore structure and field emission properties of the underlying porous silicon...

  17. Highly Stripped Ion Sources for MeV Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Original technical objectives of CRADA number PVI C-03-09 between BNL and Poole Ventura, Inc. (PVI) were to develop an intense, high charge state, ion source for MeV ion implanters. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MV LINAC is used for acceleration of a few rnA. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low energy platform (de acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This de acceleration of ions will be far more efficient (in energy utilization). The resultant implanter will be smaller in size. It will generate higher quality ion beams (with lower emittance) for fabrication of superior semiconductor products. In addition to energy and cost savings, the implanter will operate at a lower level of health risks associated with ion implantation. An additional aim of the project was to producing a product that can lead to long term job creation in Russia and/or in the US. R&D was conducted in two Russian Centers (one in Tomsk and Seversk, the other in Moscow) under the guidance ofPVI personnel and the BNL PI. Multiple approaches were pursued, developed, and tested at various locations with the best candidate for commercialization delivered and tested at on an implanter at the PVI client Axcelis. Technical developments were exciting: record output currents of high charge state phosphorus and antimony were achieved; a Calutron-Bemas ion source with a 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art). Record steady state output currents of higher charge state phosphorous and antimony and P ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb {sup 4 +}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. Ultimate commercialization goals did not succeed (even though a number of the products like high charge state phosphorus and antimony could have resulted in a lower power consumption of 30 kW/implanter) for the following reasons (which were discovered after R&D completion): record output of high charge state phosphorous would have thermally damage wafers; record high charge state of antimony requires tool (ion implanting machine in ion implantation jargon) modification, which did not make economic sense due to the small number of users. Nevertheless, BNL has benefited from advances in high-charge state ion generation, due to high charge state ions need for RHIC preinjection. High fraction boron ion was delivered to PVI client Axcelis for retrofit and implantation testing; the source could have reduced beam preinjector power consumption by a factor of 3.5. But, since the source generated some lithium (though in miniscule amounts); last minute decision was made not to employ the source in implanters. R&D of novel transport and gasless plasmaless deceleration, as well as decaborane molecular ion source to mitigate space charge problems in low energy shallow ion implantation was also conducted though results were not yet ready for commercialization. Future work should be focused on gasless plasmaless transport and deceleration as well as on molecular ions due to their significance to low energy, shallow implantation; which is the last frontier of ion implantation. To summarize the significant accomplishments: 1. Record steady state output currents of high charge state phosphorous, P, ions in particle milli-Ampere: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA). 2. Record steady state output currents of high charge state antimony, Sb, ions in particle milli-Ampere: Sb{sup 3+} (16.2 pmA), Sb{sup 4+} (7.6 pmA), Sb{sup 5+} (3.3 pmA), and Sb{sup 6+} (2.2 pmA). 3. 70% output of boron ion current (compared to 25% in present state-of-the-art) from a Calutron-Bemas ion source. These accomplishments have the potential of benefiting the semiconductor manufacturing industry by lowering power consumption by as much as 30 kW per ion implanter. Major problem w

  18. Method for implantation of high dopant concentrations in wide band gap materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Usov, Igor (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method that combines alternate low/medium ion dose implantation with rapid thermal annealing at relatively low temperatures. At least one dopant is implanted in one of a single crystal and an epitaxial film of the wide band gap compound by a plurality of implantation cycles. The number of implantation cycles is sufficient to implant a predetermined concentration of the dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film. Each of the implantation cycles includes the steps of: implanting a portion of the predetermined concentration of the one dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film; annealing one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film and implanted portion at a predetermined temperature for a predetermined time to repair damage to one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film caused by implantation and activates the implanted dopant; and cooling the annealed single crystal and implanted portion to a temperature of less than about 100.degree. C. This combination produces high concentrations of dopants, while minimizing the defect concentration.

  19. Published in 2001 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 2001, Vol.1, 331-338 -DOI 10.1109/AERO.2001.931724 Designing a Water-Quality Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Published in 2001 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 2001, Vol.1, 331-338 - DOI 10.1109/AERO.2001-7803-6599-2/01/$10.00 2001 IEEE Abstract---This effort is directed at developing a sensor for evaluating water quality. A set on the ionophore to control transport and generate a gradient of the analyte through the #12;Published in 2001 IEEE

  20. C implantation and surface degradation of InGaP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vartuli, C.B.; Abernathy, C.R.; Pearton, S.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Zolper, J.C.; Howard, A.J. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C ions were implanted alone, or with either N, Al, Ar, or P co-implants, into In{sub 0.51}Ga{sub 0.49}P at does between 5x10{sup 12}-5x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and the electrical activation was measured for annealing temperatures between 650-1000{degree}C. Capless proximity annealing preserves the surface to 900{degree}C, as measured by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The acceptor activation percentages are low (20%) in all cases. This is consistent with a model in which C has a strong tendency for self-compensation in InGaP. 28 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Ultraviolet photoluminescence from Gd-implanted AlN epilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavada, J. M.; Nepal, N.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Brown, E.; Hoemmerich, U.; Hite, J.; Thaler, G. T.; Abernathy, C. R.; Pearton, S. J.; Gwilliam, R. [U.S. Army Research Office, Durham, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2601 (United States); Department of Physics, Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia 23668 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Surrey Ion Beam Center, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep ultraviolet emission from gadolinium (Gd)-implanted AlN thin films has been observed using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The AlN epilayers were ion implanted with Gd to a total dose of {approx}6x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Using the output at 197 nm from a quadrupled Ti:sapphire laser, narrow PL emission was observed at 318 nm, characteristic of the trivalent Gd ion. A broader emission band, also centered at 318 nm, was measured with excitation at 263 nm. The PL emission intensity decreased by less than a factor of 3 over the sample temperature range of 10-300 K and decay transients were of the order of nanoseconds.

  2. Ion implantation in compound semiconductors for high-performance electronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced electronic devices based on compound semiconductors often make use of selective area ion implantation doping or isolation. The implantation processing becomes more complex as the device dimensions are reduced and more complex material systems are employed. The authors review several applications of ion implantation to high performance junction field effect transistors (JFETs) and heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) that are based on compound semiconductors, including: GaAs, AlGaAs, InGaP, and AlGaSb.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - aortic prosthesis implantation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cardiac pacing wires Yes No Artificial limb or joint Yes... No Implanted drug infusion device Yes No Body ... Source: Knutson, Brian - Departments of Psychology &...

  4. Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  5. Controlled release of gentamicin from polyelectrolyte multilayers to treat implant-related infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, Joshua Seth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyelectrolyte multilayered (PEM) coatings were fabricated to incorporate and release the small, hydrophilic antibiotic gentamicin from implant surfaces for infection control. The use of a cationic hydrolytically cleavable ...

  6. Physical properties of erbium implanted tungsten oxide films deposited by reactive dual magnetron sputtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Sodky H.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of erbium implanted tungsten oxide films deposited byDual magnetron sputtering; tungsten oxide films; Er ionoptical waveguides [3,5]. Tungsten oxide (WO 3 ) thin films

  7. Productivity Improvement for the SHX--SEN's Single-Wafer High-Current Ion Implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ninomiya, Shiro; Ochi, Akihiro; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Yumiyama, Toshio; Kudo, Tetsuya; Kurose, Takeshi; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ishikawa, Koji; Ueno, Kazuyoshi [SEN Corporation, 1501, Imazaike, Saijo, Ehime, 799-1362 (Japan)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment productivity is a critical issue for device fabrication. For ion implantation, productivity is determined both by ion current at the wafer and by utilization efficiency of the ion beam. Such improvements not only result in higher fabrication efficiency but also reduce consumption of both electrical power and process gases. For high-current ion implanters, reduction of implant area is a key factor to increase efficiency. SEN has developed the SAVING system (Scanning Area Variation Implantation with Narrower Geometrical pattern) to address this opportunity. In this paper, three variations of the SAVING system are introduced along with discussion of their effects on fab productivity.

  8. Processing of Silver-Implanted Aluminum Nitride for Energy Harvesting Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alleyne, Fatima

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conductive layer in a ceramic matrix via ion implantation.Ag precipitation in a ceramic matrix; and evaluate theform metal particles in a ceramic matrix at a concentration

  9. Science and technology of biocompatible thin films for implantable biomedical devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Kabius, B.; Auciello, O.; Materials Science Division

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation focuses on reviewing research to develop two critical biocompatible film technologies to enable implantable biomedical devices, namely: (1) development of bioinert/biocompatible coatings for encapsulation of Si chips implantable in the human body (e.g., retinal prosthesis implantable in the human eye) - the coating involves a novel ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film or hybrid biocompatible oxide/UNCD layered films; and (2) development of biocompatible films with high-dielectric constant and microfabrication process to produce energy storage super-capacitors embedded in the microchip to achieve full miniaturization for implantation into the human body.

  10. Ion implantation for high performance III-V JFETS and HFETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolper, J.C.; Baca, A.G.; Sherwin, M.E.; Klem, J.F.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion implantation has been an enabling technology for realizing many high performance electronic devices in III-V semiconductor materials. We report on advances in ion implantation processing for GaAs JFETs (joint field effect transistors), AlGaAs/GaAs HFETs (heterostructure field effect transistors), and InGaP or InAlP-barrier HFETs. The GaAs JFET has required the development of shallow p-type implants using Zn or Cd with junction depths down to 35 nm after the activation anneal. Implant activation and ionization issues for AlGaAs are reported along with those for InGaP and InAlP. A comprehensive treatment of Si-implant doping of AlGaAs is given based on donor ionization energies and conduction band density-of-states dependence on Al-composition. Si and Si+P implants in InGaP are shown to achieve higher electron concentrations than for similar implants in AlGaAs due to absence of the deep donor level. An optimized P co- implantation scheme in InGaP is shown to increase the implanted donor saturation level by 65%.

  11. Magnetic Processing A Pervasive Energy Efficient Technology for Next Generation Materials for Aerospace and Specialty Steel Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Ludtka, G.M.; Ray, P. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.); Magee, J. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing is an exceptionally fertile, pervasive and cross-cutting technology that is just now being recognized by several major industry leaders for its significant potential to increase energy efficiency and materials performance for a myriad of energy intensive industries in a variety of areas and applications. ORNL has pioneered the use and development of large magnetic fields in thermomagnetically processing (T-MP) materials for altering materials phase equilibria and transformation kinetics. ORNL has discovered that using magnetic fields, we can produce unique materials responses. T-MP can produce unique phase stabilities & microstructures with improved materials performance for structural and functional applications not achieved with traditional processing techniques. These results suggest that there are unprecedented opportunities to produce significantly enhanced materials properties via atomistic level (nano-) microstructural control and manipulation. ORNL (in addition to others) have shown that grain boundary chemistry and precipitation kinetics are also affected by large magnetic fields. This CRADA has taken advantage of ORNLs unique, custom-designed thermo-magnetic, 9 Tesla superconducting magnet facility that enables rapid heating and cooling of metallic components within the magnet bore; as well as ORNLs expertise in high magnetic field (HMF) research. Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is a a US-based industrial company, that provides enhanced performance alloys for the Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. In this CRADA, Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is focusing on applying ORNLs Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing (TMP) technology to improve their current and future proprietary materials product performance and open up new markets for their Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. Unprecedented mechanical property performance improvements have been demonstrated for a high strength bainitic alloy industrial/commercial alloy that is envisioned to provide the potential for new markets for this alloy. These thermomechanical processing results provide these alloys with a major breakthrough demonstrating that simultaneous improvements in yield strength and ductility are achieved: 12 %, 10%, 13%, and 22% increases in yield strength, elongation, reduction-in-area, and impact energy respectively. In addition, TMP appears to overcome detrimental chemical homogeneity impacts on uniform microstructure evolution.

  12. The Mechanical and Tribological Properties or Ion Implanted Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bull, Stephen John

    1988-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    by Wei et al (1987a. b) has shown that ion beam mixing of some ceramic discs with Ti, Ni or Co can result in reduced coefficients of friction at 800C in a simulated diesel exhaust environment. 1.1.3 Oxidation and Corrosion Surface films have long... ions and defects below the surface to be determined both qualitatively and quantitatively. This has an important bearing on the other surface property changes produced by ion implantation discussed in the next chapter. 2.1 The Stopping of Ions...

  13. Redistribution of Implanted Dopants in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, M.; Gao, X.A.; Han, J.; Pearton, S.J.; Rieger, D.J.; Scarvepalli, V. Sekhar, J.A.; Shul, R.J.; Singh, R.K.; Wilson, R.G.; Zavada, J.M.; Zolper, J.C.

    1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Donor (S, Se and Te) and acceptor (Mg, Be and C) dopants have been implanted into GaN at doses of 3-5x1014 cm-2 and annealed at temperatures up to 1450 *C. No redistribution of any of the elements is detectable by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, except for Be, which displays an apparent damage-assisted diffusion at 900 "C. At higher temperatures there is no further movement of the Be, suggesting that the point defect flux that assists motion at lower temperatures has been annealed. Effective diffusivities are <2X 1013 cm2.sec-1 at 1450 `C for each of the dopants in GaN.

  14. Characterization of an RF plasma ion source for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopalidis, Peter M.; Wan Zhimin [Advanced Ion Beam Technology Inc., 47370 Fremont Blvd., Fremont, CA 94538 (United States)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel inductively coupled RF plasma ion source has been developed for use in a beamline ion implanter. Ion density data have been taken with an array of four Langmuir probes spaced equally at the source extraction arc slit. These provide ion density uniformity information as a function of source pressure, RF power and gas mixture composition. In addition, total extracted ion beam current data are presented for the same conditions. The comparative advantages of the RF source in terms of higher beam current, reduced maintenance and overall productivity improvement compared to a hot cathode source are discussed.

  15. Superconductivity in Metal-mixed Ion-Implanted Polymer Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Micolich; E. Tavenner; B. J. Powell; A. R. Hamilton; M. T. Curry; R. E. Giedd; P. Meredith

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion-implantation of normally insulating polymers offers an alternative to depositing conjugated organics onto plastic films to make electronic circuits. We used a 50 keV nitrogen ion beam to mix a thin 10 nm Sn/Sb alloy film into the sub-surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and report the low temperature properties of this material. We observed metallic behavior, and the onset of superconductivity below 3 K. There are strong indications that the superconductivity does not result from a residual thin-film of alloy, but instead from a network of alloy grains coupled via a weakly conducting, ion-beam carbonized polymer matrix.

  16. Thermal Energy Harvesting with Thermoelectrics for Self-powered Sensors: With Applications to Implantable Medical Devices, Body Sensor Networks and Aging in Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Alic

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to lose favor to lithium batteries which had calculatedof lithium and lithium-ion batteries in implantable medicalof lithium and lithium-ion batteries in implantable medical

  17. Towards a better speech processor for cochlear implants : auditory- nerve responses to high-rate electric pulse trains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvak, Leonid, 1973-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cochlear implants are prosthetic devices that seek to restore hearing in profoundly deaf patients by electrically stimulating the auditory-nerve (AN). With current implants, the representation of the sound waveform in ...

  18. Annealing kinetics of ^311 defects and dislocation loops in the end-of-range damage region of ion implanted silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 L. M. Rubin and J. Jackson Eaton Corporation, Beverly was implanted using an Eaton NV-GSD 200E. The wafer was amorphized using a Si implantation, with an energy of 20

  19. CBC Reduction in InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor with Selectively Implanted Collector Pedestal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    CBC Reduction in InP Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor with Selectively Implanted Collector-3812 Fax: (805) 893-8714 Email: yingda@ece.ucsb.edu The base-collector junction capacitance (Cbc) is a key with a collector pedestal under the HBT's intrinsic region by using selective ion implantation and MBE regrowth

  20. Mass and charge overlaps in beamline implantation into compound semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Current, M. I.; Eddy, R.; Hudak, C.; Serfass, J.; Mount, G. [Current Scientific, 1729 Comstock Way, San Jose, CA 95124 (United States); Core Systems, 1050 Kifer Rd., Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States); Evans Analytical Group, 810 Kifer Rd., Sunnyvale, CA 95051 (United States)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass overlaps occurring as a result of extraction of ions from an arc discharge and gas collisions, producing molecular break up and charge exchange in the accelerator beamline, are examined for ion implantation into compound semiconductors. The effects of the choice of plasma gas elements for Be{sup +} implants are examined as an example.

  1. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester K Pancharoen, D Zhu, and S P Beeby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Schematic of hip prosthesis: (a) 3D-printing model (b) cross-section diagram. The design consists of twoA Hip Implant Energy Harvester K Pancharoen, D Zhu, and S P Beeby Electronics and Computer Science a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency

  2. The electrical and optical properties of thin lm diamond implanted with silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodzey, James

    :Si alloys were formed by the implantation of Si into polycrystalline diamond lms grown by che- mical vaporThe electrical and optical properties of thin lm diamond implanted with silicon K.J. Roea,* , J of diamond make it an attractive material for use in extreme conditions. Diamond devices have been fabricated

  3. THE ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN FILM DIAMOND IMPLANTED WITH SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolodzey, James

    devices. The C:Si alloys were formed by the implantation of Si into polycrystalline diamond films grownTHE ELECTRICAL AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF THIN FILM DIAMOND IMPLANTED WITH SILICON K. J. Roe and J and electrical properties of diamond make it an attractive material for use in extreme conditions. Diamond

  4. AN IMPLANTABLE ALL-PARYLENE LIQUID-IMPEDANCE BASED MEMS FORCE SENSOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    . Specifically, in situ and in vivo measurement of interfacial forces exerted on tissue by chronically implantedAN IMPLANTABLE ALL-PARYLENE LIQUID-IMPEDANCE BASED MEMS FORCE SENSOR Christian A. Gutierrez1 ABSTRACT We present a new transducer paradigm based on the electrochemical impedance transduction

  5. Adaptive Threshold Spike Detection using Stationary Wavelet Transform for Neural Recording Implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    to optimize power consumption. The system was designed in 130nm CMOS and shown to occupy 0.082 mm2. Such a system must operate with very low power and occupy minimal area in order to facilitate implantationAdaptive Threshold Spike Detection using Stationary Wavelet Transform for Neural Recording Implants

  6. Title: Predictors of 6-months clinical poor outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Title: Predictors of 6-months clinical poor outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve.acvd.2013.10.005 #12;2 Abstract Background: Patients' selection for transcatheter aortic valve implantation institution with a transcatheter-implanted aortic valve were prospectively followed. Our population

  7. DEFECTS AND CHARACTERIZA TION Il. -MINORITY CARRIERS LIFETIME DEGRADATION DURING ION IMPLANTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    cost [1, 2]. With regard to this point it sufficies to observe that the ion implanted solar cell SILICON SOLAR CELL PROCESSING (*) M. FINETTI (**), P. OSTOJA, S. SOLMI and G. SONCINI Laboratorio LAMEL In this work a silicon solar cell fabrication process based on ion implantation follow- ed by low temperature

  8. JOIJKUAL I)E I'HYSIQUE Diffusion study of oxygen implanted in nickel oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    JOIJKUAL I)E I'HYSIQUE Diffusion study of oxygen implanted in nickel oxide M. Meyer, S. Barbezat, C coefficients d'autodiffusion de I'oxygene dans l'oxyde de nickel, mesurkes rkemment, par Cchange isotopique implanted in nickel oxide; the experiments are carried out by annealing between 1 300 and 1 500 OC nickel

  9. Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    ! ! ! Corrosion Behavior of Solution- Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys Pooja Panigrahi University June 6, 2011 #12;! ! ""! Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys and Applied Sciences Northwestern University June 6, 2011 Abstract Corrosion behavior of solution annealed

  10. Bonding PMMA with Titanium for Dental Implants By Zhong Yuan Luo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    ` Bonding PMMA with Titanium for Dental Implants By Zhong Yuan Luo1 1Department of Mining(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) from Titanium (Ti) metal in dental implants. Project Overview Bonding is enhanced by modifying the titanium surface Modification is achieved using diazonium chemistry Different procedures

  11. Aluminum plasma immersion ion implantation in polymers M. Ueda a,*, I.H. Tan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum plasma immersion ion implantation in polymers M. Ueda a,*, I.H. Tan a , R.S. Dallaqua on the implantation of Kapton, Mylar, polypropylene and polyethylene samples with aluminum ions at 2.5, 5 and 7 k doses of (13) 1016 cm2 , with most of the aluminum concentrated on the surface. This is probably due

  12. The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

  13. Cavity nucleation and evolution in He-implanted Si and GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.; Petersen, G.A.; Barbour, J.C.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The criteria for forming stable cavities by He{sup +} implantation and annealing are examined for Si and GaAs. In Si, implanting at room temperature requires a minimum of 1.6 at. % He to form a continuous layer of cavities after annealing at 700{degrees}C. The cavities are located at dislocations and planar defects. Implanting peak He concentrations just above this threshold produces narrow layers of cavities at the projected range. In GaAs, room-temperature implantation followed by annealing results in exfoliation of the surface layer. Cavities were formed instead by implanting Ar followed by overlapping He, both at 400{degrees}C, with additional annealing at 400{degrees}C to outgas the He. This method forms 1.5--3.5 nm cavities that are often on [111] planar defects.

