National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for implants aerospace fasteners

  1. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crane, Randolph W.; Marts, Donna J.

    1994-11-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  2. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crane, Randolph W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  3. Wire brush fastening device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meigs, R.A.

    1995-09-19

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

  4. Wire brush fastening device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meigs, Richard A. (East Concord, NY)

    1995-01-01

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  5. Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium Parts (AMD-704) Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Magnesium...

  6. The effects of fastener hole defects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Scot D.

    1991-01-01

    ) August 1991 ABSTRACT The Effects of Fastener Hole Defects. (August 1991) Scot D. Andrews, B. S. , Texas A8rM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Orden O. Ochoa The influence of drilling-induced defects, such as delamination, on the fatigue... ambient and elevated temperature wet conditions. Specimens were tested in a bearing tension frame to static failure in order to measure the failure load and to calculate pin bearing stress. From static test results, a fatigue load was selected as 66...

  7. Analysis of Bolt and Rivet Structural Fasteners Subjected to Dynamic and Quasi-Static Shear Loadings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabalais, Christopher Paul

    2015-05-07

    Non-pretensioned bolted, pretensioned bolted, and riveted lap-spliced specimens were tested to observe how the fasteners’ shear strengths were affected by (1) loading type, (2) fastener type, (3) number of shear planes, ...

  8. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Ductile failure in structural materials has been a problem the Temple Foundation Professorship in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, multiscale experimental mechanics, mechanics of polymers. He is a fellow of the American Society

  9. Design and Performance of Elastic Fastening System Assemblies and Concrete Sleepers for Heavy-Haul Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    , Inc. Overland Park, KS, USA Abstract As heavy-haul freight axle loads and cumulative tonnages increase costs of concrete sleeper fastening systems is of paramount importance to the railway industry to ensure addressing current problems the industry is facing regarding the use of concrete sleepers and fastening

  10. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering The gap between `advanced' prosthetic technology was educated in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University

  11. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering In the pursuit of developing manned, reusable hypersonic will experience thermal and mechanical loads. The research presented will discuss advancements in structural

  12. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering The development of high-energy storage devices has been one in portable electronic devices, satellites, and electric vehicles. Silicon (Si) is an attractive anode

  13. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Much of past research in structural dynamics (and many other the University of Liege, Belgium, in 1983 and his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Rice University in 1987. He then joined the rather newly formed Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at ASU

  14. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Strategic Plan 2014-2018 College of Engineering, Architecture & Technology #12;Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Oklahoma State University was organized as Mechanical the strongest in the nation. MAE is proud to continue in this fine tradition, forging high quality mechanical

  15. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar Plasma Actuators for Aerodynamic Flow Control.D. in Mechanical Engineering from The Ohio State University in 2004, 2005 and 2010 respectively. He joined the Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Arizona in 2010 as an Assistant

  16. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Despite an enormous range of applications and centuries. Nicholas Ouellette is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Structures in Turbulent Flow Nicholas Ouellette Department of Mechanical Engineering & Material Sciences Yale

  17. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering This presentation presents the stability analysis of time- delay of the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, where he has Gu Dept. of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville March 27

  18. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering An experimental methodology is presented for mechanism verification of physics-based prognosis of mechanical damage, such as fatigue. The proposed experimental methodology includes multi-resolution in-situ mechanical testing, advanced imaging analysis, and mechanism

  19. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering With the increases in computational power and numerical methods a series of research challenges. These challenges involve many branches of mechanical engineering: mechanics, dynamics, tribology, statistical modeling, experimentation, and numerical methods. During

  20. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar Three Dimensional Traction Force Microscopy with Applications in Cell Mechanics abstract The interactions between biochemical and mechanical signals during-dimensional measurement techniques are needed to investigate the effect of mechanical properties of the substrate

  1. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Today's design environments take advantage of powerful professor of Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He is the founder of Visual Design award and American Society of Mechanical Engineers Design Automation Society Young Investigator Award

  2. Department of Mechanical & Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    in mechanics, electrical theory, kinematics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer and materials dynamics, fluid dynamics, propulsion and structures. While each program features a solid technicalDeveloping Leaders of Innovation Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering #12;Emphasizing

  3. AerospaceEngineering Student Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    SSVOBB Designs airplanes and UAVs and keeps an old Lambach HL II airworthy Forze H2 Hydrogen racing carFacultyof AerospaceEngineering Student Projects At the faculty of Aerospace Engineering Nuna 7 Best solar race team in the world and 5 time winner of the World Solar Challenge DARE Delft Aerospace Rocket

  4. Faculty of Engineering Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Engineering Aerospace Engineering Canada's aerospace industry is one of the largest. One of the key factors that will continue this success is a steady stream of engineering talent.uwindsor.ca/mame Rigorous, Enriching Programs Our new Aerospace Engineering program at Windsor is an optional stream within

  5. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering We introduce phonon recycling (local reabsorption of emitted) is Professor in Department of Mechanical Engineering and in Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan of Mechanical Engineering University of Michigan November 1, 2013 at 1:30pm in SCOB 228 School for Engineering

  6. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar Manipulation of Energy and Mass Transport at Micro as an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and was promoted to an associate professor award in 2007. Dr. Deyu Li Department of Mechanical Engineering Vanderbilt University January 20, 2012

  7. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Thermal transport plays an important role in energy conversion conductivity and phonon transport mechanisms over the past 2 decades, owing much to the challenging needs Faculty Fellow in Engineering and an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering directing the Nano

  8. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Interfacial flows are multi-material flows comprised of two and Solid Mechanics group in the Theoretical Division. Her research focuses on the development of numerical, and nuclear energy. She is a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Fluids Engineering

  9. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering It has been demonstrated that the color pattern of the human received the B.A. degree in physics from Houghton College, Houghton, NY, and the B.S. degree in mechanical in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, in 1997 and 2002

  10. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Fragmentation is a process in which structures fail in a very Engineering at Duke University, where he directs the Duke Computational Mechanics Laboratory. Professor Dolbow received his BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of New Hampshire in 1995, and his Ph

  11. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Bone is a biological material with excellent material properties the properties at lower level serve as inputs for modeling at the next structural level. Mechanical properties and applied mechanics at Northwestern University. Prior to joining the faculty of mechanical engineering

  12. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering The miniaturization of structural components to the sub progress in strain-gradient continuum theories to model the mechanical behavior of metallic systems at small length scales, these theories fail to represent the variety of physical mechanisms involved

  13. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Pool boiling heat transfer enhancement is taking a dramatic turn Mechanical Engineering Rochester Institute of Technology September 5, 2014 at 1:30pm in SCOB 210 School from the classical area enhancement and nucleation cavity augmentation to mechanism based

  14. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Energetic materials that include nano-scale aluminum (Al and joined the faculty in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Texas Tech University in 2000 Pantoya Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Texas Tech University April 19, 2013 at 1:30pm in LSE 106 School

  15. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering The presentation will first review emerging joint time in Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Science from the Technical University in Athens, Greece and his, vehicle engineering, bio-mechanics, and composite materials. He is Editor-in-Chief of the International

  16. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering The state of the art in Quantification of Margin and UncertaintyD in Engineering Mechanics from the University of Wisconsin in 1978. He then worked in research laboratories of the University of Wisconsin as a Senior Scientist. In March of this year, he joined the Mechanical Engineering

  17. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering The science of robotics is a unique combination of mechanical in Dayton, OH. Dr. Sodemann received a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the Georgia Institute to recent advances in the science of robotics, and thus the machines perform primarily as mechanical devices

  18. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar From Jumping Drops to Thermal Diodes Abstract Scholar and Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Duke University since.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University (2004). Dr. Chen is a recipient of numerous

  19. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar Some Forward-Looking Assistive Devices to Improve. Biosketch Michael Goldfarb, PhD, is the H. Fort Flowers Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the director in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Arizona in 1988, and received his SM and PhD degrees

  20. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Nanocrystal superlattices are materials formed by assembly Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics at the University her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering magna cum laude from Rice University in 1994 and was elected to Phi

  1. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering The atomization of a liquid jet by a high speed cross.S.E. degree in mechanical engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology in 2006 and M.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Sharif University of Technology in 2009. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate

  2. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering This talk concerns the effective behavior of heterogeneous media Science as well as the Executive Officer for Mechanical and Civil Engineering at the California Institute in Applied Mechanics from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 2004. He is currently an Editor

  3. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering It is a new beginning for innovative fundamental and applied and energy applications. Dr. Mark A. Tschopp is a materials engineer at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and Mechanical Properties Mark Tschopp Materials Engineer U.S. Army Research Laboratory September 12, 2014 at 1

  4. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Development of a deep water oil reservoir is a multi, pipelines, and export infrastructure). Maintaining flow (Flow Assurance) of the well fluids (oil, gas, water College. He obtained his Ph.D. in the field of Organic Chemistry from the University of North Carolina. He

  5. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to these natural and manmade threats to the space environment. Dr. James N Head is Systems Engineer and InnovationMechanical & Aerospace Engineering More than any other country, the United States is reliant upon to solar events--has a demonstrated ability to disrupt high-frequency communications, jam GPS signals

  6. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar The Challenges of Renewable Energy Integration Integration Specialist in the Smart Grid Technologies and Strategy Division of the California Independent System Operator (California ISO). He has been with the grid operator of the world's 8th largest economy

  7. Wanted: Aerospace Engineering Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    subjects, and explores vital related fields such as wind energy. Our Mission Our mission is to be the best live in the future. These are examples of the research at Europe's number one Aerospace Engineering for both our education and research: · Wind tunnels ranging from large low-speed (wind energy) up to Mach

  8. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar On Wind Energy: A Fundamental Perspective Toward Understanding Wind Farms Underperformance abstract Although wind turbines have been well studied from a blade in order to maximize the energy that can be extracted from the available wind resource. Past investigations

  9. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Wind power is the fastest growing non-fossil source of primary. As concern over CO2 emissions pushes society towards cleaner energy sources, the demand for wind power will continue to increase. Estimates of global wind energy potential range from 56 to 148 TW. These estimates

  10. Aerospace Sciences Meeting & Exhibit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    41st Aerospace Sciences Meeting & Exhibit 6-9 January 2003 / Reno, NV AIAA 2003-0636 A Jet Formation Criterion for Synthetic Jet Actuators Yogen Utturkar, Ryan Holman, Rajat Mittal, Bruce Carroll-0636 A Jet Formation Criterion for Synthetic Jet Actuators Yogen Utturkar,1Ł Ryan Holman,1Ł Rajat Mittal,2

  11. Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitko, J. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    The Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) Workshop concentrated on reviewing and refining the science experiments planned for the UAV Demonstration Flights (UDF) scheduled at the Oklahoma Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) in April 1994. These experiments were focused around the following sets of parameters: Clear sky, daylight; Clear-sky, night-to-day transition; Clear sky - improve/validate the accuracy of radiative fluxes derived from satellite-based measurements; Daylight, clouds of opportunity; and, Daylight, broken clouds.

  12. A bias assessment for in-situ ultrasonic hardness testing of steel fasteners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratiu, M.D.; Moisidis, N.T.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of sub-standard and/or mismarked installed fasteners has received broad attention in quality control standard and largely discussed in technical publications and in public press. The Industrial Fastener Institute (IFI, 1988) released a detailed documented inspection program to ensure the delivery and the usage of appropriate fasteners, imposing mandatory traceability of the manufacturer marking and quality certification reports. For the billions of the existing installed bolts without reliable lot identification and/or quality certification, IFI recommends in-situ control using non-destructive testing and/or hardness measurements with portable testers. The ultrasonic indentation hardness (HU) with the Krautkramer portable tester--operating on the ultrasonic contact impedance method described by Kleesattel (Jankowski D.M., 1990)--is one of the more frequent equipment used in the in-situ control of steel products and machine elements. The advantages of the ultrasonic tester--low weight, direct hardness reading, easy to operate--have determined to be included also for the in-situ control of installed fasteners. However, the bias of this method was not analyzed; the practiced calibration of standard blocks is not conclusive for the comparison of the in-situ measured hardness with the standard reference value obtained using laboratory Rockwell hardness (HR) tester. The purpose of this paper is to point out the specific consistent/systematic differences between HU results and the reference standard HR, which defines the ruggedness and the bias of the ultrasonic method.

  13. Page 1 of 7 Modeling and simulation of sparking in fastening assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the electric conductivity of metallic fasteners and the conductivity of composite materials increases current flows, with likely hazardous effects in the fuel tank area (1). The direct effects of lightning of these mechanisms depends on the material used for the assembly (for example, metal rib with carbon composite

  14. MACHINING ELIMINATION THROUGH APPLICATION OF THREAD FORMING FASTENERS IN NET SHAPED CAST HOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleaver, Ryan J.; Cleaver, Todd H.; Talbott, Richard

    2012-05-02

    The ultimate objective of this work was to eliminate approximately 30% of the machining performed in typical automotive engine and transmission plants by using thread forming fasteners in as-cast holes of aluminum and magnesium cast components. The primary issues at the source of engineers���������������¢�������������������������������� reluctance to implementing thread forming fasteners in lightweight castings are: * Little proof of consistency of clamp load vs. input torque in either aluminum or magnesium castings. * No known data to understand the effect on consistency of clamp load as casting dies wear. The clamp load consistency concern is founded in the fact that a portion of the input torque used to create clamp load is also used to create threads. The torque used for thread forming may not be consistent due to variations in casting material, hole size and shape due to tooling wear and process variation (thermal and mechanical). There is little data available to understand the magnitude of this concern or to form the basis of potential solutions if the range of clamp load variation is very high (> +/- 30%). The range of variation that can be expected in as-cast hole size and shape over the full life cycle of a high pressure die casting die was established in previous work completed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, (PNNL). This established range of variation was captured in a set of 12 cast bosses by designing core pins at the size and draft angles identified in the sited previous work. The cast bosses were cut into ���������������¢��������������������������������nuts���������������¢������������������������������� that could be used in the Ford Fastener Laboratory test-cell to measure clamp load when a thread forming fastener was driven into a cast nut. There were two sets of experiments run. First, a series of cast aluminum nuts were made reflecting the range of shape and size variations to be expected over the life cycle of a die casting die. Taptite thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for aluminum applications), were driven into the various cored, as-cast nuts at a constant input torque and resulting clamp loads were recorded continuously. The clamp load data was used to determine the range of clamp loads to be expected. The bolts were driven to failure. The clamp load corresponding to the target input of 18.5 Nm was recorded for each fastener. In a like fashion, a second set of experiments were run with cast magnesium nuts and ALtracs thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for magnesium applications). Again all clamp loads were recorded and analyzed similarly to the Taptites in aluminum cast nuts. Results from previous work performed on the same test cell for a Battelle project using standard M8 bolts into standard M8 nuts were included as a comparator for a standard bolt and nut application. The results for the thread forming fasteners in aluminum cast holes were well within industry expectations of +/- 30% for out of the box and robustness range te

  15. Department of Aerospace Engineering Science Engineering Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Department of Aerospace Engineering Science _____________________________________________________________________ Engineering Center Campus Box 429 Boulder, Colorado 80309-0429 Phone (303) 735-4900 Fax (303) 492-4990 University of Colorado Boulder Aerospace Engineering Visiting Scholar Program The Aerospace Engineering

  16. Shanghai Aerospace Industrial General Corporation aka Shanghai...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aerospace Industrial General Corporation aka Shanghai Academy of Spaceflight Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shanghai Aerospace Industrial General Corporation (aka...

  17. School of Engineering Mechanical, Aerospace & Nuclear Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Joyce R.

    School of Engineering Mechanical, Aerospace & Nuclear Engineering Undergraduate Handbook CLASS OF MECHANICAL, AEROSPACE AND NUCLEAR ENGINEERING (MANE) ................................................1 MANE .............................................................................................................................................................1 CAREERS IN ENGINEERING

  18. FacultyofAerospaceEngineering recruitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    offers two Master programmes: Aerospace Engineering and the European Wind Energy Master. Within the master programme Aerospace Engineering there are five Tracks of which. · Aerodynamics & Wind Energy-Automatisierungstechnik (TU) and Dipl. Ing. Luft.-und Raumfahrttechnik (TU) BMW group Germany Lockheed Martin We have had

  19. 16.901 Computational Methods in Aerospace Engineering, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darmofal, David L.

    Introduction to computational techniques arising in aerospace engineering. Applications drawn from aerospace structures, aerodynamics, dynamics and control, and aerospace systems. Techniques include: numerical integration ...

  20. OF TEXAS AT Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON · Aerospace Engineering · Applied Chemistry · Applied Physics · Biomedical Engineering · Chemistry · Civil Engineering · Computer Science Engineering · Computer Science · Electrical Engineering · Environmental & Earth Sciences · Experimental Psychology · Industrial Engineering

  1. AEROSPACE LABORATORY GENERAL INFORMATION MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodić, Aleksandar

    AEROSPACE LABORATORY GENERAL INFORMATION MANUAL 1. Introduction 2. Laboratory Format 3. Recommended Guidelines for Experiment Reports 4. Laboratory Notebooks 5. Report Marking Procedures 6. Course Mark compared to the systems you will find in the Undergraduate Laboratory. Typically, experimental setups

  2. PANAGIOTIS TSIOTRAS School Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsiotras, Panagiotis

    ," from ARO. Associate Professor, 1998­2005 Research in the areas of active magnetic bearing control planning, active magnetic bearing control, inverse optimality and passivity-based control for aerospace

  3. OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor The School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Oklahoma State University is pleased to invite applications for six. Salary and other compensation are competitive with major research institutions. Oklahoma State University

  4. Theme: Infrastructure and Electrical (3); Sub Theme: Track Components Finite Element Models of Prestressed Concrete Sleepers and Fastening Systems in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    as well as the development of high-speed passenger rail in North America. In light of these ever) model of prestressed concrete sleepers and fastening systems for US high speed rail and joint passenger to the development of high speed rail corridors and increasing axle loads. Currently, there is little understanding

  5. STUDY FOR THE DESIGN OF AN EDDY CURRENT ARRAY PROBE FOR THE IMAGING OF AERONAUTICAL FASTENER HOLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STUDY FOR THE DESIGN OF AN EDDY CURRENT ARRAY PROBE FOR THE IMAGING OF AERONAUTICAL FASTENER HOLES Wilson, 94230 Cachan France (joubert@satie.ens-cachan.fr) Abstract: The design of an eddy current imaging, eddy currents, imaging probe, finite element modelling, pickup coil array, printed-circuit- board coil

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE SHEAR BEHAVIOR OF RAIL PAD ASSEMBLIES AS A COMPONENT OF THE CONCRETE SLEEPER FASTENING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Fastening System RAIL PAD ASSEMBLY LATERAL DISPLACEMENT FAILURE MODE AND EFFECT ANALYSIS (FMEA) INTRODUCTION life · FMEA is used to define, identify, evaluate and eliminate potential failures from the system · FMEA was used to guide the process of answering questions related to the component behavior and also

  7. Graduate Research Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    Proceedings of ASME Turbo Expo Turbine Technical Conference IGTI 2011 June 6-10, 2011, Vancouver, Canada GT-hole probe is a proven aerodynamic tool for the accurate measurement of flow fields, but is traditionally. A five-hole probe is fastened to a precision calibration mechanism in a wind tunnel test section

  8. Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering 243 Engineering 1 Building 10 W. 32nd St. Chicago, IL 60616 312.567.3175 dept@mmae.iit.edu www.mmae.iit.edu Chair: Keith Bowman The Department of Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering offers several

  9. Kevin W. Cassel Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassel, Kevin W.

    March 2014 Kevin W. Cassel Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Associate Chair Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department Illinois Institute of Technology #12 VII.IV Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department Service, Illinois Institute

  10. Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 Satellite Attitude Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 · Satellite Attitude Control System Design Using Reaction Wheels Bhanu Gouda Brian Fast Dan Simon #12;2Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation;3Aerospace Power & Electronics Simulation Workshop 2004 ADCS ·ADCS: Attitude Determination and Control

  11. Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems: Practice, Strategy Supervisor #12;2 #12;Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems: Practice Traditionally, parts fabrication in the aerospace and automotive industries has been associated with a number

  12. Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, D.

    2011-01-01

    Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

  13. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University at Buffalo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University at Buffalo S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y o f N e w Y o r k MAE Seminar Series Rotation and Vorticity in Mechanics and Physics Alireza Hadjesfandiari Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University at Buffalo ah@buffalo.edu Abstract: Rotation

  14. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing Miguel Ávila, Joelin the aerospace and automotive industries has becomes in the aerospace and automotive industry, only during the

  15. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ávila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing Author: Avila,in the Aerospace and Automotive Industry“, SAE Transactionsin the aerospace and automotive industries has become

  16. Integrated analysis procedure of aerospace composite structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Junghyun

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of composite material application in major commercial aircraft design, represented by the Boeing 787 and Airbus A350-XWB, signals a new era in the aerospace industry. The high stiffness to weight ratio of ...

  17. Capturing value in outsourced aerospace supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chan Yuin

    2008-01-01

    The aerospace industry is increasingly outsourcing and offshoring their supply chains in order to maintain profitability in the face of increasing competition and globalization. This strategy for value creation inevitably ...

  18. Single Ion Implantation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas Schenkel

    2010-01-08

    On the equipment needed to implant ions in silicon and other materials. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/f...

  19. Aeronautics Leadership Program Canada's aerospace industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leadership program will help prepare you for a career as a commercial pilot or in the aviation industry, maintenance hangar, offices and more are on-site and easily accessible. The hands-on program and curriculum and give you time for career exploration. Canada's aviation and aerospace industry is the 5th largest

  20. Ellad B. Tadmor Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadmor, Ellad B.

    Ellad B. Tadmor Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics University of Minnesota 107 Akerman Hall, 110 of Technology, Mechanical Engineering (cum laude), June 1987 M.Sc. Technion ­ Israel Institute of Technology, Mechanical Engineering, June 1991 Ph.D. Brown University, Division of Engineering, Mechanics of Solids

  1. Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonassar, Larry

    design; sustainable design; additive manufacturing; manufacturing of advanced and multifunctional 607 255-0813 mc288@cornell.edu October 2014 Faculty Position in Design and Manufacturing Mechanical and Manufacturing, as related strongly to the disciplines within Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Candidates

  2. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    spanning Energy, Aerospace, Fluids, Structures and Materials. Our work is both creating new knowledge the behaviour of fluid flow at nano- scales to mapping trajectories for deep space missions, we are making key new knowledge with societal and industrial impact, from marine turbines for clean energy

  3. High Temperature Materials for Aerospace Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamczak, Andrea Diane

    2011-08-08

    ), bismaleimide (b), cyanate ester (c), and imide (d). ....................................................................................... 11 2.4 Use temperatures for common resin matrix composite materials. ............. 12 2.5 PMR-15 chemistry... properties.1-2 Additionally, fiber-reinforced high temperature polymer matrix composites are particularly attractive for aerospace structures because of their low density,2-3 high mechanical strength,2,4-10 high modulus,2,5,7-9 thermo-oxidative stability...

  4. West Virginia University 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , and disseminate its findings through scholarly publications. The outcomes of the graduate programs in Aerospace scholarly publications. Faculty Faculty members in the department have extensive research, industrial

  5. Content Development Policy: Mechanical Aerospace & Civil Engineering 1 The University of Manchester Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    Content Development Policy: Mechanical Aerospace & Civil Engineering 1 The University of Manchester Library Content Development Policy Mechanical Aerospace and Civil Engineering Monday, 30 April 2012 ...........................................................................................................18 #12;2 Content Development Policy: Mechanical Aerospace & Civil Engineering Introduction

  6. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    aerospace and automotive industries has become increasinglythe aerospace and automotive industry, only during the pastLMA partners in the automotive industry. formation and crown

  7. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ávila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    the Aerospace and Automotive Industry“, SAE Transactions J.aerospace and automotive industries has become increasinglyaerospace and automotive industries has become increasingly

  8. The ARM unpiloted aerospace vehicle (UAV) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowle, D.

    1995-09-01

    Unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) are an important complement to the DOE`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. ARM is primarily a ground-based program designed to extensively quantify the radiometric and meteorological properties of an atmospheric column. There is a need for airborne measurements of radiative profiles, especially flux at the tropopause, cloud properties, and upper troposphere water vapor. There is also a need for multi-day measurements at the tropopause; for example, in the tropics, at 20 km for over 24 hours. UAVs offer the greatest potential for long endurance at high altitudes and may be less expensive than piloted flights. 2 figs.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Aerospace Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuelInnovationScience & Technology, ChiefAboutAerospace

  10. Aerospace in Hawaii Week October 4 -10, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerospace in Hawaii Week October 4 -10, 2009 State Capitol Presentations 6:00 ­ 8:30 P.M. Friday, Director Office of Aerospace Development State of Hawaii Dr. Gary Huss, Director Keck CosmoChemistry Laboratory Hawaii Institute of Geophysics & Planetology - UH "Stars and Meteorites: Where Astronomy & Geology

  11. Rensselaer Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    NuclEAR sciENcE AND ENgiNEERiNg Nuclear power systems Applied Radiation technologies RadiationRensselaer Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering ANNUAL REPORT 2013 #12;facts & figures DEpARtMENt of MEchANicAl, AERospAcE, AND NuclEAR ENgiNEERiNg stuDENts 1

  12. West Virginia University 1 Department of Mechanical & Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.) · Dual Degree in Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering FACULTY CHAIR · Jacky and computational mechanics · Ismail Celik - Ph.D. (University of Iowa) Fluids engineering, Fuel cell technology of Calgary) #12;2 Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Combustion, Emissions, Fuel efficiency

  13. High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    High Assurance Aerospace CPS & Implications for the Automotive Industry Scott A. Lintelman1 assurance CPS can mutually benefit aerospace and automotive industries. I. INTRODUCTION Commercial aviation]. In the automotive industry, recent trends in intelligent transportation systems can be evidently mapped to e

  14. "Conducting basic and applied research in advanced aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    propulsion, present the opportunity to attain such goals. A scramjet is an air breathing jet engine & Aerospace Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.982.5355 Aerospace Research Laboratory new techniques to enhance the flight testing of scramjet engines Hypersonic Air Breathing Propulsion

  15. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  16. Aerospace mergers and acquisitions from a lean enterprise perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Junhong, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    In the past twenty years, companies in the aerospace industry experienced major transitions: mergers and acquisitions, and lean transformation initiatives. This thesis presents research about the relation of lean efforts ...

