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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Fasteners & Metals Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Fasteners & Metals Program. The Fastener Quality Act (FQA), Public Law 101-592, was ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

Dexter Fastener Technologies, Inc.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Salt spray testing of fasteners. [FA/166] ASTM B117 Standard Test Method of Salt Spray (Fog) Testing. Torque-tension of full-size threaded fasteners ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

3

Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation with Solid Targets for Space and Aerospace Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes successful results obtained by a new type of plasma source, named as Vaporization of Solid Targets (VAST), for treatment of materials for space and aerospace applications, by means of plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D). Here, the solid element is vaporized in a high pressure glow discharge, being further ionized and implanted/deposited in a low pressure cycle, with the aid of an extra electrode. First experiments in VAST were run using lithium as the solid target. Samples of silicon and aluminum alloy (2024) were immersed into highly ionized lithium plasma, whose density was measured by a double Langmuir probe. Measurements performed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed clear modification of the cross-sectioned treated silicon samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that lithium was implanted/deposited into/onto the surface of the silicon. Implantation depth profiles may vary according to the condition of operation of VAST. One direct application of this treatment concerns the protection against radiation damage for silicon solar cells. For the case of the aluminum alloy, X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the appearance of prominent new peaks. Surface modification of A12024 by lithium implantation/deposition can lower the coefficient of friction and improve the resistance to fatigue of this alloy. Recently, cadmium was vaporized and ionized in VAST. The main benefit of this element is associated with the improvement of corrosion resistance of metallic substrates. Besides lithium and cadmium, VAST allows to performing PIII and D with other species, leading to the modification of the near-surface of materials for distinct purposes, including applications in the space and aerospace areas.

Oliveira, R. M.; Goncalves, J. A. N.; Ueda, M.; Silva, G. [National Institute for Space Research, PO Box 515, ZIP 12227-010 Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Baba, K. [Industrial Technology Center of Nagasaki, 2-1303-8, Ikeda, Omura Nagasaki 856-0026 (Japan)

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fastener Quality Act (FQA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Please call (301) 975-4011 for more information. US Patent and Trademark Office Fastener Insignia Register and Recordal. ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

5

FASTENERS AND METALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... corrosion susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel fasteners - oxalic acid etch test f) CASS test (copper-accelerated acetic acid-salt spray test) of ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

6

Self-locking threaded fasteners  

SciTech Connect

A threaded fastener with a shape memory alloy (SMA) coatings on its threads is disclosed. The fastener has special usefulness in high temperature applications where high reliability is important. The SMA coated fastener is threaded into or onto a mating threaded part at room temperature to produce a fastened object. The SMA coating is distorted during the assembly. At elevated temperatures the coating tries to recover its original shape and thereby exerts locking forces on the threads. When the fastened object is returned to room temperature the locking forces dissipate. Consequently the threaded fasteners can be readily disassembled at room temperature but remains securely fastened at high temperatures. A spray technique is disclosed as a particularly useful method of coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy.

Glovan, Ronald J. (Butte, MT); Tierney, John C. (Butte, MT); McLean, Leroy L. (Butte, MT); Johnson, Lawrence L. (Butte, MT)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

NVLAP FASTENERS AND METALS PROGRAM-SPECIFIC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... test CASS test (copper-accelerated acetic acid-salt spray test) of fasteners Page 6. DATE: NVLAP LAB CODE: FASTENERS ...

2012-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

8

Wire brush fastening device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

Meigs, Richard A. (East Concord, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Wire brush fastening device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

Meigs, R.A.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Wire brush fastening device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

Meigs, R.A.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Fasteners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... Program Organizers: Andrew Spowage, The University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus; Tom Ackerson, IMR Metallurgical Services; Larry...

12

THE AEROSPACE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Suire 4000, 955 L' Suire 4000, 955 L' Enfant Plax. S.W.., Wahinpon. KC. 200242174. Telephone: (202) 488.6000 7117~03.87.cdy.27 27 May 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE;23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: STATUS OF ACTIONS - FUSRAP SITE LIST Aerospace recently conipleted a comprehensive review of sites listed in the FUSRAP Site Investigation and Remedial Action Summary Report, dated Uecember 31, 1986. The primary objectives of this review were to examine the status of each site identified in Sections II and III of the Report with respect to actions required to complete the Identification and Characterization Process; to provide DFSD a current status of these actions; and to identify

13

THE AEROSPACE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Suile 4000, 955 L' Suile 4000, 955 L' Enfant Plnra, S. W., Washingmn, D.C. 20024-2174. Telephorre: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.27 27 May 1987 . Mr. 'Andrew Wallo, III, NE:23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland? 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: . STATUS OF ACTIONS - FUSRAP SITE LIST Aerospace recently completed ~a comprehensive review of sites listed in the FL&RAP Site Investigation and Remedial Action Summary Report, dated Uecember 31, 1986. The primary objectives of this review were to examine the status of each site identified in Sections II,and III of the Reportwith respect to actions required to complete.the~ Identification and Characterization .' : Process; to provide.'DFSD-a current status of these actions; and to identify

14

Architectural disruption in aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distinctive technology and customer / supplier relationships are currently the primary sources of competitive advantage in the Aerospace industry. Modular Open System Architecture (MOSA) requirements represent a significant ...

Ashworth, Geoffrey (Geoffrey John)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f3 i.%# f3 i.%# r' f y -f THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION S&e 4000, 955 L' Enfant Plaza, S. W., WaJ>on, D.C. 20024, Telephone: (202) 488-6000 7005.82.aw.35 21 July 1982 Mr. Arthur J. Whitman Public Safety Division Office of Operational Safety, (EP-323) U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20585 Dear Mr. Whitman: UNIVERSAL CYCLOPS (VULCAN CRUCIBLE) SITE Enclosed are copies of AEC contracts and letters regarding the clean-up of the subject site. With a copy of this letter I am sending Hr. Steve Miller copies of the enclosed records. Aerospace is scheduled to review the Final Argonne survey report in order to determine the need for and priority of a remedial action at this site. This will be done using the PSD procedure for assigning priorities. Aerospace will begin this review as soon as other priorities

16

Project Brief: Michigan Aerospace Corporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... RECIPIENT: Michigan Aerospace Corporation, Ann Arbor, MI. Project duration: 3 Years; Total NIST Funding: $1,499,463. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

17

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 . 1 . ' . THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION SUMAC 79oOs955 L' En/Mt Ph. S. W., Wahingron. D.C. 200242174, T&jhone (20.?) 48&&700 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FIJSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

18

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CT-. \5- 02/ CT-. \5- 02/ 'W Suite fOO0, 951 L'EnJanl Pluo. S. W., WaJhington. DC. 20021. Telephone: (202, 488.6000 7117-01.85.cdy.Z 19 September 1985 . Mr. Arthur Whitman, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 T-'.- ___.- -__ -.-. __ Dear Mr. Whitman: AUTHORITY REVIEW - METAL FABRICATION CONTRACTOR SITES ~__~ /,." ..x_- The attached-authoGty review prepared by Aerospace is provided for your considAerospace in that several sites are included< This

19

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION 20030 Century Blvd., Germanlown, Maryland 20767, Telephone: (301) 428-2700 7848-02.80.eav.34 16 September 1980 m777 Dr. William E. Mott Acting Director Environmental & Safety Engineering Division U. S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20767 Dear Dr. Mott: - UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO BUILDINGS USED BY THE MANHATTAN ENGINEER DISTRICT During a recent investigation of the official Manhattan Engineer District history, I came across some additional information that may be a reason to expand the survey work at the University of Chicago. It appears that several buildings werein use for research in physics (pile project), chemistry (separation and purification of U-235 and Pu-239) and health effects (metal toxicology and radiation

20

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. . . . s ,-- :; 2 5 Y THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION . Suite 4000, 955 L' EnJant Flax. S. Iv., Wah' gt cn on, D.C. 20024-2174, Telephone: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.27 27 May 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE:23 Division of Facility,& Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: STATUS OF ACTIONS - FUSRAP SITE LIST Aerospace recently completed a comprehensive review of sites listed fin the FUSRAP Site Investigation and Remedial Action Summary Report, dated December 31, 1986. The primary objectives of this review were to examine the status of each site identified in Sections II and III of the Report with respect to actions required to complete the Identification and Characterization Process; to provide DFSD a current status of these actions; and to identify

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION \  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'Al ... 'Al ... 35-y 3 fl+ I, .* THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION \ Suite 4000, 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S. W., Washington, D.C. 20024, Telephone: (202) 488.6000 7117-01.87.sej.16 28 July 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: FINAL ELIMINATION REPORTS AND SITE SUMMARIES Aerospace has completed its review and is forwarding the final elimination reports and site summaries for the following sites: University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ TVA, Muscle Shoals, AL Dow Chemical Company, Walnut Creek, CA Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO Havens Lab, Bridgeport Brass, Bridgeport, CT General Chemical (Allied Chemical), N. Claymont, DE Slater Steels (Joslyn Stainless Steels), Ft. Wayne, IN

22

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.%ilc 7900, 955 L*Enfam Plora. S. W.. Washingron. D.C. 20024.2174~ Tekphonr: (202) 488s .%ilc 7900, 955 L*Enfam Plora. S. W.. Washingron. D.C. 20024.2174~ Tekphonr: (202) 488s 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Genantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance' /I- PlL.oE with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flo.O-oz includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated M0.03' 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, rJcPo0 and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP /

23

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CORPORATION CORPORATION Sut e 4000, 955 L En/ant Plaa,. S W.. Walshngton, D C (0024, I'eicphone 1202) 488-6000 7117-03.85.aw.44 6 August 1985 Mr. Arthur Whitman Division of Remedial Action Projects, NE-24 U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Whitman: VANADIUM CORPORATION OF AMERICA PLANT NEAR 3RIDGEVILLE,PENNSYLVANIA Enclosed please find a brief summary on the Former VCA vanadium plant in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania. This site was used under contract, during the MED era, to support activities at several UMTRAP sites. In view of the relationship of this site to the UMTRAP sites, it is recommended that you evaluate it for consideration for inclusion as a vicinity property under UMTRAP. Aerospace will await your direction before conducting any additional site specific investigations.

24

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Lie i9w, 9.55 L%n/anl Ph. S. W., Washington. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphonc (202) 488-6000 Lie i9w, 9.55 L%n/anl Ph. S. W., Washington. D.C. 20024-2174, Tekphonc (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation includes 26 colleges and universities identified-in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

25

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CORPORATION CORPORATION Suite 7900, 955 L'Enfan Plaza, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20024-2174, Telephone: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 cA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 C 0o Division of Facility & Site FL 'o-o Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy j /.o° Germantown, Maryland 20545 A/»O 2 - Dear Mr. Wallo: A0 .5 ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES A ,-O° -1 9.O?- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance 1L.°~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation ^ O.0-O0 includes 26 colleges and universities identified in Enclosure 4 to r .a. Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, A/COI

26

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,' ,' \ -_e /' Suite 4000, 955 L' Erzfunt Plaza. S. W , bhrhrnqton, D.C. 20024, Telephone: (202) 488.6000 7117-01.87.sej.16 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: FINAL ELIMINATION REPORTS AND SITE SUMMARIES Aerospace has completed its review and is forwarding the final elimination reports and site summaries for the following sites: /jZ.~la pi.0; I) PAA 0 z 0 p 1.7 , Cd> I 0 ( ' i ' 7 ' !, 0 ' C E q ' I) ~~~I' ~~ . LG.0 I@ iJ r; r>7, 0 w,or l University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ TVA, Muscle Shoals, AL Dow Chemical Company, Walnut Creek, CA Colorado School of M ines, Golden, CO Havens Lab, Bridgeport Brass, Bridgeport, CT General Chemical (Allied Chemical), N. Claymont, DE

27

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

363, 955 L' 363, 955 L' Enfant Plaza. S. W.. Washiq on. DC. 2002~2174. Telephone: (202)' 4&&6OOU 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CAlOL) Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility E Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: In/ . O-01 r~A.os ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES : M/f).0-oS k1 El.o3- The attached elimination reconuaendation was prepared in accordance' - with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation includes 26 colleges and universities identified in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSP.AP

28

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.55 LyEnfant Plaro. S.W., Washingzon, D.C. 20024.2174, Telephone: (202) 488-6000 .55 LyEnfant Plaro. S.W., Washingzon, D.C. 20024.2174, Telephone: (202) 488-6000 7117-03.87.cdy.27 27 May 1987 Mr. 'Andrew Wallo, III, NE:23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland: 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: I STATUS OF ACTIONS - FUSRAP SITE LIST Aerospace recently completed .a comprehensive review of sites listed in the FUSRAP Site Investigation and Remedial Action Summary Report, dated Uecember 31, 1986. The primary objectives of this review were to examine the status of each site identified in Sections II and III of the Reportwith respect to actions required to complete the Identification and Characterization Process; to provide,DFSD a current-status of these actions; and to identify

29

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

53 L' 53 L' Enfant Plwn. S. W.. W w tn h. go on. D.C. 20024-2174. Telephone: (202) 488.6000 7117-03.87.cdy.27 27 May 1987 Mr. 'Andrew Wallo, III, NE:23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: STATUS OF ACTIOiVS - FUSRAP SITE LIST Aerospace recently completed a comprehensive review of sites listed in the FUSRAP Site Investigation and Remedial Action Summary Report, dated Uecerober 31, 1986. The primary objectives of this review were to examine the status of each site identified in Sections II and III 'of the Repkt,with respect to actions required to complete the Identification and Characterization Process; to provide DFSD a current status of these actions; and to identify

30

Dept. of Aerospace Engg. Department of Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Laboratories: - Aerodynamics - Gas Dynamics - Rarefied Gas Dynamics - Rockets & Missiles - Combustion & Flow Three groups: - Aerodynamics & Flight Mechanics - Propulsion & Combustion - Aerospace Structures Fluid Dynamics Vortex Dynamics, Supersonic Mixing and Combustion Helicopters, MAVs Rotating

Das, Bijoy Krishna

31

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION /  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

/ / @ St& i900.955 L' E+t Pk. S. W., Washingron. D.C. 20024-2174. Tdephonr: (202) 4884400 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA CA,OLf Mr. Andrew'Wallo. III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site c r-05 Deconnnissioning Projects f-L .0-d U.S. Department of Energy lr\/.QL Germantown, Maryland ,20,54B ., iAl*Oz I., a,:,. :.. ,.. i. ,i < Dear Mr. Wallo: 1hJ *o-o1 flA.QS ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES MA.o-05 rl D.OF The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.03 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flo.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated N0.03. 27~May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ~JcQol

32

16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration ...

Darmofal, David L.

33

AEC AEROSPACE SAFETY PROGRAMS AND PHILOSOPHY  

SciTech Connect

Work in aerospace safety analysis, research, development, and testing is discussed. Studies for the SNAP program are outlined. The engineering andd test program for aerospace safety ls described. (M.C.G.)

Pittman, F.K.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

WEB RESOURCE: Aerospace Structural Materials Database - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2007 ... The Aerospace Structural Materials Database (ASMD) was developed by CINDAS LLC under a Cooperative Research and Development...

35

MACHINING ELIMINATION THROUGH APPLICATION OF THREAD FORMING FASTENERS IN NET SHAPED CAST HOLES  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this work was to eliminate approximately 30% of the machining performed in typical automotive engine and transmission plants by using thread forming fasteners in as-cast holes of aluminum and magnesium cast components. The primary issues at the source of engineers???????????????¢???????????????????????????????? reluctance to implementing thread forming fasteners in lightweight castings are: * Little proof of consistency of clamp load vs. input torque in either aluminum or magnesium castings. * No known data to understand the effect on consistency of clamp load as casting dies wear. The clamp load consistency concern is founded in the fact that a portion of the input torque used to create clamp load is also used to create threads. The torque used for thread forming may not be consistent due to variations in casting material, hole size and shape due to tooling wear and process variation (thermal and mechanical). There is little data available to understand the magnitude of this concern or to form the basis of potential solutions if the range of clamp load variation is very high (> +/- 30%). The range of variation that can be expected in as-cast hole size and shape over the full life cycle of a high pressure die casting die was established in previous work completed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, (PNNL). This established range of variation was captured in a set of 12 cast bosses by designing core pins at the size and draft angles identified in the sited previous work. The cast bosses were cut into ???????????????¢????????????????????????????????nuts???????????????¢??????????????????????????????? that could be used in the Ford Fastener Laboratory test-cell to measure clamp load when a thread forming fastener was driven into a cast nut. There were two sets of experiments run. First, a series of cast aluminum nuts were made reflecting the range of shape and size variations to be expected over the life cycle of a die casting die. Taptite thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for aluminum applications), were driven into the various cored, as-cast nuts at a constant input torque and resulting clamp loads were recorded continuously. The clamp load data was used to determine the range of clamp loads to be expected. The bolts were driven to failure. The clamp load corresponding to the target input of 18.5 Nm was recorded for each fastener. In a like fashion, a second set of experiments were run with cast magnesium nuts and ALtracs thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for magnesium applications). Again all clamp loads were recorded and analyzed similarly to the Taptites in aluminum cast nuts. Results from previous work performed on the same test cell for a Battelle project using standard M8 bolts into standard M8 nuts were included as a comparator for a standard bolt and nut application. The results for the thread forming fasteners in aluminum cast holes were well within industry expectations of +/- 30% for out of the box and robustness range te

Cleaver, Ryan J.; Cleaver, Todd H.; Talbott, Richard

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

Testing of Compact Bolted Fasteners with Insulation and Friction-Enhanced Shims for NCSX  

SciTech Connect

The fastening of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment's (NCSX) modular coils presented a number of engineering and manufacturing challenges due to the high magnetic forces, need to control induced currents, tight tolerances and restrictive space envelope. A fastening method using high strength studs, jack nuts, insulating spacers, bushings and alumina coated shims was developed which met the requirements. A test program was conducted to verify the design. The tests included measurements of flatness of the spacers, determination of contact area, torque vs. tension of the studs and jack nuts, friction coefficient tests on the alumina and G-10 insulators, electrical tests, and tension relaxation tests due to temperature excursions from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperatures. This paper will describe the design and the results of the test program.

L. E. Dudek, J.H. Chrzanowski, G. Gettelfinger, P. Heitzenroeder, S. Jurczynski, M. Viola and K. Freudenberg

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Aerospace Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the design and analysis of flight vehicles since the 1950s. Aerospace engineers at Sandia support atmospheric and space flight vehicles across the speed regimes, from subsonic...

38

The 1990 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the proceedings of the 21st annual NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop, hosted by the Marshall Space Flight Center on December 4-6, 1990. The workshop was attended by scientists and engineers from various agencies of the U.S. Government, aerospace contractors, and battery manufacturers as well as participation in like kind from the European Space Agency member nations. The subjects covered included nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, silver-zinc, lithium based chemistries, and advanced technologies as they relate to high reliability operations in aerospace applications.

Kennedy, L.M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

IT management in the aerospace industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) payoff IT investments. When the North American Aerospace Industry invests less than any other industry in the high risk investments, its foreign counterpart invests more than any other industry. The second major ...

Ferre, Gregoire, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Global Innovations in Manufacturing of Aerospace Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2010 ... 307-314]Manufacturing of ?-Titanium Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al Spin-Extruded Hollow Shafts for High Strength Power Train Applications in Aerospace...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Inventory optimization in an aerospace supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategic inventory management has become a major focus for Honeywell Aerospace as the business unit challenged itself to meeting cost reduction goals while maintaining a high level of service to its customers. This challenge ...

Lo, Billy S. (Billy Si Yee)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Materials Innovation in the Aerospace Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed schedule information follows. ... to composites to hybrid materials offers the aerospace market unique design solutions to meet ever demanding requirements in ... Director of the Office of Economic Analysis U.S. Department of Energy

43

Integrated analysis procedure of aerospace composite structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of composite material application in major commercial aircraft design, represented by the Boeing 787 and Airbus A350-XWB, signals a new era in the aerospace industry. The high stiffness to weight ratio of ...

Ahn, Junghyun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Information System Using Remote Aerospace Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system of interaction and exchange of information on natural sciences between the Center of Aerospace Information and the Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences was prototyped ...

A. V. Veselovskii; A. N. Plate

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

German Aerospace Center (DLR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aerospace Center (DLR) Aerospace Center (DLR) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: German Aerospace Center (DLR) Name German Aerospace Center (DLR) Place Cologne, Germany Number of employees 5001-10,000 Coordinates 50.9406645°, 6.9599115° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.9406645,"lon":6.9599115,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

Assessment of Lifetime Calculation of Forged IN718 Aerospace ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: Fatigue analysis, Thermo-mechanical processing, Aerospace components, Microstructural modelling .... de?ned 'worst-case' forging scenario.

47

Research Opportunities in Advanced Aerospace Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a review of a team effort that focuses on advanced aerospace concepts of the 21st Century. The paper emphasis advanced technologies, rather than cataloging every unusual aircraft that has ever been attempted. To dispel the myth that "aerodynamics ...

Jones Gregory S.; Bangert Linda S.; Garber Donald P.; Huebner Lawrence D.; Jr Robert E. McKinley; Sutton Kenneth; Jr Roy C. Swanson; Weinstein Leonard M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

May 12, 2011, Visiting Speakers Program Events - Aerospace Industry...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

work (2011) Aerospace Industries Association of America, Inc. Definition from AIA white paper Definition: - Counterfeit product or part: A product produced or altered...

51

Global Innovations in Manufacturing Aerospace Materials: A Rolls ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manufacturing of ?-Titanium Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al Spin-Extruded Hollow Shafts for High Strength Power Train Applications in Aerospace and Automotive Industries.

52

Modeling in Aerospace Materials and Manufacturing in AFRL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Manufacturing of ?-Titanium Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al Spin-Extruded Hollow Shafts for High Strength Power Train Applications in Aerospace and Automotive Industries.

53

Aerospace Meteorology: Some Lessons Learned from the Development and Application of NASA Terrestrial Environment Design Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerospace meteorology plays an important role in the design, development, and operation of aerospace vehicles. Many of the issues and lessons presented occurred during the involvement of the authors with the development and interpretation of aerospace ...

William W. Vaughan; Dale L. Johnson

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' 'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' DEC 5 1984 Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Mr. Wallo: The Divisfon of Remedial Action Projects staff has reviewed the authority review documents for Gardinler, Inc., Tampa, Florida; Conserv (formerly Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co.), Nichols, Florida; and Blockson Chemical co., Joliet, Illinois. Based on the content therein and in consultation with Mr. Steve Miller, Office of General Counsel (C&11), Departamt of Energy, It has been determined that the Department has no authority, through the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, to conduct remedial action at the aforementioned sites, Therefore, please prepare the document packages necessary to notify the appropriate state authorities and the

55

THE AEROSPACE CORPORA-iION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

CORPORA-iION CORPORA-iION Suite 4000. 955 L' EnJant Plnro. S. W.. Washingion. D.C. 20024-2174. Telephone: (2d2) 488-6000 7117~03.87.cdy.27 27 May 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE:23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: STATUS OF ACTIONS - FUSRAP SITE LIST Aerospace recently completed a comprehensive review of sites listed in the FUSRAP Site Investigation and Remeaial Action Summary Report, dated December 31, 1986. The primary objectives of this review were to examine the,status of each site identified in Sections II and III of the Report.with respect to actions required to complete the Identification and Characterization Process; to provide DFSD a current status of these actions; and to identify

56

Hr. Andrew Wallo The Aerospace Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Washington, b.C. 20545 OCT 28 1985 // && ' Q Hr. Andrew Wallo The Aerospace Corporation Suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Andy: The comTIents and authority decision from the following sites are set out 2cL.f I below. No additional cments are included; therefore, a careful editoria review of these documents should be made when the documents are finalized. t 1. Watertown Arsenal, Watertown, HA NY.4 Although building 421 was used for AEC operation under contract #AT(30-I)-956, there is insufficient evidence that DOE has the authority to conduct remedial action at this site. Buildings 34, 41, and the GSA site are not, nor were they, the responsibility of the DOE. Therefore, based on the evidence noted in the authority review, it is .

57

Reduction of rework at a large aerospace manufacturer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is an axiom of the manufacturing of any complex product that errors will occur that require repair or discard of said product. In building aircraft, Raptor Aerospace encounters and repairs numerous deviations from the ...

Lieberman, Jeremy A. (Jeremy Alan)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Inventory optimization in high volume aerospace supply chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supply chains of aerospace products can be complex, involving thousands of components per product and hundreds of vendors spaced out over an increasingly global landscape. Managing all inputs necessary for these complex ...

Masse, Brian Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Development of alternate parts for the aerospace industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the topic of the development of alternate parts for the aerospace industry, drawing on industry examples to demonstrate methods and approaches and the benefits to firms engaged in these activities. I ...

Tapley, James Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these innovations. Keywords: Thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine. This work is presented as paper AIAA-2006-7225 to Space-2006 Conference, 19-21 September, 2006, San Jose, CA, USA.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Photon Tools for Fuel Spray Studies in Aerospace Propulsion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Fuel Spray Studies in Aerospace Tools for Fuel Spray Studies in Aerospace Propulsion Systems Kuo-Cheng Lin, 1 Campbell D. Carter, 2 and Stephen A. Schumaker 3 1 Taitech, Inc., 1430 Oak Court, Suite 301, Beavercreek, OH 45430, USA; 2 Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433, USA; 3 Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA 93524, USA Fuel injection plays an important role in establishing stable and efficient combustion inside the combustor of a liquid-fueled aerospace propulsion system. Depending on the application of interest, fuel injection conditions range from high-speed crossflows in the air-breathing propulsion systems to quiescent environments with extremely high pressures in the rocket engines. In addition to the typical liquid

62

Multistate analysis and design : case studies in aerospace design and long endurance systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research contributes to the field of aerospace engineering by proposing and demonstrating an integrated process for the early-stage, multistate design of aerospace systems. The process takes into early consideration ...

Agte, Jeremy S. (Jeremy Sundermeyer)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Service bulletin inventory management and modeling for aerospace parts in customer service organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Customer Service department of United Technology Corporation (UTC) Aerospace System is primarily responsible for providing spare parts, repair services, training, and technical support for products that UTC Aerospace ...

Pardede, Erna K. (Erna Kertasasmita)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Next Generation Neural Implants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... They are still bulky, rigid, power hungry, and functionally limited. ... This talk will review progress on next generation implants, which must be miniature ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

Working Group Reports Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Workshop J. Vitko, Jr.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Workshop J. Vitko, Jr. Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, California The Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) Workshop concentrated on reviewing and refining the science experiments planned for the UAV Demonstration Flights (UDF) scheduled at the Oklahoma Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) in April 1994. These experiments are summarized below. UDF Experiments 1. Clear sky, daylight Scientific questions: Do models and observations agree? Under varying conditions (low/high humidity, low/high aerosols)? How accurately can we measure fluxes? What is the impact of surface "patchiness" in the visible? In the IR? At what length scales does it average out? Flight profiles: Minimum of 2 hrs centered on solar noon, clear sky, three altitude tiers, 10- to 20-km legs;

66

I I THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION I I,W. I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

s s I I THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION I I,W. I .%tc 7900,955 L%nfam Plaza. S. W., Wahingron. D.C. 20024-2174, T~kpdnc: (202) 488-6@~ 7117~03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CR CA*03 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Deconnnissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND "NIVERSITIiS M/&b-s pl p.o- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation nO.o-02 .includes 26 colleges and universities identified,in Enclosure 14 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated M0.63. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University oftVirginia,

67

Beijing Jinfeng Aerospace S T Developments Company | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jinfeng Aerospace S T Developments Company Jinfeng Aerospace S T Developments Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Beijing Jinfeng Aerospace S&T Developments Company Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100000 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Producer of hydrogen storing metals and one of 13 manufacturers which have a combined production capacity of 7,000 tons/year. The company is working on possible uses of hydrogen for transport applications. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

68

FLAMELESS COMBUSTION APPLICATION FOR GAS TURBINE ENGINES IN THE AEROSPACE INDUSTRY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to review the potential application of flameless combustion technology in aerospace gas turbine engines. Flameless combustion is a regime (more)

OVERMAN, NICHOLAS

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

An Assessment of the Degree of Implementation of the Lean Aerospace Initiative Principles and Practices within the US Aerospace and Defense Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is a formal documentation of the results of an assessment of the degree to which Lean Principles and Practices have been implemented in the US Aerospace and Defense Industry. An Industry Association team prepared ...

Shaw, Thomas E.

70

Structural dynamics test simulation and optimization for aerospace components  

SciTech Connect

This paper initially describes an innovative approach to product realization called Knowledge Based Testing (KBT). This research program integrates test simulation and optimization software, rapid fabrication techniques and computational model validation to support a new experimentally-based design concept. This design concept implements well defined tests earlier in the design cycle enabling the realization of highly reliable aerospace components. A test simulation and optimization software environment provides engineers with an essential tool needed to support this KBT approach. This software environment, called the Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO), integrates analysis and test based models to support optimal structural dynamic test design. A goal in developing this software tool is to provide test and analysis engineers with a capability of mathematically simulating the complete structural dynamics test environment within a computer. A developed computational model of an aerospace component can be combined with analytical and/or experimentally derived models of typical structural dynamic test instrumentation within the VETO to determine an optimal test design. The VETO provides the user with a unique analysis and visualization environment to evaluate new and existing test methods in addition to simulating specific experiments designed to maximize test based information needed to validate computational models. The results of both a modal and a vibration test design are presented for a reentry vehicle and a space truss structure.

Klenke, S.E.; Baca, T.J.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Codification vs personalisation: A study of the information evaluation practice between aerospace and construction industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the emerging digital economy, the management of information in aerospace and construction organisations is facing a particular challenge due to the ever-increasing volume of information and the extensive use of information and communication technologies ... Keywords: Aerospace, Construction, Information value, Through-life

Llewellyn C. M. Tang; Yuyang Zhao; Simon Austin; Mansur Darlington; Steve Culley

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Aerospace and Industrial Applications of C/C, C/SiC, SiC/SiC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, Aerospace and Industrial...

73

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION Suite X00, 955 L'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

X00, 955 L' X00, 955 L' Enfam Plaza, S. W., Washing on. D.C. 20024.2174~ Tekphonr: (202) 48&6000 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CR CA.& Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division bf Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance' - ltE.o= with your suggestion during ourmeeting on 22 September. The recommendation ~0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified fin Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated MO.03. 27 May 1~987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ~C.ol and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

74

German Aerospace Center (DLR)Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

75

Design of a small fast steering mirror for airborne and aerospace applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the analysis and design of a small advanced fast steering mirror (sAFSM) for airborne and aerospace platforms. The sAFSM provides feedback-controlled articulation of two rotational axes for precision ...

Boulet, Michael Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

An examination of Boeing's supply chain management practices within the context of the global aerospace industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the supply chain management practices of the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company within the context of the global aerospace industry. The methodology used for this study includes a study of emerging ...

izmeci, DaŸ lar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

An approach to analyze tradeoffs for aerospace system design and operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are important tradeoffs that need to be considered for the design and operation of aerospace systems. In addition to tradeoffs, there may also be multiple stakeholders of interest to the system and each may have ...

O'Neill, Michael Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

An Approach to Analyze Tradeoffs for Aerospace System Design and Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are important tradeoffs that need to be considered for the design and operation of aerospace systems. In addition to tradeoffs, there may also be multiple stakeholders of interest to the system and each may have ...

O'Neill, Gregory

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Architecting robustness and timeliness in a new generation of aerospace systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerospace systems have strict dependability and real-time requirements, as well as a need for flexible resource reallocation and reduced size, weight and power consumption. To cope with these issues, while still maintaining safety and fault containment ...

Jos Rufino; Joo Craveiro; Paulo Verissimo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

An object-oriented framework for distributed computational simulation of aerospace propulsion systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing and developing new aerospace propulsion systems is time-consuming and expensive. Computational simulation is a promising means for alleviating this cost, but requires a flexible software simulation system capable of integrating advanced multidisciplinary ...

John A. Reed; Abdollah A. Afjeh

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Aerospace nuclear safety: An introduction and historical overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an introduction and overview on the topical area of aerospace nuclear safety. Emphasis is on the history of the use of nuclear power sources in space, operational experience with these nuclear sources, a review of previous accidents associated with both U.S. and Russian launches, and the safety issues associated with the entire life cycle of space reactors. There are several potential missions to include near earth orbit, orbit-raising, lunar bases, and propulsion to such solar system locations as Mars, which are suitable for the use of space reactors. The process by which approval is obtained to launch these nuclear materials to space is also presented as well as the role of nuclear safety policy and requirements in a space program using nuclear power sources. Important differences in safety concerns for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) now used, and space reactors are presented. The role and purpose of independent safety evaluation and assessment in ensuring safe launch and operation is also discussed. In summary, this paper provides the requisite framework in this topical area for the remaining papers of this session.