  14. Implantable device for in-vivo intracranial and cerebrospinal fluid pressure monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ericson, Milton N. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Hylton, James O. (Clinton, TN)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  15. Central Vein Dilatation Prior to Concomitant Port Implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krombach, Gabriele A., E-mail: krombach@rad.rwth-aachen.de; Plumhans, Cedric; Goerg, Fabian; Guenther, Rolf W. [University of Technology (RWTH) Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital (Germany)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Implantation of subcutaneous port systems is routinely performed in patients requiring repeated long-term infusion therapy. Ultrasound- and fluoroscopy-guided implantation under local anesthesia is broadly established in interventional radiology and has decreased the rate of complications compared to the surgical approach. In addition, interventional radiology offers the unique possibility of simultaneous management of venous occlusion. We present a technique for recanalization of central venous occlusion and angioplasty combined with port placement in a single intervention which we performed in two patients. Surgical port placement was impossible owing to occlusion of the superior vena cava following placement of a cardiac pacemaker and occlusion of multiple central veins due to paraneoplastic coagulopathy, respectively. In both cases the affected vessel segments were dilated with balloon catheters and the port systems were placed thereafter. After successful dilatation, the venous access was secured with a 25-cm-long, 8-Fr introducer sheath, a subcutaneous pocket prepared, and the port catheter tunneled to the venipuncture site. The port catheter was introduced through the sheath with the proximal end connected to a 5-Fr catheter. This catheter was pulled through the tunnel in order to preserve the tunnel and, at the same time, allow safe removal of the long sheath over the wire. The port system functioned well in both cases. The combination of recanalization and port placement in a single intervention is a straightforward alternative for patients with central venous occlusion that can only be offered by interventional radiology.

  16. Hydrophilic property by contact angle change of ion implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chan Young; Kil, Jae Keun [Proton Engineering Frontier Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); R and D Team, Accel Korea, 146-1 Pyeongchon-dong Daeduck-gu Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, ion implantation was performed onto a polymer, polycarbonate (PC), in order to investigate surface hydrophilic property through contact angle measurement. PC was irradiated with N, Ar, and Xe ions at the irradiation energy of 20-50 keV and the dose range of 5x10{sup 15}, 1x10{sup 16}, 7x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. The contact angle of water was estimated by means of the sessile drop method and was reduced with increasing fluence and ion mass but increased with increasing implanted energy. The changes of chemical and structural properties are discussed in view of Furier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which shows increasing C-O bonding and C-C bonding. The surface roughness examined by atomic force microscopy measurement changed smoothly from 3.59 to 2.22 A as the fluence increased. It is concluded that the change in wettability may be caused by surface carbonization and oxidation as well as surface roughness.

  17. Excess vacancies in high energy ion implanted SiGe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, R.; Muecklich, A.; Skorupa, W.; Peeva, A.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Christensen, J. S.; Svensson, B. G. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, PF 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics BAS, Boulevard Tzarigradsko Chaussee 72, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Deparment of Physics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excess vacancies generated by high energy implantation with 1.2 MeV Si{sup +} and 2 MeV Ge{sup +} ions in SiGe were investigated after rapid thermal annealing at 900 degree sign C. Excess vacancies were probed by decoration with Cu and measuring the Cu profile by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cross section transmission electron microscopy of cleaved specimen enabled to visualize nanocavities resulting from agglomeration of excess vacancies. The ion-induced damage in SiGe increases with increasing Ge fraction of the alloy. The amorphization threshold decreases and the extension of a buried amorphous layer increases for given implantation and annealing conditions. In contrast to ballistic simulations of excess defect generation where perfect local self-annihilation is assumed the concentrations of excess vacancies and excess interstitials in SiGe increase with increasing Ge fraction. The main contribution to the high excess vacancy concentration in SiGe results from the inefficient recombination of vacancies and interstitials. The widely used +1 model describing the ion-induced damage in Si is not valid for SiGe.

  18. Selective compositional mixing in GaAs/AIGaAs superlattice induced by low dose Si focused ion beam implantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    of the mixing process was observed at 100 keV implantation energy, with a "pinch-off" (more heavily mixed ion beam (FIB) implantation technology has been especially attractive in this application, since/or transfer technology, the lateral profiles of the ion beam (and of the ions implanted in the solid

  19. Mechanism for the reduction of interstitial supersaturations in MeV-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezia, V.C. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Haynes, T.E. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Agarwal, A. [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, 55 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, 55 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Pelaz, L.; Gossmann, H.; Jacobson, D.C.; Eaglesham, D.J. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the excess vacancies induced by a 1 MeV Si implant reduce the excess interstitials generated by a 40 keV Si implant during thermal annealing when these two implants are superimposed in silicon. It is shown that this previously observed reduction is dominated by vacancy annihilation and not by gettering to deeper interstitial-type extended defects. Interstitial supersaturations were measured using B doping superlattices (DSL) grown on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. Implanting MeV and keV Si ions into the B DSL/SOI structure eliminated the B transient enhanced diffusion normally associated with the keV implant. The buried SiO{sub 2} layer in the SOI substrate isolates the deep interstitials-type extended defects of the MeV implant, thereby eliminating the possibility that these defects getter the interstitial excess induced by the keV Si implant. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively.

  1. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genebes, Caroline, E-mail: genebes.caroline@claudiusregaud.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Jonca, Frdric [Department of Urology, Clinique Ambroise Par, Toulouse (France); Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard [Department of Urology and Andrology, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  2. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in a Broken Vertebral Titanium Implant (Titanium Mesh Cage)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierry, G.; Buy, X.; Mohan, P. Chandra; Cupelli, J. [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology B (France); Steib, J.P. [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Orthopedic and Spinal Surgery (France); Gangi, A. [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology B (France)], E-mail: gangi@rad6.u-strasbg.fr

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the case of a percutaneous consolidation of a broken vertebral implant (Surgical Titanium Mesh Implants; DePuy Spine, Raynham, MA, USA) by vertebroplasty. Four years after anterior spondylectomy with cage implantation and stabilization with posterior instrumentation, the patient was admitted for excruciating back pain. Radiographs showed fracture of the cage, screw, and rod. An anterior surgical approach was deemed difficult and a percutaneous injection of polymethyl methacrylate into the cage was performed following posterior instrumentation replacement. This seems to be an interesting alternative to the classical anterior surgical approach, which is often difficult in postoperative conditions.

  3. Simplified modeling methods for mechanically fastened connections in flight structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Brett Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    load sharing, failure modes, and basic design are outlined such that later developments in the finite element method

  4. Mechanics of Insulator Behavior in Concrete Crosstie Fastening Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    of Insulator Behavior Analysis of failure modes and causes · Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) used

  5. Headmark List of Suspect Counterfeit Fasteners 1992 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37 OPAMResource GuideandCertiHantz

  6. Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S HBatteries with WideNOxSi-based Highand

  7. Development and evaluation of an implantable chronic DC stimulation and measurement probe for nerve regeneration studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macha, Douglas Bryan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    isotropic. The actual field strength or current density induced by the applied current is seldom directly measured in-vivo. This research seeks to evaluate the design of an implantable DC stimulator capable of delivering a constant, stable and measurable...

  8. An energy management IC for bio-implants using ultracapacitors for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, William R.

    We present the first known energy management IC to allow low-power systems, such as biomedical implants, to optimally use ultracapacitors instead of batteries as their chief energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in ...

  9. Low power data acquisition for microImplant biometric monitoring of tremors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Tania

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide doctors a means to continuously monitor biometrics over long time scales ...

  10. Energy management techniques for ultra-small bio-medical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, William R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide medical professionals a means to continuously monitor bio-markers over long time scales with ...

  11. The Effect of Titanium Implants on the Peripheral Circadian Rhythm of Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarville, Kirstin Ty

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium Figure 11. Surface Topography Data at 310x FigureVitamin D Table 3. Surface Topography of Implants from FourRough Titanium Surface Topography Data 310x 32mm

  12. Emergency delivery of Vasopressin from an implantable MEMS rapid drug delivery device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An implantable rapid drug delivery device based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology was designed, fabricated and validated for the in vivo rapid delivery of vasopressin in a rabbit model. In vitro ...

  13. Properties of two biological glasses used as metallic prosthesis coatings and after an implantation in body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Properties of two biological glasses used as metallic prosthesis coatings and after an implantation the corrosive environment during some months, to confer the layer biocompatibility on the prosthesis and to keep

  14. Damage evolution in Au-implanted Ho2Ti2O7 titanate pyrochlore...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhang Y, J Jagielski, IT Bae, X Xiang, L Thome, G Balakrishnan, DM Paul, and WJ Weber.2010."Damage evolution in Au-implanted Ho2Ti2O7 titanate pyrochlore."Nuclear...

  15. The Effect of Electrode Placement on Cochlear Implant Function and Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Sandra

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cochlear implants have been an effective treatment for restoring profound sensorineural hearing loss to those who do not benefit from traditional hearing aids. Advances in surgical technique and electrode design allow for preservation of residual...

  16. Mechanical characterization and in vivo operation of an implantable drug delivery MEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yawen, 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this thesis was to advance an implantable drug delivery MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) device developed in our laboratory. This device was designed to locally deliver multiple substances in complex release ...

  17. Effects of sequential tungsten and helium ion implantation on nano-indentation hardness of tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, D. E. J.; Edmondson, P. D.; Roberts, S. G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To simulate neutron and helium damage in a fusion reactor first wall sequential self-ion implantation up to 13 dpa followed by helium-ion implantation up to 3000 appm was performed to produce damaged layers of {approx}2 {mu}m depth in pure tungsten. The hardness of these layers was measured using nanoindentation and was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Substantial hardness increases were seen in helium implanted regions, with smaller hardness increases in regions which had already been self-ion implanted, thus, containing pre-existing dislocation loops. This suggests that, for the same helium content, helium trapped in distributed vacancies gives stronger hardening than helium trapped in vacancies condensed into dislocation loops.

  18. Proteomic comparison of biomaterial implants for regeneration of peripheral nerve tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miu, Kathy K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tissue regenerates resulting from the healing of transected peripheral nerve differ in morphological and electrophysiological properties based on the biomaterial implant used to bridge the interneural wound gap. At gap ...

  19. CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC PROPERTIES AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF TITANIUM HYDRIDE LAYERS GROWN ON TITANIUM IMPLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC PROPERTIES AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF TITANIUM HYDRIDE LAYERS GROWN ON TITANIUM, Switzerland Keywords: SLA treated titanium - bone-anchored dental implants - transmission and scanning electron microscopy - titanium hydride sub-surface layer - epitaxy Abstract Commercially pure titanium

  20. Microfluidic Integration into Neural Implants University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    Microfluidic Integration into Neural Implants E. Meng1 1 University of Southern California, Los technological deficiencies can be addressed by integrating microfluidics with electrodes and electrochemical sensors. Multimodality neural interfaces that combine electronics and microfluidics open new possibilities

  1. Coralline hydroxyapatite implants for use in the treatment of surgically created subchondral defects in the horse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillis, John Patrick

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Implant areas of interest. Figure 2. Implant regions of interest. were grouped with bone tissue. Using point counting and lineal analysis methods the volume fraction (%), specific surface area (mm /mm ) and specific interface area (mm /mm ) of each... tissue were then computed. The interface area is the measure of the boundary of one tissue with that of a complimentary tissue, or tissues. To remove the effect of linear anisotropy, lineal analysis was computed along two perpendicular axes...

  2. Evolution of Ion Implantation Technology and its Contribution to Semiconductor Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsukamoto, Katsuhiro [Mitsubishi Electric Corporation (Japan); Kuroi, Takashi; Kawasaki, Yoji [Renesas Electronics Corporation (Japan)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial aspects of the evolution of ion implantation technology will be reviewed, and their impact on the semiconductor industry will be discussed. The main topics will be the technology's application to the most advanced, ultra scaled CMOS, and to power devices, as well as productivity improvements in implantation technology. Technological insights into future developments in ion-related technologies for emerging industries will also be presented.

  3. Ion implantation of silicon at the nanometer scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianconi, Marco; Bergamini, Fabio; Cristiani, Stefano; Lulli, Giorgio [CNR-IMM-Sezione di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy) and Laboratory MIST E-R, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); CNR-IMM-Sezione di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SiO{sub 2} layers ({approx}0.5 {mu}m thick) thermally grown on (100) Si were irradiated with 12.5 MeV Ti ions at 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} fluence, and subsequently exposed to the HF vapor, in order to selectively etch the latent tracks generated by the passage of swift ions. Nearly cylindrical nanoholes having diameters as small as 25 nm, with an average value of 54{+-}5 nm, were generated by this procedure. The nanopatterned SiO{sub 2} layer served as a mask for selective amorphization of the underlying Si, achieved by implantation with 180 keV Ar{sup +} ions at a fluence of 2.0x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. Dip in aqueous HF solution was then performed to selectively etch ion amorphized Si, thus transferring the nanometric pattern of the SiO{sub 2} mask to the underlying substrate. As expected, the maximum depth of amorphizazion in Si, and consequently of etching depth, decreases when the hole radius decreases below values of the order of the lateral ion straggling. The effect has been characterized and investigated by the comparison of experiments and three dimensional Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Bilateral implant reconstruction does not affect the quality of postmastectomy radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Alice Y., E-mail: hoa1234@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Patel, Nisha [Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ohri, Nisha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mehrara, Babak J.; Disa, Joseph J.; Cordeiro, Peter G. [Department of Plastic Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gelblum, Daphna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Nerbun, Claire T.; Woch, Katherine M.; Ballangrud, Ase [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); McCormick, Beryl; Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To determine if the presence of bilateral implants, in addition to other anatomic and treatment-related variables, affects coverage of the target volume and dose to the heart and lung in patients receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). A total of 197 consecutive women with breast cancer underwent mastectomy and immediate tissue expander (TE) placement, with or without exchange for a permanent implant (PI) before radiation therapy at our center. PMRT was delivered with 2 tangential beams + supraclavicular lymph node field (50 Gy). Patients were grouped by implant number: 51% unilateral (100) and 49% bilateral (97). The planning target volume (PTV) (defined as implant + chest wall + nodes), heart, and ipsilateral lung were contoured and the following parameters were abstracted from dose-volume histogram (DVH) data: PTV D{sub 95%} > 98%, Lung V{sub 20}Gy > 30%, and Heart V{sub 25}Gy > 5%. Univariate (UVA) and multivariate analyses (MVA) were performed to determine the association of variables with these parameters. The 2 groups were well balanced for implant type and volume, internal mammary node (IMN) treatment, and laterality. In the entire cohort, 90% had PTV D{sub 95%} > 98%, indicating excellent coverage of the chest wall. Of the patients, 27% had high lung doses (V{sub 20}Gy > 30%) and 16% had high heart doses (V{sub 25}Gy > 5%). No significant factors were associated with suboptimal PTV coverage. On MVA, IMN treatment was found to be highly associated with high lung and heart doses (both p < 0.0001), but implant number was not (p = 0.54). In patients with bilateral implants, IMN treatment was the only predictor of dose to the contralateral implant (p = 0.001). In conclusion, bilateral implants do not compromise coverage of the target volume or increase lung and heart dose in patients receiving PMRT. The most important predictor of high lung and heart doses in patients with implant-based reconstruction, whether unilateral or bilateral, is treatment of the IMNs. Refinement of radiation techniques in reconstructed patients who require comprehensive nodal irradiation is warranted.

  5. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    information that the responsibility of remedial action, environmental monitoring andor control of these sites has been assumed by other DOE ,programs or offices or other Federal...

  6. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    information that the responsibility of remedial action, environmental monitoring andor control of these sites has been assumeo by other DOE programs or offices or other Federal...

  7. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and natural gas engines and related components, with sales exceeding $18 billion. Charlton started his career and natural gas engine technologies - for Ford Motor Company, British Gas, Lloyds of London among others of internal combustion engine technology. (cont'd.) (bio cont'd.) At Cummins he was directly involved

  8. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AZ o TVA, Muscle Shoals, AL o Dow Chemical Company, Walnut Creek, CA e Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO o Havens Lab, Bridgeport Brass, Bridgeport, CT o General Chemical...