  17. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. qAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation

  18. West Virginia University 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    with majors in mechanical engineering or aerospace engineering. Courses Only courses with grades of C at the 500-level or higher taken at WVU. However, the actual minimum number of coursework credits is set

  19. Fire fighting in aerospace product development : a study of project capacity and resource planning in an aerospace enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuarrie, Allan J. (Allan John), 1963-

    2003-01-01

    It is broadly recognized in the aerospace industry, as well as many others, that organizations which effectively execute development projects to meet desired cost, schedule, and performance targets for their customers ...

  20. A Lightweight Cryptographic System for Implantable Biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    A Lightweight Cryptographic System for Implantable Biosensors Sara S. Ghoreishizadeh, Tolga Yalc presents a lightweight cryptographic system integrated onto a multi-function implantable biosensor--Lightweight encryption, Keccak hash function, Authentication, Privacy, Implantable biosensor. I. INTRODUCTION Recently

  1. New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-06-14

    There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these innovations. Keywords: Thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine. This work is presented as paper AIAA-2006-7225 to Space-2006 Conference, 19-21 September, 2006, San Jose, CA, USA.

  2. Frequency modulation detection in cochlear implant subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H B; Zeng, F G

    2004-01-01

    by cochlear implant subjects,’’ J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 82,in cochlear-implant subjects. The goals of this study werehearing. II. METHODS A. Subjects Three post-lingually

  3. Multistate analysis and design : case studies in aerospace design and long endurance systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agte, Jeremy S. (Jeremy Sundermeyer)

    2011-01-01

    This research contributes to the field of aerospace engineering by proposing and demonstrating an integrated process for the early-stage, multistate design of aerospace systems. The process takes into early consideration ...

  4. Service bulletin inventory management and modeling for aerospace parts in customer service organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardede, Erna K. (Erna Kertasasmita)

    2013-01-01

    The Customer Service department of United Technology Corporation (UTC) Aerospace System is primarily responsible for providing spare parts, repair services, training, and technical support for products that UTC Aerospace ...

  5. STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BUFFALO DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BUFFALO DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING GRADUATE AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BUFFALO 318 JARVIS HALL BUFFALO, NY 14260-4400 WAIVER

  6. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ávila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    platform to scholars worldwide. 05AMT-17 Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive

  7. 1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory RPI LINAC Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory RPI LINAC Facility Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Conference April 27, 2011 #12;2Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear · Refurbishment/Upgrade Projects (Recent Future) · Resources at the Facility #12;3Mechanical, Aerospace

  8. Updated 2/6/2015 GRADUATE STUDIES IN MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    Updated 2/6/2015 A Guide to GRADUATE STUDIES IN MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING at Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering College of Engineering and Computer Science Syracuse University Graduate ........................................................................................................ 4 2. Master of Science in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

  9. 2001 -4380 -0 Aerospace EngineeringIto, Ward, and Valasek ROBUST DYNAMIC INVERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    2001 - 4380 - 0 Aerospace EngineeringIto, Ward, and Valasek ROBUST DYNAMIC INVERSION CONTROLLER DESIGN FOR THE X-38 AIAA-2001-4380 Dai Ito, Dr. Donald T. Ward, and Dr. John Valasek Aerospace Engineering AIAA GN&C Conference, Montreal, Canada 9 August 2001 #12;2001 - 4380 - 1 Aerospace Engineering

  10. College of Engineering and Computer Science Aerospace Engineering Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    of Aero. Vehicles 4 AEE446 Propulsion 3 AEE471 Des. & Anal. of Aero. Struct. 4 AEE472 Syn. of Aerospace Systems 4 AEE577 Space Flt. & Rockets 3 MAE184 Engr. Graphics & CAD 3 MAE251 Thermodynamics 4 MAE315 Mech/Aero

  11. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Updated: March 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Updated: March 2015 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Mechanical Engineering majors are required to complete four (4) Technical Electives Mechanics I MAE 211 Intro to Combustion MAE 212 Introductory Compressible Flow MAE 220A Physics of Gases

  12. Aerospace in Hawaii Week October 4 -10, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerospace in Hawaii Week October 4 -10, 2009 State Capitol Presentations 6:00 ­ 8:30 P.M. Tuesday Mission to Planet Earth October 6 Moderator: Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark Director Hawaii Institute Observations to study Ocean Currents" Dr. Peter Mouginis-Mark, Director Hawaii Institute of Geophysics

  13. AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH CENTER MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT IntroductionIntroduction PDEs viable for supersonic & hypersonic military and civilianPDEs viable for supersonic & hypersonic military and civilian applications.systems. PDE as afterburner in turbojets.PDE as afterburner in turbojets. PDE as combustor in Ram or Scram jets

  14. Jizhou Song1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Jizhou Song1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 Kyle L. Grosse Department of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 William P. King

  15. Applying Semantic Web Technologies to Knowledge Sharing in Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciravegna, Fabio

    Applying Semantic Web Technologies to Knowledge Sharing in Aerospace Engineering A.-S. Dadzie , R. This paper details an integrated methodology to optimise Knowledge reuse and sharing, illustrated with a use of Knowledge from legacy documents via automated means, or directly in systems interfacing with Knowledge

  16. College of Engineering and Computer Science Aerospace Engineering Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    of Aero. Vehicles 4 AEE446 Propulsion 3 AEE471 Des. & Anal. of Aero. Struct. 4 AEE472 Syn. of Aerospace315 Mech/Aero Lab I 3 MAE321 Dynamics of Mechanical Systems 3 MAE341 Fluid Mechanics 4 TOTAL CREDITS

  17. College of Engineering and Computer Science Aerospace Engineering Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    of Aero. Vehicles 4 AEE446 Propulsion 3 AEE471 Des. & Anal. of Aero. Struct. 4 AEE472 Syn. of Aerospace MAE315 Mech/Aero Lab I 3 MAE321 Dynamics of Mechanical Systems 3 MAE341 Fluid Mechanics 4 TOTAL

  18. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. q As a consequence plasmaAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation codes are based on the magnetohydrodynamic

  19. PROPULSION AND ENERGY 54 AEROSPACE AMERICA/DECEMBER 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Mitchell

    PROPULSION AND ENERGY 54 AEROSPACE AMERICA/DECEMBER 2005 Electric propulsion Several significant advancements in electric propulsion (EP) systems and related technolo- gies occurred this year. Flight programs throughout the discharge and includes the effects of magnetic fields on the primary electrons. PRIMA is used

  20. Aerospace Industry Opportunities in Australia UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAVs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, K. C.

    Aerospace Industry Opportunities in Australia UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAVs) - Are They Ready Technology Forum Report titled "Study of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Market in Australia", by Dr KC in Australia UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAVs) - Are They Ready This Time? Are We? Dr K.C. Wong1 Department

  1. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  2. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  3. A low-power cochlear implant system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Michael W. (Michael Warren), 1977-

    2007-01-01

    Cochlear implants, or bionic ears, restore hearing to the profoundly deaf by bypassing missing inner-ear hair cells in the cochlea and electrically stimulating the auditory nerve. For miniaturized cochlear implants, including ...

  4. College of Engineering and Computer Science Aerospace Engineering Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    Dynamics of Mechanical Systems 3 MAE341 Fluid Mechanics 4 TOTAL CREDITS 51 17 17 17 16 17 16 14 13 #12; MAE211 3 ECS222 Dynamics 3 ECS325 Mechanics of Solids 3 ECS326 Engr. Materials,Prop. & Proc. 3 ELE231 Propulsion 3 AEE471 Des. & Anal. of Aero. Struct. 4 AEE472 Syn. of Aerospace Systems 4 AEE577 Space Flt

  5. Strategies for Burr Minimization and Cleanability in Aerospace and Automotive Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ávila, Miguel C.; Gardner, Joel D.; Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    Trans. North American Manufacturing Research Institute ,Laboratory for Manufacturing and Sustainability UC BerkeleyAerospace and Automotive Manufacturing Author: Avila, Miguel

  6. UAVs in climate research: The ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolton, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    In the last year, a Department of Energy/Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program project known as ``ARM-UAV`` has made important progress in developing and demonstrating the utility of unmanned aerospace vehicles as platforms for scientific measurements. Recent accomplishments include a series of flights using an atmospheric research payload carried by a General Atomics Gnat UAV at Edwards AFB, California, and over ground instruments located in north-central Oklahoma. The reminder of this discussion will provide background on the program and describe the recent flights.

  7. 1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory Nuclear Data Research at RPI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    1Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner Laboratory Nuclear Data Research for Criticality Safety and Reactor Applications Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, April 27, 2011 #12;2Mechanical.P Barry, Dr. R.C Block, B. Epping #12;3Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering nacThe Gaerttner

  8. Press Release Monday October 5th, 2009 UHM Scientists Spark Aerospace in Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Press Release Monday October 5th, 2009 UHM Scientists Spark Aerospace in Hawaii Week Researchers from the School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa will participate in lively panel discussions this week as part of Aerospace Week in Hawaii. All presentations

  9. JOURNAL OF AEROSPACE COMPUTING, INFORMATION, AND COMMUNICATION Vol. 1, January 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JOURNAL OF AEROSPACE COMPUTING, INFORMATION, AND COMMUNICATION Vol. 1, January 2004 1 Computing. These four disciplines have historically been well served by the six existing AIAA journals, but there is an enormous amount of work going on in aerospace that does not fit within the scope of these existing journals

  10. Health Monitoring of Aging Aerospace Structures using the Electro-Mechanical Impedance Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Health Monitoring of Aging Aerospace Structures using the Electro- Mechanical Impedance Method-mechanical (E/M) impedance method for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures. As a nondestructive aircraft, health monitoring, statistics, neural networks, 1. INTRODUCTION Structural health monitoring (SHM

  11. UA Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Sept 19, 2014 2014-2015 Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    Aerodynamics and Fluid Dynamics Mechanics and Structures AME 425 Aerospace Propulsion [1] AME 430 Intermediate Mechanics of Solids or 3 AME 324BS Engineering Component Design 3 AME 331 Principles & Applications of FluidUA Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Sept 19, 2014 2014-2015 Catalog 128 units* Typical 4-year

  12. Applying Service Oriented Architecture in the Aerospace Industry Jurga Kazlauskaite, Arsalan Minhas, F. H. Vogt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    1 Applying Service Oriented Architecture in the Aerospace Industry Jurga Kazlauskaite, Arsalan at SRI International in Menlo Park and as a visiting researcher at the International Computer Science in the aerospace and shipping industries. #12;2 1. Introduction As a result of mass customisation and due

  13. An Assessment of the Degree of Implementation of the Lean Aerospace Initiative Principles and Practices within the US Aerospace and Defense Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Thomas E.

    This report is a formal documentation of the results of an assessment of the degree to which Lean Principles and Practices have been implemented in the US Aerospace and Defense Industry. An Industry Association team prepared ...

  14. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., George W. (Tijeras, NM); Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Brannon, Paul J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  15. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

  16. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-09-24

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

  17. Department Name Degrees Phone Email Website Aerospace Engineering MS, PhD 303-492-6416 aerograd@colorado.edu http://www.colorado.edu/aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Jane

    Department Name Degrees Phone Email Website Aerospace Engineering MS, PhD 303-492-6416 aerograd@colorado.edu http://www.colorado.edu/aerospace Anthropology MA, PhD 303-492-7947 anthro@colorado.edu http://www.colorado.edu/anthropology Applied Mathematics MS, PhD 303-492-1238 amgradco@colorado.edu http://amath.colorado.edu Art and Art

  18. Oxygen transfer in the implant environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goor, Jared Braden

    2007-01-01

    Chamber Liftoff Agent NC PTFE Chlorotrimethylsilane, acircles of microporous PTFE (MilliPore, 10µm exclusion)with a 12mm circular PTFE implant inside the chamber,

  19. Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of...

  20. Raman P. Singh School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Phone (Tulsa): 918.594.8155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    Raman P. Singh School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Phone (Tulsa): 918.594.8155 Oklahoma State University Phone (Stillwater): 405.744.1825 700 N. Greenwood Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74106 raman

  1. Aerospace Engineering Aircraft and Spacecraft Design BS, MS Space Transportation and Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Aviation Aviation Management BS Maintenance Management Operations Professional Flight Biomedical, CA 95192-0080 408-924-3800 PROGRAMS Aerospace Engineering 408-924-3965 www.ae.sjsu.edu Aviation 408

  2. An approach to analyze tradeoffs for aerospace system design and operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    There are important tradeoffs that need to be considered for the design and operation of aerospace systems. In addition to tradeoffs, there may also be multiple stakeholders of interest to the system and each may have ...

  3. Implementation Planning for the Introduction of Knowledge Management in an Aerospace Engineering Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Neil

    2013-05-17

    The availability of information within an aerospace organization is required for engineers to perform activities. As information is considered, it’s the experience of the engineer that allows information to become knowledge for use. Knowledge...

  4. An Approach to Analyze Tradeoffs for Aerospace System Design and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neill, Gregory

    2012-11-01

    There are important tradeoffs that need to be considered for the design and operation of aerospace systems. In addition to tradeoffs, there may also be multiple stakeholders of interest to the system and each may have ...

  5. Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences 20th ASME Wind Energy Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences 20th ASME Wind Energy Symposium January 8­11, 2001, Reno, NV and offshore structure communities. In applying probabilistic models to design wind tur- bines, a number

  6. Design for affordability in defense and aerospace systems using tradespace-based methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Marcus Shihong

    2014-01-01

    Program failures have plagued the defense and aerospace industry for decades, as unanticipated cost and schedule overruns have rendered the development of systems ineffective in terms of time and cost considerations. This ...

  7. An examination of Boeing's supply chain management practices within the context of the global aerospace industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çizmeci, DaÄŸ lar

    2005-01-01

    This thesis examines the supply chain management practices of the Boeing Commercial Airplane Company within the context of the global aerospace industry. The methodology used for this study includes a study of emerging ...

  8. Implantable, remotely-programmable insulin infusion system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, G.A.; Bair, R.E.; Gaona, J.I. Jr.; Love, J.T.; Urenda, R.S.

    1981-10-01

    An implantable, remotely-programmable insulin infusion system is described which has a mass of 280 grams and an implanted lifetime exceeding two years. The system uses a rotary solenoid-driven peristaltic pump controlled by low power CMOS timing circuitry which provides bimodal insulin delivery. Fifteen low rates from 0.39 to 5.9 units/hour and 15 high doses from 0.84 to 12.5 units are available using U100 insulin. The system has been tested in the laboratory, evaluated in diabetic dogs, and implanted in one diabetic human.

  9. Compliance with the Aerospace MACT Standard at Lockheed Martin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurucz, K.L.; Vicars, S.; Fetter, S.; Mueller, T.

    1997-12-31

    Actions taken and planned at four Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) facilities to comply with the Aerospace MACT Standard are reviewed. Many LMC sites have taken proactive steps to reduce emissions and implement low VOC coating technology. Significant administrative, facility, and material challenges remain to achieve compliance with the upcoming NESHAP and Control Technology Guideline (CTG) standards. The facilities discussed herein set up programs to develop and implement compliance strategies. These facilities manufacture military aircraft, missiles, satellites, rockets, and electronic guidance and communications systems. Some of the facilities are gearing up for new production lines subject to new source MACT standards. At this time the facilities are reviewing compliance status of all primers, topcoats, maskants and solvents subject to the standard. Facility personnel are searching for the most efficient methods of satisfying the recordkeeping, reporting and monitoring, sections of the standards while simultaneously preparing or reviewing their Title V permit applications. Facility decisions on paint booths are the next highest priority. Existing dry filter paint booths will be subject to the filtration standard for existing paint booths which requires the use of two-stage filters. Planned paint booths for the F-22 program, and other new booths must comply with the standard for new and rebuilt booths which requires three stage or HEPA filters. Facilities looking to replace existing water wash paint booths, and those required to retrofit the air handling equipment to accommodate the two-stage filters, are reviewing issues surrounding the rebuilt source definition.

  10. Atmospheric radiation measurement unmanned aerospace vehicle (ARM-UAV) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolton, W.R.

    1996-11-01

    ARM-UAV is part of the multi-agency U.S. Global Change Research Program and is addressing the largest source of uncertainty in predicting climatic response: the interaction of clouds and the sun`s energy in the Earth`s atmosphere. An important aspect of the program is the use of unmanned aerospace vehicles (UAVs) as the primary airborne platform. The ARM-UAV Program has completed two major flight series: The first series conducted in April, 1994, using an existing UAV (the General Atomics Gnat 750) consisted of eight highly successful flights at the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. The second series conducted in September/October, 1995, using two piloted aircraft (Egrett and Twin Otter), featured simultaneous measurements above and below clouds and in clear sky. Additional flight series are planned to continue study of the cloudy and clear sky energy budget in the Spring and Fall of 1996 over the DOE climate site in Oklahoma. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Evolutionary synthesis of kinematic mechanisms Computational Synthesis Laboratory, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Faculty of Computing and Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    , Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Faculty of Computing and Information Science, Computational Synthesis Laboratory, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and FacultyEvolutionary synthesis of kinematic mechanisms HOD LIPSON Computational Synthesis Laboratory

  12. Published in 2001 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 2001, Vol.1, 331-338 -DOI 10.1109/AERO.2001.931724 Designing a Water-Quality Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Published in 2001 IEEE Aerospace Conference, 2001, Vol.1, 331-338 - DOI 10.1109/AERO.2001 Aerospace Conference, 2001, Vol.1, 331-338 - DOI 10.1109/AERO.2001.931724 membrane, on the other hand

  13. Electro-anatomical models of the cochlear implant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiten, Darren M. (Darren Mark), 1977-

    2007-01-01

    While cochlear implantation has become the standard care in treating patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss, the variation in benefit (communicative ability) individual patients derive from implantation ...

  14. Medium energy ion implantation of Germanium into heated Silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoy, John Curtis

    1993-01-01

    Medium energy ion implantation of Ge into heated Si was investigated. legh fluence implants of Ge were made at energies of 40 or 60 keV into Si substrates at room temperature or heated to 300'C or higher. ...

  15. Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information, and Communication, Vol. 2, No. 1, Jan., 2005 JACIC Status and Acknowledgements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information, and Communication, Vol. 2, No. 1, Jan., 2005 JACIC of the Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information, and Communication (JACIC). It remains an exciting of JACIC to evolve over time, but in 2004 it was: This journal is devoted to the applied science

  16. 6. ANKARA INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE CONFERENCE AIAC-2011-056 14-16 September 2011 -METU, Ankara TURKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaman, Yavuz

    TURKEY MULTIPLE ASPECT DESIGN OF AN UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE WING ABSTRACT The design of aircraft Group and Middle East Technical University Department of Aerospace Engineering Ankara, Turkey Yavuz Yaman2 Middle East Technical University Department of Aerospace Engineering Ankara, Turkey #12;AIAC-2011

  17. 3rd European Conference for AeroSpace Sciences (EUCASS) Paper 2009-374 1 THE RESPONSE OF PREMIXED FLAMES TO PRESSURE OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    3rd European Conference for AeroSpace Sciences (EUCASS) Paper 2009-374 1 THE RESPONSE OF PREMIXED rate. hal-00418835,version1-21Sep2009 Author manuscript, published in "3rd European Conference for Aerospace Sciences (EUCASS), Versailles : France (2009)" #12;3rd European Conference for AeroSpace Sciences

  18. An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    An Implantable Bio-Micro-system for Drug Monitoring Sara Ghoreishizadeh, Enver G. Kilinc, Camilla of the implantable monitoring system for long- term duration has many challenges. First, a multi-target biosen- sor coil; (ii) A power manage- ment IC dealing with the energy source of the implantable microsystem

  19. Implantation des Espaces de Travail I. Introduction.............................................................. 82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donsez, Didier

    Chapitre 5 Implantation des Espaces de Travail I. Introduction Persistantes.....................................88 IV. Structure MultiThreadée des Espaces de Travail.... 105 : Implantation des Espaces de Travail - 82 - I. Introduction L'implantation des Espaces de Travail est basée sur

  20. Channel Characterization for Implant to Body Surface Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Channel Characterization for Implant to Body Surface Communication Awais M. Kamboh, and Andrew J employed in implantable biomedical devices for wireless communication with the external world. The performance of such implant-to-body-surface communication is dependent on the characteristics

  1. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  2. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, J.D.

    1985-05-20

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line and electrode arrangement are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heat region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed swtiches. 5 figs.

  3. Implantable apparatus for localized heating of tissue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doss, James D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    With the object of repetitively treating deep-seated, inoperable tumors by hyperthermia as well as locally heating other internal tissue masses repetitively, a receiving antenna, transmission line, and electrode arrangment are implanted completely within the patient's body, with the receiving antenna just under the surface of the skin and with the electrode arrangement being located so as to most effectively heat the tissue to be treated. An external, transmitting antenna, driven by an external radio-frequency energy source, is closely coupled to the implanted receiving antenna so that the energy coupled across the air-skin interface provides electromagnetic energy suitable for heating the tissue in the vicinity of the implanted electrodes. The resulting increase in tissue temperature may be estimated by an indirect measurement of the decrease in tissue resistivity in the heated region. This change in resistivity appears as a change in the loading of the receiving antenna which can be measured by either determining the change in the phase relationship between the voltage and the current appearing on the transmitting antenna or by measuring the change in the magnitude of the impedance thereof. Optionally, multiple electrode arrays may be activated or inactivated by the application of magnetic fields to operate implanted magnetic reed switches.

  4. Nucleus Implant Parameters Significantly Change the Compressive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karduna, Andrew

    stiffness of the denucleated intervertebral disc IVD when im- planted in the created nuclear defect into the custom made molds of three different diameters D1=15 mm, D2=16 mm, and D3=17 mm to achieve variation in the hydrogel implant diameter. The filled molds were gelled by six repeated cycles of freezing for 21 h at -19

  5. UB DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (MAE) BS in Mechanical Engineering (ME)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    UB DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (MAE) BS in Mechanical Engineering (ME) Facts,500. The mean annual wage for ME's is $85,930 · Degrees offered: BS, MS, and PhD · A five-year BS Mechanical Engineering + MBA program is available What do Mechanical Engineers Do? Mechanical engineers use principles

  6. AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 9-12, 2006, Reno, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    and Flapping Foils M. Bozkurttas* , H. Dong. , R. Mittal Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering. Introduction HIS work is a part of a research program designed to develop a maneuvering propulsor for AUV's (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) based on the mechanical design and performance of fish fins. Fishes

  7. The CU Aerospace / VACCO CubeSat High Impulse Propulsion System (CHIPS) offers a miniaturized and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    Aerospace's high-efficiency resistojet technology, VACCO Industries' compact frictionless valve technology. · Reliable, frictionless VACCO valve technology: · Valves tested to 200,000+ cold gas firings · System two-failure-tolerant against leakage · Life span: 2+ years from propellant load. · High-density & self-pressurizing R-134a

  8. Abstract--The growing popularity and success of fuel cells in aerospace, stationary power, and transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    1 Abstract-- The growing popularity and success of fuel cells in aerospace, stationary power runtime, and decreasing size. Di- rect-methanol fuel cell batteries have now been built and conformed to low cost technologies and chip-scale dimen- sions. Conventional fuel cell models, however, fail

  9. EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Study on the eddy current damping of the spin dynamics of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    4TH EUROPEAN CONFERENCE FOR AEROSPACE SCIENCES Study on the eddy current damping of the spin consideration in this article, are impacted by torques generated by eddy currents as the conducting non, the permanent magnetic field from the magnetosphere generates eddy current in the spinning, conducting body

  10. FOB Undergoing Test and Alignment in FAS at Ball Aerospace OPTICAL TESTS AND ALIGNMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Glenn

    FOB Undergoing Test and Alignment in FAS at Ball Aerospace OPTICAL TESTS AND ALIGNMENTS After the FOB alignment is complete, and it passes environmental tests, it will be checked out in a second HST. The NICMOS FOB will relay simulated images from RAS/HOMS to a Photometrics CCD camera placed where the three

  11. Dr. Brian L. Wardle Director, Nano-Engineered Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium and has served as the materials/structures lead on MIT's Microchemical Power MURI team developing MEMS-scale solid oxide fuel cells. Prof. Wardle is a principal member of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), discovery of a new class of oxide catalysts for carbon nanotube (CNT

  12. October 24, 2000 13:32 Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    October 24, 2000 13:32 Proceedings of AIAA Aerospace Sciences 20th ASME Wind Energy Symposium, either explicitly or implicitly, for a number of design codes---especially Copyright 2001 by The American turbine standards (e.g., IEC, 1999) have begun to adopt these code formats, in analogy with long

  13. Presented at 2000 ASME Wind Energy Symposium/38th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico ABSTRACT Wind-energy researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a new, lightPresented at 2000 ASME Wind Energy Symposium/38th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit Reno-LINKED DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM*§ Dale E. Berg , Mark A. Rumsey Wind Energy Technology Department Sandia

  14. CIRQ: Qualitative fluid flow modelling for aerospace FMEA applications Neal Snooke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snooke, Neal

    M2 CIRQ: Qualitative fluid flow modelling for aerospace FMEA applications Neal Snooke Department- oped on top of the MCIRQ simulator with the aim to produce an automated FMEA for aircraft fuel systems similar to pre- viously developed automated electrical FMEA. Introduction This paper describes a circuit

  15. Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering -Graduate Post Graduate Activities Detail & History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipson, Michal

    Raytheon Systems Engineer Tucson AZ MENG Rockwell Collins Mechanical Engineer Sterling VA MENG Space2009 Sibley School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering -Graduate Post Graduate Activities Detail Engineering Graduate Level students from the Class of 2009. Historical data is provided to allow

  16. Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering 1,115 Undergraduates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Robert J.

    NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Nuclear Power Systems Applied Radiation Technologies RadiationDepartment of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering STUDENTS 1,115 Undergraduates 152 23 Nuclear Engineering 13 DEGREES OFFERED Aeronautical Engineering (B.S., M.Eng., M.S., Ph

  17. University of California, Irvine 2014-2015 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    with engineering science and technology in areas such as fluid mechanics, heat transfer, dynamics, controls Systems and Environmental Engineering, Flow Physics and Propulsion Systems, and Design of MechanicalUniversity of California, Irvine 2014-2015 1 Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

  18. A Snapshot of the Texas Aerospace Industry and a Comparison of Competitor States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ario, Shannon; Elliott, Elizabeth; Gray, Kevin; Hemmeline, Charles; Pomeroy, Dan; White, Andrew; Zurawski, Paul

    2002-01-01

    -2000...............................................15 Figure 2-C. Average Wage by State 1996-2000 .............................................................17 Figure 4-A. Aerospace Industry Sales.............................................................................24 Figure 5-A. NASA FY 2001... Procurement Distribution .................................................30 Figure 5-B. NASA Procurements by % of Total ............................................................30 Figure 5-C. Projected Distribution of Full Time Equivalent Workers FY...

  19. CU-CAS-02-08 CENTER FOR AEROSPACE STRUCTURES Volumetric Constraint Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    CU-CAS-02-08 CENTER FOR AEROSPACE STRUCTURES Volumetric Constraint Models for Anisotropic Elastic 429 BOULDER, COLORADO 80309 #12;Volumetric Constraint Models for Anisotropic Elastic Solids Carlos A. Conclusion 5 #12;Volumetric Constraint Models for Anisotropic Elastic Solids Carlos A. Felippa and Eugenio O

  20. 6. ANKARA INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE CONFERENCE AIAC-2011-054 14-16 September 2011 -METU, Ankara TURKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaman, Yavuz

    TURKEY OPTIMIZATION OF AN HELICOPTER ROTOR FOR MINIMUM VIBRATORY LOADS Aykut TAMER1 Turkish Aerospace Engineering Ankara, TURKEY Yavuz YAMAN2 Middle East Technical University Ankara, TURKEY ABSTRACT In this study

  1. The "+Add" Model : a proposed strategic framework to create agile high performance aerospace and defense product support supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riwes, Mina (Mina Diaa)

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Aerospace and Defense industry is a vital organ for national security and humanitarian disaster response as well as an economic powerhouse creating jobs and driving exports. News headlines often stop at the sale ...

  2. Method of electroplating a conversion electron emitting source on implant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Gonzales, Gilbert R. (New York, NY); Adzic, Radoslav (East Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY)

    2012-02-14

    Methods for preparing an implant coated with a conversion electron emitting source (CEES) are disclosed. The typical method includes cleaning the surface of the implant; placing the implant in an activating solution comprising hydrochloric acid to activate the surface; reducing the surface by H.sub.2 evolution in H.sub.2SO.sub.4 solution; and placing the implant in an electroplating solution that includes ions of the CEES, HCl, H.sub.2SO.sub.4, and resorcinol, gelatin, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, before tin plating, a seed layer is formed on the surface. The electroplated CEES coating can be further protected and stabilized by annealing in a heated oven, by passivation, or by being covered with a protective film. The invention also relates to a holding device for holding an implant, wherein the device selectively prevents electrodeposition on the portions of the implant contacting the device.

  3. On the state of Mn impurity implanted in Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlov, A. F.; Bublik, V. T.; Vdovin, V. I.; Agafonov, Yu. A.; Balagurov, L. A.; Zinenko, V. I.; Kulemanov, I. V.; Shcherbachev, K. D.

    2009-07-15

    The state of manganese impurity in implanted silicon at implantation doses of up to 5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It is established that, after short-term vacuum annealing at 850{sup o}C, most of the implanted manganese impurities are in microinclusions up to 20 nm in size formed by a tetragonal silicide phase of the Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26} type.

  4. Dopant activation in ion implanted silicon by microwave annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alford, T. L.; Thompson, D. C.; Mayer, J. W. [School of Materials, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Theodore, N. David [Silicon Technology Solutions, Freescale Semiconductor Inc., 2100 East Elliot Rd., Tempe, Arizona 85284 (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Microwaves are used as a processing alternative for the electrical activation of ion implanted dopants and the repair of ion implant damage within silicon. Rutherford backscattering spectra demonstrate that microwave heating reduces the damage resulting from ion implantation of boron or arsenic into silicon. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy and selective area electron diffraction patterns demonstrate that the silicon lattice regains nearly all of its crystallinity after microwave processing of arsenic implanted silicon. Sheet resistance readings indicate the time required for boron or arsenic electrical activation within implanted silicon. Hall measurements demonstrate the extent of dopant activation after microwave heating of implanted silicon. Physical and electrical characterization determined that the mechanism of recrystallization in arsenic implanted silicon is solid phase epitaxial regrowth. The boron implanted silicon samples did not result in enough lattice damage to amorphize the silicon lattice and resulted in low boron activation during microwave annealing even though recrystallization of the Si lattice damage did take place. Despite low boron activation levels, the level of boron activation in this work was higher than that expected from traditional annealing techniques. The kinetics of microwave heating and its effects on implanted Si are also discussed.

  5. Microstructure evolution in carbon-ion implanted sapphire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orwa, J. O.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Peng, J. L.; Rubanov, S.

    2010-01-15

    Carbon ions of MeV energy were implanted into sapphire to fluences of 1x10{sup 17} or 2x10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} and thermally annealed in forming gas (4% H in Ar) for 1 h. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy results obtained from the lower dose implant showed retention of implanted carbon and accumulation of H near the end of range in the C implanted and annealed sample. Three distinct regions were identified by transmission electron microscopy of the implanted region in the higher dose implant. First, in the near surface region, was a low damage region (L{sub 1}) composed of crystalline sapphire and a high density of plateletlike defects. Underneath this was a thin, highly damaged and amorphized region (L{sub 2}) near the end of range in which a mixture of i-carbon and nanodiamond phases are present. Finally, there was a pristine, undamaged sapphire region (L{sub 3}) beyond the end of range. In the annealed sample some evidence of the presence of diamond nanoclusters was found deep within the implanted layer near the projected range of the C ions. These results are compared with our previous work on carbon implanted quartz in which nanodiamond phases were formed only a few tens of nanometers from the surface, a considerable distance from the projected range of the ions, suggesting that significant out diffusion of the implanted carbon had occurred.

  6. Interstitial diffusion of ion-implanted boron in crystalline silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. I. Velichko; A. P. Kavaliova

    2012-07-03

    Modeling of the long-range migration of boron interstitials during low temperature annealing of ion-implanted silicon crystals has been carried out.

  7. ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLE NEUROSTIMULATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantchenko, Oxana S.

    2012-01-01

    38 3. Renewable Power for ImplantableCOMPATIBILITY AND RENEWABLE POWER FOR IMPLANTABLER, Isaacson M, Shakouri A: A renewable energy power source

  8. Biocompatible implants and methods of making and attaching the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowley, Adrian P; Laude, Lucien D; Humayun, Mark S; Weiland, James D; Lotfi, Atoosa; Markland, Jr., Francis S

    2014-10-07

    The invention provides a biocompatible silicone implant that can be securely affixed to living tissue through interaction with integral membrane proteins (integrins). A silicone article containing a laser-activated surface is utilized to make the implant. One example is an implantable prosthesis to treat blindness caused by outer retinal degenerative diseases. The device bypasses damaged photoreceptors and electrically stimulates the undamaged neurons of the retina. Electrical stimulation is achieved using a silicone microelectrode array (MEA). A safe, protein adhesive is used in attaching the MEA to the retinal surface and assist in alleviating focal pressure effects. Methods of making and attaching such implants are also provided.

  9. Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Beryllium-7 Implantation in Plastics for Prosthesis Wear Studies Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear...

  10. Fractional order PID controller for improvement of PMSM speed control in aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraji, Ali Motalebi; Ghanbari, Mahmood

    2014-12-10

    Because of the benefits reduced size, cost and maintenance, noise, CO2 emissions and increased control flexibility and precision, to meet these expectations, electrical equipment increasingly utilize in modern aircraft systems and aerospace industry rather than conventional mechanic, hydraulic, and pneumatic power systems. Electric motor drives are capable of converting electrical power to drive actuators, pumps, compressors, and other subsystems at variable speeds. In the past decades, permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) and brushless dc (BLDC) motor were investigated for aerospace applications such as aircraft actuators. In this paper, the fractional-order PID controller is used in the design of speed loop of PMSM speed control system. Having more parameters for tuning fractional order PID controller lead to good performance ratio to integer order. This good performance is shown by comparison fractional order PID controller with the conventional PI and tuned PID controller by Genetic algorithm in MATLAB soft wear.

  11. Electrical activation and spin coherence of ultra low dose antimony implants in silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    and spin coherence of ultra low dose antimony implants inClara, CA 95054 We implanted ultra low doses (0.2 to 2×10 11100 nm, corresponding to ultra low ion implantation doses of

  12. Tenderness of Bos indicus influenced cattle as impacted by anabolic implants and gender 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudek, Jarrett F.

    2010-01-16

    Steers (n = 77) and heifers (n = 68) were assigned randomly to one of three treatment groups. Treatment groups were defined as: no implant, implanted twice with trenbolone acetate (Revalor S or H), or implanted twice with estrodial benzoate (Synovex...

  13. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muller, Rolf H. (Berkeley, CA); Zhang, Shengtao (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, end sodium sulfur.

  14. Ion implantation of highly corrosive electrolyte battery components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muller, R.H.; Zhang, S.

    1997-01-14

    A method of producing corrosion resistant electrodes and other surfaces in corrosive batteries using ion implantation is described. Solid electrically conductive material is used as the ion implantation source. Battery electrode grids, especially anode grids, can be produced with greatly increased corrosion resistance for use in lead acid, molten salt, and sodium sulfur. 6 figs.

  15. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices A. Zebda1,2 , S. Cosnier1 the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal further developments. Following recent developments in nano- and biotechnology, state-of-the-art biofuel

  16. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Page 1 Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj1 , William Hubbard2 , and J. A We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled

  17. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golovchenko, Jene A.

    Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj,1 William Hubbard,2 and J. A. Golovchenko1,2,a demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled

  18. Passivation layer on polyimide deposited by combined plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition and cathodic vacuum arc technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Z. J.; Tay, B. K.; Sze, J. Y.; Ha, P. C. T.

    2007-05-15

    A thin passivation layer of aluminum oxide was deposited on polyimide by using the combined plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII and D) and cathodic vacuum arc technique. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy C 1s spectra showed that the carbonyl bond (C=O) and ether group (C-O-C and C-N-C) presented in pristine polyimide were damaged by implantation of aluminum ions and deposition of an aluminum oxide passivation layer. O 1s and Al 2p spectra confirmed the formation of a thin aluminum oxide passivation layer. This passivation layer can be implemented in aerospace engineering where polyimide may suffer degradation from fast atomic oxygen in the low-earth-orbit environment. To test the protection of this passivation layer to energetic oxygen ions, a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system was used to simulate the oxygen-ion irradiation, and the results showed that a higher weight occurred for passivated samples compared to pristine ones. X-ray diffraction showed that Al peaks were presented on the surface region, but no aluminum oxide peak was detected. The authors then concluded that Al clusters were formed in polyimide besides aluminum oxide, which was in an x-ray amorphous state. Furthermore, contact-angle measurements showed a reduced contact angle for passivated polyimide from a pristine value of 78 deg. to 20 deg. by using deionized water. Several discussions have been made on the surface chemical and structural property changes by using the combined PIII and D and cathodic vacuum arc technique.

  19. Implant for in-vivo parameter monitoring, processing and transmitting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ericson, Milton N. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Hylton, James O. (Clinton, TN)

    2009-11-24

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  20. Method of fabricating optical waveguides by ion implantation doping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appleton, B.R.; Ashley, P.R.; Buchal, C.J.

    1987-03-24

    A method for fabricating high-quality optical waveguides in optical quality oxide crystals by ion implantation doping and controlled epitaxial recrystallization is provided. Masked LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals are implanted with high concentrations of Ti dopant at ion energies of about 360 keV while maintaining the crystal near liquid nitrogen temperature. Ion implantation doping produces an amorphous, Ti-rich nonequilibrium phase in the implanted region. Subsequent thermal annealing in a water-saturated oxygen atmosphere at up to 1000/degree/C produces solid-phase epitaxial regrowth onto the crystalline substrate. A high-quality crystalline layer results which incorporates the Ti into the crystal structure at much higher concentrations than is possible by standard diffusion techniques, and this implanted region has excellent optical waveguiding properties.

  1. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  2. A commercial plasma source ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheuer, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Adler, R.A. [North Star Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Horne, W.G. [Empire Hard Chrome, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Empire Hard Chrome has recently installed commercial plasma source ion implantation (PSU) equipment built by North Star Research Corporation. Los Alamos National Laboratory has assisted in this commercialization effort via two Cooperative Research and Development Agreements to develop the plasma source for the equipment and to identify low-risk commercial PSII applications. The PSII system consists of a 1 m x 1 m cylindrical vacuum chamber with a rf plasma source. The pulse modulator is capable of delivering pulses kV and peak currents of 300 A at maximum repetition rate of 400 Hz. thyratron tube to switch a pulse forming network which is tailored to match the dynamic PSII load. In this paper we discuss the PSII system, process facility, and early commercial applications to production tooling.

  3. Glass/ceramic coatings for implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomsia, Antoni P. (Pinole, CA); Saiz, Eduardo (Berkeley, CA); Gomez-Vega, Jose M. (Nagoya, JP); Marshall, Sally J. (Larkspur, CA); Marshall, Grayson W. (Larkspur, CA)

    2011-09-06

    Glass coatings on metals including Ti, Ti6A14V and CrCo were prepared for use as implants. The composition of the glasses was tailored to match the thermal expansion of the substrate metal. By controlling the firing atmosphere, time, and temperature, it was possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25-150 .mu.m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate. The optimum firing temperatures ranged between 800 and 840.degree. C. at times up to 1 min in air or 15 min in N.sub.2. The same basic technique was used to create multilayered coatings with concentration gradients of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles and SiO.sub.2.

  4. A fully implantable intracochlear drug delivery device : development and characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swan, Erin Eileen Leary, 1976-

    2009-01-01

    In a collaborative effort with the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Draper Laboratory is developing an implantable microfluidic drug delivery system for long-term treatment of inner ear disorders and prevention of ...

  5. Single ion implantation for solid state quantum computer development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenkel, Thomas; Meijers, Jan; Persaud, Arun; McDonald, Joseph W.; Holder, Joseph P.; Schneider, Dieter H.

    2001-12-18

    Several solid state quantum computer schemes are based on the manipulation of electron and nuclear spins of single donor atoms in a solid matrix. The fabrication of qubit arrays requires the placement of individual atoms with nanometer precision and high efficiency. In this article we describe first results from low dose, low energy implantations and our development of a low energy (<10 keV), single ion implantation scheme for {sup 31}P{sup q+} ions. When {sup 31}P{sup q+} ions impinge on a wafer surface, their potential energy (9.3 keV for P{sup 15+}) is released, and about 20 secondary electrons are emitted. The emission of multiple secondary electrons allows detection of each ion impact with 100% efficiency. The beam spot on target is controlled by beam focusing and collimation. Exactly one ion is implanted into a selected area avoiding a Poissonian distribution of implanted ions.

  6. Noninvasive quantification of drug delivery from an implantable MEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Audrey M., 1976-

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) sensors in vivo in real time and corroborated by scintillation of urine samples. The goal of monitoring drug delivery from an implant in vivo, in real time and without disturbing the tissue environment, was ...

  7. Interfacial Interactions between Implant Electrode and Biological Environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Cheng-Wei 1979-

    2012-11-06

    Electrodes implanted into neural systems are known to degrade due to encapsulation by surrounding tissues. The mechanisms of electrode-tissue interactions and prediction of the behavior of electrode are yet to be achieved. This research will aim...

  8. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Kulikov, Stanislav (Sarov, RU); Osorio, Ivan (Leawood, KS); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  9. Ion implanted step recovery diodes - influence of material parameter variations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosman, Thomas Michael

    1974-01-01

    on the successful application of ion implantation in the fabrication of an improved step recovery diode (SRD). At the same time a comprehensive account of the actual device processing will bring to light the problems and difficulties that are ordinarily...ION IMPLANTED STEP RECOVERY DIODES ? INFLUENCE OF MATERIAL PARAMETER VARIATIONS A Thesis by THOMAS MICHAEL MOSMAN Submitted to the Craduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  10. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-06-13

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Ions that are implanted include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and a preferred co-implant of Ar/sup +/ and Ne/sup +/. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the band gap energy threshold of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible blue light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to these positive ions of sufficient density and with sufficient energy to provide an image. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%; a lead zirconate content ranging from 62 to 70 mole %; and a lead titanate content ranging from 38 to 30%. The region of ion implantation is in a range from 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate. Density of ions is in the range from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and having an energy in the range from 100 to 500 keV.

  11. THE AEROSPACE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1 .. THE

  12. THE AEROSPACE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1 .. THESuile

  13. AIAA Paper 2004-1264, Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, NV, Jan., 2004 Information and Knowledge Transfer through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is thus an information source in an archival journal. This information source must be consumed by others age where paper was the primary means of storing information, and conferences were the primary meansAIAA Paper 2004-1264, Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, NV, Jan., 2004 Information and Knowledge

  14. 6. ANKARA INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE CONFERENCE AIAC-2011-015 14-16 September 2011 -METU, Ankara TURKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaman, Yavuz

    TURKEY AN EXPERIMENTAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION FOR THE SUPPRESSION OF VIBRATIONS OF THE SECOND MODE: yyaman@metu.edu.tr Cem ONAT1 Department of Mechanical Engineering Inonu University Malatya, TURKEY and Department of Aerospace Engineering Middle East Technical University Ankara, TURKEY Melin SAHIN2 and Yavuz

  15. 5. ANKARA INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE CONFERENCE AIAC-2009-034 17-19 August 2009 -METU, Ankara TURKEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaman, Yavuz

    5. ANKARA INTERNATIONAL AEROSPACE CONFERENCE AIAC-2009-034 17-19 August 2009 - METU, Ankara TURKEY Havelsan Ankara, Turkey Melin ahin2 Middle East Technical University Ankara, Turkey Volkan Nalbantolu3 Aselsan Ankara, Turkey Yavuz Yaman4 Middle East Technical University Ankara, Turkey ABSTRACT In this paper

  16. 46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 710, 2008/Reno, NV Upstream and downstream influence on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    08544 Statistical analysis of the upstream and downstream flow influence on shock unsteadiness in shock to further study the upstream and downstream flow influence on shock unsteadiness using direct numerical46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 7­10, 2008/Reno, NV Upstream

  17. ASME Wind Energy Symposium -Held in conjunction with the AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, January 6-9 1997.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASME Wind Energy Symposium - Held in conjunction with the AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno LOADS TO WIND TURBINE FATIGUE AND RELIABILITY ANALYSIS* Paul S. Veers Wind Energy Technology Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Abstract Cyclic loadings produce progressive damage that can

  18. ASME Wind Energy Symposium -Held in conjunction with the AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, January 6-9 1997.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ASME Wind Energy Symposium - Held in conjunction with the AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno LOADS TO WIND TURBINE FATIGUE AND RELIABILITY ANALYSIS* Paul S. Veers Wind Energy Technology Department of occurrences of cycles in each load #12;ASME Wind Energy Symposium - Held in conjunction with the AIAA

  19. 46th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, January 7-10, 2008, Reno, Nevada A Smart Wind Turbine Blade Using Distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Robert C.

    of "smart" wind turbine blades with integrated sensor-actuator-controller modules to im- prove the performance of wind turbines. The system will be designed to enhance energy capture, and reduce aerodynamic46th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, January 7-10, 2008, Reno, Nevada A Smart Wind Turbine Blade Using

  20. Fuzzy Logic in Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Structures Murali Krishna, Vladik Kreinovich, and Roberto Osegueda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Fuzzy Logic in Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Structures Murali Krishna, Vladik Kreinovich it corresponds to ultrasound. Ultrasonic scans are indeed one of the main non- destructive NDE tools; see, e--In nondestructive testing, to locate the faults, we send an ultrasonic signal and measure the resulting vibration

  1. On the virtual aeroshaping effect of synthetic jets Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Rajat

    On the virtual aeroshaping effect of synthetic jets R. Mittal Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 P. Rampunggoon Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 Received 9 October 2001; accepted 3

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program - unmanned aerospace vehicle: The follow-on phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitko, J. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (UAV) demonstration flights (UDF) are designed to provide an early demonstration of the scientific utility of UAVs by using an existing UAV and instruments to measure broadband radiative flux profiles under clear sky conditions. UDF is but the first of three phases of ARM-UAV. The second phase significantly extends both the UAV measurement techniques and the available instrumentation to allow both multi-UAV measurements in cloudy skies and extended duration measurements in the tropopause. These activities build naturally to the third and final phase, that of full operational capability, i.e., UAVs capable of autonomous operations at 20-km altitudes for multiple days with a full suite of instrumentation for measuring radiative flux, cloud properties, and water vapor profiles.

  3. Reduction of phosphorus diffusion in germanium by fluorine implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Mubarek, H. A. W. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-14

    The control of phosphorus (P) diffusion in germanium (Ge) is essential for the realisation of ultrashallow n-type junctions in Ge. This work reports a detailed study of the effect of fluorine (F) co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge. P and F profiles were characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The ion implantation damage was investigated using cross sectional transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that F co-implantation reduces the implanted P profile width and reduces both intrinsic and extrinsic P diffusion in Ge. A defect mediated mechanism for the strong influence of F co-implantation on P diffusion in Ge is proposed and invokes the formation of F{sub n}V{sub m} clusters in the F-amorphized Ge layer. A fraction of these F{sub n}V{sub m} clusters decorate the interstitial type end-of-range defects in the re-grown Ge layer and the rest react during re-growth with interstitial germanium atoms diffusing back from the amorphous crystalline interface. The Ge vacancies are then annihilated and mobile interstitial F is released and out diffuses from the surface. This results in a re-grown Ge layer which has a low vacancy concentration and in which the P diffusion rate is reduced. These results open the way to the realization of enhanced Ge n-type devices.

  4. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Land, Cecil E. (Albuquerque, NM); Peercy, Paul S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1983-01-01

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Implanted ions include H.sup.+, He.sup.+, Ne.sup.+, Ar.sup.+, as well as chemically reactive ions from Fe, Cr, and Al. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the absorption characteristics of the PLZT material from near-UV light to visible light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to the positive ions at sufficient density, from 1.times.10.sup.12 to 1.times.10.sup.17, and with sufficient energy, from 100 to 500 KeV, to provide photosensitivity enhancement. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%, a lead zirconate content of 62 to 70 mole %, and a lead titanate content of 38 to 30%. The ions are implanted at a depth of 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate.