Lee, J.H.; Buden, D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Broad beam ion implanter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Implantable medical sensor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

Darrow, Christopher B. (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Modesto, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Wang, Amy W. (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modular photonic power and VCSEL-based data links for aerospace and military applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

If photonic data and power transfer links are constructed in a modular fashion, they can be easily adapted into various forms to meet a wide range of needs for aerospace and military applications. The performance specifications associated with these needs can vary widely according to application. Alignment tolerance needs also tend to vary greatly, as can requirements on power consumption. An example of a modular photonic data and/or power transfer link that can be applied to military and aerospace needs is presented. In this approach, a link is designed for low (<10 kb/s) data rates, ultra-low electrical power consumption, large alignment tolerance, and power transfer to provide complete electrical shielding in a remote module that might be found in a military or aerospace application.

Carson, R.F.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

NVLAP Fasteners and Metals LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Metallugy Division, in front of the primary Rockwell hardness ... Handbook 150-18 contains specific requirements for energy efficient lighting ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Communication-related outcomes of cochlear implant use by late-implanted prelingually deafened adults.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cochlear implantation of prelingually deafened adults is a contentious issue and information about the outcomes of late-implanted prelingually deafened (LIPD) adults is still largely (more)

Celliers, Liani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Solar Power Forecasting at UC San Diego Jan Kleissl, Dept of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, UCSD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Power Forecasting at UC San Diego Jan Kleissl, Dept of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and discharging of fast storage devices with relatively low power (e.g. batteries or supercapacitors) could the economics of solar power. However, accurate short term forecasting of cloudiness is required for efficient

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

88

CU-CAS-97-09 CENTER FOR AEROSPACE STRUCTURES THE CONSTRUCTION OF FREE-FREE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CU-CAS-97-09 CENTER FOR AEROSPACE STRUCTURES THE CONSTRUCTION OF FREE-FREE FLEXIBILITY MATRICES OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO CAMPUS BOX 429 BOULDER, COLORADO 80309 #12;The Construction of Free-Free­418, of that journal) #12;The Construction of Free-Free Flexibility Matrices as Generalized Stiffness Inverses C. A

Felippa, Carlos A.

89

PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE  

SciTech Connect

As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

A low-power cochlear implant system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cochlear implants, or bionic ears, restore hearing to the profoundly deaf by bypassing missing inner-ear hair cells in the cochlea and electrically stimulating the auditory nerve. For miniaturized cochlear implants, including ...

Baker, Michael W. (Michael Warren), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Early History and Challenges of Implantable Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implantable systems for biomedical research and clinical care are now a flourishing field of activities in academia as well as industrial institutions. The broad field includes experimental explorations in electronics, mechanical, chemical, and biological ... Keywords: Implantable electronics, biomedical micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), implantable microsystems, micropackage, nonhermetic package, radio-frequency (RF) wireless powering

Wen H. Ko

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A capital equipment capacity planning methodology for aerospace parts manufacturing in a high-mix, low volume environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A static capacity planning model was developed and tested following a four-phased framework. This model was developed for the purposes of capital planning for capacity requirements at a large aerospace parts manufacturing ...

Reveley, Matthew A. (Matthew Aaron)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Determination of Clear-Sky Radiative Flux Profiles, Heating Rates, and Optical Depths Using Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles as a Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors report results obtained using an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV) as an experimental platform for atmospheric radiative transfer research. These are the first ever climate measurements made from a UAV and represent a ...

Francisco P. J. Valero; Shelly K. Pope; Robert G. Ellingson; Anthony W. Strawa; John Vitko Jr.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a process for etching a material such as LiNbO{sub 3} by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

Arnold, G.W. Jr.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.

1988-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

Leung, K.N.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

97

Aerospace modal test optimization using VETO (virtual environment for test optimization)  

SciTech Connect

We present a software environment integrating analysis and test based models to support optimal modal test design of aerospace components through a Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO). A goal in developing this software tool is to provide test and analysis organizations with a capability of mathematically simulating the complete test environment within a computer. Derived models of test equipment, instrumentation and hardware can be combined within the VETO to provide the user with a unique analysis and visualization capability to evaluate new and existing test methods. The VETO assists analysis and test engineers in maximizing the value of each modal test. It is particularly advantageous for structural dynamics model reconciliation applications. The VETO enables an engineer to interact with a finite element model of an aerospace component to optimally place sensors and exciters and to investigate the selection of data acquisition parameters needed to conduct a complete modal survey. Additionally, the user can evaluate the use of different types of instrumentation such as filters, amplifiers and transducers for which models are available in the VETO. The dynamic response of most of the virtual instruments (including the device under test) are modeled in the state space domain. Design of modal excitation levels and appropriate test instrumentation are facilitated by the VETO`s ability to simulate such features as unmeasured external inputs, A/D quantization effects, and electronic noise.

Klenke, S.E.; Reese, G.M.; Schoof, L.A.; Shierling, C.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Aerospace Structural Aerospace Structural Material ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... F Fuel consumption per trip F Fuel consumption per trip F 787 ... Shop rlines & gers S a Env Energy Efficiency Energy Efficiency Solid Waste Disposal ...

2013-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Artificial Retina Implant Patient Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interviews with Artificial Retina Recipients Interviews with Artificial Retina Recipients Image of Mr. R Mr. R: Argus II recipient (Italy) You Tube video (2012; 2011 implantee) Image of Mr. F Mr. F: Argus II recipient (Italy) You Tube video (2012; 2011 implantee) Image of Mr. P Mr. P: Argus II recipient (France) You Tube video (2012; 2009 implantee) Image of Mr. K Mr. K: Argus II recipient (England) You Tube video (2012; 2009 implantee) Image promoting Mail Online Article Peter L.: Blind man fitted with 'bionic eye' sees for first time in 30 years Mail Online (UK) (2009) Image promoting Mail Online Article Barbara C .: Blind U.S. woman has experimental electronic eye implant CNN video and article (2009) NDTV video and article (2009) Image promoting BBC story Ron: The man with the bionic eye BBC Video and article (2009)

100

Photoluminescence response of ion-implanted silicon  

SciTech Connect

The photoluminescence intensity from ion-implanted silicon can be quenched by the radiation damage implicit in the implantation. Annealing is then required before the intensity of the luminescence from a defect center is approximately proportional to the concentration of that center. Data from positron annihilation and photoluminescence experiments establish that severe quenching of the luminescence occurs when the mean separation of the small vacancy clusters is less than {approx}30 atomic spacings, and the authors map out where, in the annealing and implantation phase space, the luminescence intensity is expected to be approximately proportional to the concentration of the optical centers.

Harding, Ruth E.; Davies, Gordon; Hayama, S.; Coleman, P. G.; Burrows, C. P.; Wong-Leung, J. [Department of Physics, King's College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cadmium ban spurs interest in zinc-nickel coating for corrosive aerospace environments  

SciTech Connect

OSHA recently reduced the permissible exposure level for cadmium. The new standard virtually outlaws cadmium production and use, except in the most cost-insensitive applications. Aerospace manufacturers, which use cadmium extensively in coatings applications because of the material's corrosion resistance, are searching for substitutes. The most promising alternative found to date is a zinc-nickel alloy. Tests show that the alloy outperforms cadmium without generating associated toxicity issues. As a result, several major manufacturing and standards organizations have adopted the zinc-nickel compound as a standard cadmium replacement. The basis for revising the cadmium PEL -- which applies to occupational exposure in industrial, agricultural and maritime occupations -- is an official OSHA determination that employees exposed to cadmium under the existing PEL face significant health risks from lung cancer and kidney damage. In one of its principal uses, cadmium is electroplated to steel, where it acts as an anticorrosive agent.

Bates, J. (Pure Coatings Inc., West Palm Beach, FL (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Improved medical implants comes from nanostructuring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved medical implants comes from nanostructuring Improved medical implants comes from nanostructuring Improved medical implants comes from nanostructuring Together, LANL and Russia institutes modify metals to better match and integrate, or bond, with human bone tissue. April 3, 2012 Improved medical implants comes from nanostructuring In addition to possessing strength beyond what is possible in conventional pure metals, Biotanium(tm) has also been optimized for integration with living bone. Scientific studies of the attachment and growth of bone cells on Biotanium(tm) consistently show that these cells adhere better and grow significantly faster -- up to 20 times faster. ...nanostructuring remarkably improves other metal properties, including strength, cyclic load resistance, corrosion resistance, machinability, and

103

Application of ion implantation to electrochemical studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of ion implantation to electrochemical studies is illustrated with a study of electrocatalysis of the chlorine evolution reaction at RuO{sub 2}, IrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide anodes in chloride solutions. Electrode/solution interfaces of well defined catalyst composition are generated in a reproducible manner by implantation of Ru (or Ir) into Ti followed by in situ oxidation of the near surface titanium alloys. Ion implantation enables the tailoring on an atomic scale of an electrochemical interface. Analysis by Rutherford backscattering adds the ability of quantitative mechanistic study in terms of actual ion concentration at the interface. In addition, ion implantation, as a processing technique, creates new materials with improved properties which may have future practical use in catalytic materials.

Vallet, C.E.; White, C.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

McWatters, Bruce Ray (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Using lean enterprise principles to drive quality and on time delivery to customers : a study of the Honeywell Aerospace Engine Assembly and Test Center of Excellence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Honeywell Aerospace has been a leader in manufacturing high quality engines to customers for decades. With engine and auxiliary power unit (APU) growth of-9% in 2005, and projected growth similar or greater for 2006, ...

Jones, Andrea (Andrea Sieg)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

In Beam Tests of Implanted Helium Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Targets consisting of 3,4He implanted into thin aluminum foils (approximately 100, 200 or 600 ug/cm^2) were prepared using intense (a few uA) helium beams at low energy (approximately 20, 40 or 100 keV). Uniformity of the implantation was achieved by a beam raster across a 12 mm diameter tantalum collimator at the rates of 0.1 Hz in the vertical direction and 1 Hz in the horizontal direction. Helium implantation into the very thin (approximately 80-100 ug/cm^2) aluminum foils failed to produce useful targets (with only approximately 10% of the helium retained) due to an under estimation of the range by the code SRIM. The range of low energy helium in aluminum predicted by Northcliffe and Shilling and the NIST online tabulation are observed on the other hand to over estimate the range of low energy helium ions in aluminum. An attempt to increase the amount of helium by implanting a second deeper layer was also carried out, but it did not significantly increase the helium content beyond the blistering limit (approximately 6 x 10^17 helium/cm^2). The implanted targets were bombarded with moderately intense 4He and 16O beams of 50-100 particle nA . Rutherford Back Scattering of 1.0 and 2.5 MeV proton beams and recoil helium from 15.0 MeV oxygen beams were used to study the helium content and profile before, during and after bombardments. We observed the helium content and profile to be very stable even after a prolonged bombardment (up to two days) with moderately intense beams of 16O or 4He. Helium implanted into thin (aluminum) foils is a good choice for thin helium targets needed, for example, for a measurement of the 3he(a,g)7Be reaction and the associated S34 astrophysical cross section factor (S-factor).

J. E. McDonald; R. H. France III; R. A. Jarvis; M. W. Ahmed; M. A. Blackston; Th. Delbar; M. Gai; T. J. Kading; Y. Parpottas; B. A. Perdue; R. M. Prior; D. A. Rubin; M. C. Spraker; J. D. Yeomans; L. Weissman; H. R. Weller; E. L. Wilds Jr; ;; UHartford; GCSU; LNS/UConn; TUNL/Duke; UCL/LLN; Yale; NGCSU

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

123- Hydrogen Embrittlement Failure in Steel Fasteners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

086- Improvement in Gas Tightness of YSZ Coatings Produced by Atmospheric Plasma ... 145- The Synergy of XRD and XRF in a Shale and Slate Analysis.

108

Implanted : technology and connection in the deaf world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1984, the FDA approved a medical device called a cochlear implant for adult use in the United States. Unlike assistive hearing technologies that came before it, such as hearing aids, cochlear implants could offer wider ...

Calamia, Joseph Benjamin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Micro Raman Spectroscopy of Annealed Erbium Implanted GaN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wurtzite GaN epilayers grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on sapphire substrates were subsequently ion implanted with Er to a dose of 510? cm?. The implanted samples were annealed in nitrogen atmosphere ...

Vajpeyi, Agam P.

110

Implantation and Characterization of Helium in Nuclear Materials at ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Accelerated Materials Evaluation for Nuclear Application Utilizing Test Reactors, Ion Beam Facilities and Modeling. Presentation Title, Implantation

111

Ohmic contacts to Si-implanted and un-implanted n-type GaN  

SciTech Connect

We report on ohmic contacts to Si-implanted and un-implanted n-type GaN on sapphire. A ring shaped contact design avoids the need to isolate the contact structures by additional implantation or etching. Metal layers of Al and Ti/Al were investigated. On un-implanted GaN, post metalization annealing was performed in an RTA for 30 seconds in N{sub 2} at 700, 800, and 900 C. A minimum specific contact resistance (r{sub c}) of 1.4{times}10{sup -5} {Omega}{minus}cm{sup 2} was measured for Ti/Al at an annealing temperature of 800 C. Although these values are reasonably low, variations of 95% in specific contact resistance were measured within a 500 {mu}m distance on the wafer. These results are most likely caused by the presence of compensating hydrogen. Specific contact resistance variation was reduced from 95 to 10% by annealing at 900 C prior to metalization. On Si-implanted GaN, un-annealed ohmic contacts were formed with Ti/Al metalization. The implant activation anneal of 1120 C generates nitrogen vacancies that leave the surface heavily n-type, which makes un-annealed ohmic contacts with low contact resistivity possible.

Brown, J; Ramer, J.; Zheng, L.F.; Hersee, S.D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for High Technology Materials; Zolper, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

Hampikian, Janet M (Decatur, GA); Hunt, Eden M (Atlanta, GA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ultrafine-grained titanium for medical implants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

We disclose ultrafine-grained titanium. A coarse-grained titanium billet is subjected to multiple extrusions through a preheated equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) die, with billet rotation between subsequent extrusions. The resulting billet is cold processed by cold rolling and/or cold extrusion, with optional annealing. The resulting ultrafine-grained titanium has greatly improved mechanical properties and is used to make medical implants.

Zhu, Yuntian T. (Los Alamos, NM); Lowe, Terry C. (Santa Fe, NM); Valiev, Ruslan Z. (Ufa, RU); Stolyarov, Vladimir V. (Ufa, RU); Latysh, Vladimir V. (Ufa, RU); Raab, Georgy J. (Ufa, RU)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Method of electroplating a conversion electron emitting source on implant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for preparing an implant coated with a conversion electron emitting source (CEES) are disclosed. The typical method includes cleaning the surface of the implant; placing the implant in an activating solution comprising hydrochloric acid to activate the surface; reducing the surface by H.sub.2 evolution in H.sub.2SO.sub.4 solution; and placing the implant in an electroplating solution that includes ions of the CEES, HCl, H.sub.2SO.sub.4, and resorcinol, gelatin, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, before tin plating, a seed layer is formed on the surface. The electroplated CEES coating can be further protected and stabilized by annealing in a heated oven, by passivation, or by being covered with a protective film. The invention also relates to a holding device for holding an implant, wherein the device selectively prevents electrodeposition on the portions of the implant contacting the device.

Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Gonzales, Gilbert R. (New York, NY); Adzic, Radoslav (East Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

Porous coatings from wire mesh for bone implants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of coating areas of bone implant elements and the resulting implant having a porous coating are described. Preselected surface areas are covered by a preform made from continuous woven lengths of wire. The preform is compressed and heated to assure that diffusion bonding occurs between the wire surfaces and between the surface boundaries of the implant element and the wire surfaces in contact with it. Porosity is achieved by control of the resulting voids between the bonded wire portions.

Sump, Kenneth R. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Heat transmission along the surface of dental implant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Objectives: Temperature changes along an implant body have not been widely studied. The objectives of this in vitro study were (i) to establish if (more)

Patel, Zaheed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Inhibition of CNS myelin developmentin vivo by implantation of anti ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

implantation of anti-GalC hybridoma cells ... undamaged amyelinated axons remain among the hybridoma cells. Ventral .... numbers of punctate 'hot spots' (

118

Profiling symmetric encryption algorithms for implantable medical devices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The amount of Implantable Medical Devices (IMD) keeps booming in recent years. However, not many of them have encryption and decryption methods to protect their (more)

Zhu, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Plasma implantation and deposition for advanced materials surface modification.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research work described in this thesis focuses on the physics of plasma implantation and deposition as well as the application of the technology to (more)

Fu, King Yu (???)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

High-Tech Brain Implant Predicts, Prevents Epileptic Seizures ...  

This ground-breaking technology consists of miniature brain implants for automatic prediction and control of seizures ... A system and method for ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications...

122

ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLE NEUROSTIMULATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38 3. Renewable Power for ImplantableCOMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLER, Isaacson M, Shakouri A: A renewable energy power source

Pantchenko, Oxana S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Improvement of Contact Resistance with Molecular Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect

Basic characteristics of ClusterBoron (B{sub 18}H{sub 22}) implantation were investigated for improving contact resistance in DRAM devices. Generally, {sup 49}BF{sub 2} has been widely used for contact implant application in DRAM manufacturing because of its higher productivity compared to monomer boron ({sup 11}B). However, because of limited activation in a low thermal budget ({approx}800 deg. C) anneal, the sheet resistance was saturated for doses over 5x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. Although many investigations have been reported, such as {sup 30}BF implant mixed implant with monomer boron etc., no practical solution has been found for dramatic improvement of contact resistance in a productive manner. B{sub 18}H{sub 22} was developed to overcome the productivity limitations encountered in low energy, high dose boron implantation and the limited activation of {sup 49}BF{sub 2} due to co-implanted fluorine. In this study, basic characterization of the B{sub 18}H{sub 22} contact implant was performed through sheet resistance, SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) and XTEM (cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy). The B{sub 18}H{sub 22} implants showed lower sheet resistance than conventional {sup 49}BF{sub 2} for 5x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} on bare wafer tests. Through XTEM study, we found the activation behavior of both B{sub 18}H{sub 22} and {sup 49}BF{sub 2} were directly related with the amorphous layer thickness and residual defects from low thermal budget anneal. PMOS contact resistance in the sub-70 nm device by B{sub 18}H{sub 22} implantation showed considerable improvement (about 30%), showing B{sub 18}H{sub 22} could replace the BF{sub 2} for contact implant in contact resistance implant.

Lee, Kyung Won [Axcelis Technologies Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Sungkyunkwan University., 300 Cheoncheon, Jangan, Suwon, Kyoungki-do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Ku; Oh, Jae Geun; Ju, Min Ae; Jeon, Seung Joon; Ku, Ja Chun; Park, Sung Ki [Hynix Semiconductor Inc., San 136-1 Ami, Bubal, Ichon, Kyoungki-do, 467-701 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Tae Hoon; Kim, Steve; Ra, Geum Joo; Harris, Mark A.; Reece, Ronald N. [Axcelis Technologies Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Yoon, Dae Ho [Sungkyunkwan University., 300 Cheoncheon, Jangan, Suwon, Kyoungki-do, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

Emergency Medical Support System for Extravehicular Activity Training Held at Weightless Environment Test Building (WETS) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) provides extravehicular activity (EVA) training to astronauts in a weightless environment test building (WETS) located in Tsukuba City. For EVA training, Tsukuba Medial Center Hospital (TMCH) has established ... Keywords: Extravehicular activity, Helicopter transportation after the decompression, Helmet diving

Isao Nakajima; Masakazu Tachibana; Noriyoshi Ohashi; Hiroshi Imai; Yasushi Asari; Shigenori Matsuyama

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, and sodium sulfur. 6 figs.

Muller, R.H.; Zhang, S.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, end sodium sulfur.

Muller, Rolf H. (Berkeley, CA); Zhang, Shengtao (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel cells10­12 . These systems generate electricity under mild conditions through the oxidation the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal, vibra- tions or body movements to generate power for an implanted device are limited because

Recanati, Catherine

128

Assessment of passive cardiovascular implant devices for MRI compatibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The increasing popularity of both magnetic resonance angiography and minimally invasive cardiovascular interventional procedures has led to the requirement for the development of implant devices that not only provide for patient safety, but ... Keywords: Implant, MRI, artifact, safety, stent, valve

Edward G. Walsh; Brigitta C. Brott; Vicki Y. Johnson; Ramakrishna Venugopalan; Andreas Anayiotos

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Implant for in-vivo parameter monitoring, processing and transmitting  

SciTech Connect

The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

Ericson, Milton N. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Hylton, James O. (Clinton, TN)

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

130

Method of fabricating optical waveguides by ion implantation doping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fabricating high-quality optical waveguides in optical quality oxide crystals by ion implantation doping and controlled epitaxial recrystallization is provided. Masked LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals are implanted with high concentrations of Ti dopant at ion energies of about 360 keV while maintaining the crystal near liquid nitrogen temperature. Ion implantation doping produces an amorphous, Ti-rich nonequilibrium phase in the implanted region. Subsequent thermal annealing in a water-saturated oxygen atmosphere at up to 1000/degree/C produces solid-phase epitaxial regrowth onto the crystalline substrate. A high-quality crystalline layer results which incorporates the Ti into the crystal structure at much higher concentrations than is possible by standard diffusion techniques, and this implanted region has excellent optical waveguiding properties.

Appleton, B.R.; Ashley, P.R.; Buchal, C.J.

1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods - ion implantation - is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang Mengbing [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York at Albany, 255 Fuller Road, Albany NY 12203 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ion-implanted planar-buried-heterostructure diode laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Planar-Buried-Heterostructure, Graded-Index, Separate-Confinement-Heterostructure semiconductor diode laser 10 includes a single quantum well or multi-quantum well active stripe 12 disposed between a p-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 14 and an n-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 16. The laser 10 includes an ion implanted n-type region 28 within the p-type cladding layer 14 and further includes an ion implanted p-type region 26 within the n-type cladding layer 16. The ion implanted regions are disposed for defining a lateral extent of the active stripe.

Brennan, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hammons, Burrell E. (Tijeras, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Influence of Ion Implantation on cell Attachment to Glassy Polymeric Carbon  

SciTech Connect

In vitro biocompatibility tests have been carried out with model cell lines to demonstrate that near surface implantation of silver in Glassy Polymeric Carbon (GPC) can completely inhibit cell attachment on implanted areas while leaving adjacent areas unaffected. Patterned ion implantation permits precise control of tissue growth on medical applications of GPC. We have shown that silver ion implantation or argon ion assisted surface deposition of silver inhibits cell growth on GPC, a desirable improvement of current cardiac implants.

Zimmerman, R.; Ila, D. [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL (United States); Gurhan, I. [Ege University Faculty of Engineering, Izmir (Turkey); Ozdal-Kurt, F. [CBU Faculty of Science, Manisa (Turkey); Sen, B. H. [EU Faculty of Dentistry, Izmir (Turkey); Rodrigues, M. [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto SP (Brazil)

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Controlling the Biodegradation Rate of Magnesium-Based Implants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Z. Pu, D. Puleo, O.W. Dillon, Jr., I.S. Jawahir. On-Site ... By proper selection of machining conditions, magnesium-based implants with customized...

135

Noninvasive quantification of drug delivery from an implantable MEMS device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) sensors in vivo in real time and corroborated by scintillation of urine samples. The goal of monitoring drug delivery from an implant in vivo, in real time and without disturbing the tissue environment, was ...

Johnson, Audrey M., 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A fully implantable intracochlear drug delivery device : development and characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a collaborative effort with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Draper Laboratory is developing an implantable microfluidic drug delivery system for long-term treatment of inner ear disorders and prevention of ...

Swan, Erin Eileen Leary, 1976-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J. [Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento Quimica Fisica y Analitica (Spain); Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

138

Magnetic Processing A Pervasive Energy Efficient Technology for Next Generation Materials for Aerospace and Specialty Steel Markets  

SciTech Connect

Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing is an exceptionally fertile, pervasive and cross-cutting technology that is just now being recognized by several major industry leaders for its significant potential to increase energy efficiency and materials performance for a myriad of energy intensive industries in a variety of areas and applications. ORNL has pioneered the use and development of large magnetic fields in thermomagnetically processing (T-MP) materials for altering materials phase equilibria and transformation kinetics. ORNL has discovered that using magnetic fields, we can produce unique materials responses. T-MP can produce unique phase stabilities & microstructures with improved materials performance for structural and functional applications not achieved with traditional processing techniques. These results suggest that there are unprecedented opportunities to produce significantly enhanced materials properties via atomistic level (nano-) microstructural control and manipulation. ORNL (in addition to others) have shown that grain boundary chemistry and precipitation kinetics are also affected by large magnetic fields. This CRADA has taken advantage of ORNLs unique, custom-designed thermo-magnetic, 9 Tesla superconducting magnet facility that enables rapid heating and cooling of metallic components within the magnet bore; as well as ORNLs expertise in high magnetic field (HMF) research. Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is a a US-based industrial company, that provides enhanced performance alloys for the Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. In this CRADA, Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is focusing on applying ORNLs Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing (TMP) technology to improve their current and future proprietary materials product performance and open up new markets for their Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. Unprecedented mechanical property performance improvements have been demonstrated for a high strength bainitic alloy industrial/commercial alloy that is envisioned to provide the potential for new markets for this alloy. These thermomechanical processing results provide these alloys with a major breakthrough demonstrating that simultaneous improvements in yield strength and ductility are achieved: 12 %, 10%, 13%, and 22% increases in yield strength, elongation, reduction-in-area, and impact energy respectively. In addition, TMP appears to overcome detrimental chemical homogeneity impacts on uniform microstructure evolution.

Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Ludtka, G.M.; Ray, P. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.); Magee, J. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Kulikov, Stanislav (Sarov, RU); Osorio, Ivan (Leawood, KS); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

140

Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Ions that are implanted include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and a preferred co-implant of Ar/sup +/ and Ne/sup +/. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the band gap energy threshold of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible blue light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to these positive ions of sufficient density and with sufficient energy to provide an image. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%; a lead zirconate content ranging from 62 to 70 mole %; and a lead titanate content ranging from 38 to 30%. The region of ion implantation is in a range from 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate. Density of ions is in the range from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and having an energy in the range from 100 to 500 keV.

Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

1980-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Diluted magnetic semiconductor effects in Mn-implanted silicon carbide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light transmission and Faraday rotation spectra measured at the temperature of 2 K were compared for silicon carbide single crystals of 4H polytype (4H-SiC), implanted with 3.8 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} of Mn ions at the beam energy of 190 keV, and a control 4H-SiC single crystal sample, which was not implanted. Mn ion implantation led to the creation of a Mn-doped surface layer with the average Mn concentration of 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} and a thickness of approximately 0.2 {mu}m. Transmission of light through the implanted crystal changed only slightly in comparison with the control sample, which however, corresponded to a relatively strong attenuation in the implanted layer. This was interpreted as a result of scattering, which emerges in the surface layer due to optical nonuniformities, created by the high energy ion irradiation. The presence of a thin Mn-ion-containing surface layer led, despite its small thickness, to noticeable changes in the sample Faraday rotation spectra. The estimated values of the Verdet constant for this layer were about three orders of magnitude larger and of opposite sign compared to the Verdet constant values of the undoped sample. Magnetic field dependencies of the Faraday rotation contribution from the implanted layer were found to be saturating functions, which points to a proportionality of the Faraday rotation to the magnetization of the paramagnetic Mn ion subsystem. Based on these findings we conclude that the Mn-implanted SiC layer exhibits magneto-optical properties typical of a diluted magnetic semiconductor. At the same time, no ferromagnetic ordering was observed in the studied (Si, Mn)C sample.

Komarov, A. V.; Ryabchenko, S. M. [Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 46 Nauki Ave., Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Los, A. V. [ISS Ltd., Semiconductors and Circuits Lab, 15 Bozhenko Street, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Freescale Semiconductor Ukraine LLC., 15 Bozhenko Street, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Romanenko, S. M. [ISS Ltd., Semiconductors and Circuits Lab, 15 Bozhenko Street, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Optical image storage in ion implanted PLZT ceramics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optical images can be stored in transparent lead-lanthanum-zirconate-titanate (PLZT) ceramics by exposure to near-uv light with photon energies greater than the band gas energy of approx. 3.35 eV. The image storage process relies on optically induced changes in the switching properties of ferroelectric domains (photoferroelectric effect). Stored images are nonvolatile but can be erased by uniform uv illumination and simultaneous application of an electric field. Although high quality images, with contrast variations of greater than or equal to 100:1 and spatial resolution of approx. 10 ..mu..m, can be stored using the photoferroelectric effect, relatively high exposure energies (approx. 100 mJ/cm/sup 2/) are required to store these images. This large exposure energy severely limits the range of possible applications of nonvolatile image storage in PLZT ceramics. It was found in H, He, and Ar implanted PLZT that the photosensitivity can be significantly increased by ion implantation into the surface to be exposed. The photosensitivity after implantation with 5 x 10/sup 14/ 500 keV Ar/cm/sup 2/ is increased by about three orders of magnitude over that of unimplanted PLZT. The image storage process and the effect of ion implantation is presented along with a phenomenological model which describes the enhancement in photosensitivity obtained by ion implantation. This model takes into account both light- and ion implantation-induced changes in conductivity and gives quantitative agreement with the measured changes in the coercive voltage with light intensity for ion implanted PLZT.

Peercy, P. S.; Land, C. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Implanted ions include H.sup.+, He.sup.+, Ne.sup.+, Ar.sup.+, as well as chemically reactive ions from Fe, Cr, and Al. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the absorption characteristics of the PLZT material from near-UV light to visible light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to the positive ions at sufficient density, from 1.times.10.sup.12 to 1.times.10.sup.17, and with sufficient energy, from 100 to 500 KeV, to provide photosensitivity enhancement. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%, a lead zirconate content of 62 to 70 mole %, and a lead titanate content of 38 to 30%. The ions are implanted at a depth of 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate.

Land, Cecil E. (Albuquerque, NM); Peercy, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive-ion implantation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and nonvolatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Implanted ions include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ne/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, as well as chemically reactive ions from Fe, Cr, and Al. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the absorption characteristics of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to the positive ions at sufficient density, from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/, and with sufficient energy, from 100 to 500 keV, to provide photosensitivity enhancement. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%, a lead zirconate content of 62 to 70 mole %, and a lead titanate content of 38 to 30%. The ions are implanted at a depth of 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate.

Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

1982-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner.

Conrad, John R. (Madison, WI)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner. 7 figs.

Conrad, J.R.

1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

Ion-implanted planar-buried-heterostructure diode laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Planar-Buried-Heterostructure, Graded-Index, Separate-Confinement-Heterostructure semiconductor diode laser 10 includes a single quantum well or multi-quantum well active stripe 12 disposed between a p-type compositionally graded Group 3-5 cladding layer 14 and an n-type compositionally graded Group 3-5 cladding layer 16. The laser 10 includes an ion implanted n-type region 28 within the p-type cladding layer 14 and further includes an ion implanted p-type region 26 within the n-type cladding layer 16. The ion implanted regions are disposed for defining a lateral extent of the active stripe. 4 figs.

Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Myers, D.R.; Vawter, G.A.

1990-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Caborane beam from ITEP Bernas ion source for semiconductor implanters  

SciTech Connect

A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for hundreds of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past 5 years. The difficulties of extraction and transportation of low energy boron beams can be solved by implanting clusters of boron atoms. In Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) the Bernas ion source successfully generated the beam of decaborane ions. The carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beam is more attractive material due to its better thermal stability. The results of carborane ion beam generation are presented. The result of the beam implantation into the silicon wafer is presented as well.

Seleznev, D.; Hershcovitch, A.; Kropachev, G.; Kozlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Koshelev, V.; Kulevoy, T.; Jonson, B.; Poole, J.; Alexeyenko, O.; Gurkova, E.; Oks, E.; Gushenets, V.; Polozov, S.; Masunov, E.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Energy Efficiency and Reliability in Wireless Biomedical Implant Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of wireless implant technology requires correct delivery of the vital physiological signs of the patient along with the energy management in power-constrained devices. Toward these goals, we present an augmentation protocol for the physical layer of the Medical Implant Communications Service (MICS) with focus on the energy efficiency of deployed devices over the MICS frequency band. The present protocol uses the rateless code with the Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) modulation scheme to overcome the reliability and power cost concerns in tiny implantable sensors due to the considerable attenuation of propagated signals across the human body. In addition, the protocol allows a fast start-up time for the transceiver circuitry. The main advantage of using rateless codes is to provide an inherent adaptive duty-cycling for power management, due to the flexibility of the rateless code rate. Analytical results demonstrate that an 80% energy saving is achievable with the proposed protocol when compared to the IE...