  9. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power/ CSP (thermal energy storage/ TES), nuclear, oil and gas exploration (deep drilling ('09)" at SPAWAR. seminar Nano-Devices for Enhanced Thermal Energy Storage, Cooling and Se cooling, sensing and energy storage (involving both experimental and computational studies). Coupling

  10. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    implementation of predictive methods in commercial, numerical codes. Finally, opportunities for students University in 2007. During this time, he has been elected to several leadership positions within the ASME, including as the secretary of the ASME Research Committee on the Mechanics of Jointed Structures, he has

  11. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    researching at the Air Force Research Lab in Dayton, Ohio. seminar Thermoelastodynamic Responses of Panels & Energy Arizona State University November 9, 2012 at 1:30pm in SCOB 228 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport & Energy #12;

  12. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generation highly complex drivetrain systems (such as HEV, PHEV, FCHEV, ..etc) where the interaction variances due to an inclusion of highly cross linked on-board automatic controls. The development of next

  13. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes and distributed energy generation systems using detailed nonlinear models. Finally, we control architectures utilizing dedicated, wired links to measurement sensors and control actuators, potentially asynchronous and/or delayed measurements in the overall distributed control system. To address

  14. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a member of expert panels reviewing the health impacts of wind turbines. seminar Predicting Turbofan Fan to the interaction of the fan rotor wake with the fan exit guide vanes (FEGVs). Both tonal and broadband noise of the RSI (rotor-stator interaction) method that will be discussed. Input to RSI consists of rotor wake

  15. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    conductivity. Coupled with its low thermal conductivity, polymer thermoelectric composites are attractive and thermoelectric applications. I will show that the thermal conductivity of ultra-thin polymer films can both conductivity and phonon transport mechanisms over the past 2 decades, owing much to the challenging needs

  16. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a microgrid serving a large commercial building, and two building-scale PV arrays with storage. If well, battery storage, a microgrid, several large thermal storage devices and residential HVAC. It is shown that augmenting or even replacing large power generation capacity. Most of these resources will be located

  17. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    on condition monitoring and control opportunities in the emerging agriculture, environment and energy method, 2) an input de-convolution method, and 3) an efficient quality assurance metric, all applicable

  18. Jinkyu Yang Graduate Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    -Specific Quantification of Bone Quality Using Highly Nonlinear Solitary Waves Osteoporosis is a well recognized problem of Health Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center, more than 40 million Americans are at risk of fracture due to osteoporosis or low bone density. Osteoporosis can influence surgical decision

  19. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the waste heat, presenting efficiency loss. We discuss in-situ (at/adjacent to the emission site) recycling

  20. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-. \5-

  1. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-.

  2. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-.. . s

  3. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-.. .

  4. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-..

  5. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-..,' \

  6. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t 1CT-..,'

  7. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i t

  8. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i tCORPORATION

  9. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: i

  10. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w, 9.55

  11. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,

  12. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,53 L'

  13. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,53

  14. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,53q 3

  15. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION /

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie i9w,53q

  16. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION \

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3uj: ;;I : T' j-jE: iLie'Al ...

  17. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o l DH Ef3

  18. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o l DH

  19. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION ,'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o l DH,'

  20. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o l DH,'1 e

  1. Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States)] [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)] [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

  2. Effect of implanted species on thermal evolution of ion-induced defects in ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Rauwel, P.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G. [Department of Physics, Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Halln, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH-ICT, Electrum 229, SE-164 40, Kista, Stockholm (Sweden); Du, X. L. [Institute of Physics, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Implanted atoms can affect the evolution of ion-induced defects in radiation hard materials exhibiting a high dynamic annealing and these processes are poorly understood. Here, we study the thermal evolution of structural defects in wurtzite ZnO samples implanted at room temperature with a wide range of ion species (from {sup 11}B to {sup 209}Bi) to ion doses up to 2??10{sup 16}?cm{sup ?2}. The structural disorder was characterized by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy, while secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to monitor the behavior of both the implanted elements and residual impurities, such as Li. The results show that the damage formation and its thermal evolution strongly depend on the ion species. In particular, for F implanted samples, a strong out-diffusion of the implanted ions results in an efficient crystal recovery already at 600?C, while co-implantation with B (via BF{sub 2}) ions suppresses both the F out-diffusion and the lattice recovery at such low temperatures. The damage produced by heavy ions (such as Cd, Au, and Bi) exhibits a two-stage annealing behavior where efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters occurs at temperatures ?500?C, while the second stage is characterized by a gradual and partial annealing of extended defects. These defects can persist even after treatment at 900?C. In contrast, the defects produced by light and medium mass ions (O, B, and Zn) exhibit a more gradual annealing with increasing temperature without distinct stages. In addition, effects of the implanted species may lead to a nontrivial defect evolution during the annealing, with N, Ag, and Er as prime examples. In general, the obtained results are interpreted in terms of formation of different dopant-defect complexes and their thermal stability.

  3. Investigation of (110)Mo, (110)W monocrystals and Nb polycrystal implanted by oxygen ions and used as TEC electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakadze, L.M.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to improve efficiency of a thermionic energy converter (TEC), converting thermal power into electric power, there were investigated collectors made of (110)Mo and (110)W monocrystals, and Nb polycrystal, all being implanted by oxygen ions with fluence of 1*10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}2}. For emitters there were used (110)Mo and (110)W monocrystals, and Nb polycrystal implanted by oxygen ions, respectively. The performance of TEC with implanted electrode material is compared with this of TEC having electrodes of non-implanted materials. It is demonstrated that for emitter temperature range of 1,473 to 1,873 K employment of (110)Mo and (110)W monocrystals, implanted by oxygen ions, for TEC collector allows to increase the specific output power of a converter approximately by a factor of 1.6, and employment of implanted Nb for electrodes -- to increase this value approximately by a factor of 3, as compared with non-implanted electrode materials. The upgraded performance of TEC with implanted electrode materials is caused by the increase of minimum values of the collector working function by {approximately}0.15--0.2 eV as compared with non-implanted collectors, as well as by improvement of emitter emissive and adsorption properties due to oxygen supply from collectors at operating temperatures.

  4. Integration of Ion Implantation with Scanning ProbeAlignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persaud, A.; Rangelow, I.W.; Schenkel, T.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a scanning probe instrument which integrates ion beams with imaging and alignment functions of a piezo resistive scanning probe in high vacuum. Energetic ions (1 to a few hundred keV) are transported through holes in scanning probe tips [1]. Holes and imaging tips are formed by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) drilling and ion beam assisted thin film deposition. Transport of single ions can be monitored through detection of secondary electrons from highly charged dopant ions (e. g., Bi{sup 45+}) enabling single atom device formation. Fig. 1 shows SEM images of a scanning probe tip formed by ion beam assisted Pt deposition in a dual beam FIB. Ion beam collimating apertures are drilled through the silicon cantilever with a thickness of 5 {micro}m. Aspect ratio limitations preclude the direct drilling of holes with diameters well below 1 {micro}m, and smaller hole diameters are achieved through local thin film deposition [2]. The hole in Fig. 1 was reduced from 2 {micro}m to a residual opening of about 300 nm. Fig. 2 shows an in situ scanning probe image of an alignment dot pattern taken with the tip from Fig. 1. Transport of energetic ions through the aperture in the scanning probe tip allows formation of arbitrary implant patterns. In the example shown in Fig. 2 (right), a 30 nm thick PMMA resist layer on silicon was exposed to 7 keV Ar{sup 2+} ions with an equivalent dose of 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} to form the LBL logo. An exciting goal of this approach is the placement of single dopant ions into precise locations for integration of single atom devices, such as donor spin based quantum computers [3, 4]. In Fig. 3, we show a section of a micron size dot area exposed to a low dose (10{sup 11}/cm{sup 2}) of high charge state dopant ions. The Bi{sup 45+} ions (200 keV) were extracted from a low emittance highly charged ions source [5]. The potential energy of B{sup 45+}, i. e., the sum of the binding energies required to remove the electrons, amounts to 36 keV. This energy is deposited within {approx}10 fs when an ion impinges on a target. The highly localized energy deposition results in efficient resist exposure, and is associated with strongly enhanced secondary electron emission, which allows monitoring of single ion impacts [4]. The ex situ scanning probe image with line scan in Fig. 3 shows a single ion impact site in PMMA (after standard development). In our presentation, we will discuss resolution requirements for ion placement in prototype quantum computer structures [3] with respect to resolution limiting factors in ion implantation with scanning probe alignment.

  5. Physiological Stress Responses to Prolonged Exposure to MS-222 and Surgical Implantation in Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Katie A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    While many studies have investigated the effects of transmitters on fish condition, behavior, and survival, to our knowledge, no studies have taken into account anesthetic exposure time in addition to tag and surgery effects. We investigated stress responses to prolonged MS-222 exposure after stage 4 induction in surgically implanted juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Survival, tag loss, plasma cortisol concentration, and blood [Na+], [K+], [Ca2+], and pH were measured immediately following anesthetic exposure and surgical implantation and 1, 7, and 14 days post-treatment. Despite the prolonged anesthetic exposure, 3-15 minutes post Stage 4 induction, there were no mortalities or tag loss in any treatment. MS-222 was effective at delaying immediate cortisol release during surgical implantation; however, osmotic disturbances resulted, which were more pronounced in longer anesthetic time exposures. From day 1 to day 14, [Na+], [Ca2+], and pH significantly decreased, while cortisol significantly increased. The cortisol increase was exacerbated by surgical implantation. There was a significant interaction between MS-222 time exposure and observation day for [Na+], [Ca2+], [K+], and pH; variations were seen in the longer time exposures, although not consistently. In conclusion, stress response patterns suggest stress associated with surgical implantation is amplified with increased exposure to MS-222.

  6. Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliviero, E. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 108, 91405 Orsay (France); David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F. [Institut Pprime, CNRS-Universite de Poitiers-ENSMA, SP2MI, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP30179, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Fichtner, P. F. P. [Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av Bento Goncalves 9500, Caixa Postal 15051, 90035-190 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 Degree-Sign C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 Degree-Sign C annealing, complete recrystallization takes place and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {l_brace}311{r_brace} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.

  7. Charging and discharging in ion implanted dielectric films used for capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical systems switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Gang; Chen Xuyuan [Pen-Tung Sah Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Faculty of Science and Engineering, Vestfold University College, P.O. Box 2243, N-3103 Toensberg (Norway); San Haisheng [Pen-Tung Sah Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor structure was used to investigate the dielectric charging and discharging in the capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical switches. The insulator in MIS structure is silicon nitride films (SiN), which were deposited by either low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) processes. Phosphorus or boron ions were implanted into dielectric layer in order to introduce impurity energy levels into the band gap of SiN. The relaxation processes of the injected charges in SiN were changed due to the ion implantation, which led to the change in relaxation time of the trapped charges. In our experiments, the space charges were introduced by stressing the sample electrically with dc biasing. The effects of implantation process on charge accumulation and dissipation in the dielectric are studied by capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement qualitatively and quantitatively. The experimental results show that the charging and discharging behavior of the ion implanted silicon nitride films deposited by LPCVD is quite different from the one deposited by PECVD. The charge accumulation in the dielectric film can be reduced by ion implantation with proper dielectric deposition method.

  8. Method For Plasma Source Ion Implantation And Deposition For Cylindrical Surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fetherston, Robert P. (Madison, WI), Shamim, Muhammad M. (Madison, WI), Conrad, John R. (Madison, WI)

    1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform ion implantation and deposition onto cylindrical surfaces is achieved by placing a cylindrical electrode in coaxial and conformal relation to the target surface. For implantation and deposition of an inner bore surface the electrode is placed inside the target. For implantation and deposition on an outer cylindrical surface the electrode is placed around the outside of the target. A plasma is generated between the electrode and the target cylindrical surface. Applying a pulse of high voltage to the target causes ions from the plasma to be driven onto the cylindrical target surface. The plasma contained in the space between the target and the electrode is uniform, resulting in a uniform implantation or deposition of the target surface. Since the plasma is largely contained in the space between the target and the electrode, contamination of the vacuum chamber enclosing the target and electrodes by inadvertent ion deposition is reduced. The coaxial alignment of the target and the electrode may be employed for the ion assisted deposition of sputtered metals onto the target, resulting in a uniform coating of the cylindrical target surface by the sputtered material. The independently generated and contained plasmas associated with each cylindrical target/electrode pair allows for effective batch processing of multiple cylindrical targets within a single vacuum chamber, resulting in both uniform implantation or deposition, and reduced contamination of one target by adjacent target/electrode pairs.

  9. The effect of boron implant energy on transient enhanced diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.; Krishnamoorthy, V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States); Gossman, H. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Rubin, L. [Eaton Corporation, Semiconductor Equipment Division, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Eaton Corporation, Semiconductor Equipment Division, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Law, M.E. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States); Jones, K.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainsville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of boron in silica after low energy boron implantation and annealing was investigated using boron-doping superlattices (DSLs) grown by low temperature molecular beam epitaxy. Boron ions were implanted at 5, 10, 20, and 40 keV at a constant dose of 2{times}10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. Subsequent annealing was performed at 750{degree}C for times of 3 min, 15 min, and 2 h in a nitrogen ambient. The broadening of the boron spikes was measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and simulated. Boron diffusivity enhancement was quantified as a function of implant energy. Transmission electron microscopy results show that {l_angle}311{r_angle} defects are only seen for implant energies {ge}10 keV at this dose and that the density increases with energy. DSL studies indicate the point defect concentration in the background decays much slower when {l_angle}311{r_angle} defects are present. These results imply there are at least two sources of TED for boron implants (B-I): short time component that decays rapidly consistent with nonvisible B-I pairs and a longer time component consistent with interstitial release from the {l_angle}311{r_angle} defects. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Single-crystal diamond plate liftoff achieved by ion implantation and subsequent annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parikh, N.R.; Hunn, J.D.; McGucken, E.; Swanson, M.L. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)); White, C.W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6048 (United States)); Rudder, R.A.; Malta, D.P.; Posthill, J.B.; Markunas, R.J. (Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709-2194 (United States))

    1992-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method for removing thin, large area sheets of diamond from bulk or homoepitaxial diamond crystals. This method consists of an ion implantation step, followed by a selective etching procedure. High energy (4--5 MeV) implantation of carbon or oxygen ions creates a well-defined layer of damaged diamond that is buried at a controlled depth below the surface. For C implantations, this layer is graphitized by annealing in vacuum, and then etched in either an acid solution, or by heating at 550--600 [degree]C in oxygen. This process successfully lifts off the diamond plate above the graphite layer. For O implantations of a suitable dose (3[times]10[sup 17] cm[sup [minus]2] or greater), the liftoff is achieved by annealing in vacuum or flowing oxygen. In this case, the O required for etching of the graphitic layer is also supplied internally by the implantation. This liftoff method, combined with well-established homoepitaxial growth processes, has considerable potential for the fabrication of large area single crystalline diamond sheets.

  11. Long-term survival and maturation of spinally grafted human fetal and embryonic stem cellderived neural precursors in implantable tacrolimus pellet- immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-G93A model rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Danielle S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    after Tacrolimus releasable pellet implantation. Rats werein implantable tacrolimus pellet-immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-releasing Tacrolimus pellets. 12 3.2 Tolerability

  12. 2.782J / 3.961J / 20.451J / HST.524J Design of Medical Devices and Implants, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yannas, Ioannis V.

    Solution of clinical problems by use of implants and other medical devices. Systematic use of cell-matrix control volumes. The role of stress analysis in the design process. Anatomic fit: shape and size of implants. Selection ...

  13. Diffusion of nitrogen implanted in titanium nitride (TiN1-x) F. Abautret and P. Eveno

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1113 Diffusion of nitrogen implanted in titanium nitride (TiN1- x) F. Abautret and P. Eveno The diffusion of nitrogen 15, implanted in non-stoichiometric titanium nitride single-crystals (03B4 - TiN1-x on i usion m m ri es compared with the oxides. No data are available about nitrogen (or titanium

  14. The structure of titanate nanobelts used as seeds for the nucleation of hydroxyapatite at the surface of titanium implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    at the surface of titanium implants E. Conforto1* , D. Caillard2 , L. Mller3 , F.A. Mller3 1 Centre Commun d to induce the nucleation and growth of hydroxyl carbonated apatite (HCA) at the surface of titanium implants etching forms a rough titanium hydride layer, which remains unchanged after subsequent treatments

  15. Lab-on-a-chip implants : a mini laboratory under the skin Giovanni De Micheli*, Cristina Boero*, and Sandro Carrara*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    have realized an implantable and wearable system for the continuous monitoring of human metabolites where the implant is placed. The patch produces an electromagnetic field that supports power Micheli*, Cristina Boero*, and Sandro Carrara* * Laboratory of Integrated Systems, EPFL, Lausanne, CH We

  16. Journal of Power Sources 170 (2007) 216224 Design of an implantable power supply for an intraocular sensor, using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the millimeter range, comprise Zinc and Lithium based electrochemistries (Zn- air, Zn/AgO, Li-polymer, Li/MnO2 1 [39]. The smallest commercial batteries cur- rently available on the market, with sizes that span for implantable technologies. Further miniaturization of implantable systems will require new battery technologies

  17. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sochman, Jan [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Intensive Care Unit, Clinic of Cardiology (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jan.sochman@medicon.cz; Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Czech Republic); Timmermans, Hans A.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Roesch, Josef [Oregon Health and Sciences University, Dotter Interventional Institute (United States)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  18. Metastable phase diagram for Ni-implanted Al and pulse surface melted Al(Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of <110> Al implanted with Ni was examined before and after subsequent electron beam pulsed surface melting (65 ns, 1.7 J/cm/sup 2/). Both processes were done with the Al substrate at room temperature. Implantation at several energies (160 to 15 keV) into a given sample produced a nearly constant measured Ni concentration through a approx. 0.1 ..mu..m region below the surface (7). Such samples with concentrations from 8 to 25 at. % Ni were examined, along with a sample with a peak concentration of 32 at. % Ni.

  19. Bubble microstructure evolution and helium behavior in He{sup +} implanted Ni-base alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalin, B.A.; Chernov, I.I.; Kalashnikov, A.N.; Solovyev, B.G. [Moscow State Engineering Physics Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Physical Problems of Materials Science

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Behavior of ion-implanted helium in Ni as a function of alloying element concentration (Al or Ti) and irradiation conditions (at 20 or 750 C) have been investigated by means of thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Substitution elements in solid solution were demonstrated to have substantial influence on the evolution of implanted helium, shifting the TDS spectrum peaks to higher temperature region and increasing the quantity of helium remaining in the samples after long-time postirradiation annealing. TEM investigations showed that in the case of postirradiation annealing, helium bubbles are formed earlier in quenched alloys than in those annealed.

  20. Bio-inspired Electronics for Interfacing Artificial Implants to Living Systems Imagine a world in which damaged parts of the body -an arm, or an eye, or even

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Richard

    1 Bio-inspired Electronics for Interfacing Artificial Implants to Living Systems Imagine a world, today's implants are limited severely by the interface between the artificial and biological systems by artificial implants capable of restoring or even enhancing human performance. The associated improvements

  1. The Effects of Damage on Hydrogen-Implant-Induced Thin-Film Separation from Bulk Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, R.B.; Holland, O.W.; Thomas, D.K.; Wetteroth, T.A.; Wilson, S.R.

    1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Exfoliation of Sic by hydrogen implantation and subsequent annealing forms the basis for a thin-film separation process which, when combined with hydrophilic wafer bonding, can be exploited to produce silicon-carbide-on-insulator, SiCOI. Sic thin films produced by this process exhibit unacceptably high resistivity because defects generated by the implant neutralize electrical carriers. Separation occurs because of chemical interaction of hydrogen with dangling bonds within microvoids created by the implant, and physical stresses due to gas-pressure effects during post-implant anneal. Experimental results show that exfoliation of Sic is dependent upon the concentration of implanted hydrogen, but the damage generated by the implant approaches a point when exfoliation is, in fact, retarded. This is attributed to excessive damage at the projected range of the implant which inhibits physical processes of implant-induced cleaving. Damage is controlled independently of hydrogen dosage by elevating the temperature of the SiC during implant in order to promote dynamic annealing. The resulting decrease in damage is thought to promote growth of micro-cracks which form a continuous cleave. Channeled H{sup +} implantation enhances the cleaving process while simultaneously minimizing residual damage within the separated film. It is shown that high-temperature irradiation and channeling each reduces the hydrogen fluence required to affect separation of a thin film and results in a lower concentration of defects. This increases the potential for producing SiC01 which is sufficiently free of defects and, thus, more easily electrically activated.