  5. High concentration of deuterium in palladium from plasma ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhm, H.S.; Lee, W.M. )

    1991-11-01

    Based on a theoretical calculation, a new scheme to increase deuterium density in palladium over its initial value is presented. This deuterium enrichment scheme makes use of plasma ion implantation. A cylindrical palladium rod (target) preloaded with deuterium atoms, coated with a diffusion-barrier material, is immersed in a deuterium plasma. The palladium rod is connected to a high-power modulator which provides a series of negative-voltage pulses. During these negative pulses, deuterium ions fall into the target, penetrate the diffusion barrier, and are implanted inside the palladium. For reasonable system parameters allowed by present technology, it is found from theoretical calculations that the saturation deuterium density after prolonged ion implantation can be several times the palladium atomic number density. Assuming an initial deuterium density, {ital n}{sub 0}=4{times}10{sup 22} cm{sup {minus}3}, it is also found that the deuterium density in palladium can triple its original value within a few days of the ion implantation for a reasonable target size. Because of the small diffusion coefficient in palladium, the incoming ions do not diffuse quickly inward, thereby accumulating near the target surface at the beginning of the implantation.

  6. Thermal Energy Harvesting with Thermoelectrics for Self-powered Sensors: With Applications to Implantable Medical Devices, Body Sensor Networks and Aging in Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Alic

    2011-01-01

    of lithium and lithium-ion batteries in implantable medicalof lithium and lithium-ion batteries in implantable medical

  7. Double site-bond percolation model for biomaterial implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mely, H

    2011-01-01

    We present a double site-bond percolation model to account, on the one hand, for the vascularization and/or resorption of biomaterial implant in bones and, on the other hand, for its mechanical continuity. The transformation of the implant into osseous material, and the dynamical formation/destruction of this osseous material is accounted for by creation and destruction of links and sites in two, entangled, networks. We identify the relevant parameters to describe the implant and its evolution, and separate their biological or chemical origin from their physical one. We classify the various phenomena in the two regimes, percolating or non-percolating, of the networks. We present first numerical results in two dimensions.

  8. Powering mm-Size Wireless Implants for Brain-Machine Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark, Michael

    2011-01-01

    4 Proof-of-Concept: A 1 mm 3 Neural Transponder Linkfor power transfer to a 1 x 1 mm 2 implanted antenna withantenna with a diameter of 15 mm and a 1 mm 2 implant

  9. Surface-Mediated Bone Tissue Morphogenesis from Tunable Nanolayered Implant Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Nisarg J.

    The functional success of a biomedical implant critically depends on its stable bonding with the host tissue. Aseptic implant loosening accounts for more than half of all joint replacement failures. Various materials, ...

  10. Identification of novel implantation-related genes in the ovine uterus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Gwon Hwa

    2007-09-17

    for successful implantation and placentation. Therefore, studies were conducted to indentify and characterize novel endometrial genes important for implantation and conceptus development in the ovine uterus. The first and second studies defined the uterine...

  11. Process for forming one or more substantially pure layers in substrate material using ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musket, R.G.; Brown, D.W.; Munir, Z.A.

    1990-12-11

    A process is disclosed for forming a substantially pure layer of an implantable element in a substrate material by (a) selecting an implantable element and a substrate material to be implanted which, at the temperatures to be used, have limited mutual solubility in one another and do not form any intermediate phases with one another; (b) implanting a sufficient amount of the implantable element in the substrate material to permit formation of the desired substantially pure layer of the implantable element in the substrate material; and (c) annealing the implanted substrate material to form the desired layer. The annealing step may not be required if the desired layer was formed during the implantation. 2 figs.

  12. Using blind source separation techniques to improve speech recognition in bilateral cochlear implant patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2008-06-05

    Bilateral cochlear implants seek to restore the advantages of binaural hearing by improving access to binaural cues. Bilateral implant users are currently fitted with two processors, one in each ear, operating independent ...

  13. Advanced aerospace materials, including fiber reinforced polymer and ceramic matrix composites, are increasingly being used in critical and demanding applications, challenging the current damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced aerospace materials, including fiber reinforced polymer and ceramic matrix composites of ceramic matrix composite processing, improve the understanding of the effects of architectural and geometric variability in polymer matrix composites, and provide an accurate and computational efficient

  14. 45th AIAA Aerospace Science Meeting and Exhibit, January 811, 2005/Reno, Nevada Analysis of Shock Motion in STBLI Induced by a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    of scram-jet engines and hypersonic vehicles. However, many aspects of the problem such as dynamics Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 DNS data of a 24

  15. The Mechanical and Tribological Properties or Ion Implanted Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bull, Stephen John

    1988-06-17

    into the surface of a component, thereby modifying its surface chemical and physical properties. The implantation affected layer is typically $1~ thick and unlike the surface layers produced by many other coating techniques (e.g. electroplating... SLADEK Index 1. Introduction 1.1 Implantation-Induced Effects - A Brief Review 1.1.1 Mechanical Properties 1.1.2 Friction and Wear 1.1.3 Oxidation and Corrosion 1.1.4 Ion Assisted Coatings 1.2 Thesis Structure 2. The Effects of Ion Beams...

  16. A micro-structured ion-implanted magnonic crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obry, Bjoern; Pirro, Philipp; Chumak, Andrii V.; Ciubotaru, Florin; Serga, Alexander A.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Braecher, Thomas; Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, D-67663 Kaiserslautern ; Osten, Julia; Fassbender, Juergen

    2013-05-20

    We investigate spin-wave propagation in a microstructured magnonic-crystal waveguide fabricated by localized ion implantation. The irradiation caused a periodic variation in the saturation magnetization along the waveguide. As a consequence, the spin-wave transmission spectrum exhibits a set of frequency bands, where spin-wave propagation is suppressed. A weak modification of the saturation magnetization by 7% is sufficient to decrease the spin-wave transmission in the band gaps by a factor of 10. These results evidence the applicability of localized ion implantation for the fabrication of efficient micron- and nano-sized magnonic crystals for magnon spintronic applications.

  17. In-vivo orthopedic implant diagnostic device for sensing load, wear, and infection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen; Thundat, Thomas G.; Komistek, Richard D.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Mahfouz, Mohamed

    2006-08-29

    A device for providing in vivo diagnostics of loads, wear, and infection in orthopedic implants having at least one load sensor associated with the implant, at least one temperature sensor associated with the implant, at least one vibration sensor associated with the implant, and at least one signal processing device operatively coupled with the sensors. The signal processing device is operable to receive the output signal from the sensors and transmit a signal corresponding with the output signal.

  18. Defects in Ge and Si caused by 1 MeV Si+ implantation*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Defects in Ge and Si caused by 1 MeV Si+ implantation* D. P. Hickeya Department of Materials defect formation and evolution in the 001 Ge and Si wafers implanted with 1 MeV Si+ and 40 keV Si dissolve at the projected range for nonamorphizing implants into Si. However, in Ge, no 311 defect

  19. Proton implanted singlemode holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choquette, Kent

    Proton implanted singlemode holey vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers P.O. Leisher, A.J. Danner of proton implant confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers. The index confinement and selective loss (both fundamental and non-fundamental) operation [9]. Although proton implantation for current

  20. Modeling of Printed Spiral Inductors for Remote Powering of Implantable Biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Modeling of Printed Spiral Inductors for Remote Powering of Implantable Biosensors Jacopo Olivo Lausanne - EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland email: jacopo.olivo@epfl.ch Abstract--Fully implantable biosensors of the patient and require a constant "telemetry" of his/her health status. Implantable biosensors represent

  1. Optimal Frequencies for Inductive Powering of Fully Implantable Biosensors for Chronic and Elderly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Optimal Frequencies for Inductive Powering of Fully Implantable Biosensors for Chronic and Elderly wirelessly to implanted biosensors. A system with an external transmitting coil located into a skin patch and a receiving coil embedded into a fully implanted biosensor is simulated. The effects of the geometry

  2. Design-optimization and material selection for a femoral-fracture fixation-plate implant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Design-optimization and material selection for a femoral-fracture fixation-plate implant M and if the design (including the material selected for the implant) are optimal (with respect to their size, weight and simulations Femoral-fracture fixed-plate implant Optimization a b s t r a c t The problem of size

  3. Bio-implantable passive on-chip RF-MEMS strain sensing resonators for orthopaedic applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Bio-implantable passive on-chip RF-MEMS strain sensing resonators for orthopaedic applications. Micromech. Microeng. 18 (2008) 115017 (9pp) doi:10.1088/0960-1317/18/11/115017 Bio-implantable passive on designed novel, bio-implantable, passive, on-chip, RF-MEMS strain sensors that rely on the resonance

  4. PERCOLATION AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM FILMS (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-435 PERCOLATION AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM FILMS (*) F. MEUNIER and P of Si and Ge in Al thin films at 8 K produces alloys exhibiting enhanced superconducting transition in the superconducting transition temperature Tc of several such alloys [2], [5], [6] : Josephson tunnelling

  5. Field emission study of cobalt ion implanted porous silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongbiao

    1995-01-01

    as an electrode in field emission applications. In this project, the formation of a CoSi2, conducting layer on porous silicon by high dose ion implantation while preserving the pore structure and field emission properties of the underlying porous silicon...

  6. Short communication Ion-implantation modification of lithiumphosphorus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    specific energy and low-power consumption of lithium-ion batteries [1­4]. Among all possible anodeShort communication Ion-implantation modification of lithium­phosphorus oxynitride thin to a reaction with the lithium metal, and the performance of a lithium battery starts to degrade [5,6]. Lithium

  7. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with established large-scale semiconductor technologies. Recently, scalable graphene growth methods, based, and it takes the graphene synthesis into the realm of large-scale semiconductor foundries. In the first stepPage 1 Graphene synthesis by ion implantation Slaven Garaj1 , William Hubbard2 , and J. A

  8. A Glucose Fuel Cell for Implantable Brain–Machine Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.

    We have developed an implantable fuel cell that generates power through glucose oxidation, producing 3:4 mW cm{2steady-state power and up to 180 mW cm{2 peak power. The fuel cell is manufactured using a novel approach, ...

  9. Biomaterials 26 (2005) 35113519 Fabrication and biocompatibility of polypyrrole implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sur, Mriganka

    2005-01-01

    Biomaterials 26 (2005) 3511­3519 Fabrication and biocompatibility of polypyrrole implants suitable www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterials 0142-9612/$ - see front matter r 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2004.09.037 ĂCorresponding authors. Division of Biological Engineering

  10. Rutherford backscattering analysis of gallium implanted 316 stainless steel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortensi, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Ion implantation of Ga ions into 316 stainless steel was performed at fluences ranging from 8x10ą? to 10ą? ions/cm˛. The depth profile of Ga in the steel was analyzed via Rutherford Backscattering and ToFSIMS. The surface effects were...

  11. Implanted adipose progenitor cells as physicochemical regulators of breast cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Itai

    Implanted adipose progenitor cells as physicochemical regulators of breast cancer Emily M that soluble factors from breast cancer cells inhibit adipogenic differentiation while increasing proliferation surgery for breast cancer, which compose the majority of the 93,000 breast reconstructions per- formed

  12. Method for implantation of high dopant concentrations in wide band gap materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Usov, Igor (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-09-15

    A method that combines alternate low/medium ion dose implantation with rapid thermal annealing at relatively low temperatures. At least one dopant is implanted in one of a single crystal and an epitaxial film of the wide band gap compound by a plurality of implantation cycles. The number of implantation cycles is sufficient to implant a predetermined concentration of the dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film. Each of the implantation cycles includes the steps of: implanting a portion of the predetermined concentration of the one dopant in one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film; annealing one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film and implanted portion at a predetermined temperature for a predetermined time to repair damage to one of the single crystal and the epitaxial film caused by implantation and activates the implanted dopant; and cooling the annealed single crystal and implanted portion to a temperature of less than about 100.degree. C. This combination produces high concentrations of dopants, while minimizing the defect concentration.

  13. Method of making silicon on insalator material using oxygen implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hite, Larry R. (Dallas, TX); Houston, Ted (Richardson, TX); Matloubian, Mishel (Dallas, TX)

    1989-01-01

    The described embodiments of the present invention provide a semiconductor on insulator structure providing a semiconductor layer less susceptible to single event upset errors (SEU) due to radiation. The semiconductor layer is formed by implanting ions which form an insulating layer beneath the surface of a crystalline semiconductor substrate. The remaining crystalline semiconductor layer above the insulating layer provides nucleation sites for forming a crystalline semiconductor layer above the insulating layer. The damage caused by implantation of the ions for forming an insulating layer is left unannealed before formation of the semiconductor layer by epitaxial growth. The epitaxial layer, thus formed, provides superior characteristics for prevention of SEU errors, in that the carrier lifetime within the epitaxial layer, thus formed, is less than the carrier lifetime in epitaxial layers formed on annealed material while providing adequate semiconductor characteristics.

  14. Ion implanted silicon solar cells with 18% conversion efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitzer, M.B.; Keavney, C.J.; Milstein, J.B.; Tobin, S.P.

    1984-05-01

    The results of research on the basic understanding of high efficiency in silicon solar cells are presented. It is shown that through the use of low resistivity silicon, texture-etching, ion implantation, surface passivation, and Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ antireflection coatings, very high performance can be obtained. Cells with 18% AMI conversion efficiency (100 mW/cm/sup 2/, 28/sup 0/C) are reported, and research to increase the performance to much higher levels is described.

  15. Annealing Behavior of Ion-implanted Nitrogen in D9 Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arunkumar, J.; David, C.; Nair, K. G. M.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Magudapathy, P.; Kennedy, John

    2011-07-15

    Nitrogen isotope N{sup 15} was implanted at the sub-surface of D9 steel. The resonance nuclear reaction analysis was used to probe the implanted nitrogen as a function of depth. The as-implanted D9 sample was isochronally annealed and by observing the broadening of nitrogen depth profile at various annealing junctures, activation energy for nitrogen diffusion in steel was deduced.

  16. Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Ion Sources for High Energy Ion Implantation at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

  17. An extensive analysis of modified nanotube surfaces for next-generation orthopedic implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Christine Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    nanostructured cubic zirconia. arXiv.org, 13. Biggs, M.J. ,et al. , Bioactivity of zirconia nanotube arrays fabricatedcrosslinked UHMWPE and zirconia implants in knee simulation.

  18. Ion Implantation 10~100 keV/cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    FractionofactivatedCO2,Fa(%) NC out (CO2) Fa NC out (Ar) Fig. 3 Fraction of activated CO2 molecules Fa, and numberIon Implantation 1,000 CO2 100 keV µm (1,2) AFM CO2 Ar CO2 4 Ar (2) 10~100 keV/cluster Ar CO2 Langevin 300 K Ar961 (CO2)960 40 K CO2 Inter- CO2 L-J Verlet 2 ps 0.2 fs 0.5 fs 122Ĺ 182Ĺ (a) 0.3 ps (b) 0

  19. High-efficiency ion-implanted silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitzer, M.B.; Tobin, S.P.

    1984-05-01

    The development of solar cells with AM1 coversion efficiency of 18 percent is reported. The cells comprise an n/sup +/-p-p/sup +/ structure fabricated from float zone silicon having resistivity of 0.3 ..cap omega.. cm. The n/sup +/ and p/sup +/ regions are formed by low energy ion implantation and thermal annealing. An important feature of cell fabrication is the growth of SiO/sub 2/ passivation for reduction of surface recombination velocity. Details of both cell fabrication and testing are reported.

  20. Characterization of an RF plasma ion source for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopalidis, Peter M.; Wan Zhimin

    2012-11-06

    A novel inductively coupled RF plasma ion source has been developed for use in a beamline ion implanter. Ion density data have been taken with an array of four Langmuir probes spaced equally at the source extraction arc slit. These provide ion density uniformity information as a function of source pressure, RF power and gas mixture composition. In addition, total extracted ion beam current data are presented for the same conditions. The comparative advantages of the RF source in terms of higher beam current, reduced maintenance and overall productivity improvement compared to a hot cathode source are discussed.

  1. Superconductivity in Metal-mixed Ion-Implanted Polymer Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Micolich; E. Tavenner; B. J. Powell; A. R. Hamilton; M. T. Curry; R. E. Giedd; P. Meredith

    2006-03-15

    Ion-implantation of normally insulating polymers offers an alternative to depositing conjugated organics onto plastic films to make electronic circuits. We used a 50 keV nitrogen ion beam to mix a thin 10 nm Sn/Sb alloy film into the sub-surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and report the low temperature properties of this material. We observed metallic behavior, and the onset of superconductivity below 3 K. There are strong indications that the superconductivity does not result from a residual thin-film of alloy, but instead from a network of alloy grains coupled via a weakly conducting, ion-beam carbonized polymer matrix.

  2. Combined Experimental and Statistical Model to Understand the Role of Anatomical and Implant Alignment Variables in Guiding Knee Joint Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mane, Amitkumar M.

    2012-05-31

    Kinematics variation is the inheritant part of the joint mechanics; factors such as patient anatomy, joint loading and implant alignments are all variable in nature. Improvement in the design of orthopedic implants requires ...

  3. Ion Implantation in Ge: Structural and electrical investigation of the induced lattice damage & Study of the lattice location of implanted impurities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decoster, Stefan; Wahl, Ulrich

    The past two decades, germanium has drawn international attention as one of the most promising materials to replace silicon in semiconductor applications. Due to important advantages with respect to Si, such as the increased electron and hole mobility, Ge is well on its way to become an important material in future high-speed integrated circuits. Although the interest in this elemental group IV semiconductor is increasing rapidly nowadays, the number of publications about this material is still relatively scarce, especially when compared to Si. The most widely used technique to dope semiconductors is ion implantation, due to its good control of the dopant concentration and profile, and the isotopic purity of the implanted species. However, there is a major lack of knowledge of the fundamental properties of ion implantation in Ge, which has triggered the research presented in this thesis. One of the most important and generally unwanted properties of ion implantation is the creation of damage to the crystal la...

  4. Micro-fabrication of high-thickness spiral inductors for the remote powering of implantable biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    biosensors Jacopo Olivo , Sandro Carrara, Giovanni De Micheli Integrated Circuits Laboratory, EPFL ­ École Keywords: High-thickness inductors Inductive link Remote powering Implantable biosensors Ordyl a b s t r for the remote power- ing of implantable biosensors through inductive link. The process is suitable for different

  5. Photoluminescence and reflectance measurements on annealed porous silicon implanted with nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photoluminescence and reflectance measurements on annealed porous silicon implanted with nitrogen and 1000 °C. Photoluminescence (PL) and reflectance measurements on the implanted samples for wavelengths. After annealing, the reflectance decreased in the UV region up to 600 °C. Above 800 °C

  6. Title: Predictors of 6-months clinical poor outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Title: Predictors of 6-months clinical poor outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve.acvd.2013.10.005 #12;2 Abstract Background: Patients' selection for transcatheter aortic valve implantation institution with a transcatheter-implanted aortic valve were prospectively followed. Our population

  7. Mass and charge overlaps in beamline implantation into compound semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Current, M. I.; Eddy, R.; Hudak, C.; Serfass, J.; Mount, G.

    2012-11-06

    Mass overlaps occurring as a result of extraction of ions from an arc discharge and gas collisions, producing molecular break up and charge exchange in the accelerator beamline, are examined for ion implantation into compound semiconductors. The effects of the choice of plasma gas elements for Be{sup +} implants are examined as an example.

  8. "In Vivo" Pose Estimation of Artificial Knee Implants Using Computer Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, William A.

    "In Vivo" Pose Estimation of Artificial Knee Implants Using Computer Vision Scott A. Walker William an algorithm to estimate the position and orientation (pose) of artificial knee implants from fluoroscopy images using computer vision. The resulting information is used to determine contact position from "in

  9. The Case for a Generic Implant Processor Christos Strydis, Georgi N. Gaydadjiev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , energy expenditure and instruction mixes are presented and analyzed. The suitability of such an implant processor and directions for future work are given. Index Terms-- implant, low power, low energy of heavy public demands but a severely constrained public budget, the only feasible alternative to cutting

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotube growth from ion implanted Fe catalyst Yongho Choi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ural, Ant

    the growth of carbon nanotubes. Typically, transition metal nanoparticles, such as nickel Ni , iron FeSingle-walled carbon nanotube growth from ion implanted Fe catalyst Yongho Choi Department-walled carbon nanotubes can be grown by chemical vapor deposition from ion implanted iron catalyst

  11. RADIATION BELTS AND SUBSTORM PARTICLE INJECTIONS Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and LASP, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303-7814, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    1 RADIATION BELTS AND SUBSTORM PARTICLE INJECTIONS Xinlin Li Department of Aerospace Engineering belt particles in the Earth's magnetosphere is briefly reviewed, with a focus on the radiation belt energies are presented and the acceleration mecha- nisms for radiation belt electrons are discussed. 1

  12. The Advanced Coatings Lab is located at the National Center for Aviation Training and specializes in research, development and testing of aerospace coatings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Advanced Coatings Lab is located at the National Center for Aviation Training and specializes in research, development and testing of aerospace coatings. ADVANCED COATINGS LAB CAPABILITIES ·New coatings coatings ·Materials/process evaluation and optimization ·Coatings application process improvement ·Product

  13. Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue composites are inherited lighter than their metallic counterparts resulting in significant weight reduction of the aircraft/vehicle which means improved fuel efficiency, less air pollution and smaller carbon footprint

  14. Entry Level Image Science and Software Engineer Positions Available UTC Aerospace Systems (UTAS) has a number of entry-level full-time positions available now for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Entry Level Image Science and Software Engineer Positions Available UTC Aerospace Systems (UTAS both algorithm development and applied image science specialties. Software Engineer position seeks.utcaerospacesystemscareers.com/jobs/descriptions/image-scientist--westford-ma-job-4990187 Software Engineer (image processing focus): http://www.utcaerospacesystemscareers.com/jobs/descriptions/associate-software-engineer

  15. Advanced composites are being widely used in aerospace applications due to their high stiffness, strength and energy absorption capabilities. However, the assurance of structural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is placed on modeling the nonlinearity and failure of both polymer matrix and ceramic matrix compositesAdvanced composites are being widely used in aerospace applications due to their high stiffness issue because a damage event will compromise the integrity of composite structures and lead to ultimate

  16. The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

  17. Implantable device for in-vivo intracranial and cerebrospinal fluid pressure monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ericson, Milton N. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Hylton, James O. (Clinton, TN)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  18. Selective compositional mixing in GaAs/AIGaAs superlattice induced by low dose Si focused ion beam implantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    of the mixing process was observed at 100 keV implantation energy, with a "pinch-off" (more heavily mixed ion beam (FIB) implantation technology has been especially attractive in this application, since/or transfer technology, the lateral profiles of the ion beam (and of the ions implanted in the solid

  19. Modeling of electrodes and implantable pulse generator cases for the analysis of implant tip heating under MR imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acikel, Volkan Atalar, Ergin; Uslubas, Ali

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The authors’ purpose is to model the case of an implantable pulse generator (IPG) and the electrode of an active implantable medical device using lumped circuit elements in order to analyze their effect on radio frequency induced tissue heating problem during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Methods: In this study, IPG case and electrode are modeled with a voltage source and impedance. Values of these parameters are found using the modified transmission line method (MoTLiM) and the method of moments (MoM) simulations. Once the parameter values of an electrode/IPG case model are determined, they can be connected to any lead, and tip heating can be analyzed. To validate these models, both MoM simulations and MR experiments were used. The induced currents on the leads with the IPG case or electrode connections were solved using the proposed models and the MoTLiM. These results were compared with the MoM simulations. In addition, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor. The dissipated power on the electrode was calculated using the MoTLiM by changing the inductance and the results were compared with the specific absorption rate results that were obtained using MoM. Then, MRI experiments were conducted to test the IPG case and the electrode models. To test the IPG case, a bare lead was connected to the case and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the lead was measured by changing the lead length. The power at the lead tip for the same scenario was also calculated using the IPG case model and MoTLiM. Then, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the electrode was measured by changing the inductance and compared with the dissipated power on the electrode resistance. Results: The induced currents on leads with the IPG case or electrode connection were solved for using the combination of the MoTLiM and the proposed lumped circuit models. These results were compared with those from the MoM simulations. The mean square error was less than 9%. During the MRI experiments, when the IPG case was introduced, the resonance lengths were calculated to have an error less than 13%. Also the change in tip temperature rise at resonance lengths was predicted with less than 4% error. For the electrode experiments, the value of the matching impedance was predicted with an error less than 1%. Conclusions: Electrical models for the IPG case and electrode are suggested, and the method is proposed to determine the parameter values. The concept of matching of the electrode to the lead is clarified using the defined electrode impedance and the lead Thevenin impedance. The effect of the IPG case and electrode on tip heating can be predicted using the proposed theory. With these models, understanding the tissue heating due to the implants becomes easier. Also, these models are beneficial for implant safety testers and designers. Using these models, worst case conditions can be determined and the corresponding implant test experiments can be planned.