Abouei, Jamshid; Plataniotis, Konstantinos N; Pasupathy, Subbarayan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation  

SciTech Connect

Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

151

Highly porous platinum electrodes for the use in potentially implantable glucose fuel cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Implantable glucose fuel cells are investigated as self-regenerative, long-term approach to power medical implants such as cardiac pacemakers. Such fuel cells use ambient energy of (more)

Kloke, Arne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Block cipher based security for severely resource-constrained implantable medical devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large proportion of today's modern implantable medical devices (IMDs) comprises a wireless interface that enables the IMD to connect to another implanted device or a base station situated outside the body. Due to the various benefits, future IMD generations ...

Christoph Beck; Daniel Masny; Willi Geiselmann; Georg Bretthauer

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Tenderness of Bos indicus influenced cattle as impacted by anabolic implants and gender  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steers (n = 77) and heifers (n = 68) were assigned randomly to one of three treatment groups. Treatment groups were defined as: no implant, implanted twice with trenbolone acetate (Revalor S or H), or implanted twice with estrodial benzoate (Synovex S or H). Animals were fed to an estimated 10 mm backfat thickness and based on visual appraisal, were assigned a harvest date. Carcass characteristics, color space values, sarcomere length, fat and moisture determination, Warner-Bratzler shear force, and protein degradation were all measured. Implanted animals, as a whole, exhibited heavier hot carcass weights and larger ribeye areas than non-implanted animals. Animals implanted with Revalor displayed significantly lower marbling scores and lower yield grades than those from control or Synovex groups. The distribution of quality grades within treatment groups shifted, with implant groups displaying higher percentages of Select carcasses. Gender impacted percentage of extractable fat and marbling scores, with heifers displaying higher values than steers for both measurements. Both implant groups displayed higher (P gender groups, the non-implanted cattle displayed the greatest amount of degradation (62%), followed by Synovex (48%,) and lastly Revalor (33%), all of which were different (P < .05) from each other. These results indicate that use of anabolic implants positively impacted lean muscle growth, yet was a detriment to quality. Also, tenderness was negatively impacted by the use of these compounds. However, this study found by aging product for at least 21 days, tenderness differences between implanted and non-implanted animals were significantly mitigated.

Hudek, Jarrett F.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Profiling of symmetric-encryption algorithms for a novel biomedical-implant architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Starting with the implantable pacemaker, microelectronic implants have been around for more than 50 years. A plethora of commercial and research-oriented devices have been developed so far for a wide range of biomedical applications. In view of an envisioned ... Keywords: implantable devices, microarchitectural profiling, symmetric encryption, ultra-low power

Christos Strydis; Di Zhu; Georgi N. Gaydadjiev

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Glucose Fuel Cell for Implantable BrainMachine Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing 3:4 mW cm{2steady-state power and up to 180 mW cm{2 peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, ...

Rapoport, Benjamin I.

156

Surgical implantation techniques for electronic tags in fish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intracoelomic implantation of transmitters into fish requires making a surgical incision, incision closure, and other surgery related techniques; however, the tools and techniques used in the surgical process vary widely. We review the available literature and focus on tools and techniques used for conducting surgery on juvenile salmonids because of the large amount of research that is conducted on them. The use of sterilized surgical instruments properly selected for a given size of fish will minimize tissue damage and infection rates, and speed the wound healing of fish implanted with transmitters. For the implantation of transmitters into small fish, the optimal surgical methods include making an incision on the ventral midline along the linea alba (for studies under 1 month), protecting the viscera (by lifting the skin with forceps while creating the incision), and using absorbable monofilament suture with a small-swaged-on swaged-on tapered or reverse-cutting needle. Standardizing the implantation techniques to be used in a study involving particular species and age classes of fish will improve survival and transmitter retention while allowing for comparisons to be made among studies and across multiple years. This review should be useful for researchers working on juvenile salmonids and other sizes and species of fish.

Wagner, Glenn N.; Cooke, Steven J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Photoluminescence in silicon implanted with silicon ions at amorphizing doses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Luminescent and structural properties of n-FZ-Si and n-Cz-Si implanted with Si ions at amorphizing doses and annealed at 1100 Degree-Sign C in a chlorine-containing atmosphere have been studied. An analysis of proton Rutherford backscattering spectra of implanted samples demonstrated that an amorphous layer is formed, and its position and thickness depend on the implantation dose. An X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that defects of the interstitial type are formed in the samples upon annealing. Photoluminescence spectra measured at 78 K and low excitation levels are dominated by the dislocation-related line D1, which is also observed at 300 K. The peak position of this line, its full width at half-maximum, and intensity depend on the conduction type of Si and implantation dose. As the luminescence excitation power is raised, a continuous band appears in the spectrum. A model is suggested that explains the fundamental aspects of the behavior of the photoluminescence spectra in relation to the experimental conditions.

Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru; Kalyadin, A. E.; Kyutt, R. N.; Sakharov, V. I.; Serenkov, I. T.; Shek, E. I.; Afrosimov, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Tetel'baum, D. I. [Lobachevsky State University, Physicotechnical Research Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ion sources for the varying needs of ion implantation  

SciTech Connect

A joint research and development effort whose ultimate goal is to develop steady-state intense ion sources to meet the needs of the two energy extremes of ion implanters (mega-electron-volt and of hundreds of electron-volt) has been in progress for the past two years. Present day high-energy ion implanters utilize low charge state (usually single charge) ion sources in combination with rf accelerators. Usually, a MeV linear accelerator is used for acceleration of a few milliamperes. It is desirable to have instead an intense, high charge state ion source on a relatively low-energy platform (dc acceleration) to generate high-energy ion beams for implantation. This endeavor has already resulted in very high steady-state output currents of higher charge states antimony and phosphorous ions. Low-energy ion implantation is performed presently by decelerating high-energy extracted ions. Consequently, output currents are low due to space charge problems. Contamination is also a problem due to gases and plasmas employed to mitigate the space charge issues. Our efforts involve molecular ions and a plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. A program overview is presented in this article. Although source specifics are described in accompanying papers, only this article contains our most recent results.

Hershcovitch, A.; Batalin, V.A.; Bugaev, A.S. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] (and others)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Smart gun with implantable RFid match system: a practical approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study for Smart Gun Technology (SGT) based on radio frequency control. This system involves the use of a RFid tag implanted in the hand of the owner that will transmit its unique identification number to the electronic control ... Keywords: RFid, embedded electronics, firearm security, smart gun technologies, unintentional firearm death

M. A. Gazziro; L. O. B. Almeida; C. D. Pedrazzani; C. G. C. F. Machado

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Process for forming one or more substantially pure layers in substrate material using ion implantation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method comprises selecting an implantable element and a substrate material to be implanted which, at the implant/anneal temperatures, have limited mutual solubility and have no intermediate phases formed. In an example, Be is implanted with 11 {times}10{sup 17} Al/cm{sup 2} at 200 keV and then annealed for 1 h at 500 C. Rutherford backscattering shows that layer formation occurred during the anneal. SEM shows rectangular Be defects in the Al layer. Other examples of implantable elements and suitable substrate materials are tabulated. 6 figs, 1 table. (DLC)

Musket, R.G.; Brown, D.W.; Munir, Z.A.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Collagen fibre implant for tendon and ligament biological augmentation. In vivo study in an ovine model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-mail: davidenea@tiscali.it D. Enea Clinica Ortopedica, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ospedali Riuniti Ancona, via Tronto 10, 60126 Ancona, Italy J. Gwynne #2; J. Shepherd #2; S. Best #2; R. Cameron Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University... -implanted scaffold (Fig. 4j), a statistically significant increase was detected between pre-implanted EDC and implants at both 3 and 6 months. On the contrary, there was a significant decrease in force to failure between pre-implanted EDC/EGDE and implants at both 3...

Enea, D; Gwynne, J; Kew, S; Arumugam, M; Shepherd, J; Brooks, R; Ghose, S; Best, Serena Michelle; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth; Rushton, N

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

162

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION 1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 e 20030 Century Blvd., Germantown, Maryland 20767, Telephone: (301) 428-2700 7963-02.81.aw.05 20 January 1981 Dr. William E. Mott, Director Environmental & Safety Engineering Division U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20767 Dear Dr. Mott: INVESTIGATIONS OF RECORDS ON THE FORMER VULCAN CRUCIBLE SITE, ALIQUIPPA, PA. AND THE NATIONAL GUARD ARMORY, CHICAGO, IL In your comments of 12 January 1981, regarding the Argonne survey report for Vulcan Crucible Steel Co., Argonne was directed to discuss the size of the rods and the source of the billets rolled by Vulcan along with other historical data. This information was obtained from recent records searches, the following data is submitted for Argonne's use: During the period that Vulcan Crucible Tool and Steel Company,

163

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION ,'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,' ,' 20030 Century Blvd., Germantown, Maryland 20767, Telephone: (301) 428-2700 7848-02.80.aw.35 11 August 1980 Dr. William E. Mott Acting Director Environmental § Safety Engineering Division U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, MD 20767 Dear Dr. Mott: RESTRICTIONS ON THE LEWISTON LAND FORMERLY OWNED BY THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT Enclosed please find copies of the restrictions placed on properties that were formerly part of the Atomic Energy Commission portion of the Lake Ontario ordnance works. The restrictions, in the form of Orders, were based on the Atomic Energy Commission surveys and were issued on April 27, 1972 by the New York State Commissioner of Health for: 1. Certain property of the town of Lewiston, Niagara County 2. Certain property of Monroe W. Frank, located in the town of

164

Aerospace Materials-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012... changes through shockwaves, thereby leading to dramatic improvements in fatigue strength and crack propagation resistance of alloys.

165

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J.T. Baker Chemical Company Princeton University Vitro Laboratories Westinghouse Electric Corp. U.S. Pipe and Foundry Company Grants Ore Buyiny Station Los Alamos County...

166

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J.T. Baker Chemical Company Princeton University Vitro Laboratories Westinghouse Electric Corp. U.S. Pipe and Foundry Company '". Grants Ore Buying Station Los Alamos...

167

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J.T. Baker Chemical Company Princeton University Vitro Laboratories Westinghouse Electric Corp. U.S. Pipe and Foundry Company ' Grants Ore Buying Station Los Alamos County...

168

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Facilities of New York, dated 15 May 1942 appears in U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey aerial photographs dated 23 December 1943 but not in photographs dated 16 June 1946. No...

169

Aerospace - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011... Ray1; Mark Thornton1; Michael Bentz1; 1Boeing Small scale laboratory tests were performed to investigate jet fuel-water icing phenomena.

170

Properties of ion implanted Ti-6Al-4V processed using beamline and PSII techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The surface of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) alloy has been modified using beamline implantation of boron. In separate experiments, Ti64 has been implanted with nitrogen using a plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique utilizing either ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen (N{sub 2}), or their combinations as the source of nitrogen ions. Beamline experiments have shown the hardness of the N-implanted surface saturates at a dose level of {approximately} 4 {times} 10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2} at {approximately} 10 GPa. The present work makes comparisons of hardness and tribological tests of (1) B implantation using beamline techniques, and (2) N implanted samples using ammonia and/or nitrogen gas in a PSII process. The results show that PSII using N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3} gives similar hardness as N implantation using a beamline process. The presence of H in the Ti alloy surface does not affect the hardness of the implanted surface. Boron implantation increased the surface hardness by as much as 2.5x at the highest dose level. Wear testing by a pin-on-disk method indicated that nitrogen implantation reduced the wear rate by as much as 120x, and boron implantation reduced the wear rate by 6.5x. Increased wear resistance was accompanied by a decreased coefficient of friction.

Walter, K.C.; Woodring, J.S.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Williams, J.M.; Poker, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Interfacial Interactions between Implant Electrode and Biological Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrodes implanted into neural systems are known to degrade due to encapsulation by surrounding tissues. The mechanisms of electrode-tissue interactions and prediction of the behavior of electrode are yet to be achieved. This research will aim at establishing the fundamental knowledge of interfacial interactions between the host biological environment and an implanted electrode. We will identify the dynamic mechanisms of such interfacial interactions. Quantitative analysis of the electrical properties of interface will be conducted using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Results will be used to develop a general model to interpret electrical circuitry of the interface. This is expected to expand our understanding in the effects of interfacial interactions to the charge transport. The interfacial interactions of an implanted electrode with neural system will be studied in two types of electrodes: silver and graphene coated. The interfacial impedance of both samples will be studied using EIS. The development of the cellular interaction will be investigated using histological procedure. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) will be employed to study the chemical effects on the silver electrodes. Atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy will be used for material characterization of graphene-coated electrodes. In the study of silver electrode, two mechanisms affecting the interfacial impedance are proposed. First is the formation of silver oxide. The other is the immuno-response of tissue encapsulation. Histological results suggest that higher cell density cause higher impedance magnitude at the interface. It is also found that the cellular encapsulation dominates the increase in impedance for longer implanted time. In the study of graphene-coated electrode, it is found that the graphene can strongly prevent the metal substrate from being oxidized. It not only provides good electrical conductivity for signal transport, but also reduces the speed of the accumulation of tissue around the electrode. Such characteristics of graphene have great potential in the application of neural implant. Finally, the dynamic mechanisms of biological interaction are proposed. A model is also developed to represent the general circuitry of the interface between an implanted electrode and the neural system. The model has three major components, which are interfacial double layer, cellular encapsulation, and the substrate. The model presented in this study can compensate for selection and prediction of materials and their behaviors.

Chiu, Cheng-Wei 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

designing for assembly with thread forming fasteners in magnesium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012 ... This reduction in machining results in saved time as well as reduced costs for energy, tooling, and capital. In addition, a cored hole avoids...

173

Method of making silicon on insalator material using oxygen implantation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The described embodiments of the present invention provide a semiconductor on insulator structure providing a semiconductor layer less susceptible to single event upset errors (SEU) due to radiation. The semiconductor layer is formed by implanting ions which form an insulating layer beneath the surface of a crystalline semiconductor substrate. The remaining crystalline semiconductor layer above the insulating layer provides nucleation sites for forming a crystalline semiconductor layer above the insulating layer. The damage caused by implantation of the ions for forming an insulating layer is left unannealed before formation of the semiconductor layer by epitaxial growth. The epitaxial layer, thus formed, provides superior characteristics for prevention of SEU errors, in that the carrier lifetime within the epitaxial layer, thus formed, is less than the carrier lifetime in epitaxial layers formed on annealed material while providing adequate semiconductor characteristics.

Hite, Larry R. (Dallas, TX); Houston, Ted (Richardson, TX); Matloubian, Mishel (Dallas, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Intracranial electrode implantation produces regional neuroinflammation and memory deficits in rats  

SciTech Connect

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The procedure entails intracranial implantation of an electrode in a specific brain structure followed by chronic stimulation. Although the beneficial effects of DBS on motor symptoms in PD are well known, it is often accompanied by cognitive impairments, the origin of which is not fully understood. To explore the possible contribution of the surgical procedure itself, we studied the effect of electrode implantation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on regional neuroinflammation and memory function in rats implanted bilaterally with stainless steel electrodes. Age-matched sham and intact rats were used as controls. Brains were removed 1 or 8 weeks post-implantation and processed for in vitro autoradiography with [(3)H]PK11195, an established marker of microglial activation. Memory function was assessed by the novel object recognition test (ORT) before surgery and 2 and 8 weeks after surgery. Electrode implantation produced region-dependent changes in ligand binding density in the implanted brains at 1 as well as 8 weeks post-implantation. Cortical regions showed more intense and widespread neuroinflammation than striatal or thalamic structures. Furthermore, implanted animals showed deficits in ORT performance 2 and 8 weeks post-implantation. Thus, electrode implantation resulted in a widespread and persistent neuroinflammation and sustained memory impairment. These results suggest that the insertion and continued presence of electrodes in the brain, even without stimulation, may lead to inflammation-mediated cognitive deficits in susceptible individuals, as observed in patients treated with DBS.

Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Biegon, A.; Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Polat, U.; Biegon, A.

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Electromagnetic Interference with Implanted Medical Devices: An Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric and magnetic fields (EMF) and contact currents at both power and radio frequencies can interfere with the functioning of implanted medical electronic devices. In both public and occupational environments, electromagnetic interference issues are now exacerbated by the exponential increase in sources of interference over the last decade, an increasing variety of types of susceptible devices, and greater potential for unintended consequences that can be serious. This technical update discusses pote...

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

176

Process Performance of Optima XEx Single Wafer High Energy Implanter  

SciTech Connect

To meet the process requirements for well formation in future CMOS memory production, high energy implanters require more robust angle, dose, and energy control while maintaining high productivity. The Optima XEx high energy implanter meets these requirements by integrating a traditional LINAC beamline with a robust single wafer handling system. To achieve beam angle control, Optima XEx can control both the horizontal and vertical beam angles to within 0.1 degrees using advanced beam angle measurement and correction. Accurate energy calibration and energy trim functions accelerate process matching by eliminating energy calibration errors. The large volume process chamber and UDC (upstream dose control) using faraday cups outside of the process chamber precisely control implant dose regardless of any chamber pressure increase due to PR (photoresist) outgassing. An optimized RF LINAC accelerator improves reliability and enables singly charged phosphorus and boron energies up to 1200 keV and 1500 keV respectively with higher beam currents. A new single wafer endstation combined with increased beam performance leads to overall increased productivity. We report on the advanced performance of Optima XEx observed during tool installation and volume production at an advanced memory fab.

Kim, J. H.; Yoon, Jongyoon; Kondratenko, S.; David, J.; Rubin, L. M. [Axcelis Technologies, 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01950 (United States); Jang, I. S.; Cha, J. C.; Joo, Y. H.; Lee, A. B.; Jin, S. W. [Hynix Semiconductor Inc., San 136-1 Ami, Bubal, Ichon, Kyoungki-do, 467-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

177

Selective nucleation induced by defect nanostructures: A way to control cobalt disilicide precipitation during ion implantation  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we show a way to control cobalt disilicide precipitation during Co ion implantation at high temperatures (650 Degree-Sign C) by affecting radiation defects involved in precipitate nucleation and growth. We demonstrate that the relative shares of different precipitate types nucleated by implantation are strongly affected by defect microstructures deliberately created in investigated samples prior to cobalt implantation. Especially interesting is the effect of a dense ensemble of extremely small (1-3 nm) cavities, which promotes the formation of a relatively uniform layer of coherent cobalt disilicide precipitates with a narrow size distribution. In order to better understand the mechanism of the microstructural influence on the precipitate nucleation modes during Co implantation, we investigate the disilicide precipitation using different implantation setups and compare the results with those for cavity-free Si specimens implanted in similar conditions.

Fortuna, F.; Nguyen, M.-A.; Ruault, M.-O. [CSNSM, batiment 108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Kirk, M. A. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Borodin, V. A. [NRC 'Kurchatov Institute,' 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ganchenkova, M. G. [NRNU MEPhI, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Dose distribution for /sup 125/I implants due to anisotropic radiation emission and unknown seed orientation  

SciTech Connect

Variations in dose distribution due to anisotropic radiation emission around /sup 125/I seeds and a lack of knowledge about the orientation of the implanted seeds have been investigated. Upper and lower bounds for dose distributions have been calculated for planar implants using the experimentally determined angular dose distribution around a typical /sup 125/I seed. Results of our study suggest that significant dose variations in the center and the periphery of the implanted area are possible.

Prasad, S.C.; Bassano, D.A.; Fear, P.I.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Corrosion Products of Iron Wire Arterial Implants from In Vivo and In ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, iron wire was implanted into either the abdominal rat aortic wall or ... Fabrication of a Cellulosic Nanocomposite Scaffold with Improved...

180

Controlled release of gentamicin from polyelectrolyte multilayers to treat implant-related infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polyelectrolyte multilayered (PEM) coatings were fabricated to incorporate and release the small, hydrophilic antibiotic gentamicin from implant surfaces for infection control. The use of a cationic hydrolytically cleavable ...

Moskowitz, Joshua Seth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications SBIRSTTR...

182

Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives...

183

Physical properties of erbium implanted tungsten oxide films deposited by reactive dual magnetron sputtering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ion implantation, electrical resistivity, optical propertiesfocus on the electrical resistivity and optical propertiesexhibited very low electrical resistivity of 1.75 10 -3 ?

Mohamed, Sodky H.; Anders, Andre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A novel curvilinear approach for prostate seed implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A new technique called ''curvilinear approach'' for prostate seed implantation has been proposed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of curvilinear distribution of seeds for low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Twenty LDR prostate brachytherapy cases planned intraoperatively with VariSeed planning system and I-125 seeds were randomly selected as reference rectilinear cases. All the cases were replanned by using curved-needle approach keeping the same individual source strength and the volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose 145 Gy (V{sub 100}). Parameters such as number of needles, seeds, and the dose coverage of the prostate (D{sub 90}, V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}), urethra (D{sub 30}, D{sub 10}) and rectum (D{sub 5}, V{sub 100}) were compared for the rectilinear and the curvilinear methods. Statistical significance was assessed using two-tailed student's t-test. Results: Reduction of the required number of needles and seeds in curvilinear method were 30.5% (p Dose to the urethra was reduced significantly; D{sub 30} reduced by 10.1% (p dose D{sub 5} was 18.5% (p dose homogeneity (V{sub 150}, V{sub 200}) improved while urethral dose was reduced, which might potentially result in better treatment outcome. Reduction in rectal dose could potentially reduce rectal toxicity and complications. Reduction in number of needles would minimize edema and thereby could improve postimplant urinary incontinence. This study indicates that the curvilinear implantation approach is dosimetrically superior to conventional rectilinear implantation technique.

Podder, Tarun K.; Dicker, Adam P.; Hutapea, Parsaoran; Darvish, Kurosh; Yu Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leo Jenkins Cancer Center, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27834 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Superconductivity in Metal-mixed Ion-Implanted Polymer Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion-implantation of normally insulating polymers offers an alternative to depositing conjugated organics onto plastic films to make electronic circuits. We used a 50 keV nitrogen ion beam to mix a thin 10 nm Sn/Sb alloy film into the sub-surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and report the low temperature properties of this material. We observed metallic behavior, and the onset of superconductivity below 3 K. There are strong indications that the superconductivity does not result from a residual thin-film of alloy, but instead from a network of alloy grains coupled via a weakly conducting, ion-beam carbonized polymer matrix.

A. P. Micolich; E. Tavenner; B. J. Powell; A. R. Hamilton; M. T. Curry; R. E. Giedd; P. Meredith

2005-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Cost estimates for commercial plasma source ion implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A semiempirical model for the cost of a commercial plasma sourceion implantation (PSII) facility is presented. Amortized capital and operating expenses are estimated as functions of the surface area throughput T. The impact of secondary electron emission and batch processing time is considered. Treatment costs are found to decrease monotonically with T until they saturate at large T when capital equipment payback and space rental dominate the expense. A reasonably sized PSII treatment facility should be able to treat a surface area of 104 m2 per year at a cost of $0.01 per cm2.

Donald J. Rej; Ralph B. Alexander

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Structure and Properties of Nanoparticles Formed by Ion Implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter broadly describes the formation, basic microstructure, and fundamental optoelectronic properties of nanocomposites synthesized by ion implantation. It is not meant as a complete literature survey and by no means includes all references on a subject that has seen a considerable amount of research effort in the past 15 years. However, it should be a good starting point for those new to the field and in a concise way summarize the main lines of research by discussing the optical, magnetic, and smart properties of these nanoparticles and the dependence of these properties on the overall microstructure. The chapter concludes with an outlook for the future.

Meldrum, A. [University of Alberta, Edmondton, Canada; Lopez, R. [Vanderbilt University; Magruder, R H [Belmont University, Nashville; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; White, Clark W [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Towards a better speech processor for cochlear implants : auditory- nerve responses to high-rate electric pulse trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cochlear implants are prosthetic devices that seek to restore hearing in profoundly deaf patients by electrically stimulating the auditory-nerve (AN). With current implants, the representation of the sound waveform in ...

Litvak, Leonid, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Wind noise suppression in cochlear implants with one and two microphones Student Investigator: Casey Cox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Wind noise suppression in cochlear implants with one and two microphones Student Investigator coding strategy used. However, performance deteriorates significantly in wind noise. Wind noise was to investigate how wind noise affects speech intelligibility in cochlear implant users. Default noise reduction

Peterson, Blake R.

190

Fixation response of two cementless tibial implants under static and fatigue compression loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The short- and long-term success of tibial cementless implants depend on the initial fixation stability often provided by posts and screws. Excessive relative interface motions are known to inhibit bone ingrowth and, hence, biologic fixation. In the ... Keywords: fixation, knee implant, micro-motion, posts, screw

M. Dammak; A. Shirazi-Adl; D. J. Zukor

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Profiling of lossless-compression algorithms for a novel biomedical-implant architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of a booming market for microelectronic implants, our ongoing research work is focusing on the specification and design of a novel biomedical microprocessor core targeting a large subset of existing and future biomedical applications. Towards ... Keywords: implantable devices, lossless compression, microarchitectural profiling, ultra-low power

Christos Strydis; Georgi N. Gaydadjiev

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Dosimetry of I-125 seeds implanted on the surface of a cavity  

SciTech Connect

Dosimetry of a new implant technique to treat brain tumors is presented. High grade gliomas or astrocytomas are surgically removed, and radioactive I-125 seeds are implanted on the surface of the cavity. A computational model is presented to determine the number of seeds and the activity of the seeds for a given dose and cavity size.

Prasad, S.C.; Bassano, D.A.; Fear, P.I.; King, G.A. (SUNY, Syracuse (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

An Auger Sputter Profiling Study of Nitrogen and Oxygen Ion Implantations in Two Titiaium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Samples of two titanium alloys, Ti-6A1-4V and Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3A1, were ion implanted with a combination of nitrogen (N+) and oxygen (O+). For each alloy, implantation parameters were chosen to give implanted nitrogen concentrations of approximately 10 or 50 atomic percent, from a depth of 100 nanometers to a depth of 400 nanometers. In all but one case, dual energy (200 keV and 90 keV) implantations of nitrogen were used to give a relatively uniform nitrogen concentration to a depth of 300 nanometers. In each case, oxygen was implanted at 35 keV, following the nitrogen implantation, to give an oxygen-enriched region near the surface. The implanted samples were then examined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) combined with argon ion sputtering. In order to determine the stoichiometry of the nitrogen implanted regions, it was necessary to determine the N (KVV) contribution to the overlapping N (KVV) and Ti (LMM) Auger transitions. It was also necessary to correct for the ion-bombardment-induced compositional changes which have been described in an earlier study of titanium nitride thin films. The corrected AES depth profiles were in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

Barton, B. D., Pope, L. E., Wittberg, T. N.

1989-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation  

SciTech Connect

Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei [Axcelis Technologies, Inc. 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

195

Sources for Low Energy Extreme of Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect

A joint research and development effort focusing on the design of steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress for the past four and a half years. The ultimate goal is to meet the two, energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has resulted in record steady state output currents of higher charge state Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+}(8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+}(1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+}(0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. During the past year the effort was channeled towards low energy implantation, for which the effort involved molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 3 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 14 keV and a smaller current of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, a Boron fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bernas-Calutron ion source.

Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B. M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Batalin, V. A.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Pershin, V. I.; Petrenko, S. V.; Rudskoy, I.; Seleznev, D. N. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bugaev, A. S.; Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [High Current Electronics Institute Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Masunov, E. S.; Polozov, S. M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Poole, H. J. [PVI, Oxnard, California 93031-5023 (United States); Storozhenko, P. A. [State Research Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Organoelement Compounds 38, sh. Entuziastov, Moscow, 111123 (Russian Federation); Svarovski, A. Ya. [Siberian Divisions of Russian National Research Center 'A.A. Bochvara Scientific Research Institute for Inorganic Materials', Seversk, 636070 (Russian Federation)

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

ION SOURCES FOR ENERGY EXTREMES OF ION IMPLANTATION.  

SciTech Connect

For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques, which meet the two energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. For low energy ion implantation our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, Boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bemas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

HERSCHCOVITCH,A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; BATALIN, V.A.; KROPACHEV, G.N.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; KULEVOY, T.V.; KOLOMIETS, A.A.; PERSHIN, V.I.; PETRENKO, S.V.; RUDSKOY, I.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; BUGAEV, A.S.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; LITOVKO, I.V.; OKS, E.M.; YUSHKOV, G. YU.; MASEUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.; POOLE, H.J.; STOROZHENKO, P.A.; SVAROVSKI, YA.

2007-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

The effect of zirconium implantation on the structure of sapphire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of zirconium implantation on the structure of sapphire was investigated by 175 keV Zr implantation at room temperature to a fluence of 4 1016 ions/cm2 into sapphire single crystals. Samples were examined by several experimental techniques: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy along a channeling direction (RBS-C), electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and Z-contrast images obtained in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Range and deposited energy were simulated with SRIM-2008.04. The Z-contrast images from transmission electron microscope indicated: a near surface damaged layer ~30 nm thick, a subsurface region exhibiting "random" de-channeling ~52 nm thick, and a deeper damaged, crystalline zone ~64 nm thick. The RBS-C spectra confirmed the presence of these three regions. The two damaged regions contained high concentrations of as yet unresolved defect clusters. The intermediate region contained Zr-clusters embedded in an "amorphous" matrix that exhibited short-range order corresponding to -Al2O3, i.e., a defective spinel structure. The EELS measurements show that the amorphous region is deficient in oxygen.

Sina, Younes [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); McHargue, Carl J [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Duscher, Gerd [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Heat capacity of low temperature Ge- and Si-calorimeters and optimization of As-implanted silicon thermistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat capacity of low temperature Ge- and Si-calorimeters and optimization of As-implanted silicon thermistors

Alessandrello, A; Cerofolini, G F; Fiorini, Ettore; Giuliani, A; Liguori, C; Meda, L; Niinikoski, T O; Rijllart, A

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Implantable device for in-vivo intracranial and cerebrospinal fluid pressure monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

Ericson, Milton N. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Hylton, James O. (Clinton, TN)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thermal Behaviour of W+C Ion Implanted Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE)  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work was to examine thermal behavior of the surface modified Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly Ethylene (UHMWPE ) in order to understand the effect of ion implantation on the properties of this polymer which is widely used especially for biomedical applications. UHMWPE samples were Tungsten and Carbon (W+C) hybrid ion implanted by using Metal Vapour Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implantation technique with a fluence of 10 17 ions/cm2 and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Untreated and surface-treated samples were investigated by Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) Analysis, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectrometry, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). This study has shown that ion implantation represents a powerful tool on modifying thermal properties of UHMWPE surfaces. This combination of properties can make implanted UHMWPE a preferred material for biomedical applications.

Urkac, E. Sokullu; Oztarhan, A. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Tihminlioglu, F. [Chemical Engineering Department, Izmir Institute of High Technology, Gulbahcekoyu Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Ila, D.; Chhay, B.; Muntele, C. [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal, Huntsville AL 35762 (United States); Budak, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL 35762 (United States); Oks, E.; Nikolaev, A. [High Current Electrnonics, Institute, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Development of pulsed processes for the manufacture of solar cells. [Ion implantation and annealing process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a 1-year program to develop the processes required for low-energy ion implantation for the automated production of silicon solar cells. The program included (1) demonstrating state-of-the-art ion implantation equipment and designing an automated ion implanter, (2) making efforts to improve the performance of ion-implanted solar cells to 16.5 percent AM1, (3) developing a model of the pulse annealing process used in solar cell production, and (4) preparing an economic analysis of the process costs of ion implantation. During the program, phosphorus ions at an energy of 10 keV and dose of 2 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ were implanted in silicon solar cells to produce junctions, while boron ions at 25 keV and 5 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ were implanted in the cells to produce effective back surface fields. An ion implantation facility with a beam current up to 4 mA and a production throughput of 300 wafers per hour was designed and installed. A design was prepared for a 100-mA, automated implanter with a production capacity of 100 MW/sub e/ per year. A Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Costing Standards (SAMICS) economic analysis of the automated process steps of ion implantation and pulse annealing indicated that junctions can be formed and annealed at a cost of less than 3 cents per watt. The efforts during this program represent a major advancement in developing the automated production of silicon solar cells with efficiencies greater than 16 percent AM1.

Minnucci, J.A.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Molecular Ion Beam Transportation for Low Energy Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect

A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for 100's of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past five years. Current density limitation associated with extracting and transporting low energy ion beams result in lower beam currents that in turn adversely affects the process throughput. The transport channel with electrostatic lenses for decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}) and carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beams transportation was developed and investigated. The significant increase of ion beam intensity at the beam transport channel output is demonstrated. The transport channel simulation, construction and experimental results of ion beam transportation are presented.