  2. Ranges and moments of depth distributions of boron and phosphorus implanted into silicon in the energy range 1.7-5.0 MeV with an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, L.; Shaw, W.; Jones, M.A. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Wilson, R.G. [Hughes Research Labs., Malibu, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy implantation of dopant atoms is used to form buried layers of high conductivity in silicon. These layers have many potential applications, including triple wells for FLASH memory devices, buried layers for CCD devices, and damage induced gettering regions in all devices. In order to make optimum use of very high energy dopant implants, the depth and profile shape characteristics of these implants need to be determined. This paper presents the results of depth profiling by SIMS of implants of boron and phosphorus in silicon. The implants were done on an Eaton NV-GSD/VHE mechanically scanned implanter with energies of 1.7-3.0 MeV for boron and 3-5 MeV for phosphorus, doses of 1 {times} 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}, and tilt/twist orientations of 0{degrees}/0{degrees}, 5.2{degrees}/16.7{degrees}, and 7{degrees}/27{degrees}. The four central moments of the depth distributions, as well as the peak depth have been calculated for each of the profiles. The projected ranges of all these implants are underestimated by TRIM92 calculations.

  3. Lattice site location and annealing behaviour of Ca and Sr implanted GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vries, Bart; Wahl, Ulrich; Correia, J G; Arajo, Joo Pedro; Lojkowski, W; Kolesnikov, D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the lattice location of ion-implanted Ca and Sr in thin films of single-crystalline wurtzite GaN. Using the emission channeling technique the angular distributions of $\\beta\\!^{-}$?particles emitted by the radioactive isotopes $^{45}$Ca(t$_{ 1/2}$=163.8 d) and $^{89}$Sr(t$_{ 1/2}$=50.53 d) were monitored with a position-sensitive detector following 60 keV room-temperature implantation. Our experiments give direct evidence that $\\sim$90% of Ca and > 60% of Sr atoms were occupying substitutional Ga sites with root mean square displacements of the order of 0.150.30 , i.e., larger than the expected thermal vibration amplitude of 0.074 . Annealing the Ca implanted samples at 11001350 C in high-pressure N$_{2}$ atmosphere resulted in a better incorporation into the substitutional Ga site. The Sr implanted sample showed a small decrease in rms displacements for vacuum annealing up to 900 C, while the substitutional fraction remained nearly constant. The annealing behavior of the rms disp...

  4. MOSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY OF57 Fe IMPLANTED TO ALUMINIUM AT LIQUID NITROGEN TEMPERATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MOSSBAUER SPECTROSCOPY OF57 Fe IMPLANTED TO ALUMINIUM AT LIQUID NITROGEN TEMPERATURE K. Sassa, Y. The ageing behavior of the specimen was examined by conversion electron Mossbauer spec- troscopy at 77 K at room temperature. Internal conversion electron Mossbauer spec- troscopy is most suitable

  5. Cellular Inductive Powering System for Weakly-Linked Resonant Rodent Implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genov, Roman

    implements a low-cost technique which tracks the location of the animal using an impedance measurement of an infection is always present [4]. Alternatively, on-board battery can be used to power the NI implant which inevitably limits the duration of the experiment. Typically, battery life limits the length of studies to 7

  6. International Journal of Machine Tools & Manufacture 48 (2008) 459472 Micromilling of microbarbs for medical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Lee E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for medical implants Sinan Filiza , Luke Xiea , Lee E. Weissb , O.B. Ozdoganlara, a Department of Mechanical by creating microbarbs from non-biodegradable 304 stainless steel and PMMA, from bioresorbable polylactic acid-term reliability, and rapid deployment, and, in some cases, biodegradability [9,10]. Currently, suturing or gluing

  7. Response of wether lambs to implantation with trenbolone acetate combined with oestradiol-17? at two levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    of rib than controls. Significant reductions due to implantation were recorded for concentra- tions of urea and free fatty acids in blood plasma and for proportions of wool fleece and kidney plus channel significantly greater values for plasma urea, the weight (g/kg EBW) of carcass fat, kidney plus channel fat

  8. Effects of phosphorus implantation and subsequent growth on diamond Euo Sik Choa,*, Cheon An Leea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jong Duk

    ]. Espe- cially, polycrystalline diamond films grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD, and their fabrication is easy and economical. Polycrystalline diamond film has a rough surface and a lot of defectsEffects of phosphorus implantation and subsequent growth on diamond Euo Sik Choa,*, Cheon An Leea

  9. Surface blistering and flaking of sintered uranium dioxide samples under high dose gas implantation and annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Surface blistering and flaking of sintered uranium dioxide samples under high dose gas implantation, flaking Abstract. High helium contents will be generated within minor actinide doped uranium dioxide blankets which could be used in fourth generation reactors. In this framework, it is essential to improve

  10. Polyx multicrystalline silicon solar cells processed by PF+5 unanalysed ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    695 Polyx multicrystalline silicon solar cells processed by PF+5 unanalysed ion implantation of terrestrial solar cells as compared to classical furnace or pulsed laser annealing. Unfortunately, drawbacks for the fabrication of solar cells. It offers the possibility of achieving strong reduction of cell cost in spite

  11. LOW ENERGYHIGH FLUX NITROGEN IMPLANTATION OF AN OXIDE-DISPERSION-STRENGTHENED FeAl INTERMETALLIC ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 LOW ENERGYHIGH FLUX NITROGEN IMPLANTATION OF AN OXIDE- DISPERSION-STRENGTHENED Fe countercurrent diffusion of nitrogen and aluminium seems to proceed. As a result, segregation of -Fe is observed alloys, the nitridation of titanium aluminides have received most of the attention concerning

  12. Effects of suture material on incision healing, growth and survival of juvenile largemouth bass implanted with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of suture material on incision healing, growth and survival of juvenile largemouth bass implanted with miniature radio transmitters: case study of a novice and experienced fish surgeon S. J. COOKE.S.A. (Received 11 November 2002, Accepted 11 April 2003) Juvenile largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides

  13. Reducing the impact of wind noise on cochlear implant processors with two microphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Cox, Casey

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Behind-the-ear (BTE) processors of cochlear implant (CI) devices offer little to almost no protection from wind noise in most incidence angles. To assess speech intelligibility, eight CI recipients were tested in 3 and 9m/s wind. Results indicated...

  14. Reducing the impact of wind noise on cochlear implant processors with two microphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Cox, Casey

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Behind-the-ear (BTE) processors of cochlear implant (CI) devices offer little to almost no protection from wind noise in most incidence angles. To assess speech intelligibility, eight CI recipients were tested in 3 and 9?m/s wind. Results indicated...

  15. Damage formation and recovery in Fe implanted 6HSiC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Pedro; Catarino, Norberto; Lorenz, Katharina; Correia, Joo Guilherme; Alves, Eduardo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon carbide doped with magnetic ions such as Fe, Mn, Ni or Co could make this wide band gap semiconductor part of the diluted magnetic semiconductor family. In this study, we report the implantation of 6H-SiC single crystals with magnetic $^{56}$Fe$^{+}$ ions with an energy of 150 keV. The samples were implanted with 5E14 Fe$^+$/cm$^{2}$ and 1E16 Fe$^+$/cm$^{2}$ at different temperatures to study the damage formation and lattice site location. The samples were subsequently annealed up to 1500C in vacuum in order to remove the implantation damage. The effect of the annealing was followed by Rutherford Backscattering/Channeling (RBS/C) measurements. The results show that samples implanted above the critical amorphization temperature reveal a high fraction of Fe incorporated into regular sites along the [0001] axis. After the annealing at 1000C, a maximum fraction of 75%, corresponding to a total of 3.8E14 Fe$^{+}$/cm$^{2}$, was measured in regular sites along the [0001] axis. A comparison is made betwee...

  16. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Minggang, E-mail: xiamg@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanostructure and its Physics Properties, Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 China (China); Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Cheng, Zhaofang; Han, Jinyun; Zhang, Shengli [Laboratory of Nanostructure and its Physics Properties, Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 China (China); Zheng, Minrui [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Sow, Chorng-Haur [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); National University of Singapore Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Thong, John T. L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Li, Baowen [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); National University of Singapore Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga{sup +} implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 10{sup 3} ?{sup ?1}m{sup ?1} to 1.46 10{sup 4} ?{sup ?1}m{sup ?1} and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} to 1.22 Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga{sup +} implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga{sup +} point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga{sup +}-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  17. A Wireless Power Interface for Rechargeable Battery Operated Neural Recording Implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    A Wireless Power Interface for Rechargeable Battery Operated Neural Recording Implants Pengfei Li. The battery charger employs a new control loop that relaxes comparator resolution require- ments, provides-of- charge accuracy can be obtained under worst-case conditions for a comparator offset voltage of 5m

  18. Development of high productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejiri, T.; Hamamoto, N.; Hisada, S.; Iwasawa, K.; Kawakami, K.; Kokuryu, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Nogami, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasada, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, T. [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., LTD., 575, Kuze-tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2' is developed. In semiconductor manufacturing field, improvement of the productivity is continuously required. Especially mass production lines recently tend to use low energy beam and 2 pass implant for higher throughput. The 'Evo2' has been developed in an effort to fulfill these requirements. The 'Evo2' increases low energy beam current by 150 to 250% by applying electrostatic einzel lens called 'V-lens' installed at the exit of the Collimator magnet. This lens is also able to control the beam incident angle by adjusting the upper and lower electrode's voltages independently. Besides, mechanical scanning speed is enhanced to minimize process time of 2 pass implant, while also frequency of the fast beam scanning is enhanced to keep dose uniformity. In addition, a vacuum pumping capability at the target chamber is enhanced to reduce a vacuum waiting time during processing photo-resist wafers. This improvement achieved to reduce process time by 40% for a specific recipe. Furthermore, a modified Indirectly Heated Cathode with electron active Reflection 2 (IHC-R2) ion source which has a long life time filament has been installed. These new elements and/or functions have realized typically 25% improvement of productivity compared to standard EXCEED, and also improve a precise implantation capability.

  19. ENHANCEMENT OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION TEMPERATURES IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM ALLOYS (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-287 ENHANCEMENT OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION TEMPERATURES IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM ALLOYS helium temperatures, have maximum superconducting transition temperatures Tc of 4.2 K (C), 7.35 K (Ge 1976, Classification Physics Abstracts 7.188 - 8.362 One of the crucial problems in superconductivity

  20. A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1 *, Chantal Gondran2 , Fabien Giroud2 powerful ones, Glucose BioFuel Cells (GBFCs), are based on enzymes electrically wired by redox mediators applications. Citation: Cinquin P, Gondran C, Giroud F, Mazabrard S, Pellissier A, et al. (2010) A Glucose BioFuel

  1. Interstitial defects in silicon from 1{endash}5 keV Si{sup +} ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, A.; Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Eaglesham, D.J.; Gossmann, H.; Jacobson, D.C.; Poate, J.M. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, 600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Erokhin, Y.E. [Eaton Corporation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Eaton Corporation, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended defects from 5-, 2-, and 1-keV Si{sup +} ion implantation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy using implantation doses of 1 and 3{times}10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2} and annealing temperatures from 750 to 900{degree}C. Despite the proximity of the surface, {l_brace}311{r_brace}-type defects are observed even for 1 keV. Samples with a peak concentration of excess interstitials exceeding {approximately}1{percent} of the atomic density also contain some {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects which are corrugated across their width. These so-called zig-zag {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects are more stable than the ordinary {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects, having a dissolution rate at 750{degree}C which is ten times smaller. Due to their enhanced stability, the zig-zag {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects grow to lengths that are many times longer than their distance from the surface. It is proposed that zig-zag {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects form during the early stages of annealing by coalescence the high volume density of {l_brace}311{r_brace} defects confined within a very narrow implanted layer. These findings indicate that defect formation and dissolution will continue to control the interstitial supersaturation from ion implantation down to very low energies. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. PHOSPHORUS-DEFECT INTERACTIONS DURING THERMAL ANNEALING OF ION IMPLANTED SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    by the financial support of the Semiconductor Research Corporation and the industrial support of several semiconductor manufacturers. I am especially indebted to Paul Packan and Eb Andiheh of Intel Corporation like to thank Craig Jasper of Motorola and Lennie Rubin of Eaton for providing material and implants

  3. A Biomimetic Adaptive Algorithm and Low-Power Architecture for Implantable Neural Decoders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    a bank of adaptive linear filters with kernels that emulate synaptic dynamics. The filters trans- form in cochlear-implant systems, include unwanted heat dissipation in the brain, decreased longevity of batteries han- dle large quantities of high-bandwidth analog data, processing neural input signals in a slow-and-parallel

  4. SUPERCONDUCTING PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM THIN FILMS AFTER ION IMPLANTATION AT LIQUID HELIUM TEMPERATURES (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-271 SUPERCONDUCTING PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM THIN FILMS AFTER ION IMPLANTATION AT LIQUID HELIUM concentration near AlH2. It is well-known [1] that the superconducting transition temperature Tc of metals as in the electronic density of states N(O) at the Fermi surface. In the case of weak-coupling superconductors

  5. EVOLUTION OF SELF-INTERSTITIALS INDUCED BY ION-IMPLANTATION IN SiGe ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    EVOLUTION OF SELF-INTERSTITIALS INDUCED BY ION-IMPLANTATION IN SiGe ALLOYS By ROBERT T. CROSBY and Astronomy at the University of Aarhus in Denmark provided the utmost quality SiGe structures for my {311 great colleague, supervisor, and friend) grew the B-doped SiGe structures. J. Liu of Varian

  6. Controlled removal of ceramic surfaces with combination of ions implantation and ultrasonic energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rankin, Janet (Providence, RI); Thevenard, Paul (Caluire, FR); Romana, Laurence J. (Gaudeloupe Antilles, FR)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for tailoring or patterning the surface of ceramic articles is provided by implanting ions to predetermined depth into the ceramic material at a selected surface location with the ions being implanted at a fluence and energy adequate to damage the lattice structure of the ceramic material for bi-axially straining near-surface regions of the ceramic material to the predetermined depth. The resulting metastable near-surface regions of the ceramic material are then contacted with energy pulses from collapsing, ultrasonically-generated cavitation bubbles in a liquid medium for removing to a selected depth the ion-damaged near-surface regions containing the bi-axially strained lattice structure from the ceramic body. Additional patterning of the selected surface location on the ceramic body is provided by implanting a high fluence of high-energy, relatively-light ions at selected surface sites for relaxing the bi-axial strain in the near-surface regions defined by these sites and thereby preventing the removal of such ion-implanted sites by the energy pulses from the collapsing ultrasonic cavitation bubbles.

  7. CO-IMPLANTATION AND DRY-ETCH DAMAGE RECOVERY BY PLASMA NITRIDATION IN GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearton, Stephen J.

    CO-IMPLANTATION AND DRY-ETCH DAMAGE RECOVERY BY PLASMA NITRIDATION IN GaN BY DONALD G. KENT III ............................................................................ x CHAPTERS 1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................. 1 1.1 GaN Applications ........................................................ 1 1.2 GaN Material Issues

  8. Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +}-implants in Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Petersen, D. H. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, O. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); CINF, Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Lin, R.; Nielsen, P. F. [CAPRES A/S, Scion-DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Romano, L. [IMM-CNR MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Doyle, B. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-1056, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kontos, A. [Applied Materials, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in Ge was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400-600 Degree-Sign C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C for 60 s was characterized by channeling analysis with a 650 keV H{sup +} beam by utilizing the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha})2{alpha} nuclear reaction and confirmed the large fraction of off-lattice B for both c-Ge and PA-Ge. Within the investigated annealing range, no significant change in activation was observed. An increase in the fraction of activated dopant was observed with increasing energy which suggests that the surface proximity and the local point defect environment has a strong impact on B activation in Ge. The results suggest the presence of an inactive B-Ge cluster for ultra-shallow implants in both c-Ge and PA-Ge that remains stable upon annealing for temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C.

  9. Enhanced retained dose uniformity in NiTi spinal correction rod treated by three-dimensional mesh-assisted nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Q. Y.; Hu, T.; Kwok, Dixon T. K.; Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Owing to the nonconformal plasma sheath in plasma immersion ion implantation of a rod sample, the retained dose can vary significantly. The authors propose to improve the implant uniformity by introducing a metal mesh. The depth profiles obtained with and without the mesh are compared and the implantation temperature at various locations is evaluated indirectly by differential scanning calorimeter. Our results reveal that by using the metal mesh, the retained dose uniformity along the length is greatly improved and the effects of the implantation temperature on the localized mechanical properties of the implanted NiTi shape memory alloy rod are nearly negligible.

  10. Amorphous Ge quantum dots embedded in SiO{sub 2} formed by low energy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. P. [Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Huang, D. X.; Jacobson, A. J. [Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Chen, Z. Y.; Makarenkov, B. [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Chu, W. K. [Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Bahrim, B. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States); Rabalais, J. W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Physics, Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710 (United States)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, extremely small Ge nanodots embedded in SiO{sub 2}, i.e., Ge-SiO{sub 2} quantum dot composites, have been formed by ion implantation of {sup 74}Ge{sup +} isotope into (0001) Z-cut quartz at a low kinetic energy of 9 keV using varying implantation temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and micro-Raman scattering show that amorphous Ge nanodots are formed at all temperatures. The formation of amorphous Ge nanodots is different from reported crystalline Ge nanodot formation by high energy ion implantation followed by a necessary high temperature annealing process. At room temperature, a confined spatial distribution of the amorphous Ge nanodots can be obtained. Ge inward diffusion was found to be significantly enhanced by a synergetic effect of high implantation temperature and preferential sputtering of surface oxygen, which induced a much wider and deeper Ge nanodot distribution at elevated implantation temperature. The bimodal size distribution that is often observed in high energy implantation was not observed in the present study. Cross-sectional TEM observation and the depth profile of Ge atoms in SiO{sub 2} obtained from x-ray photoelectron spectra revealed a critical Ge concentration for observable amorphous nanodot formation. The mechanism of formation of amorphous Ge nanodots and the change in spatial distribution with implantation temperature are discussed.