  20. Investigation of Donor and Acceptor Ion Implantation in AlN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osinsky, Andrei

    2015-09-16

    AlGaN alloys with high Al composition and AlN based electronic devices are attractive for high voltage, high temperature applications, including microwave power sources, power switches and communication systems. AlN is of particular interest because of its wide bandgap of ~6.1eV which is ideal for power electronic device applications in extreme environments which requires high dose ion implantation. One of the major challenges that need to be addressed to achieve full utilization of AlN for opto and microelectronic applications is the development of a doping strategy for both donors and acceptors. Ion implantation is a particularly attractive approach since it allows for selected-area doping of semiconductors due to its high spatial and dose control and its high throughput capability. Active layers in the semiconductor are created by implanting a dopant species followed by very high temperature annealing to reduce defects and thereby activate the dopants. Recovery of implant damage in AlN requires excessively high temperature. In this SBIR program we began the investigation by simulation of ion beam implantation profiles for Mg, Ge and Si in AlN over wide dose and energy ranges. Si and Ge are implanted to achieve the n-type doping, Mg is investigated as a p-type doping. The simulation of implantation profiles were performed in collaboration between NRL and Agnitron using a commercial software known as Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM). The simulation results were then used as the basis for ion implantation of AlN samples. The implanted samples were annealed by an innovative technique under different conditions and evaluated along the way. Raman spectroscopy and XRD were used to determine the crystal quality of the implanted samples, demonstrating the effectiveness of annealing in removing implant induced damage. Additionally, SIMS was used to verify that a nearly uniform doping profile was achieved near the sample surface. The electrical characteristics of the implanted samples were evaluated by TLM and Hall techniques. Generally, the implanted samples before and after annealing were found to be very resistive. Further work is required before the superior properties of AlN can be fully utilized.

  1. The local structure and ferromagnetism in Fe-implanted SrTiO? single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobacheva, O. Chavarha, M.; Yiu, Y. M.; Sham, T. K.; Goncharova, L. V.

    2014-07-07

    We report a connection between the local structure of low-level Fe impurities and vacancies as the cause of ferromagnetic behavior observed in strontium titanate single crystals (STO), which were implanted with Fe and Si ions at different doses then annealed in oxygen. The effects of Fe doping and post-implantation annealing of STO were studied by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. XANES spectra for Fe and Ti K- and L-edge reveal the changes in the local environment of Fe and Ti following the implantation and annealing steps. The annealing in oxygen atmosphere partially healed implantation damages and changed the oxidation state of the implanted iron from metallic Fe? to Fe˛?/Feł? oxide. The STO single crystals were weak ferromagnets prior to implantation. The maximum saturation moment was obtained after our highest implantation dose of 2×10ą? Fe atom/cm˛, which could be correlated with the metallic Fe? phases in addition to the presence of O/Ti vacancies. After recrystallization annealing, the ferromagnetic response disappears. Iron oxide phases with Fe˛? and Feł? corresponding to this regime were identified and confirmed by calculations using Real Space Multiple Scattering program (FEFF9).

  2. Versatile, high-sensitivity faraday cup array for ion implanters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musket, Ronald G. (Danville, CA); Patterson, Robert G. (Dublin, CA)

    2003-01-01

    An improved Faraday cup array for determining the dose of ions delivered to a substrate during ion implantation and for monitoring the uniformity of the dose delivered to the substrate. The improved Faraday cup array incorporates a variable size ion beam aperture by changing only an insertable plate that defines the aperture without changing the position of the Faraday cups which are positioned for the operation of the largest ion beam aperture. The design enables the dose sensitivity range, typically 10.sup.11 -10.sup.18 ions/cm.sup.2 to be extended to below 10.sup.6 ions/cm.sup.2. The insertable plate/aperture arrangement is structurally simple and enables scaling to aperture areas between <1 cm.sup.2 and >750 cm.sup.2, and enables ultra-high vacuum (UHV) applications by incorporation of UHV-compatible materials.

  3. Characterization of few-layered graphene grown by carbon implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kin Kiong; McCallum, Jeffrey C.; Jamieson, David N. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2014-02-21

    Graphene is considered to be a very promising material for applications in nanotechnology. The properties of graphene are strongly dependent on defects that occur during growth and processing. These defects can be either detrimental or beneficial to device performance depending on defect type, location and device application. Here we present experimental results on formation of few-layered graphene by carbon ion implantation into nickel films and characteristics of graphene devices formed by graphene transfer and lithographic patterning. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the number of graphene layers formed and identify defects arising from the device processing. The graphene films were cleaned by annealing in vacuum. Transport properties of cleaned graphene films were investigated by fabrication of back-gated field-effect transistors, which exhibited high hole and electron mobility of 1935 and 1905 cm2/Vs, respectively.

  4. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genebes, Caroline; Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre; Jonca, Frédéric; Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  5. Simplified modeling methods for mechanically fastened connections in flight structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Brett Andrew

    2012-01-01

    7 2.1.1 Industry Standards for Bolt and Rivet2 Figure 2-1: Industry Standard Bolt Head Styles (fashion that moves from industry standards and current state

  6. Headmark List of Suspect Counterfeit Fasteners 1992 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMatFermiGuidoEnvironmentalA viewWhat does0

  7. Korea Parts and Fasteners KPF Plextronics JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectric Cooperative Jump to: navigation,KoreSteel

  8. Korea Parts and Fasteners KPF | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectric Cooperative Jump to: navigation,KoreSteelKPF

  9. Development of Steel Fastener Nano-Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8,Department of Energy2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells0

  10. Emergency delivery of Vasopressin from an implantable MEMS rapid drug delivery device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho Duc, Hong Linh, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    An implantable rapid drug delivery device based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology was designed, fabricated and validated for the in vivo rapid delivery of vasopressin in a rabbit model. In vitro ...

  11. The Effect of Electrode Placement on Cochlear Implant Function and Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Sandra

    2013-12-31

    can be preserved resulting in combined low frequency auditory perception and mid- to high-frequency electric perception resulting in electro-acoustic stimulation (EAS). Despite the improvements in cochlear implantation, outcomes continue to vary...

  12. Low power data acquisition for microImplant biometric monitoring of tremors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanna, Tania

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide doctors a means to continuously monitor biometrics over long time scales ...

  13. An Implantable MEMS Drug Delivery Device for Rapid Delivery in Ambulatory Emergency Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elman, Noel

    We introduce the first implantable drug delivery system based on MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems) technology specifically designed as a platform for treatment in ambulatory emergency care. The device is named ...

  14. Energy management techniques for ultra-small bio-medical implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, William R

    2012-01-01

    Trends in the medical industry have created a growing demand for implantable medical devices. In particular, the need to provide medical professionals a means to continuously monitor bio-markers over long time scales with ...

  15. Electro-mechanical characterization of piezo-metallic cellular solids for spine implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perea Camargo, Rodrigo Dennis

    2010-04-15

    ceramics were electrically rectified and then compared to previous direct electrical current stimulators that have proven to enhance bone osteogenesis [1]. The feasibility to create implants that mimic the mechanical behavior of its environment and present...

  16. From plasma immersion ion implantation to deposition: A historical perspective on principles and trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2001-01-01

    implantation. Both metal arc plasma and bias voltage wereused and patented cathodic arc plasma coating [10]. Edison’spower load of a continuous arc plasma led to damage of the

  17. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics, technology, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-01-01

    implantation using vacuum arc plasma sources," J. Vac. Sci.deposition using vacuum arc plasma sources," J. Vac. Sci.was found in cathodic-arc generated plasma [25] because such

  18. Heart-to-Heart (H2H): Authentication for Implanted Medical Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -bearing patient. Based on statistical anal- ysis of real-world data, we propose and analyze new techniques, and implantable drug pumps. Powered IMDs generally contain radios for communication with external devices called

  19. Low-temperature charge transport in Ga-acceptor nanowires implanted by focused-ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, SJ

    2008-01-01

    3 ) through an 11-nm oxide layer. 10 The beam density duringemission images of the oxide layers, and they are typicallyJVD) 23 over the 11-nm oxide layer of the Ga-implanted

  20. Aluminum plasma immersion ion implantation in polymers M. Ueda a,*, I.H. Tan a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by a thin metal oxide layer on the polymerŐs surface. Metal implantation followed by oxidation if a metal oxide layer is formed in the surface. This can be achieved after implan- tation of metallic ions

  1. Microfluidic Integration into Neural Implants University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    Microfluidic Integration into Neural Implants E. Meng1 1 University of Southern California, Los technological deficiencies can be addressed by integrating microfluidics with electrodes and electrochemical sensors. Multimodality neural interfaces that combine electronics and microfluidics open new possibilities

  2. Development and evaluation of an implantable chronic DC stimulation and measurement probe for nerve regeneration studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macha, Douglas Bryan

    1995-01-01

    isotropic. The actual field strength or current density induced by the applied current is seldom directly measured in-vivo. This research seeks to evaluate the design of an implantable DC stimulator capable of delivering a constant, stable and measurable...

  3. An energy management IC for bio-implants using ultracapacitors for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, William R.

    We present the first known energy management IC to allow low-power systems, such as biomedical implants, to optimally use ultracapacitors instead of batteries as their chief energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in ...

  4. Mechanical characterization and in vivo operation of an implantable drug delivery MEMS device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yawen, 1972-

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to advance an implantable drug delivery MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) device developed in our laboratory. This device was designed to locally deliver multiple substances in complex release ...

  5. RHEED, AES and XPS studies of the passive films formed on ion implanted stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, C.R.; Doss, K.G.K.; Wang, Y.F.; Warren, J.B.; Hubler, G.K.

    1981-12-01

    P-implantation (10/sup 17/ ions cm/sup -2/, 40 KeV) into 304 stainless steel (ss) has been carried out, and an amorphous surface alloy was formed. Polarization studies in deaerated 1N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/+ 2% NaCl showed that P-implantation improved both the general and localized corrosion resistance of 304 ss. A comparative study has been carried out between the implanted and unimplanted steel to determine what influence P-implantation has upon the properties of the passive film formed 1N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The influence of Cl ions on pre-formed passive films was also studied. RHEED, XPS and AES were used to evaluate the nature of the passive films formed in these studies.

  6. ToF-SIMS Investigations on Dental Implant Materials and Adsorbed Protein Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernsmann, Falk

    2011-01-01

    In this work the two experimental dental implant materials FAT and FAW, made of fluoroapatite particles embedded in polymer matrices, and films of the proteins lysozyme, amylase and bovine serum albumin (BSA), adsorbed to the two dental implant materials, were investigated with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and the multivariate data analysis technique discriminant principal component analysis (DPCA).

  7. Real-time Optimization Method for Optical Parameters of Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogata, Seiji [ULVAC, Inc., Research and Development Div., 2500 Hagizono Chigasaki Kanagawa 253-8543 (Japan); Nishihashi, Tsutomu; Tonari, Kazuhiko [ULVAC, Inc., Inst. Semiconductor Technology, 1220-1 Suyama Susono Shizuoka 410-1231 (Japan); Yokoo, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Hideo; Hisamune, Takeshi [ULVAC, Inc., Semiconductor Equipment Div. 2, 1220-14 Suyama Susono Shizuoka 410-1231 (Japan); Araki, Masasumi [ULVAC, Inc., Software Development Control Solution Div., Hagizono Chigasaki Kanagawa 253-8543 (Japan)

    2006-11-13

    Real-time optimization for optical parameters, such as applied voltage to the electrostatic quadrupole lens, has been realized by using newly developed high-speed computation algorithm for charged particle beams. The virtual optimization code has been incorporated in the control system of SOPHI-200, which is the ULVAC'S new medium current ion implanter. Automatic setup within 5minutes is achieved for any recipe of implantation.

  8. Magnetic Processing – A Pervasive Energy Efficient Technology for Next Generation Materials for Aerospace and Specialty Steel Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Ludtka, G.M.; Ray, P.; Magee, J.

    2010-09-10

    Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing is an exceptionally fertile, pervasive and cross-cutting technology that is just now being recognized by several major industry leaders for its significant potential to increase energy efficiency and materials performance for a myriad of energy intensive industries in a variety of areas and applications. ORNL has pioneered the use and development of large magnetic fields in thermomagnetically processing (T-MP) materials for altering materials phase equilibria and transformation kinetics. ORNL has discovered that using magnetic fields, we can produce unique materials responses. T-MP can produce unique phase stabilities & microstructures with improved materials performance for structural and functional applications not achieved with traditional processing techniques. These results suggest that there are unprecedented opportunities to produce significantly enhanced materials properties via atomistic level (nano-) microstructural control and manipulation. ORNL (in addition to others) have shown that grain boundary chemistry and precipitation kinetics are also affected by large magnetic fields. This CRADA has taken advantage of ORNL’s unique, custom-designed thermo-magnetic, 9 Tesla superconducting magnet facility that enables rapid heating and cooling of metallic components within the magnet bore; as well as ORNL’s expertise in high magnetic field (HMF) research. Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is a a US-based industrial company, that provides enhanced performance alloys for the Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. In this CRADA, Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is focusing on applying ORNL’s Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing (TMP) technology to improve their current and future proprietary materials’ product performance and open up new markets for their Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. Unprecedented mechanical property performance improvements have been demonstrated for a high strength bainitic alloy industrial/commercial alloy that is envisioned to provide the potential for new markets for this alloy. These thermomechanical processing results provide these alloys with a major breakthrough demonstrating that simultaneous improvements in yield strength and ductility are achieved: 12 %, 10%, 13%, and 22% increases in yield strength, elongation, reduction-in-area, and impact energy respectively. In addition, TMP appears to overcome detrimental chemical homogeneity impacts on uniform microstructure evolution.

  9. Charging and discharging in ion implanted dielectric films used for capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical systems switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Gang; Chen Xuyuan [Pen-Tung Sah Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Faculty of Science and Engineering, Vestfold University College, P.O. Box 2243, N-3103 Toensberg (Norway); San Haisheng [Pen-Tung Sah Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2009-06-15

    In this work, metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor structure was used to investigate the dielectric charging and discharging in the capacitive radio frequency microelectromechanical switches. The insulator in MIS structure is silicon nitride films (SiN), which were deposited by either low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) processes. Phosphorus or boron ions were implanted into dielectric layer in order to introduce impurity energy levels into the band gap of SiN. The relaxation processes of the injected charges in SiN were changed due to the ion implantation, which led to the change in relaxation time of the trapped charges. In our experiments, the space charges were introduced by stressing the sample electrically with dc biasing. The effects of implantation process on charge accumulation and dissipation in the dielectric are studied by capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement qualitatively and quantitatively. The experimental results show that the charging and discharging behavior of the ion implanted silicon nitride films deposited by LPCVD is quite different from the one deposited by PECVD. The charge accumulation in the dielectric film can be reduced by ion implantation with proper dielectric deposition method.

  10. An Efficient Molecular Dynamics Scheme for Predicting Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1998-09-15

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating the concentration profile of dopants implanted in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. The program incorporates methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model, instead of the binary collision approximation (BCA) used in implant simulators such as TRIM and Marlowe, to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and screened Coulomb potentials. Inelastic energy loss is accounted for using a Firsov model, and electronic stopping is described by a Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains the single adjustable parameter for the entire scheme. Thus, the program is easily extensible to new ion-target combinations with the minimum of tuning, and is predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy, large angle implants, and for situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using their code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon, silicon-germanium blends, and gallium-arsenide. They can predict the experimental profiles over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  11. Long-term survival and maturation of spinally grafted human fetal and embryonic stem cellderived neural precursors in implantable tacrolimus pellet- immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-G93A model rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Danielle S.

    2012-01-01

    after Tacrolimus releasable pellet implantation. Rats werein implantable tacrolimus pellet-immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-releasing Tacrolimus pellets……………………………. 12 3.2 Tolerability

  12. Patterned Exfoliation of GaAs Based on Masked Helium Implantation and Subsequent Rapid Thermal Annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, H. J.; Choi, H. W.; Kim, G. D.; Hong, W.; Kim, J. K.

    2009-03-10

    A method of patterning single crystal GaAs based on ion implantation induced selective area exfoliation is suggested. Samples were implanted with 200-500 keV helium ions to a fluence range of 2-4x10{sup 16} He{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at room temperature through masks of Ni mesh (40 {mu}m opening) or stainless steel wire (50 {mu}m in diameter), and subsequent rapid thermal annealing at 350-500{open_square} resulted in expulsion of ion beam exposed material. The influences of ion energy, ion fluence, implantation temperature, subsequent annealing conditions (temperature and ramp rate), and mask pattern and its orientation with GaAs lattice on the patterned exfoliation were examined.

  13. Low-dislocation-density silicon-on-insulator material produced by sequential oxygen implantation and low-temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Low-dislocation-density silicon-on-insulator material produced by sequential oxygen implantation and low-temperature annealing D. Venables and K. S. Jones Department of Materials Science and Engineering. The development of cavities upon annealing was used in a sequential-implantation and low

  14. XPS, AES and SEM analysis of recent dental implants Byung-Soo Kang a,*, Young-Taeg Sul a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Se-Jung

    XPS, AES and SEM analysis of recent dental implants Byung-Soo Kang a,*, Young-Taeg Sul a , Se-Jung Oh b , Hyun-Ju Lee c , Tomas Albrektsson a a Department of Biomaterials/Handicap Research, Institute a development strategy for dental implants. The present study investigated the chemistry and morphology

  15. Percutaneous Transcatheter One-Step Mechanical Aortic Disc Valve Prosthesis Implantation: A Preliminary Feasibility Study in Swine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sochman, Jan [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Intensive Care Unit, Clinic of Cardiology (Czech Republic)], E-mail: jan.sochman@medicon.cz; Peregrin, Jan H.; Rocek, Miloslav [Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Czech Republic); Timmermans, Hans A.; Pavcnik, Dusan; Roesch, Josef [Oregon Health and Sciences University, Dotter Interventional Institute (United States)

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of one-step implantation of a new type of stent-based mechanical aortic disc valve prosthesis (MADVP) above and across the native aortic valve and its short-term function in swine with both functional and dysfunctional native valves. Methods. The MADVP consisted of a folding disc valve made of silicone elastomer attached to either a nitinol Z-stent (Z model) or a nitinol cross-braided stent (SX model). Implantation of 10 MADVPs (6 Z and 4 SX models) was attempted in 10 swine: 4 (2 Z and 2 SX models) with a functional native valve and 6 (4 Z and 2 SX models) with aortic regurgitation induced either by intentional valve injury or by MADVP placement across the native valve. MADVP function was observed for up to 3 hr after implantation. Results. MADVP implantation was successful in 9 swine. One animal died of induced massive regurgitation prior to implantation. Four MADVPs implanted above functioning native valves exhibited good function. In 5 swine with regurgitation, MADVP implantation corrected the induced native valve dysfunction and the device's continuous good function was observed in 4 animals. One MADVP (SX model) placed across native valve gradually migrated into the left ventricle. Conclusion. The tested MADVP can be implanted above and across the native valve in a one-step procedure and can replace the function of the regurgitating native valve. Further technical development and testing are warranted, preferably with a manufactured MADVP.

  16. Int. Conf. Neural Inf. Proc., ICONIP '96, Hongkong, Sept. 1996 Concerning the development of retina implants with neural nets *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    implants for blind humans suffering from various retinal degenerative diseases to regain a moderate amount (RE) outside the eye has to replace the information processing of the retina. A retina stimulator (RS), implanted adjacent to the retinal ganglion cell layer at the retinal `output', has to contact a sufficient

  17. Controlled removal of ceramic surfaces with combination of ions implantation and ultrasonic energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rankin, Janet (Providence, RI); Thevenard, Paul (Caluire, FR); Romana, Laurence J. (Gaudeloupe Antilles, FR)

    1995-01-01

    A method for tailoring or patterning the surface of ceramic articles is provided by implanting ions to predetermined depth into the ceramic material at a selected surface location with the ions being implanted at a fluence and energy adequate to damage the lattice structure of the ceramic material for bi-axially straining near-surface regions of the ceramic material to the predetermined depth. The resulting metastable near-surface regions of the ceramic material are then contacted with energy pulses from collapsing, ultrasonically-generated cavitation bubbles in a liquid medium for removing to a selected depth the ion-damaged near-surface regions containing the bi-axially strained lattice structure from the ceramic body. Additional patterning of the selected surface location on the ceramic body is provided by implanting a high fluence of high-energy, relatively-light ions at selected surface sites for relaxing the bi-axial strain in the near-surface regions defined by these sites and thereby preventing the removal of such ion-implanted sites by the energy pulses from the collapsing ultrasonic cavitation bubbles.

  18. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Minggang, E-mail: xiamg@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanostructure and its Physics Properties, Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 China (China); Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Cheng, Zhaofang; Han, Jinyun; Zhang, Shengli [Laboratory of Nanostructure and its Physics Properties, Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 China (China); Zheng, Minrui [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Sow, Chorng-Haur [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); National University of Singapore Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Thong, John T. L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Li, Baowen [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); National University of Singapore Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-05-15

    The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga{sup +} implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 × 10{sup 3} ?{sup ?1}m{sup ?1} to 1.46 × 10{sup 4} ?{sup ?1}m{sup ?1} and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} to 1.22 Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga{sup +} implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga{sup +} point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga{sup +}-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  19. ENHANCEMENT OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION TEMPERATURES IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM ALLOYS (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-287 ENHANCEMENT OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSITION TEMPERATURES IN ION-IMPLANTED ALUMINIUM ALLOYS helium temperatures, have maximum superconducting transition temperatures Tc of 4.2 K (C), 7.35 K (Ge 1976, Classification Physics Abstracts 7.188 - 8.362 One of the crucial problems in superconductivity

  20. SUPERCONDUCTING PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM THIN FILMS AFTER ION IMPLANTATION AT LIQUID HELIUM TEMPERATURES (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-271 SUPERCONDUCTING PROPERTIES OF ALUMINIUM THIN FILMS AFTER ION IMPLANTATION AT LIQUID HELIUM concentration near AlH2. It is well-known [1] that the superconducting transition temperature Tc of metals as in the electronic density of states N(O) at the Fermi surface. In the case of weak-coupling superconductors

  1. A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    A Universal Level Converter Towards the Realization of Energy Efficient Implantable Drug Delivery VLSI Design and CAD Laboratory (VDCL), University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA. 2 Electrical many side effects, such as reduction in battery life time, increase in operating tempera- ture

  2. Micropower Integrated Bioamplifier and Auto-ranging ADC for Wireless and Implantable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cauwenberghs, Gert

    -resolution biopotential data ac- quisition circuit for wireless and implantable medical instrumen- tation is presented in a biopotential acquisition system. For miniature wireless battery powered devices, minimizing the power integrated solutions for multi-channel biopotential recordings using the approach of a low noise preamplifier

  3. A Wireless Power Interface for Rechargeable Battery Operated Neural Recording Implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    A Wireless Power Interface for Rechargeable Battery Operated Neural Recording Implants Pengfei Li. The battery charger employs a new control loop that relaxes comparator resolution require- ments, provides-of- charge accuracy can be obtained under worst-case conditions for a comparator offset voltage of ±5m

  4. Influence of halo implant on leakage current and sheet resistance of ultrashallow p-n junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroder, Dieter K.

    generation in the near-surface end-of-range damaged layer enhanced by trap-assisted tunneling. The reduced increase for USJs formed in halo-implanted profiles is explained by high electron and hole recombination should be addressed; electronic mail: vladimirf@frontiersemi.com 1588 1588J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 25

  5. Optimal drug release schedule for in-situ radiosensitization of image guided permanent prostate implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    of image guided 125 I prostate brachytherapy. Spacers used in permanent implants may be manufactured from such a constraint, is not known. This work determines the optimal elution schedules for 125 I prostate brachytherapy. The interaction between brachytherapy dose distributions and drug distribution around drug eluting spacers

  6. Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1998 AER excision and bead implantation. Fertilized chicken eggs (SPAFAS) were

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Nature © Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1998 8 AER excision and bead implantation. Fertilized chicken, the AER from the right forelimb was surgically excised and the embryo was incubated for the time specified of a stage-20 forelimb from which the AER was excised. Virus preparation and infections. An EcoRI fragment

  7. Design-Optimization and Material Selection for a Proximal Radius Fracture-Fixation Implant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Design-Optimization and Material Selection for a Proximal Radius Fracture-Fixation Implant M: 7 December 2009) The problem of optimal size, shape, and placement of a proximal radius-fracture fixation-plate is addressed computationally using a combined finite-element/design-optimization procedure

  8. Reducing the impact of wind noise on cochlear implant processors with two microphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Cox, Casey

    2014-04-17

    Behind-the-ear (BTE) processors of cochlear implant (CI) devices offer little to almost no protection from wind noise in most incidence angles. To assess speech intelligibility, eight CI recipients were tested in 3 and 9m/s wind. Results indicated...

  9. Reducing the impact of wind noise on cochlear implant processors with two microphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Cox, Casey

    2014-04-02

    Behind-the-ear (BTE) processors of cochlear implant (CI) devices offer little to almost no protection from wind noise in most incidence angles. To assess speech intelligibility, eight CI recipients were tested in 3 and 9?m/s wind. Results indicated...

  10. Research paper A novel perfusion-based method for cochlear implant electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Elizabeth S.