Kulevoy, T. V.; Kropachev, G. N.; Seleznev, D. N.; Yakushin, P. E.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Kozlov, A. V.; Koshelev, V. A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B. M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Gushenets, V. I.; Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Polozov, S. M. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation); Poole, H. J. [PVI, Oxnard, California 93031-5023 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Rutherford backscattering analysis of gallium implanted 316 stainless steel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion implantation of Ga ions into 316 stainless steel was performed at fluences ranging from 8x10? to 10? ions/cm. The depth profile of Ga in the steel was analyzed via Rutherford Backscattering and ToFSIMS. The surface effects were characterized with SEM analysis. Results indicate that Ga saturation was reached at fluences between 2-6x10? ions/cm. The maximum Ga concentration occurred near the surface and was between 20 and 25 atomic percent. A constant Ga concentration of 5% was attained at 300 [] and deeper. The possible enhanced diffusion of Ga was observed, but not necessarily through the grain boundaries. Although there was no indication of compound formation, significant pitting was observed at high fluences. Repassivation characteristics of stainless steel may be inhibited at high fluences; therefore future studies are recommended.

Ortensi, Javier

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Thin-film rechargeable lithium batteries for implantable devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin films of LiCoO{sub 2} have been synthesized in which the strongest x-ray reflection is either weak or missing, indicating a high degree of preferred orientation. Thin-film solid state batteries with these textured cathode films can deliver practical capacities at high current densities. For example, for one of the cells 70% of the maximum capacity between 4.2 V and 3 V ({approximately}0.2 mAh/cm{sup 2}) was delivered at a current of 2 mA/cm{sup 2}. When cycled at rates of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, the capacity loss was 0.001 %/cycle or less. The reliability and performance of Li-LiCoO{sub 2} thin-film batteries make them attractive for application in implantable devices such as neural stimulators, pacemakers, and defibrillators.

Bates, J.b.; Dudney, N.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Cryogenic ion implantation near amorphization threshold dose for halo/extension junction improvement in sub-30 nm device technologies  

SciTech Connect

We report on junction advantages of cryogenic ion implantation with medium current implanters. We propose a methodical approach on maximizing cryogenic effects on junction characteristics near the amorphization threshold doses that are typically used for halo implants for sub-30 nm technologies. BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant at a dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}cm{sup -2} does not amorphize silicon at room temperature. When implanted at -100 Degree-Sign C, it forms a 30 - 35 nm thick amorphous layer. The cryogenic BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant significantly reduces the depth of the boron distribution, both as-implanted and after anneals, which improves short channel rolloff characteristics. It also creates a shallower n{sup +}-p junction by steepening profiles of arsenic that is subsequently implanted in the surface region. We demonstrate effects of implant sequences, germanium preamorphization, indium and carbon co-implants for extension/halo process integration. When applied to sequences such as Ge+As+C+In+BF{sub 2}{sup +}, the cryogenic implants at -100 Degree-Sign C enable removal of Ge preamorphization, and form more active n{sup +}-p junctions and steeper B and In halo profiles than sequences at room temperature.

Park, Hugh; Todorov, Stan; Colombeau, Benjamin; Rodier, Dennis; Kouzminov, Dimitry; Zou Wei; Guo Baonian; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Decker-Lucke, Kurt [Applied Materials, Varian Semiconductor Equipment, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

206

Final Report for the Study on S-Implanted Alloy 22 in 1 M NaCl Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to examine the effects of high levels of S in the near-surface region on the passivity of Alloy 22, a corrosion resistant Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, in deaerated 1 M NaCl solution. Near-surface concentrations of S up to 2 at.% were achieved in Alloy 22 test specimens by implanting them with S. The S-implanted samples were then evaluated in short-term electrochemical tests in the salt solution and subsequently analyzed with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) for film thickness and composition. Specimens tested included non-implanted and annealed Alloy 22 samples, samples implanted with S, and blanks implanted with Ar as an ion that would simulate the damage of S implantation without the chemical effect. A sample of S-implanted Alloy 22 was also exposed to solution for 29 days and analyzed for evidence of S accumulation at the surface over longer times.

Windisch, Charles F.; Baer, Donald R.; Jones, R. H.; Engelhard, Mark H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Method of making an ion-implanted planar-buried-heterostructure diode laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Planar-buried-heterostructure, graded-index, separate-confinement-heterostructure semiconductor diode laser 10 includes a single quantum well or multi-quantum well active stripe 12 disposed between a p-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding lever 14 and an n-type compositionally graded Group III-V cladding layer 16. The laser 10 includes an iion implanted n-type region 28 within the p-type cladding layer 14 and further includes an ion implanted p-type region 26 within the n-type cladding layer 16. The ion implanted regions are disposed for defining a lateral extent of the active stripe.

Brennan, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hammons, Burrell E. (Tijeras, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Proteomic comparison of biomaterial implants for regeneration of peripheral nerve tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tissue regenerates resulting from the healing of transected peripheral nerve differ in morphological and electrophysiological properties based on the biomaterial implant used to bridge the interneural wound gap. At gap ...

Miu, Kathy K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: 7Be Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies Developed at: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF)

210

An energy management IC for bio-implants using ultracapacitors for energy storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first known energy management IC to allow low-power systems, such as biomedical implants, to optimally use ultracapacitors instead of batteries as their chief energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in ...

Sanchez, William R.

211

Energy management techniques for ultra-small bio-medical implants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide medical professionals a means to continuously monitor bio-markers over long time scales with ...

Sanchez, William R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Mechanical characterization and in vivo operation of an implantable drug delivery MEMS device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this thesis was to advance an implantable drug delivery MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) device developed in our laboratory. This device was designed to locally deliver multiple substances in complex release ...

Li, Yawen, 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

AA4, Optical Properties of Gd Implanted ZnO Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DD3, A New Approach to Make ZnO-Cu2O Heterojunctions for Solar Cells ... E2, AlGaAs/GaAs/GaN Wafer Fused HBTs with Ar Implanted Extrinsic Collectors.

214

Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics, technology, and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X. Y. Yao, and K. -M. Yu, "Plasma synthesis of metallic andT. Short, and J. Tendys, "Plasma immersion ion implantationBang, and M. -R. Lin, "Plasma doping for shallow junctions,"

Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

RHEED, AES and XPS studies of the passive films formed on ion implanted stainless steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

P-implantation (10/sup 17/ ions cm/sup -2/, 40 KeV) into 304 stainless steel (ss) has been carried out, and an amorphous surface alloy was formed. Polarization studies in deaerated 1N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/+ 2% NaCl showed that P-implantation improved both the general and localized corrosion resistance of 304 ss. A comparative study has been carried out between the implanted and unimplanted steel to determine what influence P-implantation has upon the properties of the passive film formed 1N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The influence of Cl ions on pre-formed passive films was also studied. RHEED, XPS and AES were used to evaluate the nature of the passive films formed in these studies.

Clayton, C.R.; Doss, K.G.K.; Wang, Y.F.; Warren, J.B.; Hubler, G.K.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Low power data acquisition for microImplant biometric monitoring of tremors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide doctors a means to continuously monitor biometrics over long time scales ...

Khanna, Tania

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Neutron activation analysis for reference determination of the implantation dose of cobalt ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors prepared depth profilling reference materials by cobalt ion implantation at an ion energy of 300 keV into n-type silicon. The implanted Co dose was then determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) giving an analytical dynamic range of almost 5 decades and uncertainty of 1.5%. This form of analysis allows sources of error (beam spreading, misalignment) to be corrected. 70 refs., 3 tabs.

Garten, R.P.H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Dortmund (Germany); Bubert, H. [Institut fuer Spektrochemie und angewandte Spektrokopie, Dortmund (Germany); Palmetshofer, L. [Johannes-Kepler-Universitaet, Linz (Australia)

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Effect of Ag and Ag+N Ion Implantation on Cell Attachment Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implanted biomedical prosthetic devices are intended to perform safely, reliably and effectively in the human body thus the materials used for orthopedic devices should have good biocompatibility. Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly Ethylene (UHMWPE) has been commonly used for total hip joint replacement because of its very good properties. In this work, UHMWPE samples were Ag and Ag+N ion implanted by using the Metal-Vapor Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implantation technique. Samples were implanted with a fluency of 1017 ion/cm2 and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used for surface studies. RBS showed the presence of Ag and N on the surface. Cell attachment properties investigated with model cell lines (L929 mouse fibroblasts) to demonstrate that the effect of Ag and Ag+N ion implantation can favorably influence the surface of UHMWPE for biomedical applications. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to demonstrate the cell attachment on the surface. Study has shown that Ag+N ion implantation represents more effective cell attachment properties on the UHMWPE surfaces.

Urkac, Emel Sokullu; Oztarhan, Ahmet; Gurhan, Ismet Deliloglu; Iz, Sultan Gulce [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Tihminlioglu, Funda [Chemical Engineering Department, Izmir Institute of High Technology, Gulbahcekoyu Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Oks, Efim; Nikolaev, Alexey [High Current Electrnonics, Institute , Tomsk (Russian Federation); Ila, Daryush [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal, Huntsville AL 35762 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

Structural and Thermal Characterization of Ti+O Ion Implanted UltraHigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE)  

SciTech Connect

In this work, Metal-Gas Hybrid Ion Implantation technique was used as a tool for the surface modification of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE). Samples were Ti+O ion implanted by using Metal-Vapour Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implanter to a fluence of 5x10{sup 16} ion/cm{sup 2} for each species and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Untreated and surface treated samples were investigated by Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) Spectrometry, Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Results indicate that Ti+O ion implantation can be applied on UHMWPE surfaces successfully. ATR-FTIR spectra indicate that the C-H concentration on the surface decreased after Ti+O implantation. Thermal characterization with TGA and DSC shows that polymeric decomposition temperature is shifted after ion implantation.

Oztarhan, A.; Urkac, E. Sokullu; Kaya, N. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova, Izmir 35100 (Turkey); Tihminlioglu, F. [Chemical Engineering Department, Izmir Institute of High Technology, Gulbahcekoyu Urla, Izmir (Turkey); Ila, D.; Chhay, B.; Muntele, C. [Center for Irradiation of Materials, Alabama A and M University, Normal, Huntsville AL 35762 (United States); Budak, S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Alabama A and M University, Normal, AL 35762 (United States); Oks, E.; Nikolaev, A. [High Current Electrnonics, Institute , Tomsk (Russian Federation)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

220

Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (dose). In clinical cases, the FM reduced the dose to some voxels by up to 50% and generated shadows with extents of the order of 4 mm. Within the prostate contour, cold spots (dose) of the order of 20 mm{sup 3} were observed. D{sub 90} proved insensitive to the presence of FM for the cases selected. Conclusions: There is a major local impact of FM present in LDR brachytherapy seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although our results are too limited to draw conclusions regarding clinical significance.

Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, CHUQ Pavillon L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands) and Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

Brown, I.G.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Lithium implantation at low temperature in silicon for sharp buried amorphous layer formation and defect engineering  

SciTech Connect

The crystalline-to-amorphous transformation induced by lithium ion implantation at low temperature has been investigated. The resulting damage structure and its thermal evolution have been studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy channelling (RBS/C) and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). Lithium low-fluence implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature is shown to produce a three layers structure: an amorphous layer surrounded by two highly damaged layers. A thermal treatment at 400 Degree-Sign C leads to the formation of a sharp amorphous/crystalline interfacial transition and defect annihilation of the front heavily damaged layer. After 600 Degree-Sign C annealing, complete recrystallization takes place and no extended defects are left. Anomalous recrystallization rate is observed with different motion velocities of the a/c interfaces and is ascribed to lithium acting as a surfactant. Moreover, the sharp buried amorphous layer is shown to be an efficient sink for interstitials impeding interstitial supersaturation and {l_brace}311{r_brace} defect formation in case of subsequent neon implantation. This study shows that lithium implantation at liquid nitrogen temperature can be suitable to form a sharp buried amorphous layer with a well-defined crystalline front layer, thus having potential applications for defects engineering in the improvement of post-implantation layers quality and for shallow junction formation.

Oliviero, E. [CSNSM, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris-Sud, Batiment 108, 91405 Orsay (France); David, M. L.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F. [Institut Pprime, CNRS-Universite de Poitiers-ENSMA, SP2MI, Bd Marie et Pierre Curie, BP30179, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Fichtner, P. F. P. [Departamento de Metalurgia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av Bento Goncalves 9500, Caixa Postal 15051, 90035-190 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

223

Method For Plasma Source Ion Implantation And Deposition For Cylindrical Surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uniform ion implantation and deposition onto cylindrical surfaces is achieved by placing a cylindrical electrode in coaxial and conformal relation to the target surface. For implantation and deposition of an inner bore surface the electrode is placed inside the target. For implantation and deposition on an outer cylindrical surface the electrode is placed around the outside of the target. A plasma is generated between the electrode and the target cylindrical surface. Applying a pulse of high voltage to the target causes ions from the plasma to be driven onto the cylindrical target surface. The plasma contained in the space between the target and the electrode is uniform, resulting in a uniform implantation or deposition of the target surface. Since the plasma is largely contained in the space between the target and the electrode, contamination of the vacuum chamber enclosing the target and electrodes by inadvertent ion deposition is reduced. The coaxial alignment of the target and the electrode may be employed for the ion assisted deposition of sputtered metals onto the target, resulting in a uniform coating of the cylindrical target surface by the sputtered material. The independently generated and contained plasmas associated with each cylindrical target/electrode pair allows for effective batch processing of multiple cylindrical targets within a single vacuum chamber, resulting in both uniform implantation or deposition, and reduced contamination of one target by adjacent target/electrode pairs.

Fetherston, Robert P. (Madison, WI), Shamim, Muhammad M. (Madison, WI), Conrad, John R. (Madison, WI)

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Technology (IET); the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE), and the Energy Institute Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) The Energy Institute (EI) Institution of Civil Engineers

Heil, Matthias

225

Lightweight Alloys for Aerospace Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

C.R. Hutchinson, X. Fan, S.J. Pennycook and G.J. Shiflet. Improving Recrystallization Resistance in Wrought Aluminum Alloys with. Scandium Addition .

226

Spectroscopy and capacitance measurements of tunneling resonances in an Sb-implanted point contact.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We fabricated a split-gate defined point contact in a double gate enhancement mode Si-MOS device, and implanted Sb donor atoms using a self-aligned process. E-beam lithography in combination with a timed implant gives us excellent control over the placement of dopant atoms, and acts as a stepping stone to focused ion beam implantation of single donors. Our approach allows us considerable latitude in experimental design in-situ. We have identified two resonance conditions in the point contact conductance as a function of split gate voltage. Using tunneling spectroscopy, we probed their electronic structure as a function of temperature and magnetic field. We also determine the capacitive coupling between the resonant feature and several gates. Comparison between experimental values and extensive quasi-classical simulations constrain the location and energy of the resonant level. We discuss our results and how they may apply to resonant tunneling through a single donor.

Wendt, Joel Robert; Rahman, Rajib; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Eng, Kevin; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Young, Ralph Watson; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Stalford, Harold Lenn; Bishop, Nathaniel; Bielejec, Edward Salvador

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation Developed at: Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York; High Current Electronic

228

Security Risks, Low-tech User Interfaces, and Implantable Medical Devices: A Case Study with Insulin Pump Infusion Systems  

SciTech Connect

Portable implantable medical device systems are playing a larger role in modern health care. Increasing attention is now being given to the wireless control interface of these systems. Our position is that wireless security in portable implantable medical device systems is just a part of the overall system security, and increased attention is needed to address low-tech security issues.

Paul, Nathanael R [ORNL; Kohno, Tadayoshi [University of Washington, Seattle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Nonlinear damage effect in graphene synthesis by C-cluster ion implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present few-layer graphene synthesis by negative carbon cluster ion implantation with C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 4} at energies below 20 keV. The small C-clusters were produced by a source of negative ion by cesium sputtering with medium beam current. We show that the nonlinear effect in cluster-induced damage is favorable for graphene precipitation compared with monomer carbon ions. The nonlinear damage effect in cluster ion implantation shows positive impact on disorder reduction, film uniformity, and the surface smoothness in graphene synthesis.

Zhang Rui; Zhang Zaodi; Wang Zesong; Wang Shixu; Wang Wei; Fu Dejun; Liu Jiarui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Materials of Ministry of Education and Accelerator Laboratory, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072 Wuhan (China)

2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

230

Effect of ion implantation on subsequent erosion and wear behavior of solids  

SciTech Connect

The removal of material from a solid surface by mechanical forces is influenced by material properties (hardness, fracture toughness, yield strength, surface free energy) as well as system parameters (force, velocity of loading, environment). Ion implantation can modify many of the material properties either by directly affecting the deformation characteristics or indirectly by affecting the chemical or phase composition at the surface. The various forms of wear and erosion are analyzed to determine the material and system parameters which control material removal. The effects of implantation on these critical parameters are noted and examples of changes in surface topography under various test conditions are discussed. 18 figs.

McHargue, C.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Effects of Damage on Hydrogen-Implant-Induced Thin-Film Separation from Bulk Silicon Carbide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exfoliation of Sic by hydrogen implantation and subsequent annealing forms the basis for a thin-film separation process which, when combined with hydrophilic wafer bonding, can be exploited to produce silicon-carbide-on-insulator, SiCOI. Sic thin films produced by this process exhibit unacceptably high resistivity because defects generated by the implant neutralize electrical carriers. Separation occurs because of chemical interaction of hydrogen with dangling bonds within microvoids created by the implant, and physical stresses due to gas-pressure effects during post-implant anneal. Experimental results show that exfoliation of Sic is dependent upon the concentration of implanted hydrogen, but the damage generated by the implant approaches a point when exfoliation is, in fact, retarded. This is attributed to excessive damage at the projected range of the implant which inhibits physical processes of implant-induced cleaving. Damage is controlled independently of hydrogen dosage by elevating the temperature of the SiC during implant in order to promote dynamic annealing. The resulting decrease in damage is thought to promote growth of micro-cracks which form a continuous cleave. Channeled H{sup +} implantation enhances the cleaving process while simultaneously minimizing residual damage within the separated film. It is shown that high-temperature irradiation and channeling each reduces the hydrogen fluence required to affect separation of a thin film and results in a lower concentration of defects. This increases the potential for producing SiC01 which is sufficiently free of defects and, thus, more easily electrically activated.

Gregory, R.B.; Holland, O.W.; Thomas, D.K.; Wetteroth, T.A.; Wilson, S.R.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Laser-induced implantation of silver particles into poly(vinyl alcohol) films and its application to electronic-circuit fabrication on encapsulated organic electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we propose a new laser-induced implantation based approach for embedding electronic interconnects in this study. Direct implantations of silver particles, vaporized by a pulsed laser from a silver film initially pre-coated on a transparent ... Keywords: Embedded electronic circuits, Encapsulation, Laser-induced implantation, Organic thin-film transistors, Polymeric light-emitting diodes

Kun-Tso Chen; Yu-Hsuan Lin; Jeng-Rong Ho; J.-W. John Cheng; Sung-Ho Liu; Jin-Long Liao; Jing-Yi Yan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Optima MDxt: A high throughput 335 keV mid-dose implanter  

SciTech Connect

The continuing demand for both energy purity and implant angle control along with high wafer throughput drove the development of the Axcelis Optima MDxt mid-dose ion implanter. The system utilizes electrostatic scanning, an electrostatic parallelizing lens and an electrostatic energy filter to produce energetically pure beams with high angular integrity. Based on field proven components, the Optima MDxt beamline architecture offers the high beam currents possible with singly charged species including arsenic at energies up to 335 keV as well as large currents from multiply charged species at energies extending over 1 MeV. Conversely, the excellent energy filtering capability allows high currents at low beam energies, since it is safe to utilize large deceleration ratios. This beamline is coupled with the >500 WPH capable endstation technology used on the Axcelis Optima XEx high energy ion implanter. The endstation includes in-situ angle measurements of the beam in order to maintain excellent beam-to-wafer implant angle control in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The Optima platform control system provides new generation dose control system that assures excellent dosimetry and charge control. This paper will describe the features and technologies that allow the Optima MDxt to provide superior process performance at the highest wafer throughput, and will provide examples of the process performance achievable.

Eisner, Edward; David, Jonathan; Justesen, Perry; Kamenitsa, Dennis; McIntyre, Edward; Rathmell, Robert; Ray, Andrew; Rzeszut, Richard [Axcelis Technologies, Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Formation of CdS Nanocrystals in SiO2 by Ion Implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of the influence of ion dose and post-implantation annealing on the synthesis and growth of CdS nanocrystals in a SiO{sub 2} matrix. Nanocrystals were obtained after implantation of monoenergetic Cd and S ions and subsequent annealing in a very wide range of annealing temperatures, T{sub a}. The average size, as determined from the blue shift of band gap E{sub g}, varied from 3.5-4.5 to 10 nm, depending on implantation and annealing parameters. For the highest dose, 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}, the synthesis of CdS phase starts already during implantation. For T{sub a} above 700 C, large nanocrystals (9-10 nm) prevail for all doses. High energy optical transitions, identified as the E{sub 1A} and E{sub 1B} transitions of hexagonal CdS, were also observed after annealings at higher temperature.

Desnica, U. V. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Desnica-Frankovic, I. D. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Gamulin, O. [Zagreb University, Zagreb, Croatia; White, Clark W [ORNL; Sonder, Edward [ORNL; Zuhr, Ray A [ORNL

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Mesoporous silica as a membrane for ultra-thin implantable direct glucose Tushar Sharma,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

failure warning systems, glucose and electrolyte sensors with systems such as an automated implantable car-linked hydro- gels, sulfonated polypropylene and cuprophan,20­22 have been used to facilitate glucose diffusion and separate the electrodes. Rao et al.20,23 and Atanasov and Wilkins24 have used hydro- phobic membranes

236

Plasma source ion implantation research and applications at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasma Source Ion Implantation research at Los Alamos Laboratory includes direct investigation of the plasma and materials science involved in target surface modification, numerical simulations of the implantation process, and supporting hardware engineering. Target materials of Al, Cr, Cu-Zn, Mg, Ni, Si, Ti, W, and various Fe alloys have been processed using plasmas produced from Ar, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gases. Individual targets with surface areas as large as {approximately}4 m{sup 2}, or weighing up to 1200 kg, have been treated in the large LANL facility. In collaboration with General Motors and the University of Wisconsin, a process has been developed for application of hard, low friction, diamond-like-carbon layers on assemblies of automotive pistons. Numerical simulations have been performed using a 2{1/2}-D particle- in-cell code, which yields time-dependent implantation energy, dose, and angle of arrival for ions at the target surface for realistic geometries. Plasma source development activities include the investigation of pulsed, inductively coupled sources capable of generating highly dissociated N{sup +} with ion densities n{sub i} {approximately} 10{sup 11}/cm{sup 3}, at {approximately}100 W average input power. Cathodic arc sources have also been used to produce filtered metallic and C plasmas for implantation and deposition either in vacuum, or in conjunction with a background gas for production of highly adherent ceramic coatings.

Munson, C.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Henins, I. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electromagnetic Interference and Implantable Medical Devices An Update and Future Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Device-based therapies have emerged as effective non-pharmacological treatments for a multitude of diseases, with associated reductions in morbidity and mortality, enhanced quality of life, and prolongation of useful working lifetimes. Consequently, in virtually every industrialized nation, clinical guidelines are prompting implantation of an increasing number of medical devices. Moreover, remarkable technological advances are resulting in increasingly sophisticated and complex device ...

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

238

Dose enhancement close to platinum implants for the 4, 6, and 10 MV stereotactic radiosurgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong (Received 28 April occur when materials with high atomic numbers are irradiated by the high- and low-energy bremsstrahlung, near targets with platinum implants (with a high atomic number) in radiosurgery cannot be predicted

Yu, K.N.

239

A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1 *, Chantal Gondran2 , Fabien Giroud2 powerful ones, Glucose BioFuel Cells (GBFCs), are based on enzymes electrically wired by redox mediators applications. Citation: Cinquin P, Gondran C, Giroud F, Mazabrard S, Pellissier A, et al. (2010) A Glucose BioFuel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

240

Controlled removal of ceramic surfaces with combination of ions implantation and ultrasonic energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for tailoring or patterning the surface of ceramic articles is provided by implanting ions to predetermined depth into the ceramic material at a selected surface location with the ions being implanted at a fluence and energy adequate to damage the lattice structure of the ceramic material for bi-axially straining near-surface regions of the ceramic material to the predetermined depth. The resulting metastable near-surface regions of the ceramic material are then contacted with energy pulses from collapsing, ultrasonically-generated cavitation bubbles in a liquid medium for removing to a selected depth the ion-damaged near-surface regions containing the bi-axially strained lattice structure from the ceramic body. Additional patterning of the selected surface location on the ceramic body is provided by implanting a high fluence of high-energy, relatively-light ions at selected surface sites for relaxing the bi-axial strain in the near-surface regions defined by these sites and thereby preventing the removal of such ion-implanted sites by the energy pulses from the collapsing ultrasonic cavitation bubbles.

Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rankin, Janet (Providence, RI); Thevenard, Paul (Caluire, FR); Romana, Laurence J. (Gaudeloupe Antilles, FR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Ferromagnetism in Mn-Implanted Epitaxially Grown Ge on Si(100)  

SciTech Connect

We have studied ferromagnetism of Mn-implanted epitaxial Ge films on silicon. The Ge films were grown by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of germane (GeH{sub 4}) and methylgermane (CH{sub 3}GeH{sub 3}) gases with a carbon concentration of less than 1 at. %, and observed surface rms roughness of 0.5 nm, as measured by atomic force microscopy. Manganese ions were implanted in epitaxial Ge films grown on Si (100) wafers to an effective concentration of 16, 12, 6, and 2 at. %. Superconducting quantum interference device measurements showed that only the three highest Mn concentration samples are ferromagnetic, while the fourth sample, with [Mn] = 2 at. %, is paramagnetic. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements indicate that localized Mn moments are ferromagnetically coupled below the Curie temperature. Isothermal annealing of Mn-implanted Ge films with [Mn] = 16 at. % at 300 C for up to 1200 s decreases the magnetization but does not change the Curie temperature, suggesting that the amount of the magnetic phase slowly decreases with time at this anneal temperature. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron grazing incidence x-ray diffraction experiments show that the Mn-implanted region is amorphous, and we believe that it is this phase that is responsible for the ferromagnetism. This is supported by our observation that high-temperature annealing leads to recrystallization and transformation of the material into a paramagnetic phase.

Guchhait, S.; Jamil, M.; Ohldag, H.; Mehta, A.; Arenholz, E.; Lian, G.; Li Fatou, A.; Ferrer, D. A.; Markert, J. T.; Colombo, L.; Banerjee, S. K.

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

242

Implant Dose Sensitivity of 0.1m CMOS Inverter Delay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulation experiment is performed to characterize the impact of process level fluctuations on the circuit performance variation for the 0.1m CMOS technology. The 0.1m NMOS and PMOS transistors are optimized using four different ion implantation ...

H. C. Srinivasaiah; Navakanta Bhat

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Optical Properties of p-type ZnO Doped by As Ion Implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As-doped p-type ZnO has been achieved by ion implantation. The As-related optical properties were analyzed by using secondary ion mass spectrometry, the Raman scattering, and the photoluminescence experiments. From the I-V measurement, the behavior of rectifying on these samples is confirmed.

Jeong, T.S.; Youn, C.J.; Han, M.S. [Semiconductor Physics Research Center (SPRC), Jeonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Y. S. [Korea Photonics Technolgy Institute (KOPTI), Gwangju 500-210 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W.S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Chosun University, Gangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +}-implants in Ge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in Ge was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400-600 Degree-Sign C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C for 60 s was characterized by channeling analysis with a 650 keV H{sup +} beam by utilizing the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha})2{alpha} nuclear reaction and confirmed the large fraction of off-lattice B for both c-Ge and PA-Ge. Within the investigated annealing range, no significant change in activation was observed. An increase in the fraction of activated dopant was observed with increasing energy which suggests that the surface proximity and the local point defect environment has a strong impact on B activation in Ge. The results suggest the presence of an inactive B-Ge cluster for ultra-shallow implants in both c-Ge and PA-Ge that remains stable upon annealing for temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C.

Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Petersen, D. H. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, O. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); CINF, Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Lin, R.; Nielsen, P. F. [CAPRES A/S, Scion-DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Romano, L. [IMM-CNR MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Doyle, B. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-1056, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kontos, A. [Applied Materials, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Prostatic edema in {sup 125}I permanent prostate implants: Dynamical dosimetry taking volume changes into account  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of edema on the dose delivered to the target volume. An evaluation of the edema characteristics was first made, and then a dynamical dosimetry algorithm was developed and used to compare its results to a standard clinical (static) dosimetry. Source positions and prostate contours extracted from 66 clinical cases on images taken at different points in time (planning, implant day, post-implant evaluation) were used, via the mean interseed distance, to characterize edema [initial increase ({delta}r{sub 0}), half-life ({tau})]. An algorithm was developed to take into account the edema by summing a time series of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) with a weight based on the fraction of the dose delivered during the time interval considered. The algorithm was then used to evaluate the impact of edema on the dosimetry of permanent implants by comparing its results to those of a standard clinical dosimetry. The volumetric study yielded results as follows: the initial prostate volume increase was found to be 1.58 (ranging from 1.15 to 2.48) and the edema half-life, approximately 30 days (range: 3 to 170 days). The dosimetric differences in D{sub 90} observed between the dynamic dosimetry and the clinical one for a single case were up to 15 Gy and depended on the edema half-life and the initial volume increase. The average edema half-life, 30 days, is about 3 times longer than the previously reported 9 days. Dosimetric differences up to 10% of the prescription dose are observed, which can lead to differences in the quality assertion of an implant. The study of individual patient edema resorption with time might be necessary to extract meaningful clinical correlation or biological parameters in permanent implants.

Leclerc, Ghyslain; Lavallee, Marie-Claude; Roy, Rene; Vigneault, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, CHUQ-Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada); Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, CHUQ-Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, G1R 2J6, (Canada); Department de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, G1K 7P4, Canada, and Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, CHUQ - Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

A 350 mu W CMOS MSK Transmitter and 400 mu W OOK Super-Regenerative Receiver for Medical Implant Communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in the medical field are spurring the need for ultra-low power transceivers for wireless communication with medical implants. To deal with the growing demand for medical telemetry, the FCC commissioned the ...

Dawson, Joel L.

247

Evaluation of the dose distribution for prostate implants using various {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, several different models of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy sources have been introduced in order to meet the increasing demand for prostate seed implants. These sources have different internal structures; hence, their TG-43 dosimetric parameters are not the same. In this study, the effects of the dosimetric differences among the sources on their clinical applications were evaluated. The quantitative and qualitative evaluations were performed by comparisons of dose distributions and dose volume histograms of prostate implants calculated for various designs of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. These comparisons were made for an identical implant scheme with the same number of seeds for each source. The results were compared with the Amersham model 6711 seed for {sup 125}I and the Theragenics model 200 seed for {sup 103}Pd using the same implant scheme.

Meigooni, Ali S.; Luerman, Christine M.; Sowards, Keith T. [Department of Radiation Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York 11030 and Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States); James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Photoluminescence in silicon implanted with erbium ions at an elevated temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photoluminescence spectra of n-type silicon upon implantation with erbium ions at 600 Degree-Sign C and oxygen ions at room temperature and subsequent annealings at 1100 Degree-Sign C in a chlorine-containing atmosphere have been studied. Depending on the annealing duration, photoluminescence spectra at 80 K are dominated by lines of the Er{sup 3+} ion or dislocation-related luminescence. The short-wavelength shift of the dislocation-related luminescence line observed at this temperature is due to implantation of erbium ions at an elevated temperature. At room temperature, lines of erbium and dislocation-related luminescence are observed in the spectra, but lines of near-band-edge luminescence predominate.

Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: nick@sobolev.ioffe.rssi.ru; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Sakharov, V. I.; Serenkov, I. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Vdovin, V. I. [St. Petersburg University, Fock Research Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Parshin, E. O.; Makoviichuk, M. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Yaroslavl Branch, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Solid-phase epitaxy of silicon amorphized by implantation of the alkali elements rubidium and cesium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The redistribution of implanted Rb and Cs profiles in amorphous silicon during solid-phase epitaxial recrystallization has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. For the implantation dose used in these experiments, the alkali atoms segregate at the a-Si/c-Si interface during annealing resulting in concentration peaks near the interface. In this way, the alkali atoms are moved towards the surface. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy in ion channeling configuration was performed to measure average recrystallization rates of the amorphous silicon layers. Preliminary studies on the influence of the alkali atoms on the solid-phase epitaxial regrowth rate reveal a strong retardation compared to the intrinsic recrystallization rate.