  11. Optimization of a plasma immersion ion implantation process for shallow junctions in silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Ashok; Nori, Rajashree; Bhatt, Piyush; Lodha, Saurabh; Pinto, Richard, E-mail: rpinto@ee.iitb.ac.in; Rao, Valipe Ramgopal [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Jomard, Franois; Neumann-Spallart, Michael [Groupe d'tude de la Matire Condense, C.N.R.S./Universit de Versailles-St.Quentin, 45, Avenue des tats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process has been developed for realizing shallow doping profiles of phosphorus and boron in silicon using an in-house built dual chamber cluster tool. High Si etch rates observed in a 5% PH{sub 3} in H{sub 2} plasma have been ascribed to high concentration of H(?) radicals. Therefore, subsequent work was carried out with 5% PH{sub 3} in He, leading to much smaller etch rates. By optical emission spectroscopy, the radical species H(?), PH*{sub 2}, and PH* have been identified. The concentration of all three species increased with pressure. Also, ion concentrations increased with pressure as evidenced by Langmuir data, with a maximum occurring at 0.12 mbar. The duty cycle of pulsed DC bias has a significant bearing on both the implantation and the etching process as it controls the leakage of positive charge collected at the surface of the silicon wafer during pulse on-time generated primarily due to secondary electron emission. The P implant process was optimized for a duty cycle of 10% or less at a pressure of 0.12 mbar with implant times as low as 30?s. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy showed a P dopant depth of 145?nm after rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at 950?C for 5?s, resulting in a sheet resistance of 77 ?/?. Si n{sup +}/p diodes fabricated with phosphorus implantation using optimized PIII and RTA conditions exhibit J{sub on}/J{sub off}?>?10{sup 6} with an ideality factor of nearly 1.2. Using similar conditions, shallow doping profiles of B in silicon have also been realized.

  12. Interaction of Sn atoms with defects introduced by ion implantation in Ge substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taoka, Noriyuki, E-mail: ntaoka@alice.xtal.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fukudome, Motoshi; Takeuchi, Wakana; Arahira, Takamitsu; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of Sn atoms with defects induced by Sn implantation of Ge substrates with antimony (Sb) as an n-type dopant and the impact of H{sub 2} annealing on these defects were investigated by comparison with defects induced by Ge self-implantation. In the Ge samples implanted with either Sn or Ge, and annealed at temperatures of less than 200?C, divacancies, Sb-vacancy complexes with single or double acceptor-like states, and defects related to Sb and interstitial Ge atoms were present. On the other hand, after annealing at 500?C in an N{sub 2} or H{sub 2} atmosphere, defects with different structures were observed in the Sn-implanted samples by deep level transition spectroscopy. The energy levels of the defects were 0.33?eV from the conduction band minimum and 0.55?eV from the valence band maximum. From the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, interaction between Sn atoms and defects after annealing at 500?C was observed. The effect of H{sub 2} annealing at around 200?C was observed in the C-V characteristics, which can be attributed to hydrogen passivation, and this effect was observed in both the Ge- and Sn-implanted samples. These results suggest the presence of defects that interact with Sn or hydrogen atoms. This indicates the possibility of defect control in Ge substrates by Sn or hydrogen incorporation. Such defect control could yield high-performance Ge-based devices.

  13. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  14. Improved hardness and wear properties of B-ion implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.H.; Rao, G.R.; Mansur, L.K. (Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycarbonate (Lexan) was implanted with 100 and 200 keV B{sup +} ions to doses of 0.26, 0.78, and 2.6{times}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature ({lt}100 {degree}C). Mechanical characterization of implanted materials was carried out by nanoindentation and sliding wear tests. The results showed that the hardness of implanted polycarbonate increased with increasing ion energy and dose, attaining hardness up to 3.2 GPa at a dose of 2.6{times}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} for 200 keV ions, which is more than 10 times that of the unimplanted polymer. Wear properties were characterized using a reciprocating tribometer with nylon, brass, and SAE 52100 Cr-steel balls with 0.5 and 1 N normal forces for 10 000 cycles. The wear mode varied widely as a function of ion energy, dose, wear ball type, and normal load. For given ion energy, load, and ball type conditions, there was an optimum dose that produced the greatest wear resistance and lowest friction coefficient. For polycarbonate implanted with 0.78{times}10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, the nylon ball produced no wear after 10 000 cycles. Moreover, the overall friction coefficient was reduced by over 40% by implantation. The results suggest that the potential of ion-beam technology for improving polycarbonate is significant, and that surface-sensitive mechanical properties can be tailored to meet the requirements for applications demanding hardness, wear, and abrasion resistance.

  15. Defect production in strained p-type Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} by Er implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamor, M. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica and INPAC, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Physics, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 50, Muscat 123, Sultanate of Oman (Oman); Pipeleers, B.; Vantomme, A. [Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica and INPAC, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Auret, F. D. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strained p-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} (x=5.3%, 10.2%, and 15.4%) was irradiated at room temperature with 160 keV {sup 166}Er{sup 2+} ions to a fluence of 1x10{sup 10} or 3x10{sup 13} Er/cm{sup 2}. The defects induced by ion implantation were investigated experimentally using high-resolution x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering and channeling spectroscopy, and deep level transient spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction indicates that the damage induced by Er implantation produces a slight perpendicular expansion of the SiGe lattice. For all compositions, channeling measurements reveal that Er implantation in p-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} to a fluence of 3x10{sup 13} Er/cm{sup 2} induces an amorphous region below the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} surface. Annealing at 850 deg. C for 30 s, results in a reduction in damage density, a relaxation of the implantation-induced perpendicular expansion of the SiGe lattice in the implanted region, while a more pronounced relaxation of the compressive strain SiGe is observed for higher Ge content (x=0.10 and 0.15). On the other hand, for the annealed SiGe samples that were implanted with Er at the fluence of 10{sup 10} Er/cm{sup 2}, the compressive strain in the SiGe layer is nearly completely retained. Deep level transient spectroscopy studies indicate that two prominent defects with discrete energy levels above the valence band are introduced during Er implantation. Their activation energy was found to decrease with increasing Ge content. However, the relatively large local strain induced by high fluence Er implantation reduces the activation energy by 40 meV with respect to the low fluence Er implanted p-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}. This shift (40 meV) in the activation energy remains constant regardless of the Ge content, suggesting that the Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} layers remained fully strained after Er implantation. The observed defects are further compared to those introduced by alpha particle irradiation and electron beam metal deposition. The results indicate that defects introduced by Er implantation have similar electronic properties as those of defects detected after electron beam deposition and alpha particle irradiation. Therefore, it is concluded that these defects are due to the Er implantation-induced damage and not to the Er species specifically.

  16. Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 147 (5) 1781-1786 (2000) 1781 S0013-4651(99)11-016-4 CCC: $7.00 The Electrochemical Society, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coat- ing in aerospace, electrical, and fastener industries owing to its excellent corrosion resistance Various zinc and zinc alloy coatings show promise in this regard. Electrodeposited zinc has been widely to be more effective when alloyed with metals such as nickel, iron, and cobalt. Zinc-nickel alloy coatings

  17. Determination of prescription dose for Cs-131 permanent implants using the BED formalism including resensitization correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Wei, E-mail: wei.luo@uky.edu; Molloy, Janelle; Aryal, Prakash; Feddock, Jonathan; Randall, Marcus [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The current widely used biological equivalent dose (BED) formalism for permanent implants is based on the linear-quadratic model that includes cell repair and repopulation but not resensitization (redistribution and reoxygenation). The authors propose a BED formalism that includes all the four biological effects (4Rs), and the authors propose how it can be used to calculate appropriate prescription doses for permanent implants with Cs-131. Methods: A resensitization correction was added to the BED calculation for permanent implants to account for 4Rs. Using the same BED, the prescription doses with Au-198, I-125, and Pd-103 were converted to the isoeffective Cs-131 prescription doses. The conversion factor F, ratio of the Cs-131 dose to the equivalent dose with the other reference isotope (F{sub r}: with resensitization, F{sub n}: without resensitization), was thus derived and used for actual prescription. Different values of biological parameters such as ?, ?, and relative biological effectiveness for different types of tumors were used for the calculation. Results: Prescription doses with I-125, Pd-103, and Au-198 ranging from 10 to 160 Gy were converted into prescription doses with Cs-131. The difference in dose conversion factors with (F{sub r}) and without (F{sub n}) resensitization was significant but varied with different isotopes and different types of tumors. The conversion factors also varied with different doses. For I-125, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 0.51/0.46, for fast growing tumors, and 0.88/0.77 for slow growing tumors. For Pd-103, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.25/1.15 for fast growing tumors, and 1.28/1.22 for slow growing tumors. For Au-198, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.08/1.25 for fast growing tumors, and 1.00/1.06 for slow growing tumors. Using the biological parameters for the HeLa/C4-I cells, the averaged value of F{sub r} was 1.07/1.11 (rounded to 1.1), and the averaged value of F{sub n} was 1.75/1.18. F{sub r} of 1.1 has been applied to gynecological cancer implants with expected acute reactions and outcomes as expected based on extensive experience with permanent implants. The calculation also gave the average Cs-131 dose of 126 Gy converted from the I-125 dose of 144 Gy for prostate implants. Conclusions: Inclusion of an allowance for resensitization led to significant dose corrections for Cs-131 permanent implants, and should be applied to prescription dose calculation. The adjustment of the Cs-131 prescription doses with resensitization correction for gynecological permanent implants was consistent with clinical experience and observations. However, the Cs-131 prescription doses converted from other implant doses can be further adjusted based on new experimental results, clinical observations, and clinical outcomes.

  18. A 350 mu W CMOS MSK Transmitter and 400 mu W OOK Super-Regenerative Receiver for Medical Implant Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Joel L.

    Recent advances in the medical field are spurring the need for ultra-low power transceivers for wireless communication with medical implants. To deal with the growing demand for medical telemetry, the FCC commissioned the ...

  19. Defects and Minor Phases in O+ and Zr+ Ion Co-implanted SrTiO3...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recovery at the surface with little recovery occurring at the damage peak, where a modest recovery is observed upon further annealing at 1423 K. Some of the implanted Zr...

  20. Effects of helium implantation on the tensile properties and microstructure of Ni??P?? metallic glass nanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liontas, Rachel; Gu, X. Wendy; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Li, Nan; Mara, Nathan; Greer, Julia R.

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report fabrication and nanomechanical tension experiments on as-fabricated and helium-implanted ~130 nm diameter Ni??P?? metallic glass nano-cylinders. The nano-cylinders were fabricated by a templated electroplating process and implanted with He? at energies of 50, 100, 150, and 200 keV to create a uniform helium concentration of ~3 at. % throughout the nano-cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and through-focus analysis reveal that the specimens contained ~2 nm helium bubbles distributed uniformly throughout the nano-cylinder volume. In-situ tensile experiments indicate that helium-implanted specimens exhibit enhanced ductility as evidenced by a 2-fold increase in plastic strain over as-fabricated specimens, with nomoresacrifice in yield and ultimate tensile strengths. This improvement in mechanical properties suggests that metallic glasses may actually exhibit a favorable response to high levels of helium implantation.less

  1. Mechanical Assessment of Veterinary Orthopedic Implant Technologies: Comparative Studies of Canine Fracture Fixation and Equine Arthrodesis Devices and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Sean Travis

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clamp-Rod Internal Fixator (CRIF) is a fracture fixation implant with growing popularity among veterinarians for its versatility and ease of use. Although the CRIF is currently in clinical use, relatively few reports ...

  2. Si?-implanted Si-wire waveguide photodetectors for the mid-infrared

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Souhan, Brian; Lu, Ming; Grote, Richard R.; Chen, Christine P.; Huang, Hsu-Cheng; Driscoll, Jeffrey B.; Stein, Aaron; Bakhru, Hassaram; Bergman, Keren; Green, William M. J.; et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CMOS-compatible Si?-implanted Si-waveguide p-i-n photodetectors operating at room temperature and at mid-infrared wavelengths from 2.2 to 2.3 m are demonstrated. Responsivities of 9.9 2.0 mA/W are measured at a 5 V reverse bias with an estimated internal quantum efficiency of 2.7 4.5%. The dark current is found to vary from a few microamps down to less than a nanoamp after a post-implantation annealing of 350C. The measured photocurrent dependence on input power shows a linear correspondence over more than three decades, and the frequency response of a 250 m-length p-i-n device is measured to be ~1.7 GHz formorea wavelength of ? = 2.2 m, thus potentially opening up new communication bands for photonic integrated circuits.less

  3. Understanding and engineering of NiGe/Ge junction formed by phosphorus ion implantation after germanidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, Hiroshi, E-mail: oka@asf.mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Modulation of the effective electron Schottky barrier height (eSBH) of NiGe/Ge contacts induced by phosphorus ion implantation after germanide formation was investigated by considering local inhomogeneity in the eSBH. Systematic studies of NiGe/Ge contact devices having various germanide thicknesses and ion implantation areas indicated the threshold dopant concentration at the NiGe/Ge interface required for eSBH modulation and negligible dopant diffusion even at NiGe/Ge interface during drive-in annealing, leading to variation in the eSBH between the bottom and sidewall portions of the NiGe regions. Consequently, this method makes it possible to design source/drain contacts with low-resistivity Ohmic and ideal rectifying characteristics for future Ge-based transistors.

  4. Si?-implanted Si-wire waveguide photodetectors for the mid-infrared

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souhan, Brian [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Lu, Ming [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Grote, Richard R. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chen, Christine P. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Huang, Hsu-Cheng [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Driscoll, Jeffrey B. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Stein, Aaron [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bakhru, Hassaram [State Univ. of New York at Albany, Albany, NY (United States); Bergman, Keren [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Green, William M. J. [IBM, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Osgood, Jr., Richard M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CMOS-compatible Si?-implanted Si-waveguide p-i-n photodetectors operating at room temperature and at mid-infrared wavelengths from 2.2 to 2.3 m are demonstrated. Responsivities of 9.9 2.0 mA/W are measured at a 5 V reverse bias with an estimated internal quantum efficiency of 2.7 4.5%. The dark current is found to vary from a few microamps down to less than a nanoamp after a post-implantation annealing of 350C. The measured photocurrent dependence on input power shows a linear correspondence over more than three decades, and the frequency response of a 250 m-length p-i-n device is measured to be ~1.7 GHz for a wavelength of ? = 2.2 m, thus potentially opening up new communication bands for photonic integrated circuits.

  5. Boron-enhanced diffusion of boron from ultralow-energy boron implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, A.; Eaglesham, D.J.; Gossmann, H.J.; Pelaz, L.; Herner, S.B.; Jacobson, D.C. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ (United States). Bell Labs.; Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.; Erokhin, Y.E. [Eaton Corp., Beverly, MA (United States)

    1998-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have investigated the diffusion enhancement mechanism of BED (boron enhanced diffusion), wherein the boron diffusivity is enhanced three to four times over the equilibrium diffusivity at 1,050 C in the proximity of a silicon layer containing a high boron concentration. It is shown that BED is associated with the formation of a fine-grain polycrystalline silicon boride phase within an initially amorphous Si layer having a high B concentration. For 0.5 keV B{sup +}, the threshold implantation dose which leads to BED lies between 3 {times} 10{sup 14} and of 1 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup {minus}2}. Formation of the shallowest possible junctions by 0.5 keV B{sup +} requires that the implant dose be kept lower than this threshold.

  6. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisby, I., E-mail: ilana.wisby@npl.co.uk; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, MC2, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gwilliam, R. [Advanced Technology Institute, Faculty of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Meeson, P. J. [Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Lindstrm, T. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1?MHz and spin linewidths of 5065?MHz.

  7. Critical issues in the formation of quantum computer test structures by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenkel, T.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schuh, A.; Persaud, A.; Bokor, J.

    2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of quantum computer test structures in silicon by ion implantation enables the characterization of spin readout mechanisms with ensembles of dopant atoms and the development of single atom devices. We briefly review recent results in the characterization of spin dependent transport and single ion doping and then discuss the diffusion and segregation behaviour of phosphorus, antimony and bismuth ions from low fluence, low energy implantations as characterized through depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both phosphorus and bismuth are found to segregate to the SiO2/Si interface during activation anneals, while antimony diffusion is found to be minimal. An effect of the ion charge state on the range of antimony ions, 121Sb25+, in SiO2/Si is also discussed.

  8. Plasma hydrogenation of strained Si/SiGe/Si heterostructure for layer transfer without ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao Lin; Lin Yuan; Lee, J.K.; Jia, Q.X.; Wang Yongqiang; Nastasi, M.; Thompson, Phillip E.; Theodore, N. David; Chu, Paul K.; Alford, T.L.; Mayer, J.W.; Chen Peng; Lau, S.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Code 6812, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5347 (United States); Advanced Products Research and Development Laboratory, Freescale Semiconductor Inc., Tempe, Arizona 85284 (United States); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an innovative approach without the use of ion implantation to transfer a high-quality thin Si layer for the fabrication of silicon-on-insulator wafers. The technique uses a buried strained SiGe layer, a few nanometers in thickness, to provide H trapping centers. In conjunction with H plasma hydrogenation, lift-off of the top Si layer can be realized with cleavage occurring at the depth of the strained SiGe layer. This technique avoids irradiation damage within the top Si layer that typically results from ion implantation used to create H trapping regions in the conventional ion-cut method. We explain the strain-facilitated layer transfer as being due to preferential vacancy aggregation within the strained layer and subsequent trapping of hydrogen, which lead to cracking in a well controlled manner.

  9. Rapid thermal annealing of ion implanted 6H-SiC by microwave processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, J.A.; Rao, M.V.; Tian, Y.L. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Holland, O.W.; Roth, E.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chi, P.H. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Ahmad, I. [FM Technologies, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid thermal processing utilizing microwave energy has been used to anneal N, P, and Al ion-implanted 6H-SiC. The microwaves raise the temperature of the sample at a rate of 200{degree}C/min vs 10{degree}C/min for conventional ceramic furnace annealing. Samples were annealed in the temperature range of 1400-1700{degree}C for 2-10 min. The implanted/annealed samples were characterized using van der Pauw Hall, Rutherford backscattering, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. For a given annealing temperature, the characteristics of the microwave-annealed material are similar to those of conventional furnace anneals despite the difference in cycle time. 19 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Electrical and optical properties of nitrile rubber modified by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Najidha [Department of Physics, B.J.M Govt: college, Chavara, Kollam, Kerala (India); Predeep, P. [Laboratory for molecular Photonics and Electronics, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Implantation of N{sup +} ion beams are performed on to a non-conjugated elastomer, acrylonirtle butadiene rubber (NBR) with energy 60 keV in the fluence range of 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. A decrease in the resistivity of the sample by about eight orders of magnitude is observed in the implanted samples along with color changes. The ion exposed specimens were characterized by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy which shows a shift in the absorption edge value for the as deposited polymer towards higher wavelengths. The band gap is evaluated from the absorption spectra and is found to decrease with increasing fluence. This study can possibly throw light on ion induced changes in the polymer surface.