    . Additionally, implants often span only the basal turn. In the present study we report on the development in scala vestibuli (SV) and the round window (RW) membrane is opened. A flow of diluted Sodium Hyaluronate (also known as Hyaluronic Acid, (HA)) is set up from the RW to the SV opening using a perfusion pump

  11. IronIC Patch: A Wearable Device for the Remote Powering and Connectivity of Implantable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    by two rechargeable lithium-ion polymer batteries and has an autonomy of 10 h in stand-by mode and about to not cause discomfort. Batteries are usually a bottleneck in the miniaturization process. Moreover sources surrounding the person to provide energy to implanted batteries [2, 3]. Thus, batteries can

  12. Electronic Implants: Power Delivery and Jacopo Olivo, Sara S. Ghoreishizadeh, Sandro Carrara, and Giovanni De Micheli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    increased capabilities with respect to those available in the past. As an example, lithium-ion batteries of an implantable sensor strongly depend by the battery size and the battery lifetime. Modern batteries have voltage until they are discharged to 75%-80% [5]. Furthermore, thin- film rechargeable batteries can

  13. Stability and Three-Dimensional Analysis of Bone Formation in Longitudinally Fluted Miniscrew Implants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, An Van

    2014-04-22

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of longitudinal flutes on mini-screw implant (MSI) bone healing and stability. Using 11 skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits, 33 longitudinally fluted and 33 non-fluted MSIs were...

  14. Development of high productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejiri, T.; Hamamoto, N.; Hisada, S.; Iwasawa, K.; Kawakami, K.; Kokuryu, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Nogami, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasada, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, T. [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., LTD., 575, Kuze-tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    High productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2' is developed. In semiconductor manufacturing field, improvement of the productivity is continuously required. Especially mass production lines recently tend to use low energy beam and 2 pass implant for higher throughput. The 'Evo2' has been developed in an effort to fulfill these requirements. The 'Evo2' increases low energy beam current by 150 to 250% by applying electrostatic einzel lens called 'V-lens' installed at the exit of the Collimator magnet. This lens is also able to control the beam incident angle by adjusting the upper and lower electrode's voltages independently. Besides, mechanical scanning speed is enhanced to minimize process time of 2 pass implant, while also frequency of the fast beam scanning is enhanced to keep dose uniformity. In addition, a vacuum pumping capability at the target chamber is enhanced to reduce a vacuum waiting time during processing photo-resist wafers. This improvement achieved to reduce process time by 40% for a specific recipe. Furthermore, a modified Indirectly Heated Cathode with electron active Reflection 2 (IHC-R2) ion source which has a long life time filament has been installed. These new elements and/or functions have realized typically 25% improvement of productivity compared to standard EXCEED, and also improve a precise implantation capability.

  15. A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1 *, Chantal Gondran2 , Fabien Giroud2 powerful ones, Glucose BioFuel Cells (GBFCs), are based on enzymes electrically wired by redox mediators applications. Citation: Cinquin P, Gondran C, Giroud F, Mazabrard S, Pellissier A, et al. (2010) A Glucose BioFuel

  16. Synthesis of layer-tunable graphene: A combined kinetic implantation and thermal ejection approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Su; Xie, Xiaoming; Ding, Guqiao; Wang, Yongqiang; Chu, Paul K.; Gao, Heng; Ren, Wei; Yuan, Qinghong; et al

    2015-05-04

    Layer-tunable graphene has attracted broad interest for its potentials in nanoelectronics applications. However, synthesis of layer-tunable graphene by using traditional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method still remains a great challenge due to the complex experimental parameters and the carbon precipitation process. Herein, by performing ion implantation into a Ni/Cu bilayer substrate, the number of graphene layers, especially single or double layer, can be controlled precisely by adjusting the carbon ion implant fluence. The growth mechanism of the layer-tunable graphene is revealed by monitoring the growth process is observed that the entire implanted carbon atoms can be expelled towards the substratemore »surface and thus graphene with designed layer number can be obtained. Such a growth mechanism is further confirmed by theoretical calculations. The proposed approach for the synthesis of layer-tunable graphene offers more flexibility in the experimental conditions. Being a core technology in microelectronics processing, ion implantation can be readily implemented in production lines and is expected to expedite the application of graphene to nanoelectronics.« less

  17. Electrical activation in silicon-on-insulator after low energy boron implantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Electrical activation in silicon-on-insulator after low energy boron implantation Antonio F of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 Mark E. Law SWAMP Center, Department of Electrical and Computer and Development Center, Research Division, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 Erin C. Jones Department of Electrical

  18. Use of ion implantation to facilitate the discovery and characterization of ferromagnetic semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebard, Arthur F.

    . Zavada Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, Durham, North Carolina 27709 The discoveryN, and SiC at a constant energy of 250 keV designed to produce 3­5 at. % concentration at the peak of the implant profile. TRIM calculations show that the concentration of ions is almost flat for the first 1000 Ĺ

  19. A FLUID-CELL INTERACTION AND ADHESION ALGORITHM FOR TISSUE-COATING OF CARDIOVASCULAR IMPLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canic, Suncica

    A FLUID-CELL INTERACTION AND ADHESION ALGORITHM FOR TISSUE-COATING OF CARDIOVASCULAR IMPLANTS JIAN. In this manuscript we develop a fluid-cell interaction and adhesion algorithm applied to modeling the cell coating parameters and adhesion parameters on the generation of a stable and strong tissue coating of artificial

  20. Metal Ion Implanted Compliant Electrodes in Dielectric Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    whose stiffness is dominated by the metallic film. Advances in Science and Technology Vol. 61 (2008) ppMetal Ion Implanted Compliant Electrodes in Dielectric Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Membranes P.dadras@unine.ch, e herbert.shea@epfl.ch Keywords: dielectric electroactive polymer actuators, EAP, DEAP, ion

  1. Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +}-implants in Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Petersen, D. H. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Hansen, O. [DTU Nanotech, Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); CINF, Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Lin, R.; Nielsen, P. F. [CAPRES A/S, Scion-DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Romano, L. [IMM-CNR MATIS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Doyle, B. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-1056, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Kontos, A. [Applied Materials, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in crystalline (c-Ge) and preamorphized Ge (PA-Ge) following rapid thermal annealing was investigated using micro Hall effect and ion beam analysis techniques. The residual implanted dose of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants in Ge was characterized using elastic recoil detection and was determined to correlate well with simulations with a dose loss of 23.2%, 21.4%, and 17.6% due to ion backscattering for 2, 4, and 6 keV implants in Ge, respectively. The electrical activation of ultra-shallow B{sup +} implants at 2, 4, and 6 keV to fluences ranging from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} was studied using micro Hall effect measurements after annealing at 400-600 Degree-Sign C for 60 s. For both c-Ge and PA-Ge, a large fraction of the implanted dose is rendered inactive due to the formation of a presumable B-Ge cluster. The B lattice location in samples annealed at 400 Degree-Sign C for 60 s was characterized by channeling analysis with a 650 keV H{sup +} beam by utilizing the {sup 11}B(p, {alpha})2{alpha} nuclear reaction and confirmed the large fraction of off-lattice B for both c-Ge and PA-Ge. Within the investigated annealing range, no significant change in activation was observed. An increase in the fraction of activated dopant was observed with increasing energy which suggests that the surface proximity and the local point defect environment has a strong impact on B activation in Ge. The results suggest the presence of an inactive B-Ge cluster for ultra-shallow implants in both c-Ge and PA-Ge that remains stable upon annealing for temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C.

  2. Interaction of Sn atoms with defects introduced by ion implantation in Ge substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taoka, Noriyuki, E-mail: ntaoka@alice.xtal.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fukudome, Motoshi; Takeuchi, Wakana; Arahira, Takamitsu; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    The interaction of Sn atoms with defects induced by Sn implantation of Ge substrates with antimony (Sb) as an n-type dopant and the impact of H{sub 2} annealing on these defects were investigated by comparison with defects induced by Ge self-implantation. In the Ge samples implanted with either Sn or Ge, and annealed at temperatures of less than 200?°C, divacancies, Sb-vacancy complexes with single or double acceptor-like states, and defects related to Sb and interstitial Ge atoms were present. On the other hand, after annealing at 500?°C in an N{sub 2} or H{sub 2} atmosphere, defects with different structures were observed in the Sn-implanted samples by deep level transition spectroscopy. The energy levels of the defects were 0.33?eV from the conduction band minimum and 0.55?eV from the valence band maximum. From the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics, interaction between Sn atoms and defects after annealing at 500?°C was observed. The effect of H{sub 2} annealing at around 200?°C was observed in the C-V characteristics, which can be attributed to hydrogen passivation, and this effect was observed in both the Ge- and Sn-implanted samples. These results suggest the presence of defects that interact with Sn or hydrogen atoms. This indicates the possibility of defect control in Ge substrates by Sn or hydrogen incorporation. Such defect control could yield high-performance Ge-based devices.

  3. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  4. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Asia have "tipped" the field into an era of disruptive and transformative products and services. Today's unprecedented convergence of technologies makes the near-term outlook very promising. Driverless vehicles-Hubo for the 2012- 2014 DARPA Robotics Challenge. In recognition of his international partnerships and impact on US

  5. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engineering. The main focus of the technical part will be on the electrical packaging process. Dr. Chuan Hu worldwide. seminar A Law Made to be Broken ­ The History and Future of Moore's Law Chuan Hu Component

  6. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -scale integration of renewable energy sources into the electric power system. seminar Self-Sustaining Turbulence­turbulence motivates the use of a quasi-streamwise constant framework to investigate plane Couette flow. The RNL system October 17, 2014 at 1:30pm in SCOB 210 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport & Energy #12;

  7. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    conductivity. Coupled with its low thermal conductivity, polymer thermoelectric composites are attractive and thermoelectric applications. I will show that the thermal conductivity of ultra-thin polymer films can both conductivity and phonon transport mechanisms over the past 2 decades, owing much to the challenging needs

  8. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    DE o Slater Steels (Joslyn Stainless Steels), Ft. Wayne, IN l U.S.-Bureau of Mines, Salt Lake City, UT l University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT o National Bureau of Standards,...

  9. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    advantage over solar collectors that require tracking mechanisms to follow the sun and they can also capture and concentrating sunlight onto specially made collector tubes at the UC Solar Lab at UC Merced. The latest external CPC collector (XCPC) is being used in Mongolia and Dubai with great success. XCPC's offer a big cost

  10. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a member of expert panels reviewing the health impacts of wind turbines. seminar Predicting Turbofan Fan necessary for design. Professor Grace's research interests lie in the fields of unsteady aerodynamics

  11. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with emphasis on the dynamics of reacting flows, turbulence-combustion interactions and thermoacoustics, (ii flow noise generation (v) buoyancy driven flows with emphasis on plumes and fires. seminar Modeling

  12. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this chemistry in CFD codes. Finally, I will consider three different applications: ignition by a hot surface) and combustion. Guillaume Blanquart is an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical and Civil Engineering department

  13. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , human-machine systems and augmentation, bioengineering, mechatronics design, artificial locomotion and Control and IEEE Transaction on Mechatronics. Dr. Kazerooni's latest work focuses on the control of human

  14. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and lithium ion batteries. Our interest is to understand how solid diffusion generates mechanical stresses in lithium batteries. Using input from ab initio and molecular dynamic simulations, we investigated to the presence of ionic fluxes. The second example is on the insertion of lithium into silicon in silicon anodes

  15. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that require face bending or partial crumpling to make many-step folds. This presentation consists of two parts-ori pattern, which are consistent with the interesting shear behavior and infinity bulk modulus of the same chapters and 95 peer-reviewed journal papers, including multi-disciplinary journals (Science, PNAS, Nature

  16. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) ­ of over 98% to near-zero levels. Key emission control technologies in diesel engine technology - that achieve near-zero exhaust emissions, will be presented. The talk with almost every new engine and exhaust emission program from 1993 to the present day. These programs

  17. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to scalable processing of polymer matrix nanocomposites (PMNCs) for specific energy-related applications, localized chemical vapor deposition in the near-particle environment was carried out using femtosecond in nuclear graphites and development of spectrally-tailored coatings for space probes. He is a member of ASME

  18. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into an existing platform is presented. Dr. Abdel Ra'ouf Mayyas is an Assistant Professor of Automotive Engineering Platform Abdel Ra'ouf Mayyas Automotive Engineering Arizona State University August 29, 2014 at 1:30pmD in 2010 from Automotive Engineering Department at Clemson University ­ International Center for Automotive

  19. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stores energy from both the human and a motor in a spring during the stance phase. The energy is released and Associates earning a Professional Engineering License. He has been a faculty member in the Department for Engineering of Matter, Transport & Energy #12;

  20. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the complex structures and behaviors observed in animal models. They guide the development of small robots

  1. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which have a misorientation dependent strength. When plastic deformation is removed via heat treatments

  2. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is proposed in this paper. The proposed methodology integrates a Lamb wave-based damage detection technique Institute of Technology, China in 2011. His research interests are Bayesian updating and applications for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy Arizona State University October 12, 2012 at 1:30pm in SCOB 228

  3. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    and New York, NY Medical College, Fordham University Long Island College of Medicine New York, NY New York, NY Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn New York, NY Rensselaer...

  4. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    New York, NY Medical College Fordham University New York, NY Long Island College of Medicine New York, NY Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn New York, NY Rensselaer Polytechnic,...

  5. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a microgrid serving a large commercial building, and two building-scale PV arrays with storage. If well is Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Director of the Center for Emerging Energy Technologies of energy systems, beginning with a project to refurbish and modernize the solar-assisted HVAC in the UNM

  6. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    layer flows relevant to renewable energy systems. The primary emphasis in many of these studies-flame interactions are also central to astrophysical problems, such as explosions of type Ia supernovae, which have, and kinetic energy spectral dynamics are presented, and the implications for modeling of turbulent combustion

  7. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by ~120% using nanofluids. This has applications in the energy technologies, suchas: concentrated solar power/ CSP (thermal energy storage/ TES), nuclear, oil and gas exploration (deep drilling

  8. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of today's cost, making nanotechnology accessible to millions of new innovators and entrepreneurs that is 200 times lower than current technology. The center also developed several CNT and MoS2 based was awarded the 2006 Nanotech Briefs National Nano50 Award, Innovator category, the 2006 Outstanding Faculty

  9. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a collaborative national endeavor to reduce overall costs by 75% to make solar energy cost competitive with other to aggressively pursue innovation and make large-scale solar energy systems cost-competitive with other forms--technologies that promise genuine transformation in the ways we generate, store, and utilize solar energy--to drive down

  10. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy harvesting, ultra- high density data storage, and selective radiation surfaces. Xianfan Xu to strongly resonate with the coming radiation. The gain of the antenna is further increased using various can be used in a wide range of engineering applications, including parallel nanolithography, solar

  11. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1 ..CT-. \5-

  12. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1 ..CT-.

  13. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1 ..CT-.. . s

  14. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1 ..CT-.. .

  15. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1 ..CT-..

  16. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1 ..CT-..,' \

  17. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1 ..CT-..,'

  18. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1

  19. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1CORPORATION

  20. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 ' 1CORPORATION1

  1. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 '

  2. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 'CORPORATION

  3. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1 'CORPORATION53

  4. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1

  5. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION '

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1q 3 THE

  6. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION /

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1q 3 THE/ @

  7. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION \

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c 1 1; -.ll 1q 3 THE/

  8. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Ambrosia'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectIo f l Df3 i.%#

  9. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Ambrosia'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectIo f l Df3

  10. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION ,'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Ambrosia'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectIo f l Df3,'

  11. THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the WeldonB100 Ambrosia'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectIo f l Df3,'1 e

  12. A 350 mu W CMOS MSK Transmitter and 400 mu W OOK Super-Regenerative Receiver for Medical Implant Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Joel L.

    Recent advances in the medical field are spurring the need for ultra-low power transceivers for wireless communication with medical implants. To deal with the growing demand for medical telemetry, the FCC commissioned the ...

  13. Effects of helium implantation on the tensile properties and microstructure of Ni??P?? metallic glass nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liontas, Rachel [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Gu, X. Wendy [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Nan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mara, Nathan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Greer, Julia R. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We report fabrication and nanomechanical tension experiments on as-fabricated and helium-implanted ~130 nm diameter Ni??P?? metallic glass nano-cylinders. The nano-cylinders were fabricated by a templated electroplating process and implanted with He? at energies of 50, 100, 150, and 200 keV to create a uniform helium concentration of ~3 at. % throughout the nano-cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and through-focus analysis reveal that the specimens contained ~2 nm helium bubbles distributed uniformly throughout the nano-cylinder volume. In-situ tensile experiments indicate that helium-implanted specimens exhibit enhanced ductility as evidenced by a 2-fold increase in plastic strain over as-fabricated specimens, with no sacrifice in yield and ultimate tensile strengths. This improvement in mechanical properties suggests that metallic glasses may actually exhibit a favorable response to high levels of helium implantation.

  14. The impact of reverberant self-masking and overlap-masking effects on speech intelligibility by cochlear implant listeners (L)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2011-05-05

    The purpose of this study is to determine the relative impact of reverberant self-masking and overlap-masking effects on speech intelligibility by cochlear implant listeners. Sentences were presented in two conditions ...

  15. Coding of Electric Pulse Trains Presented through Cochlear Implants in the Auditory Midbrain of Awake Rabbit: Comparison with Anesthetized Preparations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgutte, Bertrand

    Cochlear implant (CI) listeners show limits at high frequencies in tasks involving temporal processing such as rate pitch and interaural time difference discrimination. Similar limits have been observed in neural responses ...

  16. Noise reduction algorithms and performance metrics for improving speech reception in noise by cochlear-implant users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsworthy, Raymond Lee, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    This thesis addresses the design and evaluation of algorithms to improve speech reception for cochlear-implant (CI) users in adverse listening environments. We develop and assess performance metrics for use in the algorithm ...

  17. Effects of helium implantation on the tensile properties and microstructure of Ni??P?? metallic glass nanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liontas, Rachel; Gu, X. Wendy; Fu, Engang; Wang, Yongqiang; Li, Nan; Mara, Nathan; Greer, Julia R.

    2014-09-10

    We report fabrication and nanomechanical tension experiments on as-fabricated and helium-implanted ~130 nm diameter Ni??P?? metallic glass nano-cylinders. The nano-cylinders were fabricated by a templated electroplating process and implanted with He? at energies of 50, 100, 150, and 200 keV to create a uniform helium concentration of ~3 at. % throughout the nano-cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging and through-focus analysis reveal that the specimens contained ~2 nm helium bubbles distributed uniformly throughout the nano-cylinder volume. In-situ tensile experiments indicate that helium-implanted specimens exhibit enhanced ductility as evidenced by a 2-fold increase in plastic strain over as-fabricated specimens, with nomore »sacrifice in yield and ultimate tensile strengths. This improvement in mechanical properties suggests that metallic glasses may actually exhibit a favorable response to high levels of helium implantation.« less

  18. Understanding and engineering of NiGe/Ge junction formed by phosphorus ion implantation after germanidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, Hiroshi, E-mail: oka@asf.mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Minoura, Yuya; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji [Department of Material and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-11

    Modulation of the effective electron Schottky barrier height (eSBH) of NiGe/Ge contacts induced by phosphorus ion implantation after germanide formation was investigated by considering local inhomogeneity in the eSBH. Systematic studies of NiGe/Ge contact devices having various germanide thicknesses and ion implantation areas indicated the threshold dopant concentration at the NiGe/Ge interface required for eSBH modulation and negligible dopant diffusion even at NiGe/Ge interface during drive-in annealing, leading to variation in the eSBH between the bottom and sidewall portions of the NiGe regions. Consequently, this method makes it possible to design source/drain contacts with low-resistivity Ohmic and ideal rectifying characteristics for future Ge-based transistors.

  19. Si?-implanted Si-wire waveguide photodetectors for the mid-infrared

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Souhan, Brian; Lu, Ming; Grote, Richard R.; Chen, Christine P.; Huang, Hsu-Cheng; Driscoll, Jeffrey B.; Stein, Aaron; Bakhru, Hassaram; Bergman, Keren; Green, William M. J.; et al

    2014-10-28

    CMOS-compatible Si?-implanted Si-waveguide p-i-n photodetectors operating at room temperature and at mid-infrared wavelengths from 2.2 to 2.3 µm are demonstrated. Responsivities of 9.9 ± 2.0 mA/W are measured at a 5 V reverse bias with an estimated internal quantum efficiency of 2.7 – 4.5%. The dark current is found to vary from a few microamps down to less than a nanoamp after a post-implantation annealing of 350°C. The measured photocurrent dependence on input power shows a linear correspondence over more than three decades, and the frequency response of a 250 µm-length p-i-n device is measured to be ~1.7 GHz formore »a wavelength of ? = 2.2 µm, thus potentially opening up new communication bands for photonic integrated circuits.« less

  20. Critical Vacancy-Driven Phenomena in High-Energy Ion-Implanted Silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, T E

    2008-11-11

    High-energy (MeV) ion implantation is now being rapidly introduced into integrated circuit manufacturing because it promises process simplification and improved device performance. However, high-energy implantation introduces an imbalance of excess vacancies and vacancy-cluster defects in the near-surface region of a silicon crystal. These defects interact with dopants affecting diffusion and electrical activation during subsequent processing. The objective of this project was to develop sufficient understanding of the physical mechanisms underlying the evolution of these defects and interactions with dopant atoms to enable accurate prediction and control of dopant diffusion and defect configurations during processing. This project supported the DOE mission in science and technology by extending ongoing Basic Energy Sciences programs in ion-solid physics and x-ray scattering at ORNL into new areas. It also strengthened the national capability for advanced processing of electronic materials, an enabling technology for DOE programs in energy conversion, use, and defense.

  1. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisby, I., E-mail: ilana.wisby@npl.co.uk; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, MC2, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gwilliam, R. [Advanced Technology Institute, Faculty of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Meeson, P. J. [Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Lindström, T. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1?MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65?MHz.

  2. Electrical and optical properties of nitrile rubber modified by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Najidha [Department of Physics, B.J.M Govt: college, Chavara, Kollam, Kerala (India); Predeep, P. [Laboratory for molecular Photonics and Electronics, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Calicut (India)

    2014-10-15

    Implantation of N{sup +} ion beams are performed on to a non-conjugated elastomer, acrylonirtle butadiene rubber (NBR) with energy 60 keV in the fluence range of 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. A decrease in the resistivity of the sample by about eight orders of magnitude is observed in the implanted samples along with color changes. The ion exposed specimens were characterized by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy which shows a shift in the absorption edge value for the as deposited polymer towards higher wavelengths. The band gap is evaluated from the absorption spectra and is found to decrease with increasing fluence. This study can possibly throw light on ion induced changes in the polymer surface.

  3. Production and characterization of a nitrogen-implanted Fe standard to calibrate PIGE measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, C. L.; Silva, T. F.; Added, N.; Santos, H. C.; Tabacniks, M. H.

    2014-11-11

    Three calibration standard was produced by ion implantation of nitrogen in samples of Armco iron (99.7% iron). The samples was irradiated with nitrogen ion beams at several different energies (between 4 keV and 40 keV), and the ion doses were adjusted to obtain an uniform depth profile, using simulations with SRIM code. Two standards, one thick and other a foil (1.62mg/cm{sup 2}), was irradiated at same time with total nominal dose of 6.6×10{sup ?16} atoms/cm{sup 2} distributed in a region of 100 nm in depth, with an average concentration of 9.0% nitrogen in iron. The third sample uses the same profile, but with a small dose, 1.1×10{sup ?16} atoms/cm{sup 2} and average concentration of 1.5% nitrogen. The characterization of the implanted samples was done using RBS and NRA techniques to quantification of nitrogen.

  4. Si?-implanted Si-wire waveguide photodetectors for the mid-infrared

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Souhan, Brian [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Lu, Ming [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Grote, Richard R. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chen, Christine P. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Huang, Hsu-Cheng [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Driscoll, Jeffrey B. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Stein, Aaron [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bakhru, Hassaram [State Univ. of New York at Albany, Albany, NY (United States); Bergman, Keren [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Green, William M. J. [IBM, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Osgood, Jr., Richard M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2014-01-01

    CMOS-compatible Si?-implanted Si-waveguide p-i-n photodetectors operating at room temperature and at mid-infrared wavelengths from 2.2 to 2.3 µm are demonstrated. Responsivities of 9.9 ± 2.0 mA/W are measured at a 5 V reverse bias with an estimated internal quantum efficiency of 2.7 – 4.5%. The dark current is found to vary from a few microamps down to less than a nanoamp after a post-implantation annealing of 350°C. The measured photocurrent dependence on input power shows a linear correspondence over more than three decades, and the frequency response of a 250 µm-length p-i-n device is measured to be ~1.7 GHz for a wavelength of ? = 2.2 µm, thus potentially opening up new communication bands for photonic integrated circuits.

  5. Investigating the consequences of chromosome abnormalities arising during pre-implantation development of the mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Helen Louise

    2014-02-04

    . 16 5 4.2.3 Culture in low -energy KSOM ??????????????????????????????? ??5 4.2.4 Immunocytochemistry , TUNEL staining and confocal imaging?.???????????. ??6 4.2.5 Induction of DNA damage with ionizing radiation ???????????????????? ??6 4... sensitive to adverse culture conditions???????????????????????????????????? 17 1 4.3.3 Evaluating the DNA damage hypothesis ????????????????? ???????. ??4 4.3 .3.1 The atypical distribution of DDR foci throughout pre - implantation development...