Maier, R.; Haeublein, V.; Ryssel, H.; Voellm, H.; Feili, D.; Seidel, H.; Frey, L. [Lehrstuhl fuer Elektronische Bauelemente (LEB), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Cauerstrasse 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Integrierte Systeme und Bauelementetechnologie (IISB), Schottkystrasse 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Elektronische Bauelemente (LEB), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Cauerstrasse 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany) and Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Integrierte Systeme und Bauelementetechnologie (IISB), Schottkystrasse 10, 9 (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Mikromechanik, Mikrofluidik/ Mikroaktorik (LMM), Universitaet des Saarlandes, Campus A5.1, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Lehrstuhl fuer Elektronische Bauelemente (LEB), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Cauerstrasse 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany) and Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Integrierte Systeme und Bauelementetechnologie (IISB), Schottkystrasse 10,91 (Germany)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Everolimus-induced Pneumonitis after Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Case Report  

SciTech Connect

Despite the wide use of everolimus as an antineoplastic coating agent for coronary stents to reduce the rate of restenosis, little is known about the health hazards of everolimus-eluting stents (EES). We describe a case of pneumonitis that developed 2 months after EES implantation for angina. Lung pathology demonstrated an organizing pneumonia pattern that responded to corticosteroid therapy. Although the efficacy of EES for ischemic heart disease is well established, EES carries a risk of pneumonitis.

Sakamoto, Susumu, E-mail: susumu1029@gmail.com; Kikuchi, Naoshi; Ichikawa, Atsuo; Sano, Go; Satoh, Keita; Sugino, Keishi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan); Shibuya, Kazutoshi [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology (Japan); Homma, Sakae [Toho University School of Medicine, Department of Respiratory Medicine (Japan)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Optimal Suturing Technique and Number of Sutures for Surgical Implantation of Acoustic Transmitters in Juvenile Salmonids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The size reduction of acoustic transmitters has led to a reduction in the length of incision needed to implant a transmitter. Smaller suture knot profiles and fewer sutures may be adequate for closing an incision used to surgically implant an acoustic microtransmitter. As a result, faster surgery times and reduced tissue trauma could lead to increased survival and decreased infection for implanted fish. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of five suturing techniques on mortality, tag and suture retention, incision openness, ulceration, and redness in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha implanted with acoustic microtransmitters. Suturing was performed by three surgeons, and study fish were held at two water temperatures (12C and 17C). Mortality was low and tag retention was high for all treatments on all examination days (7, 14, 21, and 28 days post-surgery). Because there was surgeon variation in suture retention among treatments, further analyses included only the one surgeon who received feedback training in all suturing techniques. Incision openness and tissue redness did not differ among treatments. The only difference observed among treatments was in tissue ulceration. Incisions closed with a horizontal mattress pattern had more ulceration than other treatments among fish held for 28 days at 17C. Results from this study suggest that one simple interrupted 1 1 1 1 suture is adequate for closing incisions on fish under most circumstances. However, in dynamic environments, two simple interrupted 1 1 1 1 sutures should provide adequate incision closure. Reducing bias in survival and behavior tagging studies is important when making comparisons to the migrating salmon population. Therefore, by minimizing the effects of tagging on juvenile salmon (reduced tissue trauma and reduced surgery time), researchers can more accurately estimate survival and behavior.

Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

252

Minimally Invasive Catheter Procedures to Assist Complicated Pacemaker Lead Extraction and Implantation in the Operating Room  

SciTech Connect

We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 {+-} 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S., E-mail: rotemshlomo@yahoo.de; Miese, Falk R.; Blondin, Dirk [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Radiology (Germany); Winter, Joachim [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Germany); Scherer, Axel; Fuerst, Guenter [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Department of Radiology (Germany)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Wear Measurement of Highly Cross-linked UHMWPE using a 7Be Tracer Implantation Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The very low wear rates achieved with the current highly cross-linked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) used in joint prostheses have proven to be difficult to measure accurately by gravimetry. Tracer methods are there- fore being explored. The purpose of this study was to perform a proof-of-concept experiment on the use of the radioactive tracer beryllium-7 (7Be) for the determination of in vitro wear in a highly cross-linked orthopedic UHMWPE. Three cross-linked and four conventional UHMWPE pins made from compression- molded GUR 1050, were activated with 109 to 1010 7Be nuclei using a new implantation setup that produced a homogenous distribution of implanted nuclei up to 8.5 lm below the surface. The pins were tested for wear in a six-station pin-on-flat appara- tus for up to 7.1 million cycles (178 km). A Germanium gamma detector was employed to determine activity loss of the UHMWPE pins at preset intervals during the wear test. The wear of the cross-linked UHMWPE pins was readily detected and esti- mated to be 17 6 3 lg per million cycles. The conventional-to- cross-linked ratio of the wear rates was 13.1 6 0.8, in the expected range for these materials. Oxidative degradation dam- age from implantation was negligible; however, a weak depend- ence of wear on implantation dose was observed limiting the number of radioactive tracer atoms that can be introduced. Future applications of this tracer technology may include the analysis of location-specific wear, such as loss of material in the post or backside of a tibial insert.

Wimmer, Markus A. [Rush Uniiv. Medical Center; Laurent, Michael P. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Dwivedi, Yasha [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Gallardo, Luis A. [Rush Univ. Medical Center; Chipps, K. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Blackmon, Jeffery C [Louisiana State University; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Stracener, Daniel W [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Patel, Nidhi [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Rehm, Karl E. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ahmad, Irshad [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greene, John P. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Greife, Uwe [Colorado School of Mines, Golden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Implant breast reconstruction followed by radiotherapy: Can helical tomotherapy become a standard irradiation treatment?  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the benefits and limitations of helical tomotherapy (HT) for loco-regional irradiation of patients after a mastectomy and immediate implant-based reconstruction. Ten breast cancer patients with retropectoral implants were randomly selected for this comparative study. Planning target volumes (PTVs) 1 (the volume between the skin and the implant, plus margin) and 2 (supraclavicular, infraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes, plus margin) were 50 Gy in 25 fractions using a standard technique and HT. The extracted dosimetric data were compared using a 2-tailed Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Doses for PTV1 and PTV2 were significantly higher with HT (V95 of 98.91 and 97.91%, respectively) compared with the standard technique (77.46 and 72.91%, respectively). Similarly, the indexes of homogeneity were significantly greater with HT (p = 0.002). HT reduced ipsilateral lung volume that received {>=}20 Gy (16.7 vs. 35%), and bilateral lungs (p = 0.01) and neighboring organs received doses that remained well below tolerance levels. The heart volume, which received 25 Gy, was negligible with both techniques. HT can achieve full target coverage while decreasing high doses to the heart and ipsilateral lung. However, the low doses to normal tissue volumes need to be reduced in future studies.

Massabeau, Carole, E-mail: cmassabeau@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Wakil, Georges; Castro Pena, Pablo; Viard, Romain; Zefkili, Sofia; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Dose verification with Monte Carlo technique for prostate brachytherapy implants with {sup 125}I sources  

SciTech Connect

The Monte Carlo technique has been implemented to generate the dose distributions in a model prostate patient, implanted with iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) brachytherapy sources. The results of these calculations are also compared with the dose distributions calculated by a commercially available treatment planning system. The comparison shows that with the source strength suggested by the Monte Carlo technique, the current clinical planning system is found to provide 100% coverage of the prostate with the prescription dose for the same implant pattern. However, the dose-volume histogram of this investigation shows that the VariSeedTM treatment planning system has a 29% and 136% larger dose coverage for the 150% and 200% isodose lines, respectively, than the Monte Carlo simulation. These differences are attributed to the oversimplification of the current planning system using the point source approximation, and also to the interseed effects from multisources that are neglected in the conventional planning systems. The results of this study provide evidence that supports the use of the Monte Carlo technique in treatment planning systems to provide accurate dose calculations in brachytherapy implants.

Zhang Hualin [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY (United States)]. E-mail: hualinzhang@yahoo.com; Baker, Curtis [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY (United States); McKinsey, Rachel [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY (United States); Meigooni, Ali [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, KY (United States)

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Sources and transport systems for low energy extreme of ion implantation  

SciTech Connect

For the past seven years a joint research and development effort focusing on the design of steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal being to meet the two, energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. However, since the last Fortier is low energy ion implantation, focus of the endeavor has shifted to low energy ion implantation. For boron cluster source development, we started with molecular ions of decaborane (B{sub 10}H{sub 14}), octadecaborane (B{sub 18}H{sub 22}), and presently our focus is on carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ions developing methods for mitigating graphite deposition. Simultaneously, we are developing a pure boron ion source (without a working gas) that can form the basis for a novel, more efficient, plasma immersion source. Our Calutron-Berna ion source was converted into a universal source capable of switching between generating molecular phosphorous P{sub 4}{sup +}, high charge state ions, as well as other types of ions. Additionally, we have developed transport systems capable of transporting a very large variety of ion species, and simulations of a novel gasless/plasmaless ion beam deceleration method were also performed.

Hershcovitch, A.; Batalin, V.A.; Bugaev, A.S.; Gushenets, V.I.; Alexeyenko, O.; Gurkova, E.; Johnson, B.M.; Kolomiets, A.A.; Kropachev, G.N.; Kuibeda, R.P.; Kulevoy, T.V.; Masunov, E.S.; Oks, E.M.; Pershin, V.I.; Polozov, S.M.; Poole, H.J.; Seleznev, D.N.; Storozhenko, P.A.; Vizir, A.; Svarovski, A.Ya.; Yakushin, P.; Yushkov, G.Yu.

2010-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

Surface modification of nickel battery electrodes by cobalt plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition  

SciTech Connect

Nickel hydroxide is the electrochemically active material in the positive electrode of several important rechargeable alkaline-electrolyte batteries. It is believed that divalent Ni(OH){sub 2} is converted to trivalent NiOOH as the electrode is electrochemically oxidized during the battery charging process, and the reverse reaction (electrochemical reduction) occurs during battery discharge, however the details of this process are not completely understood. Because these electrochemical reactions involve surface charge-transfer processes, it is anticipated that surface modification may result in improved battery performance. We used broad-beam metal ion implantation and Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition to add cobalt and other species to the nickel electrode surface. The principle of the latter technique is explained in detail. It is shown that implanted and deposited cobalt ions act as a dopant of Ni(OH){sub 2}, and thereby alter its electronic conductivity. This electronic effect promotes lateral growth of NiOOH nodules and more-complete conversion of Ni(OH){sub 2} to NiOOH, which can be interpreted in terms of the nodule growth model. Other dopants such as Au, W, Pb, Ta and Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7} were also tested for suppressing the parasitic oxygen evolution reaction in rechargeable nickel cells.

Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Brown, I.; Kong, F.; McLarnon, F.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish  

SciTech Connect

Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

825 THE TECHNIQUE OF BLADDER IMPLANTATION: FURTHER RESULTS AND AN ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JuLL (1951) suggested that the surgical introduction of a pellet containing a test chemical into the lumen of the mouse bladder might be useful for routine testing for carcinogenic activity. The method, it was thought, would possess the following advantages: (i) the chemical would be slowly eluted from the pellet and would therefore remain in contact with the bladder epithelium for a prolonged period; (ii) the metabolic processes of the liver, etc., would be by-passed, and (iii) the bladder would function under approximately normal conditions. Bladder implantation has been used successfully in Leeds (Bonser, Clayson

D. B. Clayson; J. A. S. Pringle; G. M. Bonser; M. Wood

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Bypassing the learning curve in permanent seed implants using state-of-the-art technology  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to demonstrate, based on clinical postplan dose distributions, that technology can be used efficiently to eliminate the learning curve associated with permanent seed implant planning and delivery. Methods and Materials: Dose distributions evaluated 30 days after the implant of the initial 22 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implants at two institutions were studied. Institution 1 (I1) consisted of a new team, whereas institution 2 (I2) had performed more than 740 preplanned implantations over a 9-year period before the study. Both teams had adopted similar integrated systems based on three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasonography, intraoperative dosimetry, and an automated seed delivery and needle retraction system (FIRST, Nucletron). Procedure time and dose volume histogram parameters such as D90, V100, V150, V200, and others were collected in the operating room and at 30 days postplan. Results: The average target coverage from the intraoperative plan (V100) was 99.4% for I1 and 99.9% for I2. D90, V150, and V200 were 191.4 Gy (196.3 Gy), 75.3% (73.0%), and 37.5% (34.1%) for I1 (I2) respectively. None of these parameters shows a significant difference between institutions. The postplan D90 was 151.2 Gy for I1 and 167.3 Gy for I2, well above the 140 Gy from the Stock et al. analysis, taking into account differences at planning, results in a p value of 0.0676. The procedure time required on average 174.4 min for I1 and 89 min for I2. The time was found to decrease with the increasing number of patients. Conclusion: State-of-the-art technology enables a new brachytherapy team to obtain excellent postplan dose distributions, similar to those achieved by an experienced team with proven long-term clinical results. The cost for bypassing the usual dosimetry learning curve is time, with increasing team experience resulting in shorter treatment times.

Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada)]. E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca; Evans, Dee-Ann Radford [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Aubin, Sylviane [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Angyalfi, Steven [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Husain, Siraj [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Kay, Ian [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Martin, Andre-Guy [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Varfalvy, Nicolas [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Vigneault, Eric [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Dunscombe, Peter [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Synthesis of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO?(110) Rutile Single Crystals using Ion Implantation  

SciTech Connect

Ferromagnetic Cr-doped rutile TiO? single crystals were synthesized by high-temperature ion implantation. The associated structural, compositional and magnetic properties were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, proton induced x-ray emission, x-ray diffraction, Cr K- and L-shell near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Cr was distributed uniformly to the depth of about 300 nm with an average concentration of ~1 at. %. The samples are semiconducting and ferromagnetic as implanted, with a saturation magnetization of 0.29???B/Cr atom at room temperature. Cr is in a formal oxidation state of +3 throughout the implanted region, and no CrO? is detected.

Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Droubay, Timothy; Heald, Steve M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; McCready, David E.; Chambers, Scott A.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Mun, B. S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Dotiki saves money and time with power tool and belt fasteners  

SciTech Connect

The use of a Hilti power tool to improve belt splice installations to minimise downtime is described. 3 photos.

Bargo, K.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Moving Toward Focal Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Dual-Isotope Permanent Seed Implants as a Possible Solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare the ability of single- and dual-isotope prostate seed implants to escalate biologically effective dose (BED) to foci of disease while reducing prescription dose to the prostate. Methods and Materials: Nine plans, using {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs alone and in combination were created retrospectively for 2 patients. Ultrasound and MRI/MRS datasets were used for treatment planning. Voxel-by-voxel BED was calculated for single- and dual-isotope plans. Equivalent uniform BED (EUBED) was used to compare plans. The MRS-positive planning target volumes (PTV{sub i}) were delineated along with PTV (prostate + 5 mm), rectum, and urethra. Single-isotope implants, prescribed to conventional doses, were generated to achieve good PTV coverage. The PTV{sub i} were prospectively used to generate implants using mixtures of isotopes. For mixed-radioisotope implants, we also explored the impact on EUBED of lowering prescription doses by 15%. Results: The EUBED of PTV{sub i} in the setting of primary {sup 125}I implant increased 20-66% when {sup 103}Pd and {sup 131}Cs were used compared with {sup 125}I boost. Decreasing prescription dose by 15% in mixed-isotope implants results in a potential 10% reduction in urethral EUBED with preservation of PTV coverage while still boosting PTV{sub i} (up to 80%). When radiobiologic parameters corresponding to more-aggressive disease are assigned to foci, faster-decaying isotopes used in mixed implants have the potential to preserve the equivalent biological effect of mono-isotope implants considering less-aggressive disease distributed in the entire prostate. Conclusions: This is a hypothesis-generating study proposing a treatment paradigm that could be the middle ground between whole-gland irradiation and focal-only treatment. The use of two isotopes concurrent with decreasing the minimal peripheral dose is shown to increase EUBED of selected subvolumes while preserving the therapeutic effect at the level of the gland.

Todor, Dorin A., E-mail: dtodor@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lin, Peck-Sun; Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Beam energy tracking system on Optima XEx high energy ion implanter  

SciTech Connect

The Axcelis Optima XEx high energy implanter is an RF linac-based implanter with 12 RF resonators for beam acceleration. Even though each acceleration field is an alternating, sinusoidal RF field, the well known phase-focusing principle produces a beam with a sharp quasi-monoenergetic energy spectrum. A magnetic energy filter after the linac further attenuates the low energy continuum in the energy spectrum often associated with RF acceleration. The final beam energy is a function of the phase and amplitude of the 12 resonators in the linac. When tuning a beam, the magnetic energy filter is set to the desired energy, and each linac parameter is tuned to maximize the transmission through the filter. Once a beam is set up, all the parameters are stored in a recipe, which can be easily tuned and has proven to be quite repeatable. The magnetic field setting of the energy filter selects the beam energy from the RF Linac accelerator, and in-situ verification of beam energy in addition to the magnetic energy filter setting has long been desired. An independent energy tracking system was developed for this purpose, using the existing electrostatic beam scanner as a deflector to construct an in-situ electrostatic energy analyzer. This paper will describe the system and performance of the beam energy tracking system.

David, Jonathan; Satoh, Shu; Wu Xiangyang; Geary, Cindy; Deluca, James [Axcelis Technologies, Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Dr, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Electromagnetic interference of GSM mobile phones with the implantable deep brain stimulator, ITREL-III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003 Kainz et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Background: The purpose was to investigate mobile phone interference with implantable deep brain stimulators by means of 10 different 900 Mega Hertz (MHz) and 10 different 1800 MHz GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) mobile phones. Methods: All tests were performed in vitro using a phantom especially developed for testing with deep brain stimulators. The phantom was filled with liquid phantom materials simulating brain and muscle tissue. All examinations were carried out inside an anechoic chamber on two implants of the same type of deep brain stimulator: ITREL-III from Medtronic Inc., USA. Results: Despite a maximum transmitted peak power of mobile phones of 1 Watt (W) at 1800 MHz and 2 W at 900 MHz respectively, no influence on the ITREL-III was found. Neither the shape of the pulse form changed nor did single pulses fail. Tests with increased transmitted power using CW signals and broadband dipoles have shown that inhibition of the ITREL-III occurs at frequency dependent power levels which are below the emissions of GSM mobile phones. The ITREL-III is

Wolfgang Kainz; Franois Alesch; Dulciana Dias; Chan Open Access

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Seed orientation and the impact of dosimetric anisotropy in stranded implants  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: In postimplant dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy, dose is commonly calculated using the TG-43 1D formalism, because seed orientations are difficult to determine from CT images, the current standard for the procedure. However, the orientation of stranded seeds soon after implantation is predictable, as these seeds tend to maintain their relative spacing, and orient themselves along the implant trajectory. The aim of this study was to develop a method for determining seed orientations from reconstructed strand trajectories, and to use this information to investigate the dosimetric impact of applying the TG-43 2D formalism to clinical postimplant analysis. Methods: Using in-house software, the preplan to postimplant seed correspondence was determined for a cohort of 30 patients during routine day-0 CT-based postimplant dosimetry. All patients were implanted with stranded-seed trains. Spline curves were fit to each set of seeds composing a strand, with the requirement that the distance along the spline between seeds be equal to the seed spacing within the strand. The orientations of the seeds were estimated by the tangents to the spline at each seed centroid. Dose distributions were then determined using the 1D and 2D TG-43 formalisms. These were compared using the TG-137 recommended dose metrics for the prostate, prostatic urethra, and rectum. Results: Seven hundred and sixty one strands were analyzed in total. Defining the z-axis to be cranial-positive and the x-axis to be left-lateral positive in the CT coordinate system, the average seed had an inclination of 21 deg. {+-} 10 deg. and an azimuth of -81 deg. {+-} 57 deg. These values correspond to the average strand rising anteriorly from apex to base, approximately parallel to the midsagittal plane. Clinically minor but statistically significant differences in dose metrics were noted. Compared to the 2D calculation, the 1D calculation underestimated prostate V100 by 1.1% and D90 by 2.3 Gy, while overestimating V150 and V200 by 1.6% and 1.3%, respectively. Urethral and rectal dose quantifiers tended to be underestimated by the 1D calculation. The most pronounced differences were in the urethral D30 and rectal D2cc, which rose by 3.8 and 1.9 Gy, respectively, using the 2D calculation. The total volume of the 100% isodose region as a percentage of the prostate volume was found to increase by 0.4%. Conclusions: Stranded seeds in the supine patient are not oriented in a uniformly random manner, nor are they aligned along the axis of the CT scanner. Instead, this study identified a consistent anterior pitch that is likely attributable to differences in patient pose between implant and CT imaging. The angle of the ultrasound probe with respect to the patient during implant may have also been a contributing factor. The dose metrics derived using the 1D formalism were found to be within 2%, on average, of those derived using the 2D formalism. For greater accuracy, 2D dosimetry can be pursued using the strand-fitting method described in this work. If a 1D representation is used, integrating over the empirically determined seed orientation density reported here may be more appropriate than assuming that seed inclinations are distributed uniformly.

Chng, Nicholas; Spadinger, Ingrid; Rasoda, Rosey; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, 600 West 10th, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, 5500-2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre, 600 West 10th, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, 5500-2332 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Finite element modelling of the neck-stem interface of a modular hip implant for micro-motion study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three dimensional, non-linear finite element modelling was used to analyse component stresses and relative micromotion at the modular junction interface of a Ti-alloy modular hip implant, using ANSYS finite element software. The model was developed ... Keywords: biomechanical modelling, finite element modelling, fretting, micromotion, modular hip stem

Kassim A. Abdullah

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Radiobiology for eye plaque brachytherapy and evaluation of implant duration and radionuclide choice using an objective function  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Clinical optimization of Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS) eye plaque brachytherapy is currently limited to tumor coverage, consensus prescription dosage, and dose calculations to ocular structures. The biologically effective dose (BED) of temporary brachytherapy treatments is a function of both chosen radionuclide R and implant duration T. This study endeavored to evaluate BED delivered to the tumor volume and surrounding ocular structures as a function of plaque position P, prescription dose, R, and T. Methods: Plaque-heterogeneity-corrected dose distributions were generated with MCNP5 for the range of currently available COMS plaques loaded with sources using three available low-energy radionuclides. These physical dose distributions were imported into the PINNACLE{sup 3} treatment planning system using the TG-43 hybrid technique and used to generate dose volume histograms for a T = 7 day implant within a reference eye geometry including the ciliary body, cornea, eyelid, foveola, lacrimal gland, lens, optic disc, optic nerve, retina, and tumor at eight standard treatment positions. The equation of Dale and Jones was employed to create biologically effective dose volume histograms (BEDVHs), allowing for BED volumetric analysis of all ROIs. Isobiologically effective prescription doses were calculated for T = 5 days down to 0.01 days, with BEDVHs subsequently generated for all ROIs using correspondingly reduced prescription doses. Objective functions were created to evaluate the BEDVHs as a function of R and T. These objective functions are mathematically accessible and sufficiently general to be applied to temporary or permanent brachytherapy implants for a variety of disease sites. Results: Reducing T from 7 to 0.01 days for a 10 mm plaque produced an average BED benefit of 26%, 20%, and 17% for {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs, respectively, for all P; 16 and 22 mm plaque results were more position-dependent. {sup 103}Pd produced a 16%-35% BED benefit over {sup 125}I, whereas {sup 131}Cs produced a 3%-7% BED detriment, independent of P, T, and plaque size. Additionally, corresponding organ at risk physical doses were lowest using {sup 103}Pd in all circumstances. Conclusions: The results suggest that shorter implant durations may correlate with more favorable outcomes compared to 7 day implants when treating small or medium intraocular lesions. The data also indicate that implant duration may be safely reduced if the prescription physical dose is likewise diminished and that {sup 103}Pd offers a substantial radiobiological benefit over {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs irrespective of plaque position, implant duration, and tumor size.

Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer.

Myers, Jr., Samuel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Bishop, Dawn M. (Albuquerque, NM); Follstaedt, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer. 4 figs.

Myers, S.M. Jr.; Bishop, D.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

271

Performance Assessment of Suture Type in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine the best overall suture material to close incisions from the surgical implantation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The effects of seven suture materials, four surgeons, and two water temperatures on suture retention, incision openness, tag retention, tissue inflammation, and tissue ulceration were quantified. The laboratory study, conducted by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supports a larger effort under way for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, aimed at determining the suitability of acoustic telemetry for estimating short- and longer-term (30-60 days) juvenile-salmonid survival at Columbia and Snake River dams and through the lower Columbia River.

Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

272

Comparison between simulated and experimental Au-ion profiles implanted in nanocrystalline ceria  

SciTech Connect

Radiation response of nanocrystalline ceria films deposited on a silicon substrate was investigated under a 3-MeV Au-ion irradiation at 300 K. A uniform grain growth cross the ceria films is observed and effective densification of the ceria thin films occurs during irradiation. The Au ion profiling was measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and compared to the Au ion distribution predicted by the Stopping and Range of Ions in Solids (SRIM) code. It is observed that the Au-ion penetration depth is underestimated in comparison with the SIMS measurements. An overestimation of the electronic stopping power for heavy incident ions in the SRIM program may account for the discrepancies between the calculations and the SIMS experimental results. This work presents an approach to compensate the overestimation of the electronic stopping powers in the SRIM program by adjusting the nanocrystalline ceria target density to better predict the ion implantation profile.

Moll, Sandra [CEA, Saclay, France; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Zhu, Zihua [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Edmondson, Dr. Philip [University of Oxford; Namavar, Fereydoon [University of Nebraska Medical Center; Weber, William J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Electrical activation and spin coherence of ultra low doseantimony implants in silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We implanted ultra low doses (0.2 to 2 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}) of Sb ions into isotopically enriched {sup 28}Si, and probed electrical activation and electron spin relaxation after rapid thermal annealing. Strong segregation of dopants towards both Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2} interfaces limits electrical activation. Pulsed Electron Spin Resonance shows that spin echo decay is sensitive to the dopant profiles, and the interface quality. A spin decoherence time, T{sub 2}, of 1.5 ms is found for profiles peaking 25 nm below a Si/SiO{sub 2} interface, increasing to 2.1 ms when the surface is passivated with hydrogen. These measurements provide benchmark data for the development of devices in which quantum information is encoded in donor electron spins.

Schenkel, T.; Tyryshkin, A.M.; de Sousa, R.; Whaley, K.B.; Bokor,J.; Liddle, J.A.; Persaud, A.; Shangkuan, J.; Chakarov, I.; Lyon, S.A.

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

Effect of post-implant edema on prostate brachytherapy treatment margins  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine if postimplant prostate brachytherapy treatment margins calculated on Day 0 differ substantially from those calculated on Day 30. Methods: Thirty patients with 1997 American Joint Commission on Cancer clinical stage T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma underwent prostate brachytherapy with I-125 prescribed to 144 Gy. Treatment planning methods included using loose seeds in a modified peripheral loading pattern and treatment margins (TMs) of 5-8 mm. Postimplant plain radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance scans were obtained 1-4 hours after implantation (Day 0). A second set of imaging studies was obtained at 30 days after implantation (Day 30) and similarly analyzed. Treatment margins were measured as the radial distance in millimeters from the prostate edge to the 100% isodose line. The TMs were measured and tabulated at 90{sup o} intervals around the prostate periphery at 0.6-cm intervals. Each direction was averaged to obtain the mean anterior, posterior, left, and right margins. Results: The mean overall TM increased from 2.6 mm ({+-}2.3) on Day 0 to 3.5 mm ({+-}2.4) on Day 30. The mean anterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 1.8 mm on Day 30. The posterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 2.8 mm on Day 30. The lateral treatment margins increased most over time, with mean right treatment margin increasing from 3.9 mm on Day 0 to 4.7 mm on Day 30. Conclusion: Treatment margins appear to be durable in the postimplant period, with a clinically insignificant increase from Day 0 to Day 30.

Reed, Daniel R. [Radiation Oncology, Arizona Oncology Services, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Wallner, Kent [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Radiation Oncology, Group Health Cooperative, Seattle, WA (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Mueller, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States); Maki, Jeffrey [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Sutlief, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling, WV (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

BEDVH--A method for evaluating biologically effective dose volume histograms: Application to eye plaque brachytherapy implants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A method is introduced to examine the influence of implant duration T, radionuclide, and radiobiological parameters on the biologically effective dose (BED) throughout the entire volume of regions of interest for episcleral brachytherapy using available radionuclides. This method is employed to evaluate a particular eye plaque brachytherapy implant in a radiobiological context. Methods: A reference eye geometry and 16 mm COMS eye plaque loaded with {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, or {sup 131}Cs sources were examined with dose distributions accounting for plaque heterogeneities. For a standardized 7 day implant, doses to 90% of the tumor volume ( {sub TUMOR}D{sub 90}) and 10% of the organ at risk volumes ( {sub OAR}D{sub 10}) were calculated. The BED equation from Dale and Jones and published {alpha}/{beta} and {mu} parameters were incorporated with dose volume histograms (DVHs) for various T values such as T = 7 days (i.e., {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} and {sub OAR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10}). By calculating BED throughout the volumes, biologically effective dose volume histograms (BEDVHs) were developed for tumor and OARs. Influence of T, radionuclide choice, and radiobiological parameters on {sub TUMOR}BEDVH and {sub OAR}BEDVH were examined. The nominal dose was scaled for shorter implants to achieve biological equivalence. Results: {sub TUMOR}D{sub 90} values were 102, 112, and 110 Gy for {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs, respectively. Corresponding {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} values were 124, 140, and 138 Gy, respectively. As T decreased from 7 to 0.01 days, the isobiologically effective prescription dose decreased by a factor of three. As expected, {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BEDVH did not significantly change as a function of radionuclide half-life but varied by 10% due to radionuclide dose distribution. Variations in reported radiobiological parameters caused {sub TUMOR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} to deviate by up to 46%. Over the range of {sub OAR}{alpha}/{beta} values, {sub OAR} {sup 7}BED{sub 10} varied by up to 41%, 3.1%, and 1.4% for the lens, optic nerve, and lacrimal gland, respectively. Conclusions: BEDVH permits evaluation of the relative biological effectiveness for brachytherapy implants. For eye plaques, {sub TUMOR}BEDVH and {sub OAR}BEDVH were sensitive to implant duration, which may be manipulated to affect outcomes.

Gagne, Nolan L.; Leonard, Kara L.; Huber, Kathryn E.; Mignano, John E.; Duker, Jay S.; Laver, Nora V.; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Departments of Ophthalmology and Pathology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Biological effects of implanted nuclear energy sources for artificial heart devices. Progress report, September 1, 1975--August 31, 1976. [Heat dissipation from /sup 238/Pu power sources implanted in dogs  

SciTech Connect

A total of sixty dogs were implanted with radioisotope-powered artificial heart systems producing radiation fluxes similar to that of plutonium-238, but having no associated heat, at levels of from one to seventy times the radiation flux expected from a 30-watt plutonium-238 source. Results from studies lasting up to 6 years after implantation indicate that these animals, and by inference human beings, may be able to tolerate the radiation flux from 30-watt /sup 238/Pu power sources. Results of heat dissipation studies in calves indicate that it may be possible to induce a vascularized connective tissue capsule sufficient to dissipate 30 watts of additional heat from a surface area of approximately 500 cm sq., allowing a heat flux of 0.06 watts per cm sq.

Kallfelz, F.A.; Wentworth, R.A.; Cady, K.B.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Diffusion Bonding Process for Aerospace Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Boosted Suction (DDBS) System Doubles Pot Suction, Reduces Roof Emission ... Phase Change Materials in Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar...

278

Micro -Thermonuclear AB-Reactors for Aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers several innovations that he first suggested publicly early in 1983 for the AB multi-reflex engine, space propulsion, getting energy from plasma, etc. (see: A. Bolonkin, Non-Rocket Space Launch and Flight, Elsevier, London, 2006, Chapters 12, 3A). It is the micro-thermonuclear AB-Reactors. That is new micro-thermonuclear reactor with very small fuel pellet that uses plasma confinement generated by multi-reflection of laser beam or its own magnetic field. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The author also suggests a new method of heating the power-making fuel pellet by outer electric current as well as new direct method of transformation of ion kinetic energy into harvestable electricity. These offered innovations dramatically decrease the size, weight and cost of thermonuclear reactor, installation, propulsion system and electric generator. Non-industrial countries can produce these researches and constructions. Currently, the author is researching the efficiency of these innovations for two types of the micro-thermonuclear reactors: multi-reflection reactor (ICF) and self-magnetic reactor (MCF).

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

279

Failure Analysis in the Aerospace Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013 ... Investigation of Fatigue Failures of Titanium Alloy Blades Used in Compressor Modules of Aeroderivative Industrial Gas Turbines: Michal...

280

Salvador E. Menjivar Mechanical-Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and an electrolyte on both sides of a dielectric separator #12;http://www.supercapacitors.org/Supercapacitor

Petta, Jason

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Titanium Metal Matrix Composites for Aerospace Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and reproducibility combined with high processing and materials costs have prevented their introduction into production applications. This paper describes the...