  11. Bone Implant Interface Investigation by Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Microfluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calasans-Maia, M. [Odondology Department, Fluminense Federal Univeristy, Niteroi 24030-900, RJ (Brazil); Sales, E.; Lopes, R. T. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory-PEN/COPPE, Federal Univeristy of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-914, RJ (Brazil); Granjeiro, J. M. [Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Fluminense Federal University, Niteroi 24030-900, RJ (Brazil); Lima, I. [Odondology Department, Fluminense Federal Univeristy, Niteroi 24030-900, RJ (Brazil); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy, Rio de Janeiro State University, Regional Campus-Polytechnic Institute-Alberto Rangel, s/n, Vila Nova, room 308, 28630-050, Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc is known to play a relevant role in growth and development; it has stimulatory effects on in vitro and in vivo bone formation and an inhibitory effect on in vitro osteoclastic bone resorption. The inorganic component of the bone tissue is nonstoichiometric apatite; changes in the composition of hidroxyapatite are subject of studies in order to improve the tissue response after implantation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 0.5% zinc-containing hydroxyapatite in comparison to hydroxyapatite on osseous repair of rabbit's tibia. Cylinders (2x6 mm) of both materials were produced according to the specification of the International Organization for Standardization. Ethics Commission on Teaching and Research in Animals approved this project (HUAP-195/06). Fifteen White New Zealand rabbits were submitted to general anesthesia and two perforations (2 mm) were made in each tibia for implantation of zinc-containing hydroxyapatite cylinders (left tibia) and hydroxyapatite cylinders (right tibia). After 1, 2 and 4 weeks, the animals were killed and one fragment of each tibia with the cylinder was collected and embedded in a methacrylate-based resin and cut into slices (approx200 {mu}m thickness), parallel to the implant's long axis with a precision diamond saw for Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Microfluorescence investigation. The accomplishment of the standard procedures helped the planning, execution and the comparative analysis of the results. The chemical and physical properties of the biomaterials were modified after its implantation and the incorporation of zinc. Both materials are biocompatible and promote osteoconduction and favored bone repair.

  12. Everolimus-induced Pneumonitis after Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Susumu, E-mail: susumu1029@gmail.com; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Ichikawa, Atsuo; Sano, Go; Satoh, Keita; Sugino, Keishi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan); Shibuya, Kazutoshi [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology (Japan); Homma, Sakae [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the wide use of everolimus as an antineoplastic coating agent for coronary stents to reduce the rate of restenosis, little is known about the health hazards of everolimus-eluting stents (EES). We describe a case of pneumonitis that developed 2 months after EES implantation for angina. Lung pathology demonstrated an organizing pneumonia pattern that responded to corticosteroid therapy. Although the efficacy of EES for ischemic heart disease is well established, EES carries a risk of pneumonitis.

  13. Europium doping of zincblende GaN by ion implantation K. Lorenz,1,2,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    /channeling spectrometry. A low concentration 10% of wurtzite phase inclusions was observed by XRD analysis in as-lattice parameter of wurtzite GaN W-GaN . For ZB-GaN:Eu, a large fraction of Eu ions is found on a high symmetry-GaN:Eu. The implantation damage in ZB-GaN:Eu could partly be removed by thermal annealing, but an increase in the wurtzite

  14. Optical absorption in silicon layers in the presence of charge inversion/accumulation or ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alloatti, L.; Lauermann, M.; Koos, C.; Freude, W. [Institutes IPQ and IMT, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany)] [Institutes IPQ and IMT, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany); Srgers, C. [Physikalisches Institut and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P. O. Box 6980, Karlsruhe 76049 (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut and DFG-Center for Functional Nanostructures, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P. O. Box 6980, Karlsruhe 76049 (Germany); Leuthold, J. [Institutes IPQ and IMT, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany) [Institutes IPQ and IMT, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany); Institute of Electromagnetic Fields (IFH), ETH Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the optical losses in gate-induced charge accumulation/inversion layers at a Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. Comparison between gate-induced charge layers and ion-implanted thin silicon films having an identical sheet resistance shows that optical losses can be significantly lower for gate-induced layers. For a given sheet resistance, holes produce higher optical loss than electrons. Measurements have been performed at ? = 1550 nm.

  15. A study of laser annealing effects in boron ion implanted polycrystalline silicon films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Inhak Harry

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , large-grain polycrysta11ine silicon has potential use for large volume production of low cost solar cells [1-3] . Polycrystalline silicon is easy to prepare and is compa- tible with monolithic silicon integrated circuit technology; however... of 2O pico second [5]. The MOSFET's fabricated to date on thin films of polycrystalline silicon have also exhibited poor transconductance [5J. It has been reported that the electrical properties of ion implanted polycrystalline silicon can...

  16. Identification of novel implantation-related genes in the ovine uterus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Gwon Hwa

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .S., Dankook University; M.S., Seoul National University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Fuller W. Bazer Dr. Thomas E. Spencer The peri-implantation period in mammals is critical... the constant assistance and advice from my friend, Dr. Kathrin Dunlap. Thank you does not seem a strong enough statement to offer to my family. I am forever indebted to my family for providing me with encouragement and support throughout my life...

  17. The role of helium implantation induced vacancy defect on hardening of tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ou, Xin, E-mail: x.ou@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); State Key Laboratory of Functional Material for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200250 (China); Anwand, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.anwand@hzdr.de; Kgler, Reinhard, E-mail: r.koegler@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Zhou, Hong-Bo [Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Richter, Asta, E-mail: asta.richter@th-wildau.de [Technische Hochschule Wildau, Hochschulring1, 15745 Wildau (Germany)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacancy-type defects created by helium implantation in tungsten and their impact on the nano-hardness characteristics were investigated by correlating the results from the positron annihilation spectroscopy and the nano-indentation technique. Helium implantation was performed at room temperature (RT) and at an elevated temperate of 600?C. Also, the effect of post-annealing of the RT implanted sample was studied. The S parameter characterizing the open volume in the material was found to increase after helium irradiation and is significantly enhanced for the samples thermally treated at 600?C either by irradiation at high temperature or by post-annealing. Two types of helium-vacancy defects were detected after helium irradiation; small defects with high helium-to-vacancy ratio (low S parameter) for RT irradiation and large defects with low helium-to-vacancy ratio (high S parameter) for thermally treated tungsten. The hardness of the heat treated tungsten coincides with the S parameter, and hence is controlled by the large helium-vacancy defects. The hardness of tungsten irradiated at RT without thermal treatment is dominated by manufacturing related defects such as dislocation loops and impurity clusters and additionally by trapped He atoms from irradiation effects, which enhance hardness. He-stabilized dislocation loops mainly cause the very high hardness values in RT irradiated samples without post-annealing.

  18. Cole-cole analysis and electrical conduction mechanism of N{sup +} implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chawla, Mahak; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Aggarwal, Sanjeev, E-mail: write2sa@gmail.com; Sharma, Annu [Department of Physics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136119 (India); Nair, K. G. M. [Consultant, UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kalpakkam Node, Kokilamedu 603104, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present the analysis of the dielectric (dielectric constant, dielectric loss, a.c. conductivity) and electrical properties (IV characteristics) of pristine and nitrogen ion implanted polycarbonate. The samples of polycarbonate were implanted with 100?keV N{sup +} ions with fluence ranging from 1??10{sup 15} to 1??10{sup 17} ions cm{sup ?2}. The dielectric measurements of these samples were performed in the frequency range of 100 kHz to 100 MHz. It has been observed that dielectric constant decreases whereas dielectric loss and a.c. conductivity increases with increasing ion fluence. An analysis of real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity has been elucidated using Cole-Cole plot of the complex permittivity. With the help of Cole-Cole plot, we determined the values of static dielectric constant (?{sub s}), optical dielectric constant (?{sub ?}), spreading factor (?), average relaxation time (?{sub 0}), and molecular relaxation time (?). The IV characteristics were studied using Keithley (6517) electrometer. The electrical conduction behaviour of pristine and implanted polycarbonate specimens has been explained using various models of conduction.

  19. Depth profiling of vacancy clusters in MeV-implanted Si using Au labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezia, V.C.; Eaglesham, D.J. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States); Haynes, T.E. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, MS-6048, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Agarwal, A. [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)] [Semiconductor Equipment Operations, Eaton Corporation, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States); Jacobson, D.C.; Gossmann, H.; Baumann, F.H. [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)] [Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974 (United States)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for profiling the clustered-vacancy region produced by high-energy ion implantation into silicon is described and tested. This technique takes advantage of the fact that metal impurities, such as Au, are trapped in the region of excess vacancies produced by MeV Si implants into silicon. In this work, the clustered-vacancy regions produced by 1-, 2-, and 8-MeV Si implants into silicon have been labeled with Au diffused in from the front surface at 750thinsp{degree}C. The trapped Au was profiled with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The dynamics of the clustered-vacancy region were monitored for isochronal annealing at 750{endash}1000thinsp{degree}C, and for isothermal annealing at 950thinsp{degree}C, for 10{endash}600 s. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that after the drive-in anneal, the Au in the region of vacancy clusters is in the form of precipitates. The results demonstrate that the Au-labeling technique offers a convenient and potentially quantitative tool for depth profiling vacancies in clusters. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. High-performance carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres for supercapacitors with low series resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Bin [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chen, Xiaohua, E-mail: hudacxh62@yahoo.com.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Guo, Kaimin [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China)] [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China); Xu, Longshan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen 361024 (China)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen 361024 (China); Chen, Chuansheng [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China)] [College of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology (China); Yan, Haimei; Chen, Jianghua [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} CNTs-implanted porous carbon spheres are prepared by using gelatin as soft template. {yields} Homogeneously distributed CNTs form a well-develop network in carbon spheres. {yields} CNTs act as a reinforcing backbone assisting the formation of pore structure. {yields} CNTs improve electrical conductivity and specific capacitance of supercapacitor. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres were prepared by an easy polymerization-induced colloid aggregation method using gelatin as a soft template. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements reveal that the materials are mesoporous carbon spheres, with a diameter of {approx}0.5-1.0 {mu}m, a specific surface area of 284 m{sup 2}/g and average pore size of 3.9 nm. Using the carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres as electrode material for supercapacitors in an aqueous electrolyte solution, a low equivalent series resistance of 0.83 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and a maximum specific capacitance of 189 F/g with a measured power density of 8.7 kW/kg at energy density of 6.6 Wh/kg are obtained.

  1. Spin-dependent recombination at arsenic donors in ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franke, David P., E-mail: david.franke@wsi.tum.de; Brandt, Martin S. [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik-Department, Technische Universitt Mnchen, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching (Germany); Otsuka, Manabu; Matsuoka, Takashi; Itoh, Kohei M. [School of Fundamental Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Vlasenko, Marina P. [A. F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin-dependent transport processes in thin near-surface doping regions created by low energy ion implantation of arsenic in silicon are detected by two methods, spin-dependent recombination using microwave photoconductivity and electrically detected magnetic resonance monitoring the direct current through the sample. The high sensitivity of these techniques allows the observation of the magnetic resonance, in particular, of As in weak magnetic fields and at low resonance frequencies (401200 MHz), where high-field-forbidden transitions between the magnetic sublevels can be observed due to the mixing of electron and nuclear spin states. Several implantation-induced defects are present in the samples studied and act as spin readout partner. We explicitly demonstrate this by electrically detected electron double resonance experiments and identify a pair recombination of close pairs formed by As donors and oxygen-vacancy centers in an excited triplet state (SL1) as the dominant spin-dependent process in As-implanted Czochralski-grown Si.

  2. Peripherally Placed Totally Implantable Venous-access Port Systems of the Forearm: Clinical Experience in 763 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goltz, Jan P., E-mail: Goltz@roentgen.uni-wuerzburg.de; Scholl, Anne; Ritter, Christian O. [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany); Wittenberg, Guenther [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bielefeld Gilead, Institute of Radiology (Germany); Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph [University of Wuerzburg, Institute of Radiology (Germany)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneously placed totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) of the forearm. Between January 2006 and October 2008, peripheral TIVAPs were implanted in 763 consecutive patients by ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. All catheters were implanted under local anesthesia and were tunneled subcutaneously. Indication, technical success, and complications were retrospectively analyzed according to Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) criteria. Presence of antibiotic prophylaxis, periprocedurally administered drugs (e.g., sedation), and laboratory results at the time of implantation were analyzed. Maintenance during the service interval was evaluated. In total, 327,499 catheter-days were analyzed. Technical success rate was 99.3%. Reasons for initial failure of implantation were either unexpected thrombosis of the subclavian vein, expanding tumor mass of the mediastinum, or failure of peripheral venous access due to fragile vessels. Mean follow-up was 430 days. There were 115 complications observed (15.1%, 0.03 per 100 catheter-days), of which 33 (4.3%) were classified as early (within 30 days from implantation) and 82 (10.7%) as late. Catheter-related venous thrombosis was found in 65 (8.5%) of 763 (0.02 per 100 catheter-days) TIVAPs. Infections were observed in 41 (5.4%) of 763 (0.01 per 100 catheter-days) devices. Other complications observed included dislocation of the catheter tip (0.8%), occlusion (0.1%), or rupture (0.1%) of the port catheter. Dislocated catheters were corrected during a second interventional procedure. In conclusion, implantation of percutaneously placed peripheral TIVAPs shows a high technical success rate and low risk of early complications when ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance are used. Late complications are observed three times as often as early complications.

  3. Magnetic properties of ion implanted Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x} thin films solidified through pulsed laser melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commisso Dolph, Melissa [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Kim, Taeseok; Recht, Daniel; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Yin Wenjing; Fan Wenbin; Yu Jiani; Lu Jiwei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Wolf, Stuart A. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x} thin films with an average Mn concentration of 0.64 at. % were fabricated through Mn ion implantation into crystalline germanium-on-insulator wafers. Implantation damage was removed and crystallinity restored by pulsed laser melting from a single 30-ns 308-nm XeCl{sup +} excimer laser pulse. Resolidified films demonstrated higher Curie temperatures but smaller saturation magnetizations than those of both as-implanted films and implanted films subjected to rapid thermal annealing. These findings are attributed to the redistribution of Mn during solidification.

  4. Controlled fabrication of Si nanocrystal delta-layers in thin SiO{sub 2} layers by plasma immersion ion implantation for nonvolatile memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonafos, C.; Ben-Assayag, G.; Groenen, J.; Carrada, M. [CEMES-CNRS and Universit de Toulouse, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)] [CEMES-CNRS and Universit de Toulouse, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F. [IBS, Rue G Imbert Prolonge, ZI Peynier-Rousset, 13790 Peynier (France)] [IBS, Rue G Imbert Prolonge, ZI Peynier-Rousset, 13790 Peynier (France); Normand, P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Kapetanakis, E. [NCSRD, Terma Patriarchou Gregoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)] [NCSRD, Terma Patriarchou Gregoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Sahu, B. S.; Slaoui, A. [ICube, 23 Rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)] [ICube, 23 Rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to beam line implantation to produce a single layer of nanocrystals (NCs) in the gate insulator of metal-oxide semiconductor devices. We report herein the fabrication of two-dimensional Si-NCs arrays in thin SiO{sub 2} films using PIII and rapid thermal annealing. The effect of plasma and implantation conditions on the structural properties of the NC layers is examined by transmission electron microscopy. A fine tuning of the NCs characteristics is possible by optimizing the oxide thickness, implantation energy, and dose. Electrical characterization revealed that the PIII-produced-Si NC structures are appealing for nonvolatile memories.

  5. Structural, optical, and magnetic properties of highly-resistive Sm-implanted GaN thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo, Fang-Yuh, E-mail: fangyuhlo@ntnu.edu.tw; Huang, Cheng-De; Chou, Kai-Chieh; Guo, Jhong-Yu; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chia, Chi-Ta [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, 11677 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Ney, Verena; Ney, Andreas [Experimentalphysik, Universitt Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Shvarkov, Stepan; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl fr Angewandte Festkrperphysik, Ruhr-Universitt Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Pezzagna, Sbastien [Lehrstuhl fr Angewandte Festkrperphysik, Ruhr-Universitt Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Centre de Recherche sur l'Htropitaxie et ses Application, 06560 Valbonne, UPR-CNRS (France); Chern, Ming-Yau [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Massies, Jean [Centre de Recherche sur l'Htropitaxie et ses Application, 06560 Valbonne, UPR-CNRS (France)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Samarium ions of 200?keV in energy were implanted into highly-resistive molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaN thin films with a focused-ion-beam implanter at room temperature. The implantation doses range from 1??10{sup 14} to 1??10{sup 16?}cm{sup ?2}. Structural properties studied by x-ray diffraction and Raman-scattering spectroscopy revealed Sm incorporation into GaN matrix without secondary phase. The optical measurements showed that the band gap and optical constants changed very slightly by the implantation. Photoluminescence measurements showed emission spectra similar to p-type GaN for all samples. Magnetic investigations with a superconducting quantum interference device identified magnetic ordering for Sm dose of and above 1??10{sup 15?}cm{sup ?2} before thermal annealing, while ferromagnetism was only observed after thermal annealing from the sample with highest Sm dose. The long-range magnetic ordering can be attributed to interaction of Sm ions through the implantation-induced Ga vacancy.

  6. Lattice location of implanted $^{147}$Nd and $^{147*}$Pm in GaN using emission channeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vries, B; Vantomme, A; Correia, J G

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lattice location of $^{147}$Nd and $^{147^{*}}$Pm in thin-film, single-crystalline hexagonal GaN was studied by means of the emission channeling technique. The angular emission yields of $\\beta^{-}$-particles and conversion electrons emitted by the radioactive isotopes $^{147}$Nd and $^{147^{*}}$Pm were measured using a position-sensitive detector following 60 keV room temperature implantation at a dose of 1 $\\times 10^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$ and annealing at 900C. The emission patterns around the [0001], [1102], [1101], and [2113] crystal axes give direct evidence that the majority (70%) of Nd and Pm atoms occupy substitutional Ga sites.

  7. Higher-order aberrations after implantation of iris-fixated rigid or foldable phakic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Geunyoung

    : This retrospective comparative case series comprised 27 eyes (14 patients) that had Artiflex pIOL implantation and 22, the mean SE changed from 9.90 G 2.74 D (range 4.00 to 14.50 D) to 0.20 G 0.42 D (range 0.75 to 0.50 D, and safety of implanta- tion of the Artisan phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) (Oph- tec B.V.) for the correction

  8. The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

  9. Suppression of tin precipitation in SiSn alloy layers by implanted carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaiduk, P. I., E-mail: gaiduk@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Belarusian State University, prosp. Nezavisimosti 4, 220030 Minsk (Belarus); Lundsgaard Hansen, J., E-mail: johnlh@phys.au.dk; Nylandsted Larsen, A., E-mail: anl@phys.au.dk [Department of Physics and Astronomy/iNANO, Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 14, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bregolin, F. L., E-mail: f.lipp-bregolin@hzdr.de; Skorupa, W., E-mail: W.Skorupa@hzdr.de [Department of Semiconductor Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrae 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    By combining transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, we have identified carbon related suppression of dislocations and tin precipitation in supersaturated molecular-beam epitaxial grown SiSn alloy layers. Secondary ion mass spectrometry has exposed the accumulation of carbon in the SiSn layers after high temperature carbon implantation and high temperature thermal treatment. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects and formation of dopant-defect complexes are suggested to be responsible for the effects. The possibility for carbon assisted segregation-free high temperature growth of heteroepitaxial SiSn/Si and GeSn/Si structures is argued.