  6. Collagen fibre implant for tendon and ligament biological augmentation. In vivo study in an ovine model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enea, D.; Gwynne, J.; Kew, S.; Arumugam, M.; Shepherd, J.; Brooks, R.; Ghose, S.; Best, Serena Michelle; Cameron, Ruth Elizabeth; Rushton, N.

    2012-06-20

    the rat Achilles tendon with glutaraldehyde or EDC/dehydrothermal treatment (DHT) crosslinked collagen fibres cast in a non-crosslinked col- lagen matrix. At 12 months, the EDC/DHT implant was completely resorbed and produced a yield strength of 22 MPa... tissue deposition. The white spaces between fibres are artefacts from cutting and possibly from shrinkage of the tissue; i empty group (3 m). Dotted line highlights the boundary between native tendon (nt) and regenerated tissue (rt) with fibroblasts...

  7. Everolimus-induced Pneumonitis after Drug-eluting Stent Implantation: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Susumu Kikuchi, Naoshi; Ichikawa, Atsuo; Sano, Go; Satoh, Keita; Sugino, Keishi; Isobe, Kazutoshi; Takai, Yujiro; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Homma, Sakae

    2013-08-01

    Despite the wide use of everolimus as an antineoplastic coating agent for coronary stents to reduce the rate of restenosis, little is known about the health hazards of everolimus-eluting stents (EES). We describe a case of pneumonitis that developed 2 months after EES implantation for angina. Lung pathology demonstrated an organizing pneumonia pattern that responded to corticosteroid therapy. Although the efficacy of EES for ischemic heart disease is well established, EES carries a risk of pneumonitis.

  8. Defect production during ion implantation of various A/sub III/B/sub V/ semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesch, W.; Wendler, E.; Goetz, G.; Kekelidse, N.P.

    1989-01-15

    The present paper gives a survey about the defect generation caused by ion implantation of GaAs, InAs, GaP, and InP. By combining Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, optical spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopic methods, further information concerning the kinetics of the defect production as well as the type of defects created is obtained. Generally, the defect concentration in the region of implantation parameters investigated can be described by the energy density deposited into nuclear processes. Below critical values of the nuclear deposited energy density in GaAs weakly damaged layers containing point defects and point defect clusters are produced. With increasing nuclear deposited energy density an increasing number of amorphous zones is created due to manifold overlap of the initial defect clusters. The results indicate that in GaAs and InAs already at relatively low implantation temperatures, the amorphization occurs via homogeneous defect nucleation. The results obtained for GaP and InP, on the other hand, point at a remarkable contribution of heterogeneous defect nucleation already at room temperature, leading to amorphization at markedly lower nuclear deposited energy densities in spite of nearly identical values of the nuclear deposited energy. It is therefore concluded that defect recombination and annealing at room temperature is much less pronounced in the phosphides than in the arsenides.

  9. Spin-dependent recombination at arsenic donors in ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franke, David P. Brandt, Martin S.; Otsuka, Manabu; Matsuoka, Takashi; Itoh, Kohei M.; Vlasenko, Leonid S.; Vlasenko, Marina P.

    2014-09-15

    Spin-dependent transport processes in thin near-surface doping regions created by low energy ion implantation of arsenic in silicon are detected by two methods, spin-dependent recombination using microwave photoconductivity and electrically detected magnetic resonance monitoring the direct current through the sample. The high sensitivity of these techniques allows the observation of the magnetic resonance, in particular, of As in weak magnetic fields and at low resonance frequencies (40–1200 MHz), where high-field-forbidden transitions between the magnetic sublevels can be observed due to the mixing of electron and nuclear spin states. Several implantation-induced defects are present in the samples studied and act as spin readout partner. We explicitly demonstrate this by electrically detected electron double resonance experiments and identify a pair recombination of close pairs formed by As donors and oxygen-vacancy centers in an excited triplet state (SL1) as the dominant spin-dependent process in As-implanted Czochralski-grown Si.

  10. High-performance carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres for supercapacitors with low series resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, Bin; Chen, Xiaohua; Guo, Kaimin; Xu, Longshan; Chen, Chuansheng; Yan, Haimei; Chen, Jianghua

    2011-11-15

    Research highlights: {yields} CNTs-implanted porous carbon spheres are prepared by using gelatin as soft template. {yields} Homogeneously distributed CNTs form a well-develop network in carbon spheres. {yields} CNTs act as a reinforcing backbone assisting the formation of pore structure. {yields} CNTs improve electrical conductivity and specific capacitance of supercapacitor. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres were prepared by an easy polymerization-induced colloid aggregation method using gelatin as a soft template. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements reveal that the materials are mesoporous carbon spheres, with a diameter of {approx}0.5-1.0 {mu}m, a specific surface area of 284 m{sup 2}/g and average pore size of 3.9 nm. Using the carbon nanotube-implanted mesoporous carbon spheres as electrode material for supercapacitors in an aqueous electrolyte solution, a low equivalent series resistance of 0.83 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and a maximum specific capacitance of 189 F/g with a measured power density of 8.7 kW/kg at energy density of 6.6 Wh/kg are obtained.

  11. Development of ZnNiCd coatings by pulse electrodeposition process Prabhu Ganesan, Swaminatha P. Kumaraguru, Branko N. Popov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Development of Zn­Ni­Cd coatings by pulse electrodeposition process Prabhu Ganesan, Swaminatha P indicated that Zn­Ni­Cd alloys exhibit superior barrier properties when compared to Cd or Zn­Ni coatings of corrosion resistant coating in aerospace, electrical, and fastener industries due to its excel- lent

  12. Controlled fabrication of Si nanocrystal delta-layers in thin SiO{sub 2} layers by plasma immersion ion implantation for nonvolatile memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonafos, C.; Ben-Assayag, G.; Groenen, J.; Carrada, M.; Spiegel, Y.; Torregrosa, F.; Normand, P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Kapetanakis, E.; Sahu, B. S.; Slaoui, A.

    2013-12-16

    Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to beam line implantation to produce a single layer of nanocrystals (NCs) in the gate insulator of metal-oxide semiconductor devices. We report herein the fabrication of two-dimensional Si-NCs arrays in thin SiO{sub 2} films using PIII and rapid thermal annealing. The effect of plasma and implantation conditions on the structural properties of the NC layers is examined by transmission electron microscopy. A fine tuning of the NCs characteristics is possible by optimizing the oxide thickness, implantation energy, and dose. Electrical characterization revealed that the PIII-produced-Si NC structures are appealing for nonvolatile memories.

  13. Magnetic properties of ion implanted Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x} thin films solidified through pulsed laser melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commisso Dolph, Melissa [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Kim, Taeseok; Recht, Daniel; Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Yin Wenjing; Fan Wenbin; Yu Jiani; Lu Jiwei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Wolf, Stuart A. [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Ge{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x} thin films with an average Mn concentration of 0.64 at. % were fabricated through Mn ion implantation into crystalline germanium-on-insulator wafers. Implantation damage was removed and crystallinity restored by pulsed laser melting from a single 30-ns 308-nm XeCl{sup +} excimer laser pulse. Resolidified films demonstrated higher Curie temperatures but smaller saturation magnetizations than those of both as-implanted films and implanted films subjected to rapid thermal annealing. These findings are attributed to the redistribution of Mn during solidification.

  14. Dose calculation for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monajemi, T. T.; Clements, Charles M.; Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada) and Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were (i) to develop a dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants that incorporates a clinically motivated model for edema and (ii) to illustrate the use of the method by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error for a reference configuration of {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 137}Cs seeds subject to edema-induced motions corresponding to a variety of model parameters. Methods: A model for spatially anisotropic edema that resolves linearly with time was developed based on serial magnetic resonance imaging measurements made previously at our center to characterize the edema for a group of n=40 prostate implant patients [R. S. Sloboda et al., ''Time course of prostatic edema post permanent seed implant determined by magnetic resonance imaging,'' Brachytherapy 9, 354-361 (2010)]. Model parameters consisted of edema magnitude, {Delta}, and period, T. The TG-43 dose calculation formalism for a point source was extended to incorporate the edema model, thus enabling calculation via numerical integration of the cumulative dose around an individual seed in the presence of edema. Using an even power piecewise-continuous polynomial representation for the radial dose function, the cumulative dose was also expressed in closed analytical form. Application of the method was illustrated by calculating the preimplant dosimetry error, RE{sub preplan}, in a 5x5x5 cm{sup 3} volume for {sup 125}I (Oncura 6711), {sup 103}Pd (Theragenics 200), and {sup 131}Cs (IsoRay CS-1) seeds arranged in the Radiological Physics Center test case 2 configuration for a range of edema relative magnitudes ({Delta}=[0.1,0.2,0.4,0.6,1.0]) and periods (T=[28,56,84] d). Results were compared to preimplant dosimetry errors calculated using a variation of the isotropic edema model developed by Chen et al. [''Dosimetric effects of edema in permanent prostate seed implants: A rigorous solution,'' Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000)]. Results: As expected, RE{sub preplan} for our edema model indicated underdosage in the calculation volume with a clear dependence on seed and calculation point positions, and increased with increasing values of {Delta} and T. Values of RE{sub preplan} were generally larger near the ends of the virtual prostate in the RPC phantom compared with more central locations. For edema characteristics similar to the population average values previously measured at our center, i.e., {Delta}=0.2 and T=28 d, mean values of RE{sub preplan} in an axial plane located 1.5 cm from the center of the seed distribution were 8.3% for {sup 131}Cs seeds, 7.5% for {sup 103}Pd seeds, and 2.2% for {sup 125}I seeds. Maximum values of RE{sub preplan} in the same plane were about 1.5 times greater. Note that detailed results strictly apply only for loose seed implants where the seeds are fixed in tissue and move in synchrony with that tissue. Conclusions: A dose calculation method for permanent prostate implants incorporating spatially anisotropic linearly time-resolving edema was developed for which cumulative dose can be written in closed form. The method yields values for RE{sub preplan} that differ from those for spatially isotropic edema. The method is suitable for calculating pre- and postimplant dosimetry correction factors for clinical seed configurations when edema characteristics can be measured or estimated.

  15. Response of Steers to Implantation of Diethylstilbestrol During Suckling, Wintering and Finishing Periods. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melton, A. A.; Riggs, J. K.

    1965-01-01

    of stilbestrol on steer performance and carcass characteristics. J. Animal Sci. 21533. Texas A6M University Texas Agricultural Experiment Station College Station. Texas 77841 Director Publication-Annual Report or Bulletin or Report of Progress Permit 1105... E i IYFLUENCE OF REPELATED IMPLANTATION WITH DIETHYLSTILBESTROL UPON FEEDLOT PERFORM- ANCE OF FATTENING STEERS, 4-YEAR SUMMARY la[ \\oniher 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 \\~tmhc~ of Ttrcrc l vi0 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 l:lf l 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 1 '-I62 10 10 10 10...

  16. The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-02-28

    Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods—2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

  17. Lattice location of implanted $^{147}$Nd and $^{147*}$Pm in GaN using emission channeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Vries, B; Vantomme, A; Correia, J G

    2003-01-01

    The lattice location of $^{147}$Nd and $^{147^{*}}$Pm in thin-film, single-crystalline hexagonal GaN was studied by means of the emission channeling technique. The angular emission yields of $\\beta^{-}$-particles and conversion electrons emitted by the radioactive isotopes $^{147}$Nd and $^{147^{*}}$Pm were measured using a position-sensitive detector following 60 keV room temperature implantation at a dose of 1 $\\times 10^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$ and annealing at 900°C. The emission patterns around the [0001], [1102], [1101], and [2113] crystal axes give direct evidence that the majority (70%) of Nd and Pm atoms occupy substitutional Ga sites.

  18. Origins of low resistivity and Ge donor level in Ge ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamioka, K.; Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K. [College of Engineering and Research Center of Ion Beam Technology, Hosei University Koganei, Tokyo 184-8584 (Japan); Kushida, K. [Departments of Arts and Sciences, Osaka Kyoiku University Kashiwara, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    The energy level of Ge in Ge-ion implanted ZnO single crystals is studied by Hall-effect and photoluminescence (PL) methods. The variations in resistivity from ?10{sup 3} ?cm for un-implanted samples to ?10{sup ?2} ?cm for as-implanted ones are observed. The resistivity is further decreased to ?10{sup ?3} ?cm by annealing. The origins of the low resistivity are attributed to both the zinc interstitial (Zn{sub i}) related defects and the electrical activated Ge donor. An activation energy of Ge donors estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration is 102 meV. In PL studies, the new peak at 372 nm (3.33 eV) related to the Ge donor is observed in 1000 °C annealed samples.

  19. Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis: implant fabrication and performance This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanker, Daniel

    Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis: implant fabrication and performance This article has been (11pp) doi:10.1088/1741-2560/9/4/046014 Photovoltaic retinal prosthesis: implant fabrication/046014 Abstract The objective of this work is to develop and test a photovoltaic retinal prosthesis for restoring

  20. Space Science Technology Health General Sci-fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Politics Education Entertainment Sports Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Education Entertainment Sports Implant Maps Heart Electrical Activity In Unprecedented Detail Posted on of implantable device for measuring the heart's electrical output that they say is a vast improvement over allows for measuring electrical activity with greater resolution in time and space. The new device can

  1. Design for an inexpensive but effective cochlear implant BLAKES.WILSON,STEPHENREBSCHER,FAN-GANGZENG,ROBERTV.SHANNON,GERALDE.LOEB,DEWEYT.LAWSON,and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    monopolar electrodes. All implanted components are passive, reducing to a minimum the complexity(Rebscher),the University of California at San Francisco;the House Ear Institute (Zeng and Shannon);and the Bio Symposiumon Cochlear Implants and Linguistics,Zhengzhou,China,Oct.25-28, 1993. Reprintrequests:Fan-GangZeng,PhD,House

  2. High-fluence Ga-implanted silicon—The effect of annealing and cover layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiedler, J., E-mail: jan.fiedler@hzdr.de; Heera, V.; Hübner, R.; Voelskow, M.; Germer, S.; Schmidt, B.; Skorupa, W. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-14

    The influence of SiO{sub 2} and SiN{sub x} cover layers on the dopant distribution as well as microstructure of high fluence Ga implanted Si after thermal processing is investigated. The annealing temperature determines the layer microstructure and the cover layers influence the obtained Ga profile. Rapid thermal annealing at temperatures up to 750?°C leads to a polycrystalline layer structure containing amorphous Ga-rich precipitates. Already after a short 20?ms flash lamp annealing, a Ga-rich interface layer is observed for implantation through the cover layers. This effect can partly be suppressed by annealing temperatures of at least 900?°C. However, in this case, Ga accumulates in larger, cone-like precipitates without disturbing the surrounding Si lattice parameters. Such a Ga-rich crystalline Si phase does not exist in the equilibrium phase diagram according to which the Ga solubility in Si is less than 0.1 at. %. The Ga-rich areas are capped with SiO{sub x} grown during annealing which only can be avoided by the usage of SiN{sub x} cover layers.

  3. Inhibitive formation of nanocavities by introduction of Si atoms in Ge nanocrystals produced by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, R. S.; Shang, L.; Liu, X. H.; Zhang, Y. J. [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Wang, Y. Q., E-mail: yqwang@qdu.edu.cn, E-mail: barba@emt.inrs.ca [The Cultivation Base for State Key Laboratory, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); College of Physics Science, Qingdao University, No. 308 Ningxia Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Ross, G. G.; Barba, D., E-mail: yqwang@qdu.edu.cn, E-mail: barba@emt.inrs.ca [INRS-Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650 boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2014-05-28

    Germanium nanocrystals (Ge-nc) were successfully synthesized by co-implantation of Si and Ge ions into a SiO{sub 2} film thermally grown on (100) Si substrate and fused silica (pure SiO{sub 2}), respectively, followed by subsequent annealing at 1150?°C for 1?h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examinations show that nanocavities only exist in the fused silica sample but not in the SiO{sub 2} film on a Si substrate. From the analysis of the high-resolution TEM images and electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra, it is revealed that the absence of nanocavities in the SiO{sub 2} film/Si substrate is attributed to the presence of Si atoms inside the formed Ge-nc. Because the energy of Si-Ge bonds (301?kJ·mol{sup ?1}) are greater than that of Ge-Ge bonds (264?kJ·mol{sup ?1}), the introduction of the Si-Ge bonds inside the Ge-nc can inhibit the diffusion of Ge from the Ge-nc during the annealing process. However, for the fused silica sample, no crystalline Si-Ge bonds are detected within the Ge-nc, where strong Ge outdiffusion effects produce a great number of nanocavities. Our results can shed light on the formation mechanism of nanocavities and provide a good way to avoid nanocavities during the process of ion implantation.

  4. Laser annealing of ion implanted CZ silicon for solar cell junction formation. Quarterly report No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzeff, J. S.

    1980-07-01

    A project to evaluate the merits of large spot size pulsed laser annealing of ion implanted silicon wafers for junction formation on solar cells is described. A Q-switched Nd:Glass laser system is used operating in the 1064 (regular) and 532 (with frequency doubler) nm wavelengths. The laser output is in excess of 30 joules with a 20 to 50 ns pulse duration. Material used in this investigation is 3-inch diameter CZ silicon, P-type 0.014 inches thick, 10..cap omega..-cm resistivity, <100> orientation. Three wafer surface conditions are being evaluated in this pulse annealing investigation: chem-polished, texture etched, and flash etched. Annealing was performed with and without beam homogenization. Both modes showed excellent lattice recovery from the implant-induced damage as analyzed using Rutherford backscattering techniques. Homogenization of the beam was performed using a fused silica rod configured with a 90/sup 0/ bend. The unhomogenized annealing was performed using a plano-concave lens. Fabrication of laser annealed cells using both modes is forthcoming.

  5. Fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition facility for hybrid surface modification layer fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Langping; Huang Lei; Xie Zhiwen; Wang Xiaofeng; Tang Baoyin

    2008-02-15

    The fourth-generation plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) facility for hybrid and batch treatment was built in our laboratory recently. Comparing with our previous PIIID facilities, several novel designs are utilized. Two multicathode pulsed cathodic arc plasma sources are fixed on the chamber wall symmetrically, which can increase the steady working time from 6 h (the single cathode source in our previous facilities) to about 18 h. Meanwhile, the inner diameter of the pulsed cathodic arc plasma source is increased from the previous 80 to 209 mm, thus, large area metal plasma can be obtained by the source. Instead of the simple sample holder in our previous facility, a complex revolution-rotation sample holder composed of 24 shafts, which can rotate around its axis and adjust its position through revolving around the center axis of the vacuum chamber, is fixed in the center of the vacuum chamber. In addition, one magnetron sputtering source is set on the chamber wall instead of the top cover in the previous facility. Because of the above characteristic, the PIIID hybrid process involving ion implantation, vacuum arc, and magnetron sputtering deposition can be acquired without breaking vacuum. In addition, the PIIID batch treatment of cylinderlike components can be finished by installing these components on the rotating shafts on the sample holder.

  6. Preoperative irradiation, lymphadenectomy, and 125iodine implantation for patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLaney, T.F.; Shipley, W.U.; O'Leary, M.P.; Biggs, P.J.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1986-10-01

    Fifty-four patients with clinically and surgically localized prostatic carcinoma were treated with low-dose preoperative irradiation (1050 cGy), pelvic lymphadenectomy, and interstitial /sup 125/Iodine implantation. The follow-up range is 2 to 9 years with a median follow-up of 5 years. Overall local tumor control is 92%. Actuarial 5-year survival is 86% and the actuarial disease-free survival at 5 years is 73%. Patients with poorly differentiated tumors have a significantly worse actuarial survival (62%) at 5 years than patients with well (95%) or moderately well differentiated tumors (93%), p = 0.04. Disease-free survival at 5 years was influenced by grade: well (100%), moderate (60%), and poor (48%), p = 0.03. Multivariate regression analysis indicates that only the degree of differentiation (p = 0.05) significantly impacts on survival. Both degree of differentiation (p = 0.04) and nodal status (p = 0.03) significantly influence disease-free survival. Potency has been maintained in 71% of patients potent at the time of implantation. Late reactions have been acceptable to date: bladder outlet obstruction (13%), mild proctitis (13%), cystourethritis (6%), incontinence (2%), and prostatic calculi (2%).

  7. Synthesis, optical properties, and microstructure of semiconductor nanocrystals formed by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budai, J.D.; White, C.W.; Withrow, S.P.; Zuhr, R.A.; Zhu, J.G.

    1996-12-01

    High-dose ion implantation, followed by annealing, has been shown to provide a versatile technique for creating semiconductor nanocrystals encapsulated in the surface region of a substrate material. The authors have successfully formed nanocrystalline precipitates from groups IV (Si, Ge, SiGe), III-V (GaAs, InAs, GaP, InP, GaN), and II-VI (CdS, CdSe, CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1{minus}x}, CdTe, ZnS, ZnSe) in fused silica, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Si substrates. Representative examples will be presented in order to illustrate the synthesis, microstructure, and optical properties of the nanostructured composite systems. The optical spectra reveal blue-shifts in good agreement with theoretical estimates of size-dependent quantum-confinement energies of electrons and holes. When formed in crystalline substrates, the nanocrystal lattice structure and orientation can be reproducibly controlled by adjusting the implantation conditions.

  8. Beam energy tracking system on Optima XEx high energy ion implanter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, Jonathan; Satoh, Shu; Wu Xiangyang; Geary, Cindy; Deluca, James [Axcelis Technologies, Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Dr, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    The Axcelis Optima XEx high energy implanter is an RF linac-based implanter with 12 RF resonators for beam acceleration. Even though each acceleration field is an alternating, sinusoidal RF field, the well known phase-focusing principle produces a beam with a sharp quasi-monoenergetic energy spectrum. A magnetic energy filter after the linac further attenuates the low energy continuum in the energy spectrum often associated with RF acceleration. The final beam energy is a function of the phase and amplitude of the 12 resonators in the linac. When tuning a beam, the magnetic energy filter is set to the desired energy, and each linac parameter is tuned to maximize the transmission through the filter. Once a beam is set up, all the parameters are stored in a recipe, which can be easily tuned and has proven to be quite repeatable. The magnetic field setting of the energy filter selects the beam energy from the RF Linac accelerator, and in-situ verification of beam energy in addition to the magnetic energy filter setting has long been desired. An independent energy tracking system was developed for this purpose, using the existing electrostatic beam scanner as a deflector to construct an in-situ electrostatic energy analyzer. This paper will describe the system and performance of the beam energy tracking system.

  9. Predicting Low Energy Dopant Implant Profiles in Semiconductors using Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardmore, K.M.; Gronbech-Jensen, N.

    1999-05-02

    The authors present a highly efficient molecular dynamics scheme for calculating dopant density profiles in group-IV alloy, and III-V zinc blende structure materials. Their scheme incorporates several necessary methods for reducing computational overhead, plus a rare event algorithm to give statistical accuracy over several orders of magnitude change in the dopant concentration. The code uses a molecular dynamics (MD) model to describe ion-target interactions. Atomic interactions are described by a combination of 'many-body' and pair specific screened Coulomb potentials. Accumulative damage is accounted for using a Kinchin-Pease type model, inelastic energy loss is represented by a Firsov expression, and electronic stopping is described by a modified Brandt-Kitagawa model which contains a single adjustable ion-target dependent parameter. Thus, the program is easily extensible beyond a given validation range, and is therefore truly predictive over a wide range of implant energies and angles. The scheme is especially suited for calculating profiles due to low energy and to situations where a predictive capability is required with the minimum of experimental validation. They give examples of using the code to calculate concentration profiles and 2D 'point response' profiles of dopants in crystalline silicon and gallium-arsenide. Here they can predict the experimental profile over five orders of magnitude for <100> and <110> channeling and for non-channeling implants at energies up to hundreds of keV.