282

Santosh Krishnamurthy Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in conven- tional scale tube bundle systems, i.e., independent of wall heat flux and increasing with mass. Z., and Axelsson, E., 1970, "Calculation of Void Volume Fraction in the Subcooled and Quality During Flow Across Tubes and Tube Bundles," HVAC&R Res., 11 2 , pp. 285­303. 28 Cornwell, K., 1990, "The

Peles, Yoav

283

Santosh Krishnamurthy Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Phase Void Fraction and Pressure Drop in Horizontal Crossflow Across a Tube Bundle," ASME J. Flu- ids Eng, namely, single tube, single heated tube in an unheated in- line tube bundle, and heated in-line tube a tube/cylinder in a tube bundle is strongly dependent on geometrical parameters such as tube con

Peles, Yoav

284

Global Innovations in Manufacturing of Aerospace Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizer(s), Deborah D. Whitis, General Electric Company ... Constitutive Model of Superplastic and Power-law Creep Deformation During Isothermal Forging...

285

The 1991 NASA Aerospace Battery Workshop  

SciTech Connect

The proceedings from the workshop are presented. The subjects covered include nickel-cadmium, nickel-hydrogen, silver-zinc, and lithium based technologies, as well as advanced technologies including nickel-metal hydride and sodium-sulfur.

Brewer, J.C.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Computational and Experimental Investigations into Aerospace Plasmas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Investigations into two different fields of plasma research are presented here. These include the study of ion engine performance and the use of plasma discharges (more)

Bennett, William Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these i...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Postgraduate Student  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................... 12 Project Two: Commercial Viability of Landfill Gas

Strathclyde, University of

289

Tim Lieuwen School of Aerospace Engineering,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Stability This paper addresses the impact of fuel composition on the operability of lean premixed gas of gas turbines capable of fuel-flexible operation raises a variety of issues. For example sources, such as biomass, landfill gas, or process gas 1 . Technologies such as integrated gasification

Lieuwen, Timothy C.

290

Aerospace nuclear safety report for August 1967  

SciTech Connect

The AEC Safety Branch advised that the present outlook for a potential mission using four modified SNAP-3 type generators is rather negative. Drop tests of four SNAP-19 intact reentry heat source capsules were conducted at the Tonopah Test Range. A preliminary GE SNAP-27 safety analysis was reviewed. Three arc tunnel tests were conducted at low heat fluxes. Debris were collected on downrange impactors from all tests. The rapid helium depressurization test on fuel microspheres was conducted by Battelle; preliminary examination of the fuel revealed no obvious change in microsphere characteristics.

Illing, R.G. (comp.)

1967-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Structural Materials for Aerospace and Defense  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... new materials and processing technologies for minimizing the environmental impact, ... First-Principles Calculation of Finite Temperature APB Energies in the...

292

Developing a 21st Century Aerospace Workforce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Across the industry there are leaders at every level who are being challenged to think and act in new ways. The same is true for this commission. This can't be a "business as usual" review of the industry's status. As the ...

Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

293

PNNL: Available Technologies: Aerospace & Defense Industry  

Other. Improved Materials for Sampling of Surfaces for Measurement of Explosives and Other Chemicals of Interest; Improved Sensor Technology using Qua ...

294

Thermal Energy Harvesting with Thermoelectrics for Self-powered Sensors: With Applications to Implantable Medical Devices, Body Sensor Networks and Aging in Place  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the growing power consumption of medical devices. However,power consumption and high performance has spawned a new wave of portable and implantable biomedical devices.device [53], [54], [62], [72]. The total power consumption

Chen, Alic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A New In Situ Method of Determining Relative Abundances and Charge States of Implanted Transition Metals in Individual Grains Using Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

We report on a new in situ method of determining relative abundances and charge states of implanted transition metals in individual grains using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence. In order to determine in situ the relative abundances and charge states of the transition metals in implanted solar wind in individual lunar plagioclase grains, we have developed a new microbeam x-ray fluorescence method using the synchrotron x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source (GSECARS sector 13) at Argonne National Laboratory.

Kitts, K.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M. (NIU); (UofC)

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

296

Single phase formation of Co-implanted ZnO thin films by swift heavy ion irradiation: Optical studies  

SciTech Connect

Low temperature photoluminescence and optical absorption studies on 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiated Co-implanted ZnO thin films were studied. The Co clusters present in as implanted samples were observed to be dissolved using 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiation with a fluence of 1x10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The photoluminescence spectrum of pure ZnO thin film was characterized by the I{sub 4} peak due to the neutral donor bound excitons and the broad green emission. The Co-doped ZnO films show three sharp levels and two shoulders corresponding to 3t{sub 2g} and 2e{sub g} levels of crystal field splitted Co d orbitals, respectively. The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy also shows the systematic variation of band gap after 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiation.

Kumar, Ravi; Singh, Fouran; Angadi, Basavaraj; Choi, Ji-Won; Choi, Won-Kook; Jeong, Kwangho; Song, Jong-Han; Khan, M. Wasi; Srivastava, J. P.; Kumar, Ajay; Tandon, R. P. [Materials Science Division, Inter-University Accelerator Centre, P.O. Box 10502, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Thin Films Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Physics and Applied Physics, Yonsei University, Shincheon-dong 134, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Analysis Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, Delhi 110007 (India)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Radiation Badge Survey for Family Members Living With Patients Treated With a {sup 103}Pd Permanent Breast Seed Implant  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Sixty-seven patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated in a Phase I/II clinical trial using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant as adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. We report the dose received by family members living with these patients and compare measured doses with theoretical worst-case scenario estimates. Methods and Materials: Exposure-rate measurements were taken at 1 m from the patient by using a calibrated low-energy survey meter. Landauer (Landauer Inc., Glenwood, IL) Luxel badges, with sensitivity of 0.01 mSv, were given to family members to wear after the implantation. Badge readings for 33 spouses and 28 other family members were used to estimate effective doses, and these were compared with theory. Results: Average preimplantation planning target volume from computed tomography was 50.3 ml (range, 18.0-96.7 ml), and average preimplantation distance between the skin and the most anterior planning target volume margin was 0.57 cm. The average maximum exposure rate was measured to be 2.4 {+-} 1.1 mR/h, and average measured dose to a spouse was 0.99 {+-} 1.0 mSv. The calculated exposure rates and spousal doses using preimplantation computed tomography scan data overestimated those measured. Average measured family member dose (excluding spouses) was 0.20 {+-} 0.58 mSv. Conclusions: Based on measured and calculated spousal doses, a permanent breast seed implant using {sup 103}Pd is safe for the public. However, it is recommended that extra precautions in the way of a breast patch be used when patients with an implant will be in the vicinity of toddlers or pregnant women.

Keller, Brian M. [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: brian.keller@sunnybrook.ca; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa; O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Method for enhancing growth of SiO.sub.2 in Si by the implantation of germanium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing the conversion of Si to SiO.sub.2 in a directional fashion wherein steam or wet oxidation of Si is enhanced by the prior implantation of Ge into the Si. The unique advantages of the Ge impurity include the directional enhancement of oxidation and the reduction in thermal budget, while at the same time, Ge is an electrically inactive impurity.

Holland, Orin W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fathy, Dariush (Knoxville, TN); White, Clark W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

299

dc field-emission analysis of GaAs and plasma-source ion-implanted stainless steel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field-emission studies have been performed on a GaAs wafer and a sample of its stainless-steel (SS) support electrode that are part of a photocathode gun for the 10 kW Upgrade infrared free electron laser at Jefferson Lab. The objective of the studies presented here is to characterize the effect of both the cleanliness of the wafer and the plasma-source ion-implanted layer on the electrode to suppress field emission. Field emission is the limiting factor to achieve the required 6 MV/m at the surface of the wafer. Potential field emitters are first located on the surface of 1 in. diameter samples with a dc scanning field-emission microscope at 60 MV/m, then each emitter is characterized in a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The GaAs wafer was hydrogen cleaned before the study. The results show three emitters caused by indium contamination during wafer handling. The GaAs wafer thus shows good high-voltage characteristics and the need to maintain cleanliness during handling. The SS sample is hand polished with diamond paste to a 1-m surface finish, then implanted with N2/SiO2 in a plasma-source ion-implantation chamber in preparation for the field-emission studies.

C. Hernandez; T. Wang; T. Siggins; D. Bullard; H. F. Dylla; C. Reece; N. D. Theodore; D. M. Manos

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Performance Assessment of Suture Type, Water Temperature, and Surgeon Skill in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Size reductions of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision - one that may warrant only one suture for closure. However, it is not known if a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during passage of hydroelectric dams. The objectives of this study were to evaluate five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon subjected to simulated turbine passage. Fish were implanted with an acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air); incisions (6 mm) were closed with either one or two sutures. Following exposure, no transmitters were expelled. In addition, suture and incision tearing and mortal injury did not differ between treatment and control fish. Viscera expulsion was higher in treatment (12%) than control (1%) fish. The higher incidence of viscera expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, the authors do not recommend using one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation when juvenile salmonids may be exposed to turbine passage.

Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Predictive process simulation of cryogenic implants for leading edge transistor design  

SciTech Connect

Two cryogenic implant TCAD-modules have been developed: (i) A continuum-based compact model targeted towards a TCAD production environment calibrated against an extensive data-set for all common dopants. Ion-specific calibration parameters related to damage generation and dynamic annealing were used and resulted in excellent fits to the calibration data-set. (ii) A Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model including the full time dependence of ion-exposure that a particular spot on the wafer experiences, as well as the resulting temperature vs. time profile of this spot. It was calibrated by adjusting damage generation and dynamic annealing parameters. The kMC simulations clearly demonstrate the importance of the time-structure of the beam for the amorphization process: Assuming an average dose-rate does not capture all of the physics and may lead to incorrect conclusions. The model enables optimization of the amorphization process through tool parameters such as scan speed or beam height.

Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Zographos, Nikolas; Park, Hugh; Colombeau, Benjamin; Parrill, Thomas; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Borges, Ricardo; Gull, Ronald; Erokhin, Yuri [Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Synopsys Switzerland LLC, Thurgauerstrasse 40, 8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Synopsys Inc., 1101 Slater Road, Durham, NC 27703 (United States); Synopsys Switzerland LLC, Thurgauerstrasse 40, 8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development and evaluation of an implantable chronic DC stimulation and measurement probe for nerve regeneration studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beneficial effects of chronic DC electrical stimulation upon peripheral nervous system (PNS) regeneration of injured nerve has been adequately confirmed, yet few attempts have been made to quantify the relevant stimulus parameter. The localized electric field strength and current densities produced by the injection of electrical current through inhomogenous structures in the region of the nerve are the acknowledged parameter of interest. However, because of the difficulties inherent in measuring these values, researchers have previously chosen to characterize stimulus in terms of raw current supplied to nerve injuries. Attempts to quantify field strength or current densities in vivo were based on assumptions which idealize the conductive media as being isotropic. The actual field strength or current density induced by the applied current is seldom directly measured in-vivo. This research seeks to evaluate the design of an implantable DC stimulator capable of delivering a constant, stable and measurable electrical stimulus across a defined region of nerve, and for the purpose of measuring the bulk tissue resistivity and electrical field strength in the defined region in a chronic regime. From this information, current density within the region can be measured and controlled, providing a stimulation parameter which can be correlated to nerve regeneration. Such a probe will prove very useful in ongoing research which evaluates the effects of applied electrical fields upon nerve regeneration.

Macha, Douglas Bryan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Holding of juvenile salmonids for surgical implantation of electronic tags: a review and recommendations  

SciTech Connect

Many telemetry based studies require that fish be sampled from the wild and then held for some amount of time both prior to and after the implantation of a transmitter. However, the effects of such holding (or the lack thereof) are often overlooked. Pre-surgical holding often occurs to facilitate logistical needs of research projects and as an attempt to minimize negative physiological effects due to capture and handling stress. Further, post-surgical holding time and conditions greatly influence the physiological state of fish prior to being returned to the wild. This paper reviews pertinent studies pertaining to the effects of surgical holding on the behavior, physiology, and survival of fishes, with particular emphasis on juvenile salmonids. The effects of individual aspects of surgical holding such as stressors, time, holding conditions and water quality are also examined. Recommendations regarding certain aspects of surgical holding (e.g., holding duration) are offered with a goal of reducing bias related to the surgical process. Pre- and post-surgical holding times of 1836 h are suggested as a general guideline for juvenile salmonids.

Oldenburg, Eric W.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Clinical Study Anterior Lumbar Interbody Implants: Importance of the Interdevice Distance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2011 Brian R. Subach et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Object. The implantation of interbody fusion cages allows for the restoration of disc height and the enlargement of the neuroforaminal space. The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of subsidence occurring after conventional cage placement compared to a novel wider cage placement technique. Methods. This study is a retrospective evaluation of radiographs of patients who underwent stand-alone single level anterior lumbar interbody fusion with lordotic titanium cages and rhBMP-2. Fifty-three patients were evaluated: 39 patients had wide cage placement (6 mm interdevice distance) and 14 had narrow cage placement (2 mm interdevice distance). Anterior and posterior intervertebral disc space heights were measured post-operatively and at follow-up imaging. Results. The decrease in anterior intervertebral disc space height was 2.05 mm versus 3.92 mm (P subsidence greater than 2 mm was 41.0 % in the wide cage patients and 85.7 % for the narrow cage patients (P subsidence while allowing for a greater exposed surface area for interbody fusion. 1.

Brian R. Subach; Anne G. Copay; Marcus M. Martin; Thomas C. Schuler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Some Electrical Properties of Ion-Implanted Urania--Part II: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's effort to evaluate the use of UO2 as a material for photovoltaic (e.g., solar cell) applications, single-crystal UO2 samples were characterized as to their electrical and electro-optical properties. Samples of UO2 were ion implanted with boron and sulfur dopants, as well as with boron and sulfur co-dopants, at the Ion Beam Materials Laboratory facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Activation energies for electrical conduction were measured to be from 0.13 to 0.26 eV, when temperatures varied from 180 to 450 K. Dark current was measured followed by light current under 1-sun illumination. In general, the dark and light currents were about an order of magnitude greater than those reported earlier for polycrystalline UO2. Optical and infrared absorption and transmission data were also obtained and are reported. Transmission data on the single-crystal samples revealed a complex structure that made it difficult to resolve a single optical bandgap.

von Roedern, B.; Meek, T. T.; Haire, M. J.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

On the use of EPID-based implanted marker tracking for 4D radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Four-dimensional (4D) radiotherapy delivery to dynamically moving tumors requires a real-time signal of the tumor position as a function of time so that the radiation beam can continuously track the tumor during the respiration cycle. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based marker-tracking system that can be used for real-time tumor targeting, or 4D radiotherapy. Three gold cylinders, 3 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter, were implanted in a dynamic lung phantom. The phantom range of motion was 4 cm with a 3-s 'breathing' period. EPID image acquisition parameters were modified, allowing image acquisition in 0.1 s. Images of the stationary and moving phantom were acquired. Software was developed to segment automatically the marker positions from the EPID images. Images acquired in 0.1 s displayed higher noise and a lower signal-noise ratio than those obtained using regular (>1 s) acquisition settings. However, the markers were still clearly visible on the 0.1-s images. The motion of the phantom blurred the images of the markers and further reduced the signal-noise ratio, though they could still be successfully segmented from the images in 10-30 ms of computation time. The positions of gold markers placed in the lung phantom were detected successfully, even for phantom velocities substantially higher than those observed for typical lung tumors. This study shows that using EPID-based marker tracking for 4D radiotherapy is feasible, however, changes in linear accelerator technology and EPID-based image acquisition as well as patient studies are required before this method can be implemented clinically.

Keall, P.J.; Todor, A.D.; Vedam, S.S.; Bartee, C.L.; Siebers, J.V.; Kini, V.R.; Mohan, R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 College Street, P.O. Box 980058, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, P.O. Box 94, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Surgically Implanted JSATS Micro-Acoustic Transmitters Effects on Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Tag Expulsion and Survival, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate survival model assumptions associated with a concurrent study - Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Dam Passage Survival and Associated Metrics at John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2010 by Thomas Carlson and others in 2010 - in which the Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The micro-acoustic transmitter used in these studies is the smallest acoustic transmitter model to date (12 mm long x 5 mm wide x 4 mm high, and weighing 0.43 g in air). This study and the 2010 study by Carlson and others were conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet requirements set forth by the 2008 FCRPS Biological Opinion. In 2010, we compared survival, tag burden, and tag expulsion in five spring groups of yearling Chinook salmon (YCH) and steelhead (STH) and five summer groups of subyearling Chinook salmon (SYC) to evaluate survival model assumptions described in the concurrent study. Each tagging group consisted of approximately 120 fish/species, which were collected and implanted on a weekly basis, yielding approximately 600 fish total/species. YCH and STH were collected and implanted from late April to late May (5 weeks) and SYC were collected and implanted from mid-June to mid-July (5 weeks) at the John Day Dam Smolt Monitoring Facility. The fish were collected once a week, separated by species, and assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) Control (no surgical treatment), (2) Sham (surgical implantation of only a passive integrated transponder [PIT] tag), and (3) Tagged (surgical implantation of JSATS micro-acoustic transmitter [AT] and PIT tags). The test fish were held for 30 days in indoor circular tanks at the Bonneville Dam Juvenile Monitoring Facility. Overall mortality ranged weekly from 45 to 72% for YCH, 55 to 83% for STH, and 56 to 84% for SYC. The high background mortality in all groups and species made it difficult to discern tag effects. However, for YCH, STH, and SYC, the Tagged treatment groups had the highest overall mean mortality - 62%, 79%, and 76%, respectively. Fungal infections were found on 35% of all fish. Mean tag burden for the Tagged treatment group was relatively low for YCH (1.7%) and moderate for SYC (4.2%), while STH had a very low mean tag burden (0.7%). Tag burden was significantly higher in the Tagged treatment group for all species when compared to the Sham treatment group because of the presence of two tags. Surgeon performance did not contribute to the difference in mortality between the Sham and Tagged treatment groups. Tag expulsion from fish that survived to the end of the 30-day experiment was low but occurred in all species, with only two PIT tags and one AT lost, one tag per species. The high background mortality in this experiment was not limited to a treatment, temperature, or month. The decreased number of surviving fish influenced our experimental results and thus analyses. For future research, we recommend that a more natural exposure to monitor tag effects and other factors, such as swimming ability and predator avoidance, be considered to determine the effects of AT- and PIT- implantation on fishes.

Woodley, Christa M.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Royer, Ida M.; Knox, Kasey M.; Kim, Jin A.; Gay, Marybeth E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Brown, Richard S.

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Determine the Influence of Time Held in Knockdown Anesthesia on Survival and Stress of Surgically Implanted Juvenile Salmonids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Portland District (USACE) to address questions related to survival and performance measures of juvenile salmonids as they pass through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Researchers using JSATS acoustic transmitters (ATs) were tasked with standardizing the surgical implantation procedure to ensure that the stressors of handling and surgery on salmonids were consistent and less likely to cause effects of tagging in survival studies. Researchers questioned whether the exposure time in 'knockdown' anesthesia (or induction) to prepare fish for surgery could influence the survival of study fish (CBSPSC 2011). Currently, fish are held in knockdown anesthesia after they reach Stage 4 anesthesia until the completion of the surgical implantation of a transmitter, varies from 5 to 15 minutes for studies conducted in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Surgical Protocol Steering Committee (CBSPSC ) expressed concern that its currently recommended 10-minute maximum time limit during which fish are held in anesthetic - tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222, 80 mg L-1 water) - could increase behavioral and physiological costs, and/or decrease survival of outmigrating juvenile salmonids. In addition, the variability in the time fish are held at Stage 4 could affect the data intended for direct comparison of fish within or among survival studies. Under the current recommended protocol, if fish exceed the 10-minute time limit, they are to be released without surgical implantation, thereby increasing the number of fish handled and endangered species 'take' at the bypass systems for FCRPS survival studies.

Woodley, Christa M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Knox, Kasey M.

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ferromagnetism and suppression of metallic clusters in Fe implanted ZnO -- a phenomenon related to defects?  

SciTech Connect

We investigated ZnO(0001) single crystals annealed in high vacuum with respect to their magnetic properties and cluster formation tendency after implant-doping with Fe. While metallic Fe cluster formation is suppressed, no evidence for the relevance of the Fe magnetic moment to the observed ferromagnetism was found. The latter along with the cluster suppression is discussed with respect to defects in the ZnO host matrix, since the crystalline quality of the substrates was lowered due to the preparation as observed by x-ray diffraction.

Arenholz, Elke; Zhou, S.; Potzger, K.; Talut, G.; Reuther, H.; Kuepper, K.; Grenzer, J.; Xu, Q.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

310

Enhanced x-ray imaging for a thin film cochlear implant with metal artefacts using phase retrieval tomography  

SciTech Connect

Phase retrieval tomography has been successfully used to enhance imaging in systems that exhibit poor absorption contrast. However, when highly absorbing regions are present in a sample, so-called metal artefacts can appear in the tomographic reconstruction. We demonstrate that straightforward approaches for metal artefact reconstruction, developed in absorption contrast tomography, can be applied when using phase retrieval. Using a prototype thin film cochlear implant that has high and low absorption components made from iridium (or platinum) and plastic, respectively, we show that segmentation of the various components is possible and hence measurement of the electrode geometry and relative location to other regions of interest can be achieved.

Arhatari, B. D. [Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, Melbourne (Australia); Harris, A. R.; Paolini, A. G. [School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, Melbourne (Australia); Peele, A. G. [Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, Melbourne (Australia); Australian Synchrotron, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Training considerations for the intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags in fish with a summary of common surgical errors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Training is a fundamental part of all scientific and technical disciplines. This is particularly true for all types of surgeons. For surgical procedures, a number of skills are necessary to reduce mistakes. Trainees must learn an extensive yet standardized set of problem-solving and technical skills to handle challenges as they arise. There are currently no guidelines or consistent training methods for those intending to implant electronic tags in fish; this is surprising, considering documented cases of negative consequences of fish surgeries and information from studies having empirically tested fish surgical techniques. Learning how to do fish surgery once is insufficient for ensuring the maintenance or improvement of surgical skill. Assessment of surgical skills is rarely incorporated into training, and is needed. Evaluation provides useful feedback that guides future learning, fosters habits of self-reflection and self-remediation, and promotes access to advanced training. Veterinary professionals should be involved in aspects of training to monitor basic surgical principles. We identified attributes related to knowledge, understanding, and skill that surgeons must demonstrate prior to performing fish surgery including a hands-on assessment using live fish. Included is a summary of common problems encountered by fish surgeons. We conclude by presenting core competencies that should be required as well as outlining a 3-day curriculum for training surgeons to conduct intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags. This curriculum could be offered through professional fisheries societies as professional development courses.

Cooke, Steven J.; Wagner, Glenn N.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Physics of Plasma-Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID)and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS): A Comparison  

SciTech Connect

The emerging technology of High Power Impulse MagnetronSputtering (HIPIMS) has much in common with the more establishedtechnology of Plasma Based Ion Implantation&Deposition (PBIID):both use pulsed plasmas, the pulsed sheath periodically evolves andcollapses, the plasma-sheath system interacts with the pulse-drivingpower supply, the plasma parameters are affected by the power dissipated,surface atoms are sputtered and secondary electrons are emitted, etc.Therefore, both fields of science and technology could learn from eachother, which has not been fully explored. On the other hand, there aresignificant differences, too. Most importantly, the operation of HIPIMSheavilyrelies on the presence of a strong magnetic field, confiningelectrons and causing their ExB drift, which is closed for typicalmagnetron configurations. Second, at the high peak power levels used forHIPIMS, 1 kW/cm2 or greater averaged over the target area, the sputteredmaterial greatly affects plasma generation. For PBIID, in contrast,plasma generation and ion processing of the surface (ion implantation,etching, and deposition) are considered rela-tively independentprocesses. Third, secondary electron emission is generally considered anuisance for PBIID, especially at high voltages, whereas it is a criticalingredient to the operation of HIPIMS. Fourth, the voltages in PBIID areoften higher than in HIPIMS. For the first three reasons listed above,modelling of PBIID seems to be easier and could give some guidance forfuture HIPIMS models, which, clearly, will be more involved.

Anders, Andre

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

An Energy Management IC for Bio-Implants Using Ultracapacitors for Energy Storage William Sanchez, Charles Sodini, and Joel L. Dawson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in a 0.18 m CMOS process, consists of a switched-capacitor DC-DCAn Energy Management IC for Bio-Implants Using Ultracapacitors for Energy Storage William Sanchez of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Abstract We present the first known energy management IC to allow low

Dawson, Joel

314

Treatment of carcinoma of the pancreas with radon seed implantation and intra-arterial infusion of 5-FUDR  

SciTech Connect

This review has the shortcomings of any retrospective uncontrolled study and one should not conclude that the procedures described offer better palliation with less morbidity and mortality than present attempts at cure and palliation of this disease. At present, surgical resection offers the best chance of cure and palliation. However, the dismal results of surgical therapy make imperative the establishment of additional protocols with new therapeutic approaches, which include and combine the use of high dose external and interstitial radiation, systemic and regional chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. Radon seed implantation is able to provide high dose cancericidal radiation with relatively few side effects. Concomitant chemotherapy, both regional and systemic, can therefore be given with less fear of additive toxicity from therapeutic levels for control of disseminated microscopic foci of disease. (auth)

Barone, R.M.

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Structural and magnetic properties of MnAs nanoclusters formed by Mn ion implantation in GaAs  

SciTech Connect

Ferromagnetic (FM) nanostructures embedded in semiconductors are of fundamental interest since their physical properties could be used in new devices such as memories, sensors or spintronics. In this work, we present results obtained on the synthesis and characterization of nanosized MnAs ferromagnets buried in GaAs. These nanocrystals are formed either by single Mn implantation or Mn + As co-implantation at room temperature into GaAs wafers at 141 and 180 keV respectively. Two doses, 1 x 10{sup 16} and 2 x 10{sup 16} ions {center_dot} cm{sup -2} for each impurity, are tested. Pieces of the wafers are then annealed by RTA or classical furnace annealing at various temperatures under N{sub 2} atmosphere for increasing times. HRTEM and diffraction analysis show that under such conditions MnAs precipitates form with a regular hexagonal structure, the 3m orientation-relationship of precipitates with respect to the matrix offers the most energetically stable configuration. Size distributions are systematically extracted from statistical analysis of ''2 beam'' TEM images. The precipitate mean diameters of nanocrystals populations range from 9 to 13 nm depending on the annealing conditions. Magnetization measurements by SQUID magnetometry on the same samples reveal a progressive transition from a superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature to an FM one at 2K, reflecting a distribution of blocking temperature, due to distribution of size and to dipolar interactions. Curie temperatures in the range of 360K were measured.

Serres, A.; Benassayag, G.; Respaud, M.; Armand, C.; Pesant, J.C.; Mari, A.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Claverie, A.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sunnybrook.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chartier, Carole [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The SPRITE and POS-SPRITE user report: An extensible calculation of particle, positron and electron implantation in solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SPRITE (Simulation of Particle Reemission, Implantation and Transmission--Extensible) is a Fortran computer program designed to model the transport of a stream of energetic particles as they scatter through a solid or multilayer. SPRITE is intended to be a user-friendly and easily-extensible engine for performing basic transport calculations, and SPRITE incorporates such physics as is required to simulate the transport process, but specifically omits the details of the scattering mechanisms. PSPRITE is a Fortran computer program, built around the SPRITE transport engine and incorporating physical information necessary for modeling the implantation and thermalization of a stream of positrons or electrons with a solid. This document is intended to be the primary source of information and the only operations manual for SPRITE and the POS-SPRITE family of programs. This information includes the mode of operation of SPRITE, the format of the required and optional file types, as well as information about the output and results of the calculation. Information about installing and running these programs on a variety of computer systems will not be addressed in this report. Such information is rapidly expanding as these programs are adapted to run on different platforms, and thus the user can expect such information to be contained with the source code distribution set. Detailed information about the calculations of the structure of the POS-SPRITE programs are provided in this report, but detailed benchmark comparisons between the output of these calculations and experimental data are an active topic of research, and they refer the reader to the published literature for this information.

Ritley, K.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; McKewown, M.; Welch, D.O. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

318

Dosimetric perturbations due to an implanted cardiac pacemaker in MammoSite{sup Registered-Sign} treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate dose perturbations for pacemaker-implanted patients in partial breast irradiation using high dose rate (HDR) balloon brachytherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to calculate dose distributions involving a pacemaker in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy. Dose perturbations by varying balloon-to-pacemaker distances (BPD = 50 or 100 mm) and concentrations of iodine contrast medium (2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, and 10.0% by volume) in the balloon were investigated for separate parts of the pacemaker (i.e., battery and substrate). Relative measurements using an ion-chamber were also performed to confirm MC results. Results: The MC and measured results in homogeneous media without a pacemaker agreed with published data within 2% from the balloon surface to 100 mm BPD. Further their dose distributions with a pacemaker were in a comparable agreement. The MC results showed that doses over the battery were increased by a factor of 3, compared to doses without a pacemaker. However, there was no significant dose perturbation in the middle of substrate but up to 70% dose increase in the substrate interface with the titanium capsule. The attenuation by iodine contrast medium lessened doses delivered to the pacemaker by up to 9%. Conclusions: Due to inhomogeneity of pacemaker and contrast medium as well as low-energy photons in Ir-192 HDR balloon brachytherapy, the actual dose received in a pacemaker is different from the homogeneous medium-based dose and the external beam-based dose. Therefore, the dose perturbations should be considered for pacemaker-implanted patients when evaluating a safe clinical distance between the balloon and pacemaker.

Sung, Wonmo; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Jung-in; Lee, Jae-gi; Shin, Young-Joo; Jung, Jae-Yong; Ye, Sung-Joon [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799, South Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 110-746 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744, South Korea and Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul 139-707 (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of) and Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Effects of B{sub 18}H{sub x}{sup +} and B{sub 18}H{sub x} dimer ion implantations on crystallinity and retained B dose in silicon  

SciTech Connect

The effects of B{sub 18}H{sub x}{sup +} and B{sub 18}H{sub x} dimer ion (B{sub 36}H{sub y}{sup +}) implantations on Si crystallinity and the retained B dose in Si were investigated using B{sub 18}H{sub x} bombardment and compared with the effects of B{sup +} implantation. Crystallinity was estimated for the implantation dose using molecular dynamic simulations (MDSs) and was quantified using the optical thickness obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry. The authors focused on the crystallinity at a low B dose and compared the amorphized zones predicted by MDS for B{sub 18}H{sub x}{sup +} implantation with those measured using transmission electron microscopy; the predicted and measured results were in reasonable agreement. The authors then used their understanding of B{sub 18}H{sub x} bombardment to discuss the process for the generation of larger amorphized zones and thicker amorphized layers, as observed in B{sub 36}H{sub y}{sup +} implantation. The retained B dose and the sputtering were examined with secondary ion mass spectroscopy, focusing on a comparison of the retained B and the sputtering of Si and SiO{sub 2} surfaces. The retained B dose was lower for B{sub 18}H{sub x}{sup +} and B{sub 36}H{sub y}{sup +} implantations, with and without surface SiO{sub 2}, than for B{sup +} implantation, although no sputtering was observed. The reduction of the retained B dose was more severe in the samples with SiO{sub 2}. The origin of the differences between Si and SiO{sub 2} surfaces was considered to be Si melting; this was predicted by the MDSs, and observed indirectly as flat B profiles in the Si region. To examine the effects of both crystallinity and retained B dose on the electrical characteristics, the sheet resistance (R{sub S}) was measured. The R{sub S} for B{sub 18}H{sub x}{sup +} implantation was lower than that for B{sup +} implantation at both B doses studied. Additionally, the B{sub 36}H{sub y}{sup +} implantation under conditions that produced a thicker amorphized layer led to lower R{sub S} than B{sub 18}H{sub x}{sup +} implantation. These results indicate that both the amorphized layer and the amorphized zone contribute to the activation of more B atoms.

Kawasaki, Yoji; Shibahara, Kentaro [Renesas Electronics Corporation, 751 Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan) and Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Research Institute for Nanodevice and Bio Systems, Hiroshima University, 1-4-2 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan) and Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall's tau ({tau}{sub {beta}}) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4-14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.6, p =}1 cm{sup 2}. Grade 3-4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.3-0.5, p {Low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy provides acceptable local control in select early-stage BCa patients. However, treatment-related toxicity and cosmetic complications were significant with longer follow-up and at higher doses.