  10. Origins of low resistivity and Ge donor level in Ge ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamioka, K.; Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K. [College of Engineering and Research Center of Ion Beam Technology, Hosei University Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan); Kushida, K. [Departments of Arts and Sciences, Osaka Kyoiku University Kashiwara, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy level of Ge in Ge-ion implanted ZnO single crystals is studied by Hall-effect and photoluminescence (PL) methods. The variations in resistivity from ?10{sup 3} ?cm for un-implanted samples to ?10{sup ?2} ?cm for as-implanted ones are observed. The resistivity is further decreased to ?10{sup ?3} ?cm by annealing. The origins of the low resistivity are attributed to both the zinc interstitial (Zn{sub i}) related defects and the electrical activated Ge donor. An activation energy of Ge donors estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration is 102 meV. In PL studies, the new peak at 372 nm (3.33 eV) related to the Ge donor is observed in 1000 C annealed samples.

  11. Correlation of experimental damage data for the development of the UT-MARLOWE Monte Carlo ion implant simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, M. F. [Motorola, Mesa, Arizona 85202 (United States); Tian, S. [Avante, Fremont, California 94538 (United States); Chen, Y.; Tasch, A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78723 (United States); Baumann, S. [Evans Texas, Round Rock, Texas 78681 (United States); Kirchhoff, J. F. [Charles Evans and Assoc., California 94603 (United States); Hummel, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Prussin, S. [Electrical Engineering Department, UCLA, Los Angeles, California, 90024 (United States); Kamenitsa, D. [Eaton Corporation, Austin, Texas 78717 (United States); Jackson, J. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, Massachusetts 01915 (United States)

    1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monte Carlo ion implant simulator UT-MARLOWE has usually been verified using a large array of Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) data ({approx}200 profiles per ion species)(1). A model has recently been developed (1) to explicitly simulate defect production, diffusion, and their interactions during the picosecond 'defect production stage' of ion implantation. In order to thoroughly validate this model, both SIMS and various damage measurements were obtained (primarily channeling-Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, Differential Reflectometry and Tapered Groove Profilometry, but supported with SEM and XTEM data). In general, the data from the various experimental techniques was consistent, and the Kinetic Accumulation Damage Model (KADM) was developed and validated using this data. This paper discusses the gathering of damage data in conjunction with SIMS in support of the development of an ion implantation simulator.

  12. Dept. of Aerospace Engg. Department of Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Bijoy Krishna

    Design/Development of Autonomous Flying Vehicles 3 #12;Research Facilities Aerodynamics Group Various Computational Combustion Combustion Instabilities Multiphase Flow Simulation Fuel Injection Strategies Flows Hypersonic & Low density flows Fuel injection & Mixing for supersonic combustion Vortices

  13. InP DHBT IC Technology with Implanted Collector-Pedestal and Electroplated Device Contacts M. Urteaga, K. Shinohara, R. Pierson, P. Rowell and B. Brar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    InP DHBT IC Technology with Implanted Collector-Pedestal and Electroplated Device Contacts M that incorporates an ion implanted N+ collector-pedestal for reduction of extrinsic collector-base capacitance Ccb without a collector pedestal. Static frequency-divider circuits have been realized in the technology

  14. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis: implant fabrication and performance This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanker, Daniel

    Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis: implant fabrication and performance This article has been (11pp) doi:10.1088/1741-2560/9/4/046014 Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis: implant fabrication/046014 Abstract The objective of this work is to develop and test a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis for restoring

  15. Space Science Technology Health General Sci-fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Politics Education Entertainment Sports Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Education Entertainment Sports Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity In Unprecedented Detail Posted on of implantable device for measuring the heart's electrical output that they say is a vast improvement over to the design of devices for localizing and treating abnormal heart rhythms. We believe these new devices

  16. Inhibitive formation of nanocavities by introduction of Si atoms in Ge nanocrystals produced by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, R. S.; Shang, L.; Liu, X. H.; Zhang, Y. J. [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Wang, Y. Q., E-mail: yqwang@qdu.edu.cn, E-mail: barba@emt.inrs.ca [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); College of Physics Science, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Ross, G. G.; Barba, D., E-mail: yqwang@qdu.edu.cn, E-mail: barba@emt.inrs.ca [INRS-nergie, Matriaux et Tlcommunications, 1650 boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes Qubec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Germanium nanocrystals (Ge-nc) were successfully synthesized by co-implantation of Si and Ge ions into a SiO{sub 2} film thermally grown on (100) Si substrate and fused silica (pure SiO{sub 2}), respectively, followed by subsequent annealing at 1150?C for 1?h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examinations show that nanocavities only exist in the fused silica sample but not in the SiO{sub 2} film on a Si substrate. From the analysis of the high-resolution TEM images and electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra, it is revealed that the absence of nanocavities in the SiO{sub 2} film/Si substrate is attributed to the presence of Si atoms inside the formed Ge-nc. Because the energy of Si-Ge bonds (301?kJmol{sup ?1}) are greater than that of Ge-Ge bonds (264?kJmol{sup ?1}), the introduction of the Si-Ge bonds inside the Ge-nc can inhibit the diffusion of Ge from the Ge-nc during the annealing process. However, for the fused silica sample, no crystalline Si-Ge bonds are detected within the Ge-nc, where strong Ge outdiffusion effects produce a great number of nanocavities. Our results can shed light on the formation mechanism of nanocavities and provide a good way to avoid nanocavities during the process of ion implantation.

  17. Paramagnetism and antiferromagnetic interactions in single-phase Fe-implanted ZnO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Lino Miguel da Costa; Correia, Joo Guilherme; Van Bael, M J; Temst, Kristiaan; Vantomme, Andr; Arajo, Joo Pedro

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the intrinsic origin of the high temperature ferromagnetism often observed in wide-gap dilute magnetic semiconductors becomes increasingly debated, there is a growing need for comprehensive studies on the single-phase region of the phase diagram of these materials. Here we report on the magnetic and structural properties of Fe-doped ZnO prepared by ion implantation of ZnO single crystals. A detailed structural characterization shows that the Fe impurities substitute for Zn in ZnO in a wurtzite Zn$_{1?x}$Fe$_{x}$O phase which is coherent with the ZnO host. In addition, the density of beam-induced defects is progressively decreased by thermal annealing up to 900$^ {?}$C, from highly disordered after implantation to highly crystalline upon subsequent annealing. Based on a detailed analysis of the magnetometry data, we demonstrate that isolated Fe impurities occupying Zn substitutional sites behave as localized paramagnetic moments down to 2 K, irrespective of the Fe concentration and the density of beam-i...

  18. Preoperative irradiation, lymphadenectomy, and 125iodine implantation for patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLaney, T.F.; Shipley, W.U.; O'Leary, M.P.; Biggs, P.J.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifty-four patients with clinically and surgically localized prostatic carcinoma were treated with low-dose preoperative irradiation (1050 cGy), pelvic lymphadenectomy, and interstitial /sup 125/Iodine implantation. The follow-up range is 2 to 9 years with a median follow-up of 5 years. Overall local tumor control is 92%. Actuarial 5-year survival is 86% and the actuarial disease-free survival at 5 years is 73%. Patients with poorly differentiated tumors have a significantly worse actuarial survival (62%) at 5 years than patients with well (95%) or moderately well differentiated tumors (93%), p = 0.04. Disease-free survival at 5 years was influenced by grade: well (100%), moderate (60%), and poor (48%), p = 0.03. Multivariate regression analysis indicates that only the degree of differentiation (p = 0.05) significantly impacts on survival. Both degree of differentiation (p = 0.04) and nodal status (p = 0.03) significantly influence disease-free survival. Potency has been maintained in 71% of patients potent at the time of implantation. Late reactions have been acceptable to date: bladder outlet obstruction (13%), mild proctitis (13%), cystourethritis (6%), incontinence (2%), and prostatic calculi (2%).

  19. ClusterBoron Implant Alternative to BF{sub 2} PMOS SDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feudel, Thomas; Illgen, Ralf; Krueger, Christian; Braun, Marek [AMD Saxony, LLC and Co. KG, Wilschdorfer Landstr 101, D01109 Dresden (Germany); Sekar, Karuppanan; Lee, David; Krull, Wade [SemEquip, Inc., 34 Sullivan Road, North Billerica, Massachusetts 01862 (United States)

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    As device geometries scale, the formation of the SDE becomes increasingly difficult and increasingly important. For advanced technologies, new methods such as ultra-low-energy boron implantation and millisecond annealing (flash or laser) are necessary to achieve the required junction characteristics. In addition, these processes must be compatible with the remainder of the process flow, which might include advanced dielectrics, stress technologies, SOI, etc. The emergence of ClusterBoron as a high productivity alternative for the low energy implant creates interest in device performance possible in a realistic process flow. This paper will present an evaluation of the use of ClusterBoron for the PMOS SDE in an advanced 65 nm logic process which includes laser annealing, e-SiGe stress layers and SOI. The conventional process uses a BF2 SDE process. Complete device characteristics will be shown comparing the ClusterBoron SDE to the conventional BF2. It will be shown that the ClusterBoron process achieves better boron activation, leading to enhanced transistor drive current. It will also be shown that the ClusterBoron is compatible with the SiGe stress layers and SOI structure. In summary, ClusterBoron presents an attractive alternative to the conventional BF2 process for advanced PMOS SDE.

  20. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplkment au no 12, Tome 37, DPcembre 1976,page C6-897 M~SSBAUERSTUDIES OF' lZ9IATOMS IMPLANTED IN a-AND fl-TIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    ~SSBAUERSTUDIES OF' lZ9IATOMS IMPLANTED IN a- AND fl-TIN H. DE WAARD and G. J. KEMERINK Laboratorium voor Algemene on the basis of a simple model. Implants of 1291 in /3 tin yield two line spectra identicalto those found for implants in a tin converted to /3 tin by heating. Repeated phase transitions show that the impurity

  1. D. Banerjee Mechanical and Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    grid generation method was utilized to construct a grid system which was aligned with the interface in space vehicle and other systems operating in micro-gravity, thermal issues in high speed civil transport, and thermal storage systems among others. Although film boiling has been studied extensively in the past, only

  2. Implantable Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Joy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ways of controlling the prosthesis. One major method isdirect bone attachment prosthesis, and so they developed an

  3. GaGa11--xxMnMnxxAsAs11--yyTeTeyy Synthesized bySynthesized by Ion Implantation & Pulsed Laser MeltingIon Implantation & Pulsed Laser Melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priour, Don - Department of Physics, University of Missouri

    ] stabilizing EF by compensation might allow higher MnGa add Te experiment possible using II-PLM no chamber Implantation & Pulsed Laser Melting (IIPulsed Laser Melting (II--PLM)PLM) Excimer Laser Pulse GaAs Liquid Melt, NATURE MATERIALS 1 185 (2002) [4] Scarpulla, PHYSICA B 340 908 (2003) #12;IIII--PLM GaPLM Ga11--xx

  4. Fabrication of an inexpensive, implantable cooling device for2 reversible brain deactivation in animals ranging from rodents3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krubitzer, Leah A.

    function (see Malpeli 1999 for84 review). Compared to cooling, such techniques are especially useful1 1 Fabrication of an inexpensive, implantable cooling device for2 reversible brain deactivation, California15 16 Running head: A lightweight cooling device for brain deactivation17 18 19 20 21 Text: 41

  5. Modeling of implantation and mixing damage during etching of SiO2 over Si in fluorocarbon plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Modeling of implantation and mixing damage during etching of SiO2 over Si in fluorocarbon plasmas- sions (CD).3 An example of this process is fluorocarbon plasma etching of trenches and vias in SiO2 and stopping on a crystalline Si layer. The fluorocarbon radicals produced in the plasma deposit a polymer

  6. Implantation of D+ and He+ in Candidate Fusion First Wall Materials R.F. Radel and G.L. Kulcinski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    implantation in tungsten for use in fusion first walls. Schematic of the IEC Fusion Device (with blowup of cathode grid during operation) Sample mounted in the IEC during irradiation at 1150 C. The IEC fusion and profiles using Elastic Recoil Detection analysis Pulsed IEC Operation Pulsed operation will better

  7. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 58 (1999) 199}208 The behaviour of Na implanted into Mo thin "lms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockett, Angus

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 58 (1999) 199}208 The behaviour of Na implanted into Mo thin, As ngstro( m Solar Center, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala, Sweden Department of Materials Science Mo thin "lms used as back contacts for Cu(In,Ga)Se solar cells. The samples were analysed

  8. The accumulation effect of positrons in the stack of foils, detected by measurements of the positron implantation profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dryzek, Jerzy [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakw (Poland); Institute of Physics, Opole University, ul. Oleska 48, 45-052 Opole (Poland); Siemek, Krzysztof [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakw (Poland)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The profiles of positrons implanted from the radioactive source {sup 22}Na into a stack of foils and plates are the subject of our experimental and theoretical studies. The measurements were performed using the depth scanning of positron implantation profile method, and the theoretical calculations using the phenomenological multi-scattering model (MSM). Several stacks consisting of silver, gold and aluminum foils, and titanium and germanium plates were investigated. We notice that the MSM describes well the experimental profiles; however when the stack consisting of silver and gold foils, the backscattering and linear absorption coefficients differ significantly from those reported in the literature. We suggest the energy dependency of the backscattering coefficient for silver and gold. In the stacks which comprise titanium and germanium plates, there were observed the features, which indicate the presence of the accumulation effect in the experimental implantation profile. This effect was previously detected in implantation profiles in Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 tool kit, and it consists in higher localization of positrons close the interface. We suppose that this effect can be essential for positron annihilation in any heterogeneous materials.

  9. Patient Positioning Based on a Radioactive Tracer Implanted in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: A Performance and Safety Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruijf, Willy J.M. de, E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Verstraete, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Neustadter, David [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel)] [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)] [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hol, Sandra; Venselaar, Jack L.M. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Davits, Rob J.; Wijsman, Bart P. [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Van den Bergh, Laura; Budiharto, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, Raymond [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, Karin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Poortmans, Philip M.P. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. Results: The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Conclusions: Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye.

  10. Locomotive Micro-Implant with Active Electromagnetic Propulsion Daniel Pivonka, Ada S. Y. Poon, and Teresa H. Meng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Ada

    Locomotive Micro-Implant with Active Electromagnetic Propulsion Daniel Pivonka, Ada S. Y. Poon An active locomotive technique requiring only an ex- ternal power source and a static magnetic field is pre- sented, and its operation is analyzed and simulated. For a modest static MRI magnetic field of 1 T

  11. Performance Assessment of Suture Type in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to determine the best overall suture material to close incisions from the surgical implantation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The effects of seven suture materials, four surgeons, and two water temperatures on suture retention, incision openness, tag retention, tissue inflammation, and tissue ulceration were quantified. The laboratory study, conducted by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supports a larger effort under way for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, aimed at determining the suitability of acoustic telemetry for estimating short- and longer-term (30-60 days) juvenile-salmonid survival at Columbia and Snake River dams and through the lower Columbia River.

  12. N-type doping of Ge by As implantation and excimer laser annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milazzo, R.; Napolitani, E., E-mail: enrico.napolitani@unipd.it; De Salvador, D.; Mastromatteo, M.; Carnera, A. [CNR-IMM MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica Astronomia, Universit di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Impellizzeri, G.; Boninelli, S.; Priolo, F.; Privitera, V. [CNR-IMM MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universit di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Fisicaro, G.; Italia, M.; La Magna, A. [CNR-IMM, Z.I. VIII Strada 5, 95121 Catania (Italy); Cuscun, M.; Fortunato, G. [CNR-IMM, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffusion and activation of arsenic implanted into germanium at 40?keV with maximum concentrations below and above the solid solubility (8??10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}) have been studied, both experimentally and theoretically, after excimer laser annealing (??=?308?nm) in the melting regime with different laser energy densities and single or multiple pulses. Arsenic is observed to diffuse similarly for different fluences with no out-diffusion and no formation of pile-up at the maximum melt depth. The diffusion profiles have been satisfactorily simulated by assuming two diffusivity states of As in the molten Ge and a non-equilibrium segregation at the maximum melt depth. The electrical activation is partial and decreases with increasing the chemical concentration with a saturation of the active concentration at 1??10{sup 20}?cm{sup ?3}, which represents a new record for the As-doped Ge system.

  13. Crucial role of implanted atoms on dynamic defect annealing in ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G. [Department of Physics, Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Wendler, E. [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitt Jena, Institut fr Festkrperphysik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes of defect formation in radiation hard semiconductors exhibiting efficient dynamic annealing are different from those in amorphizible ones, and the latter are generally more well-studied. In the present work, we investigate structural disorder in wurtzite ZnO, which is a radiation hard material, implanted with different ions at room temperature and 15?K. The sample analysis was undertaken by Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry performed in-situ without changing the sample temperature. The fluence dependence of bulk disorder exhibits the so-called IV-stage evolution, where the high fluence regime is characterized by both a strong influence on the damage build-up by the ion type and a reverse temperature effect. A straightforward methodology is demonstrated to differentiate between the contributions of pure ballistic and ion-defect reaction processes in the damage formation.

  14. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Jr., Samuel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Bishop, Dawn M. (Albuquerque, NM); Follstaedt, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer.

  15. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, S.M. Jr.; Bishop, D.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer. 4 figs.

  16. Oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation treatment to enhance data retention of tungsten nanocrystal nonvolatile memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jer-Chyi, E-mail: jcwang@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Lai, Chao-Sung, E-mail: cslai@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kweishan 333, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Li-Chun [Department of Material Engineering and Center for Thin Film Technologies and Applications, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan 24301, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Longtan 325, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Data retention characteristics of tungsten nanocrystal (W-NC) memory devices using an oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment are investigated. With an increase of oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time, the capacitancevoltage hysteresis memory window is increased but the data retention characteristics become degraded. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that this poor data retention is a result of plasma damage on the tunneling oxide layer, which can be prevented by lowering the bias voltage to 7?kV. In addition, by using the elevated temperature retention measurement technique, the effective charge trapping level of the WO{sub 3} film surrounding the W-NCs can be extracted. This measurement reveals that a higher oxygen PIII bias voltage and treatment time induces more shallow traps within the WO{sub 3} film, degrading the retention behavior of the W-NC memory.

  17. An experiment on the dynamics of ion implantation and sputtering of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. A.; Kesler, L. A.; Peterson, E. E.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Whyte, D. G.; Woller, K. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A major impediment towards a better understanding of the complex plasma-surface interaction is the limited diagnostic access to the material surface while it is undergoing plasma exposure. The Dynamics of ION Implantation and Sputtering Of Surfaces (DIONISOS) experiment overcomes this limitation by uniquely combining powerful, non-perturbing ion beam analysis techniques with a steady-state helicon plasma exposure chamber, allowing for real-time, depth-resolved in situ measurements of material compositions during plasma exposure. Design solutions are described that provide compatibility between the ion beam analysis requirements in the presence of a high-intensity helicon plasma. The three primary ion beam analysis techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, and nuclear reaction analysis, are successfully implemented on targets during plasma exposure in DIONISOS. These techniques measure parameters of interest for plasma-material interactions such as erosion/deposition rates of materials and the concentration of plasma fuel species in the material surface.

  18. Buried layer/connecting layer high energy implantation for improved CMOS latch-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, W. [Silicon Engineering, Austin, TX (United States); Rubin, L. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Wristers, D. [Advanced Micro Devices, Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated P-Buried Layer formed by MeV ion implantation combined with a localized P-Connecting Layer has been studied for latch-up isolation improvements for advanced CMOS technology. Latch-up trigger currents have been characterized with regards to buried layer dose/energy, connecting layer dose/energy, and n-well retrograde dose. Simulation results confirmed by data indicate that P+ injection trigger currents > 450 {mu}A/{mu}m can be achieved by utilizing certain combinations of B.L./C.L. and n-well retrograde doses for n+/p+ spacings = 2.0{mu}m. The B.L./C.L. process architecture shows great promise for providing an alternative isolation technique for latch-up improvement that is easy to implement, and for eliminating the dependence on epi silicon for latch-up control.

  19. Uniaxial strain relaxation in He{sup +} ion implanted (110) oriented SiGe layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minamisawa, R. A.; Buca, D.; Trinkaus, H.; Hollaender, B.; Mantl, S. [Institute of Bio and Nanosystems (IBN1-IT) and JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Destefanis, V. [ST Microelectronics, 850 Rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Crolles Cedex (France); Hartmann, J. M. [CEA-LETI, MINATEC, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniaxially strained (011)Si is attractive for high performance p-channel metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor devices due to the predicted high hole mobilities. Here, we demonstrate the realization of purely uniaxially relaxed (011) SiGe virtual substrates by He{sup +} ion implantation and thermal annealing. Perfect uniaxial relaxation is evidenced by precise ion channeling angular yield scan measurements and plan view transmission electron microscopy as predicted theoretically on the basis of the layer symmetry dependent dislocation dynamics. Strikingly, misfit dislocations propagate exclusively along the [011] direction in the (011) oriented crystal and, in contrast to (100)Si, no crosshatch is formed. We describe dislocation formation and propagation inducing strain relaxation of (011)SiGe and enlighten the differences to (100) oriented SiGe on Si.

  20. Nanoporosity induced by ion implantation in deposited amorphous Ge thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, L.; Impellizzeri, G.; Ruffino, F.; Miritello, M.; Grimaldi, M. G. [IMM-CNR MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Bosco, L. [Scuola Superiore di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 9, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of a nano-porous structure in amorphous Ge thin film (sputter-deposited on SiO{sub 2}) during ion irradiation at room temperature with 300 keV Ge{sup +} has been observed. The porous film showed a sponge-like structure substantially different from the columnar structure reported for ion implanted bulk Ge. The voids size and structure resulted to be strongly affected by the material preparation, while the volume expansion turned out to be determined only by the nuclear deposition energy. In SiGe alloys, the swelling occurs only if the Ge concentration is above 90%. These findings rely on peculiar characteristics related to the mechanism of voids nucleation and growth, but they are crucial for future applications of active nanostructured layers such as low cost chemical and biochemical sensing devices or electrodes in batteries.

  1. Effect of brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on cervical cancer implant dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anker, Christopher J., E-mail: chris.anker@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); O'Donnell, Kristen [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Boucher, Kenneth M. [Department of Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Hospital, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From 1998 to 2008, 31 patients with cervical cancer with full dosimetric data were identified who received definitive external-beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. Doses were recorded at point A, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)-38 rectal point, the ICRU-38 bladder point, the vaginal surface, and the pelvic sidewall. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the significance of changes in OAR to point A dose ratios with differences in brachytherapy technique or patient characteristics. Patients underwent a median of 5 brachytherapy procedures (range, 3 to 5), with a total of 179 procedures for 31 patients. For all brachytherapy treatments, the average ratios between the doses for the rectal, bladder, vaginal surface, and pelvic sidewall reference points to those at point A were 0.49, 0.59, 1.15, and 0.17, respectively. In general, decreased OAR dose was associated with a lower stage, younger age, increased ovoid size, increased tandem length, and earlier implant number. Increased tandem curvature significantly increased bladder dose and decreased rectal dose. Intravenous anesthesia usage was not correlated with improved dosimetry. This study allowed identification of patient and procedure characteristics influencing OAR dosing. Although the advent of 3-dimensional (3D) image-guided brachytherapy will bring new advances in treatment optimization, the actual technique involved at the time of the brachytherapy implant procedure will remain important.

  2. Effect of post-implant edema on prostate brachytherapy treatment margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, Daniel R. [Radiation Oncology, Arizona Oncology Services, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Wallner, Kent [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Mueller, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Maki, Jeffrey [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Sutlief, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine if postimplant prostate brachytherapy treatment margins calculated on Day 0 differ substantially from those calculated on Day 30. Methods: Thirty patients with 1997 American Joint Commission on Cancer clinical stage T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma underwent prostate brachytherapy with I-125 prescribed to 144 Gy. Treatment planning methods included using loose seeds in a modified peripheral loading pattern and treatment margins (TMs) of 5-8 mm. Postimplant plain radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance scans were obtained 1-4 hours after implantation (Day 0). A second set of imaging studies was obtained at 30 days after implantation (Day 30) and similarly analyzed. Treatment margins were measured as the radial distance in millimeters from the prostate edge to the 100% isodose line. The TMs were measured and tabulated at 90{sup o} intervals around the prostate periphery at 0.6-cm intervals. Each direction was averaged to obtain the mean anterior, posterior, left, and right margins. Results: The mean overall TM increased from 2.6 mm ({+-}2.3) on Day 0 to 3.5 mm ({+-}2.4) on Day 30. The mean anterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 1.8 mm on Day 30. The posterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 2.8 mm on Day 30. The lateral treatment margins increased most over time, with mean right treatment margin increasing from 3.9 mm on Day 0 to 4.7 mm on Day 30. Conclusion: Treatment margins appear to be durable in the postimplant period, with a clinically insignificant increase from Day 0 to Day 30.

  3. Complications of Transfemoral Removal of Percutaneous Transfemorally Implanted Port-Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yahiro, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Naoyuki, E-mail: naotoyo@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide [Programs for Applied Biomedicine, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Hiroshima University, Department of Radiology, Division of Medical Intelligence and Informatics (Japan)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Our purpose is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the withdrawal procedure of percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter systems. Thirty-seven patients (17.7%) underwent the withdrawal procedure of this port-catheter system among 209 patients. The reasons for withdrawal were as follows: termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy (n = 7), obstruction of hepatic artery (n = 5), port infection (n = 4), catheter infection (n = 4), catheter obstruction (n = 4), lower-limb palsy and pain (n = 2), exposure of the port due to skin defect (n = 2), patient's desire (n = 2), side effect of chemotherapy (n = 1), no effectiveness of chemotherapy (n = 1), hematoma at the puncture site (n = 1), duodenum perforation by the catheter (n = 1), intermittent claudication due to severe stenosis of right common iliac artery (n = 1), dissection of common hepatic artery (n = 1), and broken catheter (n = 1). In thirty-four of the 37 cases, the port-catheter system was successfully withdrawn without any complications. Clinical success rate was 91.9%. Complications occurred in three cases (8.1%), which were a pseudoaneurysm, thromboembolism of the right common iliac artery, and continuous bleeding from the subcutaneous pocket where the port system was placed for 1 month. In 15 cases, correction of the catheter tip or exchange for dislocation of the tip had to be done without withdrawal. It is not rare to withdraw port-catheter systems in cases of infection or hematoma around the system. Although withdrawal of a percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter system is a relatively safe procedure, the port-catheter system should not be removed unless absolutely indicated.

  4. Past Topics for the Ph.D. Preliminary Qualifying Examination 2002: Development of an Implant System to Treat Patent Foramen Ovale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    to Treat Patent Foramen Ovale You have just taken a position as the head of research and development for a cardiovascular device company. They have been given a grant to develop an implantable system to treat patent

  5. Co-implantation of group VI elements and N for formation of non-alloyed ohmic contacts for n-type semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin M.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-alloyed, low resistivity contacts for semiconductors using Group III-V and Group II-VI compounds and methods of making are disclosed. Co-implantation techniques are disclosed.

  6. Nonpolar cubic AlGaN/GaN heterojunction field-effect transistor on Ar+ implanted 3CSiC ,,001...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    As, Donat Josef

    through the substrate. Cubic AlGaN/GaN heterostructures were grown in a RibeNonpolar cubic AlGaN/GaN heterojunction field-effect transistor on Ar+ implanted 3CSiC ,,001... E HFET was fabricated of nonpolar cubic AlGaN/GaN grown on Ar+ implanted 3CSiC 001 by molecular beam

  7. Tunable photoluminescence of self-assembled GeSi quantum dots by B{sup +} implantation and rapid thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yulu; Wu, Shan; Ma, Yinjie; Fan, Yongliang; Yang, Xinju; Zhong, Zhenyang; Jiang, Zuimin [National Key Laboratory for Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The layered GeSi quantum dots (QDs) are grown on (001) Si substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The photoluminescence (PL) peak of the as-grown GeSi quantum dots has obvious blue shift and enhancement after processed by ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing. It is indicated that the blue shift is originated from the interdiffusion of Ge and Si at the interface between QDs and the surrounding matrix. The dependence of PL intensity on the excitation power shows that there are the nonradiative centers of shallow local energy levels from the point defects caused by the ion implantation, but not removed by the rapid thermal annealing. The tunable blue shift of the PL position from the 1300?nm to 1500?nm region may have significant application value in the optical communication.

  8. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia, E-mail: ciurea@infim.ro; Lazanu, Sorina, E-mail: ciurea@infim.ro [National Institute for Materials Physics, 105bis Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  9. Direct observation and mechanism for enhanced field emission sites in platinum ion implanted/post-annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, Kalpataru, E-mail: panda@afm.eei.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: phy.kalpa@gmail.com; Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Tai, Nyan Hwa [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, I-Nan, E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced electron field emission (EFE) properties for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films upon platinum (Pt) ion implantation and subsequent post-annealing processes is reported, viz., low turn-on field of 4.17?V/?m with high EFE current density of 5.08?mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 7.0?V/?m. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) mode in scanning tunneling spectroscopy directly revealed the increased electron emission sites density for Pt ion implanted/post-annealed UNCD films than the pristine one. The high resolution CITS mapping and local currentvoltage characteristic curves demonstrated that the electrons are dominantly emitted from the diamond grain boundaries and Pt nanoparticles.

  10. Introduction of the MC3-II/GP system, medium current ion implanter with enhanced multi-charge beam current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koike, Masazumi; Sato, Fumiaki; Sano, Makoto; Kawatsu, Sho; Kariya, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Kudo, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Miyuki; Shinozuka, Masamitsu; Takahashi, Yuji; Ishida, Yuji; Tsukihara, Mitsukuni; Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Sugitani, Michiro [SEN Corporation, 1501, Imazaike, Saijo, Ehime, 799-1362 (Japan)

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The MC3-II/GP is a leading-edge single-wafer medium-current ion implanter, newly developed by SEN Corporation. It demonstrates exceptional productivity based on a high speed wafer-handling station and enhanced beam current. It covers a substantively wider energy range in order to fully meet advanced device requirements. Retaining the superior features of the MC3-II/WR, the MC3-II/GP provides a remarkable increase of multiply-charged beam current coupled with longer ion source lifetime. Another advanced feature of the MC3-II/GP is a 30 second or 14% reduction in auto beam setup time. These improvements enable a fabrication line to reduce the total number of ion implanters and dramatically reduce COO.

  11. Process architectures using MeV implanted blanket buried layers for latch-up improvements on bulk silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, L.M.; Simonton, R.B.; Wilson, S.D. [Eaton Corporation, Beverly, MA (United States); Morris, W. [Silicon Engineering, Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Doped buried layers formed by MeV ion implantation are attractive alternatives to expensive epitaxial substrates for controlling latch-up in CMOS devices. Two different process architecture approaches for forming effective buried layers are discussed. P+ Around Boundary (PAB), and a more recent derivative, BILLI are compared to a Buried Layer/Connecting Layer (BUCL) architecture, with regards to latch-up resistance, process flexibility, and future scalability. While both architectures have been shown to increase latch-up trigger current on bulk silicon, the BUCL process provides greater latch-up control and process/device flexibility. Process and device simulations as well as experimental data indicate that a properly chosen set of implants for both n-well, p-well, and buried layer structures can yield latch-up isolation superior to 3mm epi.

  12. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  13. Enhanced stress relaxation in ultrathin SiGe-on-insulator by H{sup +}-implantation-assisted oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadoh, T.; Matsuura, R.; Miyao, M.; Ninomiya, M.; Nakamae, M.; Enokida, T. [Department of Electronics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); SUMCO, 314 Nishisangao, Noda, Chiba 278-0015 (Japan); SUMCO, 2201 Oaza Kamioda, Kohoku-cho, Kishima-gun, Saga 849-0597 (Japan); Analysis and Evaluation Center, Fukuryo Semicon Engineering Corporation, 1-1-1 Imajuku-Higashi, Fukuoka 819-0192 (Japan)

    2005-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of H{sup +} implantation ({<=}5x10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}) on stress relaxation in an oxidation-induced Ge condensation method have been investigated to form stress-relaxed ultrathin ({approx}30 nm) SiGe-on-insulator (SGOI) virtual substrates. High-dose ({>=}10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}) implantation enhanced stress relaxation, which was attributed to bond breaking at the SiGe/buried SiO{sub 2} interface. However, oxidation velocity was also enhanced due to irradiation defects. Two-step annealing (500 deg. C for 30 min and 850 deg. C for 60 min) before oxidation was proposed to remove irradiation defects. This achieved enhanced stress relaxation in ultrathin SGOI without changing oxidation velocity.

  14. Method for enhancing growth of SiO.sub.2 in Si by the implantation of germanium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, Orin W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fathy, Dariush (Knoxville, TN); White, Clark W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for enhancing the conversion of Si to SiO.sub.2 in a directional fashion wherein steam or wet oxidation of Si is enhanced by the prior implantation of Ge into the Si. The unique advantages of the Ge impurity include the directional enhancement of oxidation and the reduction in thermal budget, while at the same time, Ge is an electrically inactive impurity.

  15. Elastic Deformation Properties of Implanted Endobronchial Wire Stents in Benign and Malignant Bronchial Disease: A Radiographic In Vivo Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hautmann, Hubert [Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Ziemssentrasse 1, D-80336 Munich (Germany); Rieger, Johannes [Radiologische Klinik, Klinikum Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Ziemssentrasse 1, D-80336 Munich (Germany); Huber, Rudolf M. [Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Ziemssentrasse 1, D-80336 Munich (Germany); Pfeifer, Klaus J. [Radiologische Klinik, Klinikum Innenstadt, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Ziemssentrasse 1, D-80336 Munich (Germany)

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term mechanical behavior in vivo of expandable endobronchial wire stents, we imaged three different prostheses in the treatment of tracheobronchial disease. Methods: Six patients with bronchial stenoses (three benign, three malignant) underwent insertion of metallic stents. Two self-expandable Wallstents, two balloon-expandable tantalum Strecker stents and two self-expandable nitinol Accuflex stents were used. Measurements of deformation properties were performed during voluntary cough by means of fluoroscopy, at 1 month and 7-10 months after implantation. The procedures were videotaped, their images digitized and the narrowing of stent diameters calculated at intervals of 20 msec. Results: After stent implantation all patients improved with respect to ventilatory function. Radial stent narrowing during cough reached 53% (Wallstent), 59% (tantalum Strecker stent), and 52% (nitinol Accuflex stent) of the relaxed post-implantation diameter. Stent compression was more marked in benign compared with malignant stenoses. In the long term permanent deformation occurred with the tantalum Strecker stents; the other stents were unchanged. Conclusion: Endobronchial wire stents can be helpful in the treatment of major airway collapse and obstructing bronchial lesions. However, evidence of material fatigue as a possible effect of exposure to recurrent mechanical stress on the flexible mesh tube may limit their long-term use. This seems to be predominantly important in benign bronchial collapse.

  16. Investigation of plasma immersion ion implantation of nickel-titanium rod by multiple-grid particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwok, Dixon T. K. [APPG, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Wu, Shuilin; Liu, Xiangmei; Fu, Ricky K. Y.; Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple-grid-particle-in-cell numerical method has been developed. This method uses grids of different cell sizes and details are needed in only one part of the simulation region and not others. Hence, there are fewer nodes in the simulation thereby reduced computational time without sacrificing details. In the multiple-grid system, a phenomenon is identified to arise at the interface between two grids and a half-cell weighting method is utilized to solve the weighting issue at the boundary. It is shown that the expression of the change of momentum has no weighting function. This method is employed to numerically simulate the plasma immersion ion implantation process into a nickel titanium rod measuring 50 mm long and 4.8 mm in diameter used in orthopaedic surgery. To conduct more uniform implantation, the NiTi rod is elevated on the sample stage by a metal rod. The nitrogen implantation fluences and depth profiles are simulated and compared to experimental values determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  17. dc field-emission analysis of GaAs and plasma-source ion-implanted stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Hernandez; T. Wang; T. Siggins; D. Bullard; H. F. Dylla; C. Reece; N. D. Theodore; D. M. Manos

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field-emission studies have been performed on a GaAs wafer and a sample of its stainless-steel (SS) support electrode that are part of a photocathode gun for the 10 kW Upgrade infrared free electron laser at Jefferson Lab. The objective of the studies presented here is to characterize the effect of both the cleanliness of the wafer and the plasma-source ion-implanted layer on the electrode to suppress field emission. Field emission is the limiting factor to achieve the required 6 MV/m at the surface of the wafer. Potential field emitters are first located on the surface of 1 in. diameter samples with a dc scanning field-emission microscope at 60 MV/m, then each emitter is characterized in a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The GaAs wafer was hydrogen cleaned before the study. The results show three emitters caused by indium contamination during wafer handling. The GaAs wafer thus shows good high-voltage characteristics and the need to maintain cleanliness during handling. The SS sample is hand polished with diamond paste to a 1-m surface finish, then implanted with N2/SiO2 in a plasma-source ion-implantation chamber in preparation for the field-emission studies.

  18. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state suggests that there are preferred Si <100> interstitial splits. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C-SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C-SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.80.410e-19 m2/sec.

  19. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  20. Performance improvement of gadolinium oxide resistive random access memory treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jer-Chyi, E-mail: jcwang@mail.cgu.edu.tw; Hsu, Chih-Hsien; Ye, Yu-Ren [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kweishan 333, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Ai, Chi-Fong; Tsai, Wen-Fa [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Longtan 325, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics improvement of gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub x}O{sub y}) resistive random access memories (RRAMs) treated by hydrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was investigated. With the hydrogen PIII treatment, the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs exhibited low set/reset voltages and a high resistance ratio, which were attributed to the enhanced movement of oxygen ions within the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} films and the increased Schottky barrier height at Pt/Gd{sub x}O{sub y} interface, respectively. The resistive switching mechanism of Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs was dominated by Schottky emission, as proved by the area dependence of the resistance in the low resistance state. After the hydrogen PIII treatment, a retention time of more than 10{sup 4}?s was achieved at an elevated measurement temperature. In addition, a stable cycling endurance with the resistance ratio of more than three orders of magnitude of the Gd{sub x}O{sub y} RRAMs can be obtained.