Hattangadi, Jona A. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Freer, Phoebe [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lawenda, Brian [21st Century Oncology, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Alm El-Din, Mohamed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Department of Clinical Oncology, Tanta University Hospital, Tanta (Egypt); Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Radiation blistering of Nb implanted sequentially with helium ions of different energies (3-500 keV)  

SciTech Connect

Cold rolled, polycrystalline niobium samples were irradiated at room temperature with $sup 4$He$sup +$ ions sequentially at 14 different energies over an energy range from 3 keV--500 keV in steps of 50 keV. The dose for each energy was chosen to give an approximately uniform concentration of helium between the implant depths corresponding to 3 keV and 500 keV. In one set of experiments the irradiations were started at the Kurchatov Institute with 3 keV $sup 4$He$sup +$ ions and extended up to 80 keV in several steps. Subsequently, the same target area was irradiated with $sup 4$He$sup +$ ions at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) starting at 100 keV and increased to 500 keV in steps of 50 keV. Another set of irradiations were started at ANL with 500 keV $sup 4$He$sup +$ ions and continued with decreasing ion energies to 100 keV. Subsequently, the same area was irradiated at the Kurchatov Institute starting at 80 keV and continued with decreasing ion energies to 3 keV. Both sets of irradiations were completed for two different total doses, 0.5 C cm$sup -2$ and 1.0 C cm$sup -2$.

Guseva, M.I.; Gusev, V.; Krasulin, U.L.; Martinenko, U.V.; Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nuclear radiation detectors based on a matrix of ion-implanted p-i-n diodes on undoped GaAs epilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of nuclear detectors which represent matrices of p-i-n diodes were fabricated based on undoped gallium arsenide epitaxial layers by ion implantation technology. The detectors have a size of the active area of 0.4 Multiplication-Sign 0.4 and 0.9 Multiplication-Sign 0.9 cm{sup 2}. Electrical characteristics of fabricated detectors and results of measurements of fast neutrons spectra of {sup 241}Am-Be source by the recoil protons method are discussed.

Baryshnikov, F. M.; Britvich, G. I.; Chernykh, A. V.; Chernykh, S. V.; Chubenko, A. P.; Didenko, S. I.; Koltsov, G. I. [National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', Leninskiy prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute for High Energy Physics, Polshhad nauki 1, 142281 Protvino (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', Leninskiy prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the RAS, Leninskiy prospect 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS', Leninskiy prospect 4, 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

323

CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009  

SciTech Connect

The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Sanders, Charlene A [ORNL; Kandagor, Vincent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Abundance and Charge State of Implanted Solar Wind Transition Metals in Individual Apollo 16 and 17 Lunar Soil Plagioclase Grains Determined In Situ Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

We report (1) a new method for determining the relative abundances in situ of Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni in implanted solar wind in individual Apollo 16 and 17 lunar plagioclases via synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and (2) the charge states of these metals. By virture of its mass alone, the Sun provides a representative composition of the solar system and can be used as a background against which to gauge excesses or deficiencies of specific components. One way of sampling the Sun is by measuring solar wind implanted ions in lunar soil grains. Such measurements are valuable because of their long exposure ages which compliment shorter time scale collections, such as those obtained by the Genesis spacecraft. Kitts et al. sought to determine the isotopic composition of solar Cr by analyzing the solar wind implanted into plagioclase grains from Apollo 16 lunar soils. The isotopic composition of the solar wind bearing fraction was anomalous and did not match any other known Cr isotopic signature. This could only be explained by either (1) an enrichment in the solar wind of heavy Cr due to spallation in the solar atmosphere or (2) that the Earth and the various parent bodies of the meteorites are distinct from the Sun and must have formed from slightly different mixes of presolar materials. To help resolve this issue, we have developed a wholly independent method for determining the relative abundances of transition metals in the solar wind implanted in individual lunar soil grains. This method is based on in situ abundance measurements by microbeam x-ray fluorescence in both the implantation zone and bulk grains using the synchrotron x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source (GSECARS sector 13) at Argonne National Laboratory. Here, we report results for Apollo 16 and 17 plagioclase grains. Additionally, a micro-XANES technique was used to determine charge states of the implanted Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni.

Kitts, K.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M. (NIU); (UofC)

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

First report of a permanent breast {sup 103}Pd seed implant as adjuvant radiation treatment for early-stage breast cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A new technique of adjuvant partial breast irradiation using {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implants (PBSI) is presented. The procedure is performed in a single 1-hour session under local anesthesia. Methods and Materials: Patients referred to a single institution for adjuvant radiotherapy after lumpectomy for an infiltrating ductal carcinoma {=}2 mm, no extensive in situ carcinoma, no lymphovascular invasion, and minimal or negative lymph node involvement were offered a PBSI. Results: Between May and December 2004, 31 eligible patients underwent CT scan and ultrasound simulations assessing PBSI feasibility. Fifteen were excluded because of feasibility issues, and 16 received PBSI. A minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the planning target volume corresponding to the clinical target volume identified on the CT scan plus a margin of 1 cm. The procedure was well tolerated; 56% of the patients reported no pain during the procedure, and 46% of the patients developed National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 1 acute reaction. None experienced toxicity Grade 2 or 3. Conclusions: Permanent breast seed implantation seems feasible and well tolerated on these preliminary clinical data and represents an ultimate step in the reduction of treatment fraction for partial breast irradiation.

Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Keller, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Easton, Harry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Que, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Strain evolution in Si substrate due to implantation of MeV ion observed by extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We studied the strain introduced in a Si(111) substrate due to MeV ion implantation using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction and measured the rocking curves of asymmetrical 113 diffraction for the Si substrates implanted with a 1.5 MeV Au{sup 2+} ion at fluence values of 1x10{sup 13}, 5x10{sup 13}, and 1x10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}. The measured curves consisted of a bulk peak and accompanying subpeak with an interference fringe. The positional relationship of the bulk peak to the subpeak and the intensity variation of those peaks with respect to the wavelengths of the x rays indicated that crystal lattices near the surface were strained; the lattice spacing of surface normal (111) planes near the surface was larger than that of the bulk. Detailed strain profiles along the depth direction were successfully estimated using a curve-fitting method based on Darwin's dynamical diffraction theory. Comparing the shapes of resultant strain profiles, we found that a strain evolution rapidly occurred within a depth of approx300 nm at fluence values between 1x10{sup 13} and 5x10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}. This indicates that formation of the complex defects progressed near the surface when the fluence value went beyond a critical value between 1x10{sup 13} and 5x10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} and the defects brought a large strain to the substrate.

Emoto, T. [Department of Physics, Toyota National College of Technology, 2-1, Eisei-cho, Toyota 471-8525 (Japan); Ghatak, J.; Satyam, P. V. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Akimoto, K. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Naoyga 464-8603 (Japan)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Artificial Retina Implant Eligibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CRADA Established October 14, 2004 CRADA Established October 14, 2004 A Joint Research Partnership Between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), DOE Laboratories, Universities, and a Private Company On October 14, 2004, the Department of Energy and Second Sight Medical Products, Inc. of Sylmar, California, held a press conference to announce the formal signing of a CRADA* for the Artificial Retina Project. This press conference included a speech by Energy Secretary Abraham, five minute video presentation, and multiple press releases. The press releases and video are listed below. Video A video explaining the artificial retina project and retinitis pigmentosa was shown during the press conference. This video is available on the video page. "See Artificial Retina Project Overview."

328

Artificial Retina Implant Eligibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Participate to Participate February 14, 2013: BREAKING NEWS FDA Approves Argus II After more than 20 years of research and development, Second Sight Medical Products, Inc., has announced that it's Argus® II Retinal Prosthesis System ("Argus II") has received U.S. market approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat individuals with late stage retinitis pigmentosa (RP). This announcement followed receipt of the European approval in 2011, and a unanimous recommendation by the FDA's Ophthalmic Devices Advisory Panel in September 2012 that this revolutionary product be made available to treat this patient population in the U.S. With approval from the FDA, the Argus II is slated to be available later in 2013 in clinical centers across the country. Second Sight will be actively adding sites to make the therapy more readily available and encourages interested facilities and patients to contact them.

329

Titanium Dental Implants Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preparation and Characterization of Biodegradable Composites Based on Brazilian Cassava Starch, Corn Starch and Coconut Fibers Process and...

330

Fixture layout optimization for flexible aerospace parts based on self ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

stochastic methods [7, 8]. No derivates are .... selection, stochastic tournament, and expected value .... remaining degrees of freedom are resisted by the friction.

331

Chromium-free Conversion Coatings for Aerospace Aluminum Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Predicting and Combating Corrosion and Degradation of New Coating and...

332

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

CARLETON UNIVERSITY Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for space and DHW heating. A heat transfer modelling study will be conducted that considers the solar Reduction in Large Power Plants ­ Professor J. Sasiadek - The project involves design of an intelligent interests and skills of students. ENERGY Optimization of Building Envelope and Architecture for a Solar

Dawson, Jeff W.

334

Pamela L. Dickrell Department of Mechanical and Aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surface bonds of carbon atoms and reduce the friction coefficient; when the hydro- gen is removed envi- ronments 1­3,5,6 . In contrast, hydrogen-free diamondlike car- bon films show their lowest

Sawyer, Wallace

335

Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications  

SciTech Connect

Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

English, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Capacity planning and change management in an aerospace overhaul cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purpose - This thesis analyzes the transformation of the Small Components Cell in Pratt & Whitney's aftermarket division through lean manufacturing techniques. The thesis focuses on use of a labor capacity planning model, ...

Walker, David, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

LIGHT WEIGHT ALLOYS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATION IV: III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Room: 330A. Session Chairperson: J.E. Benci, Wayne State University, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Detroit, MI 48202...

338

West Virginia University 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-solid and density stratified flows. Available instrumentation includes eight channels of hot wire/film anemometry) to investigate a wide variety of problems in fuel cell technology, fixed wing and rotorcraft aerodynamics and emissions, fuel cell technology, heat transfer, numerical analysis of thermal systems, the analysis

Mohaghegh, Shahab

339

The Production-Scale Spray Forming of Superalloys for Aerospace ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sprayform Technologies International L.L.C. has two sprayform units, one used for development applications and the other for production. The development unit ...

340

Strategic inventory management in an aerospace supply chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces multiple methods to set and optimize inventory levels. These methods are then classified based on the complexity involved to implement them. As an organization develops a deeper understanding of ...

Mauro, Joseph (Joseph Peter)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

LIGHT WEIGHT ALLOYS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATION IV: II: Al ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tech., Pohang 790784, Korea; M.C. Kim, Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Tech., Pohang 790600, Korea. Amorphous aluminum alloys show an attractive...

342

LIGHT WEIGHT ALLOYS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATION IV: V: Ti ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Room: 330A. Session Chairperson: Soo Woo Nam, Dept. of Materials Science & Eng., Korea Adv. Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon 305-701 Korea...

343

Implications of Pb-free microelectronics assembly in aerospace applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

three-dimensional laser-based measurement system. Componentlaser-based solder paste height and width measurement system

Shapiro, A A; Bonner, J K; Ogunseitan, O A; Saphores, JDM; Schoenung, J M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

CHUNG K. (ED) LAW Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Michigan Technological University 4. A. L. Randolph, '86 "Experimental investigation of the gasification combustion and gasification mechanisms of multicomponent and reactive materials" Research Staff, National and Mass Transfer, Vol. 27, pp. 1418-1421 (1984). 72. "Simulation of fuel droplet gasification in SI

345

I I THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION I I,W. I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

under consideration; and six institutions recently iden- hry .0-q tified during a search of Hanford records. r.1y.6-0 I The attached was prepared to document the elimination...

346

Stirling engines. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel consumption, engine design and testing, computerized simulation, and lubrication systems relative to the Stirling cycle engine. Solar energy conversion research, thermodynamic efficiency, economics, and utilization for power generation and automobile engines are included. Materials used in Stirling engines are briefly evaluated. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Observation and Detection of Corrosion on Aerospace Bearing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Michael F Hurley, Cole Smith, Darryl Butt. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Michael F Hurley. Abstract Scope, Lubricant degradation or contamination in jet...

348

LIGHT WEIGHT ALLOYS FOR AEROSPACE APPLICATION IV: I: Al ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Engineering, College of Chemical, Physical, and Materials Science & Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701.

349

P. Axelrad -Challenges and Opportunities in Aerospace Education, Stanford May 10, 2008 1 Challenges and Opportunities in Aerospace Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an answer. It's like having an answer key to everything at your fingertips: 24-7. And, like an answer key of fundamentals is getting awfully long. Other departments like mechanical and electrical engineering degrees from aero/astro programs ­ in fact it is quite common to find electrical and mechanical engineers

Prinz, Friedrich B.

350

An introduction to the practical and ethical perspectives on the need to advance and standardize the intracoelomic surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intracoelomic surgical implantation of electronic tags (including radio and acoustic telemetry transmitters, passive integrated transponders and archival biologgers) is frequently used for conducting studies on fish. Electronic tagging studies provide information on the spatial ecology, behavior and survival of fish in marine and freshwater systems. However, any surgical procedure, particularly one where a laparotomy is performed and the coelomic cavity is opened, has the potential to alter the survival, behavior or condition of the animal which can impair welfare and introduce bias. Given that management, regulatory and conservation decisions are based on the assumption that fish implanted with electronic tags have similar fates and behavior relative to untagged conspecifics, it is critical to ensure that best surgical practices are being used. Also, the current lack of standardized surgical procedures and reporting of specific methodological details precludes cross-study and cross-year analyses which would further progress the field of fisheries science. This compilation of papers seeks to identify the best practices for the entire intracoelomic tagging procedure including pre- and post-operative care, anesthesia, wound closure, and use of antibiotics. Although there is a particular focus on salmonid smolts given the large body of literature available on that group, other life-stages and species of fish are discussed where there is sufficient knowledge. Additional papers explore the role of the veterinarian in fish surgeries, the need for minimal standards in the training of fish surgeons, providing a call for more complete and transparent procedures, and identifying trends in procedures and research needs. Collectively, this body of knowledge should help to improve data quality (including comparability and repeatability), enhance management and conservation strategies, and maintain the welfare status of tagged fish.

Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.; Murchie, Karen J.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Cooke, Steven J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Ultra-stable implanted 83Rb/83mKr electron sources for the energy scale monitoring in the KATRIN experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The KATRIN experiment aims at the direct model-independent determination of the average electron neutrino mass via the measurement of the endpoint region of the tritium beta decay spectrum. The electron spectrometer of the MAC-E filter type is used, requiring very high stability of the electric filtering potential. This work proves the feasibility of implanted 83Rb/83mKr calibration electron sources which will be utilised in the additional monitor spectrometer sharing the high voltage with the main spectrometer of KATRIN. The source employs conversion electrons of 83mKr which is continuously generated by 83Rb. The K-32 conversion line (kinetic energy of 17.8 keV, natural line width of 2.7 eV) is shown to fulfill the KATRIN requirement of the relative energy stability of +/-1.6 ppm/month. The sources will serve as a standard tool for continuous monitoring of KATRIN's energy scale stability with sub-ppm precision. They may also be used in other applications where the precise conversion lines can be separated from the low energy spectrum caused by the electron inelastic scattering in the substrate.

M. Zbo?il; S. Bauer; M. Beck; J. Bonn; O. Dragoun; J. Jak\\rubek; K. Johnston; A. Kovalk; E. W. Otten; K. Schlsser; M. Slezk; A. palek; T. Thmmler; D. Vnos; J. emli?ka; C. Weinheimer

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

A permanent breast seed implant as partial breast radiation therapy for early-stage patients: A comparison of palladium-103 and iodine-125 isotopes based on radiation safety considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) technique has been developed as a new form of partial adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. This study compares iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) and palladium-103 ({sup 103}Pd) isotopes by examining the exposure and effective dose (ED) to a patient's partner.Methods and Materials: A low-energy survey meter was used to measure exposure rates as a function of bolus thickness placed over {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I seeds. A general mathematical expression for the initial exposure rate at 1 m (x{sub o,1m}) from the skin surface as a function of the implant size, R, and the distance between the skin surface and the implant, d, was derived. Also, a second general equation is proposed to calculate the ED to the patient's partner.Results: The initial exposure rate at 1 meter and the ED are calculated as follows: x{sub o,1m} = (3{alpha})/2R{sup 3}{center_dot}{beta}{sup 3} [e{sup -{beta}}{sup (2R+d)}({beta}R + 1) + e{sup -{beta}}{sup {center_dot}}{sup d}({beta}R - 1)], and ED = aR{sup b} {center_dot} [e{sup -c(2R+d)} {center_dot} (cR + 1) + e{sup -cd} -bar (cR - 1)]. For {sup 125}I, the parameters are: {alpha} = 0.154409, {beta} = 0.388460, a = 197, b = -0.95, and c = 0.38846. For {sup 103}Pd, they are: {alpha} = 0.06877, {beta} = 0.421098, a = 18.6, b -0.78, and c = 0.421098. For implant diameters varying from 2 to 6 cm and skin-to-implant distances varying from 0.7 to 4 cm, the ED is consistently below 2.6 mSv using the {sup 103}Pd isotope, but more than 5 mSv in many instances and possibly up to 20 mSv using {sup 125}I.Conclusions: PBSI using {sup 103}Pd seeds appears safe because the patient's partner ED is consistently below 5 mSv. The{sup 125}I isotope is not recommended for PBSI.

Keller, Brian [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A Comparison of Acute and Chronic Toxicity for Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy or {sup 125}I Permanent Implant  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the toxicity and biochemical outcomes of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and {sup 125}I transperineal permanent prostate seed implant ({sup 125}I) for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, a total of 374 low-risk patients (prostate-specific antigen < 10 ng/ml, T1c-T2b, Gleason score of 6 or less, and no neoadjuvant hormones) were treated at Fox Chase Cancer Center (216 IMRT and 158 {sup 125}I patients). Median follow-up was 43 months for IMRT and 48 months for {sup 125}I. The IMRT prescription dose ranged from 74-78 Gy, and {sup 125}I prescription was 145 Gy. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was recorded by using a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Freedom from biochemical failure was defined by using the Phoenix definition (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2.0 ng/ml). Results: Patients treated by using IMRT were more likely to be older and have a higher baseline American Urological Association symptom index score, history of previous transurethral resection of the prostate, and larger prostate volumes. On multivariate analysis, IMRT was an independent predictor of lower acute and late Grade 2 or higher GU toxicity and late Grade 2 or higher GI toxicity. Three-year actuarial estimates of late Grade 2 or higher toxicity were 2.4% for GI and 3.5% for GU by using IMRT compared with 7.7% for GI and 19.2% for GU for {sup 125}I, respectively. Four-year actuarial estimates of freedom from biochemical failure were 99.5% for IMRT and 93.5% for {sup 125}I (p = 0.09). Conclusions: The IMRT and {sup 125}I produce similar outcomes, although IMRT appears to have less acute and late toxicity.

Eade, Thomas N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu; Ruth, Karen [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K.; D'Ambrosio, David J.; Feigenberg, Steven J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chen, David Y.T. [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Postmastectomy Chest Wall Radiation to a Temporary Tissue Expander or Permanent Breast Implant-Is There a Difference in Complication Rates?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the likelihood of complications and cosmetic results among breast cancer patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy (MRM) and breast reconstruction followed by radiation therapy (RT) to either a temporary tissue expander (TTE) or permanent breast implant (PI). Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 74 patients with breast cancer who underwent MRM followed by breast reconstruction and RT. Reconstruction consisted of a TTE usually followed by exchange to a PI. RT was delivered to the TTE in 62 patients and to the PI in 12 patients. Dose to the reconstructed chest wall was 50 Gy. Median follow-up was 48 months. The primary end point was the incidence of complications involving the reconstruction. Results: There was no significant difference in the rate of major complications in the PI group (0%) vs. 4.8% in the TTE group. No patients lost the reconstruction in the PI group. Three patients lost the reconstruction in the TTE group. There were excellent/good cosmetic scores in 90% of the TTE group and 80% of the PI group (p = 0.22). On multivariate regression models, the type of reconstruction irradiated had no statistically significant impact on complication rates. Conclusions: Patients treated with breast reconstruction and RT can experience low rates of major complications. We demonstrate no significant difference in the overall rate of major or minor complications between the TTE and PI groups. Postmastectomy RT to either the TTE or the PI should be considered as acceptable treatment options in all eligible patients.

Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: p_anderson@fccc.edu; Freedman, Gary; Nicolaou, Nicos; Sharma, Navesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Topham, Neal; Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Lithium/selenium secondary battery for implantation. Annual report, 23 June 1970--30 July 1971. [Li/Se and Li--Al/S--Se--Tl, 400 C, 30 W  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A lithium/selenium battery is being developed as an implantable power source for an artificial heart or heart-assist device. During this period, the principal effort was directed toward extending the lifetimes of two types of lithium/selenium cells operating at about 400C. One type consists of a liquid lithium anode, a liquid selenium cathode, and a rigid past electrolyte composed of a molten-salt eutectic and lithium aluminate filler. The other type employs a molten-salt-eutectic liquid electrolyte, a solid lithium--aluminum alloy anode, and an immobilized sulfur--selenium--thallium alloy cathode. Cell cycle life had been severely limited by the transport of selenium to the anode; long-term, steady-state operation of single cells using Se--Tl cathodes demonstrated that this problem has been solved. An improved cell design (employing a liquid electrolyte and solid lithium--aluminum anode) which appears capable of meeting or exceeding the capacity density, power density, and weight objectives for an implantable 30-W battery is presented.

Chilenskas, A.A.; Walsh, W.J.; Trevorrow, L.E.; Webster, D.S.; Cairns, E.J.

1971-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Proc. SPIE 7287 (2009). 10. B.A. Trimmer, New challenges in biorobotics: incorporating soft tissue into control systems. Appl. Bionics Biomech.

357

Biomedical Materials Implants and Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... In order to solve this 'stress shield effect', TNZ40 alloy has been designed and fabricated, which shows excellent bio-compatibility, better bone...

358

PROCEEDINGS OF THE BIOMAGNETIC EFFECTS WORKSHOP, APRIL 6-7, 1978, LAWRENCE BERKELEY LAB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, Pensacola,Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, Pensacola,Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, Pensacola)

Tenforde, Tom S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kreider and F. Kreith, "Solar Heating and Cooling". McGraw-and R. L. Field, "Solar Heating of Buildings and DomesticHeat Storage for Solar Heating Systems", N75-17005 (

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. L. Field, "Solar Heating of Buildings and Domestic HotPullium, "Solar Heating and Cooling In Buildings: Air Force7Z LI I Tl Solar Heating and Cooling in Buildings: DATE: May

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Getting ahead in sourcing through benchmarking and system dynamic analysis : an aerospace industry perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sourcing and purchasing have received renewed attention recently as many supply chains challenge themselves to meet cost reduction goals. These challenges are especially apparent in the high-mix, low volume, and often ...

Chang, Yue (Yue Cathy)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Freeze ToLerant Solar Water Heater Using C ross Linkedof a Freeze Tolerant Solar Water Heater Using Crosslinkedof a Freeze- Tolerant Solar Water Heater Using Crosslinked

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General) ro space Medicine Aircraft Propulsion and PowerSpace Sciences (General) Spacecraft Instru:mentation Solar Physics Spacecraft Propulsion

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Greenhouse effect and the global climate. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning terrestrial climatic changes known as the greenhouse effect. The greenhouse effect is an accumulation of carbon dioxide and other gases that retain solar-induced heat, thereby increasing the average global temperature. Modeling studies, measurements of atmospheric gases, pollutants and temperatures, studies of climatic records for occurrence of similar changes (paleoclimatology), prediction of environmental changes due to the greenhouse effect, government energy policy as a result of possible climate change, and the contributions of manmade and natural pollutants to the greenhouse effect are among the topics discussed. (Contains a minimum of 52 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

THE A.EROSPACE CORPORATION Suite 4000, 955 L'Enfk Plaza, S. W...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IOWA STATE COLLEGE,) AMES, IOWA INTRUDUCTIUN The purpose of this review is to present information per work performed under spoflsorship of the Atomic Energy Commiss the...

366

Building flexibility in the volatile aftermarket parts : supply chains of the defense aerospace industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the Integrated Defense Systems of The Boeing Company, aftermarket support of military aircraft serves as an increasingly large source of revenue. One of the newest contracts between Boeing and the U.S. Government ...

Myers, Kevin Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projects such as home heating and cooling is the overall production cost of converting solarcosts do not project a bright future for this method in solar

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Standard practice for infrared flash thermography of composite panels and repair patches used in aerospace applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice describes a procedure for detecting subsurface flaws in composite panels and repair patches using Flash Thermography (FT), in which an infrared (IR) camera is used to detect anomalous cooling behavior of a sample surface after it has been heated with a spatially uniform light pulse from a flash lamp array. 1.2 This practice describes established FT test methods that are currently used by industry, and have demonstrated utility in quality assurance of composite structures during post-manufacturing and in-service examinations. 1.3 This practice has utility for testing of polymer composite panels and repair patches containing, but not limited to, bismaleimide, epoxy, phenolic, poly(amide imide), polybenzimidazole, polyester (thermosetting and thermoplastic), poly(ether ether ketone), poly(ether imide), polyimide (thermosetting and thermoplastic), poly(phenylene sulfide), or polysulfone matrices; and alumina, aramid, boron, carbon, glass, quartz, or silicon carbide fibers. Typical as-fabricate...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Lean effectiveness model for products and services : servicing existing systems in aerospace and technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enterprises undergo transformation for more efficient and effective performance and growth. The Lean Enterprise Self Assessment Tool (LESAT) is a product of the Lean Advancement Initiative (LAI) and the Massachusetts ...

Srivastava, Tina Prabha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications'! , Sharing the Sun, Solar Technology in theAbsorber " , Sharing the Sun, Solar Technology in the 70's,Design ll , Sharing the Sun, Solar Technology in the 70's K,

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer ram for Design Performance Analysis of Navigationram, see the attached Hughe s pamphle t ( Appendix F), One window arrangement chosen for an analysis

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Pump and Energy Conversion System Based on MetalMaterials for Energy Storage and Conversion Systems", N76-energy conversion a conventional steam power station can be added to the thermonic system

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

99--MarMar--0707 11AERODYNAMIC RESEARCH CENTER MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constant volume combustion offers better efficiencies than constant pressure combustion in Brayton cycle simplicity and versatilityversatility Mostly military: Missiles,Mostly military: Missiles, UAVsUAVs Electric

Texas at Arlington, University of

374

Economic and environmental evaluation of end-of-life aerospace aluminum options using optimization methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The benefits of recycling have long been understood and the conspicuous energy savings of secondary aluminum production have caused aluminum recycling to increase. Obsolete aircraft are a valuable source of aluminum scrap ...

Chen, Emily, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering -Graduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Graduate Level students from the Class of 2008. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 98 Number Responded: 70 Response Rate: 71% 2008 SINGAPORE MENG General Electric Mechanical Engineer Lynn MA MENG Jet Propulsion Laboratory Electrical

Lipson, Michal

376

Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering -Graduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Graduate Level students from the Class of 2007. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 69 Number Responded: 55 Response Rate: 80% (-N Engineer Not Reported ?? ExxonMobil - N Researcher Houston TX General Electric / Aviation Combustion Engine

Lipson, Michal

377

Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering -Graduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Graduate Level students from the Class of 2011. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 108 Number Responded: 70 Response Rate: 65% 2011 Cambridge MA MENG General Electric-Aviation Edison Engineering Development Program Lynn MA MENG Guill Tools

Lipson, Michal

378

Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering -Graduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Graduate Level students from the Class of 2010. Historical data is provided to allow for comparison of activity and salary trends. Number Graduated: 84 Number Responded: 49 Response Rate: 68% 2010 CA MENG General Electric Engineer/Technologist Evendale OH MENG General Motors PDO Control

Lipson, Michal

379

Safety-Driven Design for Software-Intensive Aerospace and Automotive Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Too often, systems are designed and then an attempt is made to add safety features or to prove that the design is safe after the fact. Safety has to be designed into a system from the start-it cannot be effectively added ...

Stringfellow, Margaret V.

380

Lean Transformation in the U.S. Aerospace Industry: Appreciating Interdependent Social and Technical Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lean practices and principles build on a half-century of successive initiatives aimed at transforming social and technical systems in organizations. While they are send as ...

CUTCHER-GERSHENFELD, JOEL

2003-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Synthesis and cure characterization of high temperature polymers for aerospace applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The E-beam curable BMI resin systems and phenylethynyl terminated AFR-PEPA-4 oligomer together with an imide model compound N-phenyl-[4-(phenylethynyl) phthalimide] were synthesized and characterized. E-beam exposure cannot propagate the polymerization of BMI system until the temperature goes up to 100oC. However, a small amount of oligomers may be generated from solid-state cure reaction under low E-beam intensity radiation. Higher intensity E-beam at 40 kGy per pass can give above 75% reaction conversion of BMI with thermal cure mechanism involved. NVP is a good reactive diluent for BMI resin. The cure extents of BMI/NVP increase with the increase of the dosage and applied dosage per pass. The reaction rate is much higher at the beginning of the E-beam cure and slows down after 2 dose passes due to diffusion control. Free radical initiator dicumyl peroxide can accelerate the reaction rate at the beginning of E-beam cure reaction but doesn?t affect final cure conversion very much. According to the results from FT-IR, 200 kGy total dosage E- beam exposure at 10 kGy per pass can give 70% reaction conversion of BMI/NVP with the temperature rise no more than 50oC. The product has a Tg of 180oC. The predicted ultimate Tg of cured AFR-PEPA-4 polyimide is found to be 437.2oC by simulation of DSC Tg as a function of cure. The activation energy of thermal cure reaction of AFR-PEPA-4 oligomer is 142.6 ± 10.0 kJ/mol with the kinetic order of 1 when the reaction conversion is less than 80%. The kinetics analysis of the thermal cure of N-phenyl-[4-(phenylethynyl) phthalimide] was determined by FT-IR spectroscopy by following the absorbance of the phenylethynyl triple bond and conjugated bonds. The thermal crosslinking of N-phenyl-[4-(phenylethynyl) phthalimide] through phenylethynyl addition reaction has a reaction order of 0.95 and an activation energy of 173.5 ± 8.2 kJ/mol. The conjugated bond addition reactions have a lower reaction order of 0.94 and lower activation energy (102.7 ± 15.9 kJ/mol). The cure reaction of N-phenyl-[4-(phenylethynyl) phthalimide] can be described as a fast first-order reaction stage followed by a slow second stage that is kinetically controlled by diffusion.

Li, Yuntao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dr. Brian L. Wardle Director, Nano-Engineered Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research to answer key outstanding "questions of the day" related to CNT contributions to bulk composite and electrical conductivity results will be discussed and the underlying mechanisms elucidated. Fundamental

Guiltinan, Mark

383

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of High Temperature Thermal' Energy Storage", Sand 75-W, A, Brooksbank, Jr. , "Thermal Energy Storage Subsystems",Inorganic Oxides for Thermal Energy Storage Applications",

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A qualitative mapping and evaluation of an aerospace supply chain strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effective supply chain is critical to the success of the products and services sold by companies. Companies must have an explicit understanding of what the supply chain strategy is in order to evaluate it. While most ...

Hung, Jonathan (Jonathan W.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy end-uses for heat, SNG, and el city (Task 5) o opmentand interchange- lity of the SNG with natural gas (Task 4) o

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model for joint wave and wind loads on offshore structures,UAV wing, offshore platforms, and composite wind turbinesuch as wind turbines, critical components in offshore

Gobbato, Maurizio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

e-mail: pelesy@rpi.edu Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-bubble distribution (uneven void fraction) in the tube sections, due to the dominance of surface tension forces [8]. #12; +($7 75$16)(5 0(&+$1,60 One end of the PHP tube bundle receives heat, transferring

Peles, Yoav

388

Measuring and managing intellectual capital in the U.S. aerospace industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Intellectual capital" has been heralded in business journals as an important component for successful business development in today's economy. Intellectual capital consists of knowledge-based assets -- including people, ...

Siegel, Lawrence R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

INTERNATIONONAL INSTITUTE FOR AEROSPACE.SURVEY AND EARTH SCIENCES Atkilt Girma, MSc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

practices. Common mineral amendments that could be used are: gypsum, phosphogypsum, calcite and other acid

Rossiter, D G "David"

390

State University of New York at Buffalo Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstration reactor, a 300 kWe nuclear heated, nitrogen cooled machine designed to be truck transportable] Now we have some idea of a Gas Turbine Power plant, which base on the theory of Brayton Cycle. And we: This is an application of the Brayton cycle in nuclear power plant. This engine is called the Adams engine. It uses

Krovi, Venkat

391

Transforming commercial aerospace supply chain management practices by utilizing Toyota production system principles, practices, and methodologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines The Toyota Motor Corporation's core precepts, management principles, supply chain architecture, product development methods, leveraged practice of supplier partnerships and procurement practices, all ...

Patneaude, Steven M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F. Uno, "High Efficiency Solar Panel (HESP)! ', N78 10572,High Efficiency, Long Life Terrestrial Solar Panel", 7 8Ncapabilities, the efficiency of the solar panels, co-

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A framework for the architecting of aerospace systems portfolios with commonality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) The framework was applied to three case studies: commonality analysis for a portfolio of future and legacy exploration life support systems, for the historical Saturn launch vehicle portfolio, and for a portfolio ...

Hofstetter, Wilfried Konstantin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mode delamination growth in carbon-fiber composite laminatesmode delamination growth in carbon-fiber composite laminatesmode delamination growth in carbon-fiber composite laminates

Gobbato, Maurizio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ti) composite (CFRP Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer) stackups are CFRP/CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers),

Avila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Code Thrust 1400 Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering (including Aerodynamics, Aerospace Engineering, and Space Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences (including Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technologies, Communication Disorders Sciences and Services, Gerontology, Health and Medical Administrative Services, Other Health Professions and Related Services, Environmental health, Geotechnical, Hydraulic, Hydrologic, Sanitary, Structural, and Transportation) 1404

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

397

PROCEEDINGS OF AEROSPACE NUCLEAR SAFETY, OCTOBER 1-4, 1963, ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for 18 of the 28 papers presented; 8 were previously abstracted in NSA. Topics covered include safety programs and philosophy, nuclear safety aspects of SNAP desigu and of propulsion reactor design, environmental factors, and re-entry and postmission disposal. (R.E.U.)

Dunlap, R.E. ed.

1964-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

An exploration of supply chain management practices in the aerospace industry and in Rolls-Royce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a part of the Supply Chain 2020 research project which seeks to study best practices in supply chain management in multiple industries in order to develop a deeper understanding of key principles and practices ...

Tiwari, Mohit

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reliability of aging offshore platforms (Moan, 2005, 2007,mechanical systems, offshore platforms (Moan, 2005, 2007,composite UAV wing, offshore platforms, and composite wind

Gobbato, Maurizio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Developing a Practical Wind Tunnel Test Engineering Course for Undergraduate Aerospace Engineering Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and assessment of an undergraduate wind tunnel test engineering course utilizing the 7ft by 10ft Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). Only 5 other universities in the United States have a wind tunnel of similar size and none have an undergraduate wind tunnel test engineering course built around it. Many universities use smaller wind tunnels for laboratory instruction, but these experiments are meant to only demonstrate basic concepts. Students go beyond conceptual learning in this wind tunnel test engineering course and conduct real-world experiments in the LSWT. This course puts knowledge into practice and further prepares students whether continuing on to graduate school or industry. Course content mainly originates from the chapters in Low Speed Wind Tunnel Testing by Barlow, Rae, and Pope. This is the most comprehensive book that addresses the specific requirements of large scale, low speed wind tunnel testing. It is not a textbook for novices. The three experiments used in the course are modeled on actual experiments that were performed at the LSWT. They are exactly what a commercial entity would want performed although the time scale is drastically reduced because of class requirements. Students complete the course with a working knowledge of the requirements of large scale, low speed wind tunnel tests because they have successfully performed real-world tests and have performed data reduction that is needed for high-quality industrial tests.

Recla, Benjamin Jeremiah

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Transforming commercial aerospace supply chain management practices by utilizing Toyota production system principles, practices, and methodologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines The Toyota Motor Corporation's core precepts, management principles, supply chain architecture, product development methods, leveraged practice of supplier partnerships and procurement practices, (more)

Patneaude, Steven M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Improving inventory and distribution in an aerospace parts and service organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hamilton Sundstrand has made several changes to their supply chain in recent years, including increased offshore and outsourced production, new service offerings and relocation of facilities, to meet shifting business needs ...

Wessels, Steven Allan, Jr

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Science Technology Engineering Math Science Technology Engineering Math Mechanical Engineering Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Technology Engineering Math Science Technology Engineering Math Mechanical Engineering Loop glider Airboat Straw rockets College Class Science Activity Stomp rockets Underwater copters AND/OR Circuits College Class Science Activity Electronic T/F Motorized flying gliders

Rohs, Remo

404

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which is basically indium oxide, I istance vs. temperatureis assembled from 2 indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A strategic framework for establishing aerospace value chains in emerging markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: CEO's and top management teams of large corporations in developed countries acknowledge that globalization is the most critical challenge they face today. They are also keenly aware that it has become during ...

Grover, Rishi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

West Virginia University 1 Air Force ROTC: WVU Division of Aerospace Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hours of credit are awarded for each of the four semesters of work in the POC program. To qualify Laboratory · Nature of Program · Professional Officer Course (POC) · Scholarship Program (p. 2) · Uniform, as well as the leadership studies minor program. · Compete for AFROTC scholarships that pay up to full

Mohaghegh, Shahab

407

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ks W" Boer, t1Th.e Solar Spectrum at Typical Clear WeatherDifferent Regions of the Solar Spectrum in Degrading an ABS1) transmit the solar spectrum and reflect the infrared,

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage Heat Exchanger (Molten Salt Heat Exchanger Des forStorage Heat Exchanger (Molten Salt Heat Exchanger Designmetallic are added to a molten salt heat transfer fluid; the

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF WINDOW AND COATING MA TERIALS MEASUREMEN T OFTRANSFER A. SECTION 4. WINDOW ANALYSIS, B,. HEAT PIPES, C,Water Vapors in 3-121-'m window", AD A025377, N77 13597 (

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE AEROSPACE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM AT OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The epoxy is then heat cured, forming a protective barrier within the manhole. MultiPlexx Layup treatment plant structures with moderate to high levels of corrosion. May also be used as an underlayment Plant structures against H2S attack. Can be spray applied up to 2" thick using rotor/stator type pumping

411

Framework for the selection of acquisition targets applied in the commercial aerospace industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acquisitions are costly, even the ones that never happen. They require a significant commitment of resources involving multi-disciplinary teams examining all aspects of a business. This can come at a significant cost if ...

Tajima, Michael (Michael Ken)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Faculty Mentor Assignments for Aerospace Engineering Students Last Name First Name Mentor Mentor Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mkrstic@ucsd.edu Hernandez Jason Allan Abedania Juan Lasheras jlasheras@ucsd.edu Hernandez Mary Azucena Raymond De Callafon callafon@ucsd.edu Hernandez-Ibarra David Robert Bitmead rbitmead@ucsd.edu Hinden Name Mentor Mentor Email Malcolm Dustin Lee Hidenori Murakami hmurakami@ucsd.edu Malta Ramon Keiko

Krstic, Miroslav

413

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Construction and Insulation Conditions of Small Buildings",Therefore thermal insulation in buildings is one of the mostthe thern1al insulation capability of building materials. It

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of NOAA Solar/Weather S", N78 24766 (1977). F, C,Boer, t1Th.e Solar Spectrum at Typical Clear Weather Days",FORM The Solar Spectrum at Typical Clear Weather Days N77-

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Acquisition strategies for commonality across complex aerospace systems-of-systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commonality is a system architecting strategy widely used to improve affordability and reliability of families of products. However not all commonality is beneficial, and organizations must balance commonality benefits and ...

Wicht, Anthony C. (Anthony Charles)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the University of California or the U.S. Department ofof the University of California, Los Alamos, N. Mex. , MarchThesis, University of California {Berkely) (1966). 7) S.A.

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fong Prean Industrial Co., Ltd.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Metallic Materials. Salt spray testing of fasteners. [FA/166] ASTM B117 Standard Test Method of Salt Spray (Fog) Testing. ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

418

Surface Chemistry of Titanium Dental Implants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural Competition and Phase Transformations in Binary Ti-Nb Alloys for Biomedical Applications Structure and Fracture Resistance of Armored Fish Scales.

419

Channel Models for Medical Implant Communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Page 4. muscle), Vagus Nerve Stimulation (Right Neck and Shoulder) and two Motion Sensor ... For, example, it is well known that for free space n = 2 ...

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

420

Biomedical device potential for robust, implantable product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraViolet Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraViolet Light-emitting nanocrystal diodes go ultraviolet A team of scientists has developed a process for creating glass-based, inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that produce light in the ultraviolet range. February 24, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Surface Electrical Degradation of Helium Implanted Sapphire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma Engineering and Diagnostics / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

S. M. Gonzlez de Vicente; A. Moroo; E. R. Hodgson

422

Failure Analysis of Titanium Dental Implants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a Bucketwheel Stacker Reclaimer Structural Failure Analysis of Glass Breakage Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings.

423

Charge neutralization apparatus for ion implantation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for neutralization of a workpiece such as a semiconductor wafer in a system wherein a beam of positive ions is applied to the workpiece. The apparatus includes an electron source for generating an electron beam and a magnetic assembly for generating a magnetic field for guiding the electron beam to the workpiece. The electron beam path preferably includes a first section between the electron source and the ion beam and a second section which is coincident with the ion beam. The magnetic assembly generates an axial component of magnetic field along the electron beam path. The magnetic assembly also generates a transverse component of the magnetic field in an elbow region between the first and second sections of the electron beam path. The electron source preferably includes a large area lanthanum hexaboride cathode and an extraction grid positioned in close proximity to the cathode. The apparatus provides a high current, low energy electron beam for neutralizing charge buildup on the workpiece.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Kunkel, Wulf B. (Berkeley, CA); Williams, Malcom D. (Danville, CA); McKenna, Charles M. (Boxford, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Implantable Medical Devices - Cyber Risks and Mitigation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the pump, or reduce it http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/92054-black-hat- hacker-details-wireless-attack-on-insulin-pumps ... Meager Storage ...

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

Bio-Inspired Materials: Implants and Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... A series of unconventional approaches are under development at Michigan Technological University which aim to screen candidate materials...

426

Photoelectrochemical Semiconductor Surface Fortification via Ion Implantation  

include fuel cells, transportation, and other power generation. The market for hydrogen has been growing consistently. U.S. fuel cell shipments quadrupled between 2008 and 2010. The small-industrial market for hydrogen is about 300,000 kg/day and ...

427

Graded coatings for metallic implant alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

firing time and temperature on 6P57 coatings on Ti6Al4V and 6P50 on Co-firing time and temperature on the adhesion of coatings manufactured with glass 6P57 on Ti6Al4V and glass 6P50 on Co-

Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Fujino, Shigeru; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

http://www.ornl.gov/Procurement.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

93 93 1. All Grade 5 and Grade 8 fasteners of foreign origin which do not bear any manufacturer's headmarks: Grade 5 Grade 8 2. Grade 5 fasteners with the following manufacturers' headmarks: J Jinn Her (TW) KS Kosaka Kogyo (JP) J KS 3. Grade 8 fasteners with the following manufacturers' headmarks: A Asahi Mfg (JP) KS Kosaka Kogyo (JP) A KS NF RT NF Nippon Fasteners (JP) RT Takai Ltd (JP) H Hinomoto Metal (JP) FM Fastener Co (of JP) H FM J M MS KY M Minamida Sieybo (JP) KY Kyoei (JP) MS Minato Kogyo (JP) J Jinn Her (JP) E Hollow Infasco Co. (CA TW JP YU) Triangle (sizes greater than 1/2-in dia) UNY E Daiei (JP) UNY Unytite (JP) 4. Grade 8.2 fasteners with the following headmarks: KS Kosaka Kogyo (JP) KS 5. Grade A325 Fasteners (Bennett Denver Target only) with the following headmarks: A325 KS Kosaka Kogyo (JP)

429

Leveraging measurement systems to drive enterprise transformation: Two case studies from the U.S. aerospace industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this paper is to depict the role of measurement systems in driving enterprise behavior and guiding enterprise transformation. Although enterprise transformation and performance measurement are separate areas of study, few have made the connection ... Keywords: Metrics, enterprise architecting, enterprise transformation, measurement systems, performance measurement

Ricardo Valerdi; Craig Blackburn

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Standard practice for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials used in aerospace applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice is intended to be used as a supplement to Practices E 1742, E 1255, and E 2033. 1.2 This practice describes procedures for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials made entirely or in part from fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites. Radiologic examination is: a) radiographic (RT) with film, b) Computed Radiography (CR) with Imaging Plate, c) Digital Radiology (DR) with Digital Detector Arrays (DDA), and d) Radioscopic (RTR) Real Time Radiology with a detection system such as an Image Intensifier. The composite materials under consideration typically contain continuous high modulus fibers (> 20 GPa), such as those listed in 1.4. 1.3 This practice describes established radiological examination methods that are currently used by industry that have demonstrated utility in quality assurance of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials during product process design and optimization, process control, after manufacture inspection, in service exami...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Reducing enterprise IT fragmentation through standard metrics and decision tools : a case study in the aerospace and defense industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last several decades, manufacturing companies around the world have embraced new and powerful business tools made possible with Information Technology. Major investments are frequently made in enterprise-wide ...

Wheeler, Benjamin (Benjamin Ray)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Will Model-based Definition replace engineering drawings throughout the product lifecycle? A global perspective from aerospace industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model-based Definition (MBD) approach is gaining popularity in various industries. MBD represents a trend in Computer-aided Design (CAD) that promises reduced time-to-market and improved product quality. Its main goal is to improve and accelerate ... Keywords: CAD, Engineering drawing, MBD, Model-based Definition, Product lifecycle

Virgilio Quintana; Louis Rivest; Robert Pellerin; Frdrick Venne; Fawzi Kheddouci

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Microstructure, Texture and Mechanical Property Evolution during Additive Manufacturing of Ti6Al4V Alloy for Aerospace Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Additive Manufacturing (AM) is an innovative manufacturing process which offers near-net shape fabrication of complex components, directly from CAD models, without dies or substantial machining, (more)

Antonysamy, Alphons Anandaraj

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit AIAA-2010-1340 4 -7 January 2010,Orlando, Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat ovens also use intense thermal energy to effect sterilization. However, steam is often preferred due to its higher heat capacity. Additionally dry heat ovens require operational times of 3-8 hours was applied. For a long time, ozone generation was the major industrial application utilizing DBDs

Roy, Subrata

435

AIAA Paper No. 2005-6982 InfoTech@Aerospace Conference, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Sept., 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Astronautics, Sept., 2005 1 An Undergraduate Course in Unmanned Air Vehicles Lyle N. Long* , Scott D. Hanford the students about aircraft construction, electric power systems, servos, transmitters and receivers

436

45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit AIAA-2007-0173 Reno, Nevada, 8 -11 Jan 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ratios. However, the reduction in NOx emission levels due to leaner operation is partially offset reduction in NOx emissions by facilitating combustion at an ultra lean stoichiometry, the reduced burning, "The effectiveness of multi fuel reburning in an internally staged burner of NOx reduction", Fuel 73

Seitzman, Jerry M.

437

Implementation of lean processes at a high-mix low-volume aerospace manufacturing facility in France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theories of the Toyota Production System have been operational touchstones now for over twenty years in North America and Western Europe. In spite of this many companies, particularly those in high-mix low-volume ...

Hurd, A.-P. (Annie-Pierre), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Environmental effects on composite airframes: A study conducted for the ARM UAV Program (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle)  

SciTech Connect

Composite materials are affected by environments differently than conventional airframe structural materials are. This study identifies the environmental conditions which the composite-airframe ARM UAV may encounter, and discusses the potential degradation processes composite materials may undergo when subjected to those environments. This information is intended to be useful in a follow-on program to develop equipment and procedures to prevent, detect, or otherwise mitigate significant degradation with the ultimate goal of preventing catastrophic aircraft failure.

Noguchi, R.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Preliminary reentry safety assessment of the General Purpose Heat Source module for the Cassini mission: Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program  

SciTech Connect

As asked by the U. S. Department of Energy/Office of Special Applications, and in support of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Cassini mission, The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has conducted preliminary one-dimensional ablation and thermal analyses of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS). The predicted earth entry conditions provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for a Cassini Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VVEJGA) trajectory were used as initial conditions. The results of this study which constitute the initial reentry analysis assessment leading to the Cassini Updated Safety, Analysis Report (USAR) are discussed in this document.

Conn, D.W.; Brenza, P.T.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Enhancing Undergraduate Education in Aerospace Engineering and Planetary Sciences at MIT through the Development of a Cubesat Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CubeSats are a class of nanosatellites that conform to a standardized 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm, 1 kg form factor. This miniaturization, along with a standardized deployment device for launch vehicles, allows CubeSats to be ...

Smith, Matthew William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Taiwan Aerospace and McDonnell Douglas: A Strategic Perspective on the National Interest in the Commercial Aircraft Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boeing 707. "Orders by international carriers were heavy. Inheavy research and development costs for jet engines, jumbo airframes and wings, and advanced avionics, federal military grants allowed Boeing [

Tyson, Laura D'Andrea; Chin, Pei-Hsiung

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit AIAA-2007-0466 Reno, Nevada, 8 -11 Jan 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Chemiluminescence Measurements and Modeling in Syngas (syngas) fuel mixtures and in a swirl-stabilized combustor for methane. Emission from the OH A2 state signals over a range of equivalence ratios () and, for the syngas fuels, with reactant preheating

Seitzman, Jerry M.

443

Geometrically exact 3D beam element for arbitrary large rigid-elastic deformation analysis of aerospace structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a geometrically exact beam theory and a corresponding displacement-based finite-element formulation for modeling and analysis of highly flexible beam components of multibody systems undergoing huge static/dynamic rigid-elastic deformations. ... Keywords: Flexible multibody systems, Geometrically exact beam theory, Jaumann strains, Nonlinear finite element analysis, Nonlinear structural mechanics

Genyong Wu; Xingsuo He; P. Frank Pai

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Lithium/selenium secondary battery for implantation. Annual technical progress report No. 1, 23 June 1969--22 June 1970. [10 W, 120 Wh, 1. 1 kg, LiF--LiCl--LiI + LiAlO/sub 2/ electrolyte  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A lithium/selenium battery is being developed as an implantable power source for an artificial heart or heart-assist device. Tests of 7.5-cm dia single cells operating at about 370C with a paste electrolyte consisting of LiF--LiCl--LiI and LiAlO/sub 2/ powder yielded energy densities exceeding 0.76 Wh/cm/sup 2/ at an average voltage above 1.7 V. This performance is sufficient to permit the construction of a 10-W, 120-Wh battery weighing about 1.1 kg. An unsealed battery test demonstrated that a battery of five 7.5-cm dia lithium/selenium cells will be capable of at least 12 W of power. In addition, a sealed lithium/selenium battery was operated in an air environment, and was found to be relatively insensitive to motion as well as orientation. Further work is needed on the development of sealed cells and batteries, on increasing the battery power level to 30 W, and on increased cell life.

Cairs, F.J.; Chilenskas, A.A.; Shimotake, H.; Steunenbert, R.K.; Tevebaugh, A.D.

1970-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system - Energy Innovation Portal  

A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener ...

446

Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloys for Aviation by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refill FSSW process can supersede conventional rivet fastening and resistance spot welding techniques and contribute to weight reduction of structures as well.

447

Compositions and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Beta C is used in fasteners, springs, and torsion bars. It is also used for tubulars and casings in oil, gas, and geothermal wells....

448

Industrial Scale Processing and Elevated Temperature Properties of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

elements for appliances, aircraft fasteners, gas and ... with small amounts of the disordered structure. (y-phase) ... Also, small isothermally forged disks and rapid ...

449

Responding to National Needs: Supplement to Appendices ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mark the container of the fasteners with the lot number from which ... the total installed price of hard-metric concrete masonry units is estimated to be ...

450

#LabChat: Science of the Very Fast and Very Small, June 11 at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a solar cell test prototype with a microscale lens array fastened to it. Together, the cell and lens help create a concentrated photovoltaic unit that when commercialized will...

451

A Statistical Path Loss Model for Medical Implant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Pacemaker (located below the left pectoral muscle), Vagus Nerve Stimulation (Right Neck ... For, example, it is well known that for free space, n= ...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

452

Piezoelectric based high voltage power simulator for implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is based on resonant method that allows the piezoelectric transformer to generate a ... The device is small and with high power density and high efficiency

453

ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLE NEUROSTIMULATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis and Discussion . 55 3.5.1. Calculating Electrical Potential Energy .Analysis and Discussion 3.5.1. Calculating Electrical Potential Energy

Pantchenko, Oxana S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Synthesis and Characterization of Graphene after Ion Implantation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Register as a New User ... Symposium, Surfaces and Heterostructures at Nano- or Micro-Scale and Their Characterization, Properties, and Applications ... Development and Mechanical Characterization of Novel Alumina Based ... Glass Transition at a Polymer Surface Monitored by Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance.

455

Multidisciplinary Approaches in Implant Dentistry,October 3-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! ! ! 12:00-13:00 Lunch ! 13:00-15:00 "All Ceramic Restorations for Esthetic Dentistry" Dr. Marc Wang ! 15 to make sound clinical judgments without industry influence. The course includes diagnostic treatment

Datta, Sandeep Robert

456

Study on TOU Price Implantation Effect on Huainan Resident  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time-of-use (TOU) tariff is an important means toad just the residential electricity consumption behavior and reduce the difference between the peak and valley load. This paper sets up a residential electricity consumption inclination model by extracting ... Keywords: TOU electricity price, Valley quantity coefficient, Peak shifting, valley filling, Electricity costs

Li Mei; Wan Qiulan

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Nanostructured Bio-scaffold for Bone Implants, Stents: A Biomedical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... mechanical toughness and proliferation and perform controlled on-site drug ... Engineering Non-Stick, Pro-Stick/Adhesion and Anti-Corrosion Surfaces with...

458

RF-Driven Plasma Source for Ion Implantation Applications  

E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Automotive manufacturing ; Machine tools ; Medical tool manufacturing

459

Functional thin film polymers for biopassivation of neuroprosthetic implants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neuroprosthetics is the investigation of methods to control external electronic devices utilizing recorded neuronal firing patterns. These investigations are crucial to the quality of life of quadriplegic patients. Central ...

O'Shaughnessy, Wm. Shannan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

An implantable device for localized drug delivery and sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many potential clinical applications for localized drug delivery and sensing systems, such as cancer, vaccinations, pain management, and hormone therapy. Localized drug delivery systems reduce the amount of drug ...

Daniel, Karen D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

NCNR Ion-Implanted P in Silicon SRM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The latter was collected by filtration, washed with dilute ammonium hydroxide and ethanol, air dried, weighed, and packaged for beta-ray counting. ...

462

Composite Ti-6Al-4V + Hydroxyapatite Biomedical Implant Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Together the augmented diffusion mode and accelerated application of thermal energy allow co-sintering of Ti-6Al-4V + HA below 1000C to be realized, thus...

463

Biomedical Materials, Implants and Devices - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011... Kennedy, Clemson University; John Nychka, University of Alberta .... of a Biological Beta-Ti Alloy: Sudhakar Vadiraja1; 1Montana Tech

464

a comparative study of dental implantations systems applied for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignocellulosic-Based Carbon Fibers from Biofuel Production Wastes Magnesium Sheets Produced by Extrusion Magnetite Formation Observed with TEM on...

465

Biocompatibility of an implantable ophthalmic drug delivery device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diseases of the posterior eye present clinicians with a treatment challenge mainly due to the region's inaccessible location. Several drugs, including those available for the treatment of exudative age-related macular ...

Cohen, Sarah J. (Sarah Jennifer)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

wear determination via mass loss is imprecise due to the liquid soak. Also, the long test times usually do not allow sufficient resolution to test the impact of different...

467

Calculation of dose to soft tisse from implanted beta sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Treatment of Arterio-Venous Malformation (AVM) requires the occlusion of the unwanted arteries. Irradiation of a blood vessel wall with beta particles causes it to be permanently blocked by multiplication of the endothelial cells. For this purpose, spherical radioactive particles are injected into these arteries. This study deals with the development of BRAIN-DOSES, a computer code based on VARSKIN MOD2 and SADDE MOD2, which evaluates gamma and beta dose distributions for radioactive sources with five different geometries: point, line, shell cylinder, solid cylinder and solid sphere. Since the particles injected into the blood vessels can be modeled as a line of spheres, this work focuses on the development of a computational method for estimating the spatial distribution of absorbed dose around a line of spheres. BRAIN-DOSES uses integration of Berger point kernels over the source volume, employing the scaled point kernels tabulated by Berger in 1971. This method requires calculation of the beta particle path within the two media crossed, tissue and source material. Consequently, besides the computational approach, this study describes a detailed geometrical approach of the problem. Results obtained from calculations with BRAIN-DOSES have been used to evaluate the beta dose distribution in the capillary walls of the rete of pigs, a vascular system which may model an AVM. The source was a 418 CI line of spheres made of a mixture of 42.8% hydrated polyacrylonitrile (PAN), 49.8% powdered Pt-197 and 7.4% powdered Pr-142 (in weight percentage). The sphere diameters were from 150 to 350 gm.

Dauffy, Lucile

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A platform for implantable medical device validation: demo abstract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the design of an integrated modeling platform to investigate efficient methodologies for certifying medical device software. The outcome of this research has the potential to expedite medical device software certification for safer operation. ...

Zhihao Jiang; Miroslav Pajic; Allison Connolly; Sanjay Dixit; Rahul Mangharam

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Wireless power transfer for scaled electronic biomedical implants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy harvesting with aluminum nitride-based piezoelectricplates) or piezoelectric methods. Mechanical energy isenergy can be converted to and from acoustic waves using piezoelectric

Theilmann, Paul Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLE NEUROSTIMULATORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3Hz), pulse width (210-500 usec). The other two implantableand pulse width (500 usec). Overall, the output amplitude of

Pantchenko, Oxana S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Mechanical and Tribological Properties or Ion Implanted Ceramics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4.3 Crack Nucleation 4.5 Elastic Recovery 4.6 Chemomechanical Effects 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 6 6 6 10 12 13 13 13 14 16 17 18 19 20 20 20 22 23 25 27 29 29 30 32 35 39 39 40 43 44 45 46 47 47 47 51 52 56 56 59 60 62... in Solids The mechanisms by which ions interact with solids have been well reviewed in the literature. Much of the following has been taken from the books by Deamaley et al (1973), Carter and Grant (1976), Townsend et al (1977), Ryssel and Glawischnig...

Bull, Stephen John

1988-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

472

Wireless power transfer for scaled electronic biomedical implants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A picture of the wireless LED during operation is shown inDemonstration of wireless LED system during operation. ForDemonstration of wireless LED system during operation. For

Theilmann, Paul Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

NIST HANDBOOK 150-18 CHECKLIST (REV. 2009-10-28) PAGE 1 OF 11 Enter Date: Enter NVLAP Lab Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST HANDBOOK 150-18 CHECKLIST (REV. 2009-10-28) PAGE 1 OF 11 Enter Date: Enter NVLAP Lab Code: NIST HANDBOOK 150-18 CHECKLIST FASTENERS AND METALS TESTING PROGRAM Instructions to the Assessor: This checklist addresses specific accreditation requirements prescribed in NIST Handbook 150-18, Fasteners

Magee, Joseph W.

474

Page 1 of 22 Know Better Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fasteners are tight including sling connector Check that hand control buttons operate in the corresponding or excessive wear Check that exposed fasteners are tight including sling connector Check that hand control on the spreader bar Push down on handle; attach leg straps Insure that strap connectors are fully engaged

Oliver, Douglas L.

475

Posted 7/24/12 Manufacturing Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, starters, and generators for the commercial transportation, hybrid electric vehicle and aerospace of technologically advanced aerospace and industrial products. We design and manufacture aerospace systems Prairie, WI 53158 Electromagnetic Enterprises (EME) designs and manufactures specialized electric motors

Heller, Barbara

476

Follow-up investigations of GPHS motion during heat pulse intervals of reentries from gravity-assist trajectories. Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motion studies of the General Purpose Heat Source Module, GPHS, which were conducted in the heat pulse intervals associated with entries from earth gravity assist trajectories. The APL six-degree-of-freedom reentry program designated TMAGRA6C was used. The objectives of the studies were to (1) determine whether the GPHS module entering the earth`s atmosphere from an earth-gravity-assist trajectory has a preferred orientation during the heat pulse of reentry, (2) determine the effect of magnus force on the roll rate and angle of attack of the GPHS during an EGA entry, (3) determine the effect of the magnitude of pitch and roll damping on the GPHS motion.

Sharbaugh, R.C.

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

477

34 AEROSPACE AMERICA/MAY 2011 Copyright 2011 by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Long gone are the days when weekend  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ved March 30, 2007 Interest in the gas-to-liquid process (GTL) using Fischer-Tropsch reactors (F-T) has The Fischer Tropsch (F-T) synthesis was originally devel- oped in Germany in the 1920s by Franz Fischer into syngas and, then, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of syngas into synthetic liquid fuels. A first plant

478

APPLICATION FORM Short term course on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Address: Prof. Tapan K. Sengupta High Performance Computing Lab Department of Aerospace Venue : IIT Kanpur, Kanpur Organized by: High Performance Computing Lab, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

479

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Life at Sandia: People...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with the best scientists and engineers in bioscience, climate, microsystems, and combustion." Kelsey Kelsey Aerospace Engineer, Aerospace Systems and Analysis Kelsey's...

480

Alloy Development: Superalloys, Shape Memory Alloys, and Design ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NRC Aerospace Monday 2:00 PM October 28, 2013. Room: 520e. Location: Palais des Congres de Montreal Session Chair: Linruo Zhao, NRC Aerospace...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "implants aerospace fasteners" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Yolanda Dionicio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yolanda Dionicio Undergraduate Student Aerospace Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Yolanda Dionicio is an undergraduate student studying Aerospace Engineering...

482

Toxicity of materials used in the manufacture of lithium batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growing interest in battery systems has led to major advances in high-energy and/or high-power-density lithium batteries. Potential applications for lithium batteries include radio transceivers, portable electronic instrumentation, emergency locator transmitters, night vision devices, human implantable devices, as well as uses in the aerospace and defense programs. With this new technology comes the use of new solvent and electrolyte systems in the research, development, and production of lithium batteries. The goal is to enhance lithium battery technology with the use of non-hazardous materials. Therefore, the toxicity and health hazards associated with exposure to the solvents and electrolytes used in current lithium battery research and development is evaluated and described.

Archuleta, M.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Copyright 2006, Society of Petroleum Engineers This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2006 SPE Intelligent Energy Conference and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aerospace to automotive to household appliances) has been able to increase its products IQ (Intelligence

Mohaghegh, Shahab

484

IP2006: Home Page - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

His technical areas of expertise include nanotechnology, materials science, semiconductor processing, chemistry, aerospace, medical treatments, medical...

485

Dimensional Metrology Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Programs/Projects. ... Dimensional Measurement Services provide industry with accurate ... medical, aerospace, automotive, energy, and biotechnology ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

486

Investigation on Electrohydraulic Servovalve through a Finite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typical applications include aerospace, robotic manipulators, motion simulators, injection molding, CNC machines and material testing machines.

487

DEFINING THE CORE MATERIALS CURRICULUM: I: State of the Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CASE STUDY: METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Marek Dollar, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering Dept.,...

488

NETL: Educational Initiatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

middle that is 18 centimeters (7") long and 23 centimeters (8") wide. Step 14. Use brass fasteners to attach the platform to the sides. Step 15. Using a utility knife or other...

489

Microsoft Word - Raccoon_Article_final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a good variety of food scraps will act as a magnet for raccoons. To avoid creating a "banquet" area for these animals, all outside garbage receptacles should have fastened tight...

490

Intertidal ecology of riprap jetties and breakwaters : marine communities inhabiting anthropogenic structures along the west coast of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of two pieces of marine plywood, with 12 tiles anchored totiles each. Each piece of plywood was fastened to the rockepoxy. The two pieces of plywood in each array were anchored

Pister, Benjamin Alan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Intertidal Ecology of Riprap Jetties and Breakwaters: Marine Communities Inhabiting Anthropogenic Structures along the West Coast of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of two pieces of marine plywood, with 12 tiles anchored totiles each. Each piece of plywood was fastened to the rockepoxy. The two pieces of plywood in each array were anchored

Pister, Benjamin A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Testing and prediction of failure of AHSS sheets at Die Radius and Sidewall using novel fracture apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new apparatus was constructed to fit the Impact and Crashworthiness Lab's dual actuator custom-made loading frame that has force or position control. The strip is pre-bent into an elbow configuration and fastened by the ...

Issa, Danielle La

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Aircraft Inspection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Typical locations of corrosion on aircraft...by maintenance, moisture intrusion V RBR. BAS Nose section Nose radome latches Galvanic (steel fasteners in aluminum structures)

494

Inverted lVIicroscope DIAPHOT-TMD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-over is pulled out, and the lower one is pushed in. ® It is recommended to adjust the brightness by the ND) Replacement· Connector not connected securely) Secure connection· Fuse holder not firmly fastened) Firm

Kleinfeld, David

495

Simulation and process development for ion-implanted N-type silicon solar cells .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the efficiency potential for the industrial P-type Al-BSF silicon solar cell reaches its limit, new solar cell technologies are required to continue the pursuit (more)

Ning, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

Marchant, T. E.; Skalski, A.; Matuszewski, B. J. [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, Krakow 30-059 (Poland); School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z