  10. Corresponding author: E-mail: smuftu@coe.neu.edu, Phone/Fax: (617) 373-4743/2921 Evaluation of load transfer characteristics of five different implants in compact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müftü, Sinan

    , and number of implant designs on the market, better understanding of the effect of macroconfiguration­implant interface8 . Currently, there are more than 50 implant designs available in the market. The evolution has prostheses for a variety of tooth loss scenarios. The traditional undisturbed healing concept has been proven

  11. Implantable Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Joy

    2009-01-01

    quot;I can pick up a Styrofoam cup without crushing it. Withhave ”I can pick up a Styrofoam cup without crushing it. ”

  12. Electrical activation of ion implanted Si in amorphous and crystalline In0.53Ga0.47As

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    candidates for future generations of n-channel devices as the electron mobilities of III­V materials are consider- ably higher than that of Si which has subsequently led to a renewed interest in studying.47As for the implant energies and doses stud- ied and that the increase in resistance observed

  13. Magnetic and structural properties of Mn-implanted GaN N. Theodoropoulou and A. F. Hebard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebard, Arthur F.

    process- ing, and storage and in photonics. It has been demonstrated in a number of semiconductors, and S. J. Peartona) Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville hole concentration of 2 1017 cm 3 . Mn ions were implanted at an energy of 250 keV and doses from 1015

  14. PREPARATION AND IMPLANTATION ALZET OSMOTIC PUMPS (SOP-9) Osmotic pumps manufactured by ALZA Corporation (Palo Alto, CA) are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    PREPARATION AND IMPLANTATION ALZET OSMOTIC PUMPS (SOP-9) Osmotic pumps manufactured by ALZA the inner reservoir and the outer wall of the pump is an `osmotic sleeve' which expands as water passes information on the operation and applications of osmotic pumps can be found in the manufacturer's Technical

  15. The corrosion behavior and hemocompatibility of TiNi alloys coated with DLC by plasma based ion implantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    The corrosion behavior and hemocompatibility of TiNi alloys coated with DLC by plasma based ion successfully deposited on Ti­50.8 at.% Ni alloys using plasma based ion implantation (PBII) technique on the surface modification of TiNi alloys, including ion implan- tation, multi arc ion-plating as well as Ti

  16. High temperature indentation of helium-implanted tungsten James S.K.-L. Gibson a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (essentially helium ions) from the plasma as well as 14 MeV neutrons. While the rate of helium production dueHigh temperature indentation of helium-implanted tungsten James S.K.-L. Gibson a,n , Steve G Hardening a b s t r a c t Nanoindentation has been performed on tungsten, unimplanted and helium

  17. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN BIOMEDICINE, VOL. 14, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 2010 1397 Trustworthy Data Collection From Implantable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Fei

    hardware description language is studied based on industry Standard IEEE 1363 to increase the speed of key access trust model. Index Terms--Implantable medical devices (IMDs), industry Standard IEEE 1363, medical such as pacemak- ers, insulin pump, and brain neurostimulators can be used for a Manuscript received January 29

  18. Locomotive Micro-Implant with Active Electromagnetic Propulsion Daniel Pivonka, Ada S. Y. Poon, and Teresa H. Meng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Ada

    Locomotive Micro-Implant with Active Electromagnetic Propulsion Daniel Pivonka, Ada S. Y. Poon An active locomotive technique requiring only an ex- ternal power source and a static magnetic field is pre- sented, and its operation is analyzed and simulated. For a modest static MRI magnetic field of 1 T

  19. Patient Positioning Based on a Radioactive Tracer Implanted in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: A Performance and Safety Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruijf, Willy J.M. de, E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Verstraete, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Neustadter, David [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel)] [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)] [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hol, Sandra; Venselaar, Jack L.M. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Davits, Rob J.; Wijsman, Bart P. [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Van den Bergh, Laura; Budiharto, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, Raymond [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, Karin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Poortmans, Philip M.P. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. Results: The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Conclusions: Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye.

  20. Malfunctions of Implantable Cardiac Devices in Patients Receiving Proton Beam Therapy: Incidence and Predictors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Poenisch, Falk [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pinnix, Chelsea C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sheu, Tommy [Department of Experimental Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Memon, Nada [Department of Cardiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Rozner, Marc A. [Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dougherty, Anne H. [Department of Cardiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Photon therapy has been reported to induce resets of implanted cardiac devices, but the clinical sequelae of treating patients with such devices with proton beam therapy (PBT) are not well known. We reviewed the incidence of device malfunctions among patients undergoing PBT. Methods and Materials: From March 2009 through July 2012, 42 patients with implanted cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIED; 28 pacemakers and 14 cardioverter-defibrillators) underwent 42 courses of PBT for thoracic (23, 55%), prostate (15, 36%), liver (3, 7%), or base of skull (1, 2%) tumors at a single institution. The median prescribed dose was 74 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; range 46.8-87.5 Gy), and the median distance from the treatment field to the CIED was 10 cm (range 0.8-40 cm). Maximum proton and neutron doses were estimated for each treatment course. All CIEDs were checked before radiation delivery and monitored throughout treatment. Results: Median estimated peak proton and neutron doses to the CIED in all patients were 0.8 Gy (range 0.13-21 Gy) and 346 Sv (range 11-1100 mSv). Six CIED malfunctions occurred in 5 patients (2 pacemakers and 3 defibrillators). Five of these malfunctions were CIED resets, and 1 patient with a defibrillator (in a patient with a liver tumor) had an elective replacement indicator after therapy that was not influenced by radiation. The mean distance from the proton beam to the CIED among devices that reset was 7.0 cm (range 0.9-8 cm), and the mean maximum neutron dose was 655 mSv (range 330-1100 mSv). All resets occurred in patients receiving thoracic PBT and were corrected without clinical incident. The generator for the defibrillator with the elective replacement indicator message was replaced uneventfully after treatment. Conclusions: The incidence of CIED resets was about 20% among patients receiving PBT to the thorax. We recommend that PBT be avoided in pacing-dependent patients and that patients with any type of CIED receiving thoracic PBT be followed closely.

  1. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P. Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.

    2015-03-30

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in surface roughness.

  2. SU-E-T-546: Use of Implant Volume for Quality Assurance of Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkinson, D; Kolar, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the application of volume implant (V100) data as a method for a global check of low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy plans. Methods: Treatment plans for 335 consecutive patients undergoing permanent seed implants for prostate cancer and for 113 patients treated with plaque therapy for ocular melanoma were analyzed. Plaques used were 54 COMS (10 to 20 mm, notched and regular) and 59 Eye Physics EP917s with variable loading. Plots of treatment time x implanted activity per unit dose versus v100 ^.667 were made. V100 values were obtained using dose volume histograms calculated by the treatment planning systems (Variseed 8.02 and Plaque Simulator 5.4). Four different physicists were involved in planning the prostate seed cases; two physicists for the eye plaques. Results: Since the time and dose for the prostate cases did not vary, a plot of implanted activity vs V100 ^.667 was made. A linear fit with no intercept had an r{sup 2} = 0.978; more than 94% of the actual activities fell within 5% of the activities calculated from the linear fit. The greatest deviations were in cases where the implant volumes were large (> 100 cc). Both COMS and EP917 plaque linear fits were good (r{sup 2} = .967 and .957); the largest deviations were seen for large volumes. Conclusions: The method outlined here is effective for checking planning consistency and quality assurance of two types of LDR brachytherapy treatment plans (temporary and permanent). A spreadsheet for the calculations enables a quick check of the plan in situations were time is short (e.g. OR-based prostate planning)

  3. Electrical properties and electronic structure of Si-implanted hexagonal boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, B.; Yuen, M. F.; Zhang, W. J., E-mail: apwjzh@cityu.edu.hk [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF), and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Qiu, M. [School of Physics and Electronic Science, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410114 (China)

    2014-07-07

    Si ion implantation with a set of ion energies and ion doses was carried out to dope hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) thin films synthesized by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. Hall effect measurements revealed n-type conduction with a low resistivity of 0.5 ? cm at room temperature, corresponding to an electron concentration of 2.0?×?10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3} and a mobility of 0.6 cm{sup 2}/V s. Temperature-dependent resistivity measurements in a wide temperature range from 50 to 800?K demonstrated two shallow donor levels in the hBN band gap induced by Si doping, which was in consistence with the theoretical calculation by density function theory.

  4. Ion Implanted Ge:B Far Infrard Blocked Impurity BandDetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeman, J.W.; Goyal, S.; Reichertz, L.A.; Haller, E.E.

    2006-06-12

    Ge Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) photoconductors have the potential to replace stressed Ge:Ga photoconductors for far-infrared astronomical observations. A novel planar BIB device has been fabricated in which ion-implanted boron is used to form the blocking and absorbing layers of necessary purity and compensation. The effect of doping in the infrared active layer on the far-infrared photoconductive response has been studied, and the optimum doping concentration is found to be {approx} 4 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. Devices doped near this concentration show good blocking characteristics with low dark currents. The spectral response extends to {approx} 45 cm{sup -1}, clearly showing the formation of an impurity band. Under low background testing conditions these devices attain a responsivity of 0.12 A/W and NEP of 5.23 x 10{sup -15} W/Hz{sup -1/2}.

  5. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, S.M. Jr.; Bishop, D.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1998-11-24

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer. 4 figs.

  6. A high voltage pulse power supply for metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Araujo, W. W. R.; Sgubin, L. G.; Sochugov, N. S.; Spirin, R. E.; Brown, I. G.

    2010-12-15

    We describe the design and implementation of a high voltage pulse power supply (pulser) that supports the operation of a repetitively pulsed filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition facility in plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (Mepiiid) mode. Negative pulses (micropulses) of up to 20 kV in magnitude and 20 A peak current are provided in gated pulse packets (macropulses) over a broad range of possible pulse width and duty cycle. Application of the system consisting of filtered vacuum arc and high voltage pulser is demonstrated by forming diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films with and without substrate bias provided by the pulser. Significantly enhanced film/substrate adhesion is observed when the pulser is used to induce interface mixing between the DLC film and the underlying Si substrate.

  7. An experiment on the dynamics of ion implantation and sputtering of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. A.; Kesler, L. A.; Peterson, E. E.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Whyte, D. G.; Woller, K. B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    A major impediment towards a better understanding of the complex plasma-surface interaction is the limited diagnostic access to the material surface while it is undergoing plasma exposure. The Dynamics of ION Implantation and Sputtering Of Surfaces (DIONISOS) experiment overcomes this limitation by uniquely combining powerful, non-perturbing ion beam analysis techniques with a steady-state helicon plasma exposure chamber, allowing for real-time, depth-resolved in situ measurements of material compositions during plasma exposure. Design solutions are described that provide compatibility between the ion beam analysis requirements in the presence of a high-intensity helicon plasma. The three primary ion beam analysis techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, and nuclear reaction analysis, are successfully implemented on targets during plasma exposure in DIONISOS. These techniques measure parameters of interest for plasma-material interactions such as erosion/deposition rates of materials and the concentration of plasma fuel species in the material surface.

  8. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; et al

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developedmore »using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.« less

  9. A 3D approximate maximum likelihood solver for localization of fish implanted with acoustic transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Z. Daniel; USA, Richland Washington; Sun, Yannan; USA, Richland Washington; Martinez, Jayson J.; USA, Richland Washington; Fu, Tao; USA, Richland Washington; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; USA, Richland Washington; Carlson, Thomas J.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-11-27

    Better understanding of fish behavior is vital for recovery of many endangered species including salmon. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed to observe the out-migratory behavior of juvenile salmonids tagged by surgical implantation of acoustic micro-transmitters and to estimate the survival when passing through dams on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. A robust three-dimensional solver was needed to accurately and efficiently estimate the time sequence of locations of fish tagged with JSATS acoustic transmitters, to describe in sufficient detail the information needed to assess the function of dam-passage design alternatives. An approximate maximum likelihood solver was developed using measurements of time difference of arrival from all hydrophones in receiving arrays on which a transmission was detected. Field experiments demonstrated that the developed solver performed significantly better in tracking efficiency and accuracy than other solvers described in the literature.

  10. Performance Assessment of Suture Type in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.

    2009-02-27

    The objective of this study was to determine the best overall suture material to close incisions from the surgical implantation of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic microtransmitters in subyearling Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The effects of seven suture materials, four surgeons, and two water temperatures on suture retention, incision openness, tag retention, tissue inflammation, and tissue ulceration were quantified. The laboratory study, conducted by researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, supports a larger effort under way for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, aimed at determining the suitability of acoustic telemetry for estimating short- and longer-term (30-60 days) juvenile-salmonid survival at Columbia and Snake River dams and through the lower Columbia River.

  11. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Jr., Samuel M. (Albuquerque, NM); Bishop, Dawn M. (Albuquerque, NM); Follstaedt, David M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer.

  12. Late Pseudocoarctation Syndrome After Stent-Graft Implantation For Traumatic Aortic Rupture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letocart, Vincent Fau, Georges Tirouvanziam, Ashok; Toquet, Claire; Al Habash, Oussama Guerin, Patrice; Rousseau, Herve; Crochet, Dominique

    2013-06-15

    The present observation illustrates an unusual complication occurring after stent-grafting (S-graft) for aortic isthmus rupture. A 22-year-old patient, treated by S-graft in the emergency department for traumatic aortic rupture, was readmitted 10 months later with pseudocoarctation syndrome. A membrane was found inside the stent-graft that had induced a pseudo-dissection, which caused the pseudocoarctation syndrome. Surgical treatment consisted of removing the stent-graft and membrane and replacing it with a vascular implant. The patient's clinical course was fair. The suggested mechanism was circumferential neoendothelialization of the stent-graft. Dehiscence caused the superior part of the membrane to drop into the lumen of the stent-graft creating a 'false channel' that compressed the 'true lumen' and induced 'pseudocoarctation' syndrome. The cause of the extensive neointimalization remains unexplained. Thoracic aortic stent-grafts require regular follow-up monitoring by angioscan or angio-magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. Boron Ion Implantation into Silicon by Use of the Boron Vacuum-Arc Plasma Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Chivers, D. J.; Hazelton, R. C.; Moschella, J. J.; Keitz, M. D.

    2006-11-13

    This paper continues with presentation of experimental work pertaining to use of the boron vacuum arc (a.k.a. cathodic arc) plasma generator for boron doping in semiconductor silicon, particularly with a view to the problems associated with shallow junction doping. Progress includes development of an excellent and novel macroparticle filter and subsequent ion implantations. An important perceived issue for vacuum arc generators is the production of copious macroparticles from cathode material. This issue is more important for cathodes of materials such as carbon or boron, for which the particles are not molten or plastic, but instead are elastic, and tend to recoil from baffles used in particle filters. The present design starts with two vanes of special orientation, so as to back reflect the particles, while steering the plasma between the vanes by use of high countercurrents in the vanes. Secondly, behind and surrounding the vanes is a complex system of baffles that has been designed by a computer-based strategy to ultimately trap the particles for multiple bounces. The statistical transmittance of particles is less than 5 per coulomb of boron ions transmitted at a position just a few centimeters outside the filter. This value appears adequate for the silicon wafer application, but improvement is easily visualized as wafers will be situated much further away when they are treated in systems. A total of 11 silicon samples, comprising an area of 250 cm2, have been implanted. Particles were not detected. Sample biases ranged from 60 to 500 V. Boron doses ranged from 5 x 1014 to 5 x 1015/cm2. Exposure times ranged from 20 to 200 ms for average transmitted boron current values of about 125 mA. SIMS concentration profiles from crystalline material are presented. The results appear broadly favorable in relation to competitive techniques and will be discussed. It is concluded that doubly charged boron ions are not present in the plume.

  14. InP DHBT IC Technology with Implanted Collector-Pedestal and Electroplated Device Contacts M. Urteaga, K. Shinohara, R. Pierson, P. Rowell and B. Brar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    InP DHBT IC Technology with Implanted Collector-Pedestal and Electroplated Device Contacts M. The technology also utilizes novel electroplating processes and dielectric sidewall spacers to eliminate

  15. The Winnipeg Free Press, Sunday September 24, 2000 The wired manBrain implant gives Parkinson's victim a joyous new outlook on life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manitoba, University of

    to find the right spot even with the aid of MRI images used like McNally road maps to navigate the brain. The electrodes are wired to a battery- powered stimulator that was later implanted under Yamron's collar bone

  16. Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B+-implants in Ge B. R. Yates, B. L. Darby, D. H. Petersen, O. Hansen, R. Lin et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B+-implants in Ge B. R. Yates, B. L. Darby, D. H://jap.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow B1 -implants in Ge B. R. Yates,1,a) B. L. Darby 2012; published online 27 December 2012) The activation and thermal stability of ultra-shallow Bţ

  17. Investigation Of Plasma Produced By High-Energy Low-Intensity Laser Pulses For Implantation Of Ge Ions Into Si And Sio2 Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosinski, M.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Parys, P.; Boody, F. P.; Gammino, S.; Krasa, J.; Laska, L.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Ullschmied, J.; Mezzasalma, A.; Torrisi, L.

    2006-01-15

    The development of implantation techniques requires investigation of laser plasma as a potential source of multiply charged ions. The laser ion source delivers ions with kinetic energy and a charge state dependent on the irradiated target material and the parameters of the laser radiation used. By the focusing the laser beam on the solid target the higher current densities of ions than by using other currently available ion sources can be produced. The crucial issue for efficiency of the ion implantation technology is selection of proper laser beam characteristics. Implantation of different kinds of laser-produced ions into metals and organic materials were performed recently at the PALS Research Center in Prague, in cooperative experiments using 0.4-ns iodine laser pulses having energies up to 750 J at wavelength of 1315 nm or up to 250 J at wavelength of 438 nm. In this contribution we describe the characterization and optimization of laser-produced Ge ion streams as well as analysis of the direct implantation of these ions into Si and SiO2 substrates. The Ge target was irradiated with the use of laser pulses of energy up to 50 J at radiation intensities of {approx}1011 W/cm2 and {approx}2'1013 W/cm2. The implanted samples were placed along the target normal at distances of 17, 31 and 83 cm from the target surface. The ion stream parameters were measured using the time-of-fight method. The depth of ion implantation was determined by the Rutherford backscattering method (RBS). The maximum depth of implantation of Ge ions was {approx}450 nm. These investigations were carried out for optimization of low and medium energy laser-generated Ge ion streams, suitable for specific implantation technique, namely for fabrication of semiconductor nanostructures within the SRAP 'SEMINANO' project.

  18. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  19. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  20. Direct observation and mechanism for enhanced field emission sites in platinum ion implanted/post-annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, Kalpataru E-mail: phy.kalpa@gmail.com; Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Tai, Nyan Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2014-10-20

    Enhanced electron field emission (EFE) properties for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films upon platinum (Pt) ion implantation and subsequent post-annealing processes is reported, viz., low turn-on field of 4.17?V/?m with high EFE current density of 5.08?mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 7.0?V/?m. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) mode in scanning tunneling spectroscopy directly revealed the increased electron emission sites density for Pt ion implanted/post-annealed UNCD films than the pristine one. The high resolution CITS mapping and local current–voltage characteristic curves demonstrated that the electrons are dominantly emitted from the diamond grain boundaries and Pt nanoparticles.

  1. Tunable photoluminescence of self-assembled GeSi quantum dots by B{sup +} implantation and rapid thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yulu; Wu, Shan; Ma, Yinjie; Fan, Yongliang; Yang, Xinju; Zhong, Zhenyang; Jiang, Zuimin

    2014-06-21

    The layered GeSi quantum dots (QDs) are grown on (001) Si substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The photoluminescence (PL) peak of the as-grown GeSi quantum dots has obvious blue shift and enhancement after processed by ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing. It is indicated that the blue shift is originated from the interdiffusion of Ge and Si at the interface between QDs and the surrounding matrix. The dependence of PL intensity on the excitation power shows that there are the nonradiative centers of shallow local energy levels from the point defects caused by the ion implantation, but not removed by the rapid thermal annealing. The tunable blue shift of the PL position from the 1300?nm to 1500?nm region may have significant application value in the optical communication.

  2. Method for enhancing growth of SiO.sub.2 in Si by the implantation of germanium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, Orin W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fathy, Dariush (Knoxville, TN); White, Clark W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-04-24

    A method for enhancing the conversion of Si to SiO.sub.2 in a directional fashion wherein steam or wet oxidation of Si is enhanced by the prior implantation of Ge into the Si. The unique advantages of the Ge impurity include the directional enhancement of oxidation and the reduction in thermal budget, while at the same time, Ge is an electrically inactive impurity.

  3. Effect of 200 keV Ar{sup +} implantation on optical and electrical properties of polyethyleneterepthalate (PET)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Rajiv Goyal, Meetika Sharma, Ambika; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Sharma, Annu; Kanjilal, D.

    2015-05-15

    In the present paper we have discussed the effect of 200 keV Ar{sup +} ions on the electrical and optical properties of PET samples. PET samples were implanted with 200 keV Ar{sup +} ions to various doses ranging from 1×10{sup 15} to 1×10{sup 17} Ar{sup +} cm{sup 2}. The changes in the electrical and optical properties of pristine and implanted PET specimens have been studied by using Keithley electrometer and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The electrical conductivity has found to be increased with increasing ion dose. The optical studies have revealed the drastic alterations in optical band gap from 3.63 eV to 1.48 eV and also increase in number of carbon atoms per cluster from 215 to 537. Further, the change in the electrical conductivity and optical band gap has also been correlated with the formation of conductive islands in the implanted layers of PET.

  4. Elastic Deformation Properties of Implanted Endobronchial Wire Stents in Benign and Malignant Bronchial Disease: A Radiographic In Vivo Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hautmann, Hubert; Rieger, Johannes; Huber, Rudolf M.; Pfeifer, Klaus J.

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term mechanical behavior in vivo of expandable endobronchial wire stents, we imaged three different prostheses in the treatment of tracheobronchial disease. Methods: Six patients with bronchial stenoses (three benign, three malignant) underwent insertion of metallic stents. Two self-expandable Wallstents, two balloon-expandable tantalum Strecker stents and two self-expandable nitinol Accuflex stents were used. Measurements of deformation properties were performed during voluntary cough by means of fluoroscopy, at 1 month and 7-10 months after implantation. The procedures were videotaped, their images digitized and the narrowing of stent diameters calculated at intervals of 20 msec. Results: After stent implantation all patients improved with respect to ventilatory function. Radial stent narrowing during cough reached 53% (Wallstent), 59% (tantalum Strecker stent), and 52% (nitinol Accuflex stent) of the relaxed post-implantation diameter. Stent compression was more marked in benign compared with malignant stenoses. In the long term permanent deformation occurred with the tantalum Strecker stents; the other stents were unchanged. Conclusion: Endobronchial wire stents can be helpful in the treatment of major airway collapse and obstructing bronchial lesions. However, evidence of material fatigue as a possible effect of exposure to recurrent mechanical stress on the flexible mesh tube may limit their long-term use. This seems to be predominantly important in benign bronchial collapse.

  5. Performance Assessment of Suture Type, Water Temperature, and Surgeon Skill in Juvenile Chinook Salmon Surgically Implanted with Acoustic Transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deters, Katherine A.; Brown, Richard S.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Boyd, James W.; Eppard, M. B.; Seaburg, Adam

    2010-08-01

    Size reductions of acoustic transmitters implanted in migrating juvenile salmonids have resulted in the use of a shorter incision - one that may warrant only one suture for closure. However, it is not known if a single suture will sufficiently hold the incision closed when fish are decompressed and outward pressure is placed on the surgical site during passage of hydroelectric dams. The objectives of this study were to evaluate five response variables in juvenile Chinook salmon subjected to simulated turbine passage. Fish were implanted with an acoustic transmitter (0.43 g in air) and a passive integrated transponder tag (0.10 g in air); incisions (6 mm) were closed with either one or two sutures. Following exposure, no transmitters were expelled. In addition, suture and incision tearing and mortal injury did not differ between treatment and control fish. Viscera expulsion was higher in treatment (12%) than control (1%) fish. The higher incidence of viscera expulsion through single-suture incisions warrants concern. Consequently, the authors do not recommend using one suture to close 6-mm incisions associated with acoustic transmitter implantation when juvenile salmonids may be exposed to turbine passage.

  6. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state suggests that there are preferred Si <100> interstitial splits. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C-SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C-SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8±0.4×10e-19 m2/sec.

  7. Predictive process simulation of cryogenic implants for leading edge transistor design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gossmann, Hans-Joachim; Zographos, Nikolas; Park, Hugh; Colombeau, Benjamin; Parrill, Thomas; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Borges, Ricardo; Gull, Ronald; Erokhin, Yuri [Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Synopsys Switzerland LLC, Thurgauerstrasse 40, 8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Synopsys Inc., 1101 Slater Road, Durham, NC 27703 (United States); Synopsys Switzerland LLC, Thurgauerstrasse 40, 8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Two cryogenic implant TCAD-modules have been developed: (i) A continuum-based compact model targeted towards a TCAD production environment calibrated against an extensive data-set for all common dopants. Ion-specific calibration parameters related to damage generation and dynamic annealing were used and resulted in excellent fits to the calibration data-set. (ii) A Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model including the full time dependence of ion-exposure that a particular spot on the wafer experiences, as well as the resulting temperature vs. time profile of this spot. It was calibrated by adjusting damage generation and dynamic annealing parameters. The kMC simulations clearly demonstrate the importance of the time-structure of the beam for the amorphization process: Assuming an average dose-rate does not capture all of the physics and may lead to incorrect conclusions. The model enables optimization of the amorphization process through tool parameters such as scan speed or beam height.

  8. D. Banerjee Mechanical and Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    grid generation method was utilized to construct a grid system which was aligned with the interface in space vehicle and other systems operating in micro-gravity, thermal issues in high speed civil transport, and thermal storage systems among others. Although film boiling has been studied extensively in the past, only

  9. Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GlaxoSmithKline 8 Harris Foundation 8 Milliken & Company 8 Shell Oil Company Foundation 8 Wells Fargo Alliance 7 Corvid Technologies, Inc. 7 Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co 7 ABCO Automation Inc. 7 BASF Corporation

  10. D. Banerjee Mechanical and Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    . The significant enhancement in liquid side heat transfer was attributed to the alteration of flow field and Schubert 6 and also discussed by Busse 7 , for a system undergoing first order phase change by heating from. An application of this analysis was in a geothermal situation where, for instance, water can be stably stratified

  11. Exascale Opportunities for Aerospace Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8) Wigner HomeExample Cleanup

  12. A Study on Driving Interference-fit Fastener Using Stress Wave Zengqiang Cao1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Qinghua

    clearance and support, but handheld hammering tools have to be used sometimes being of structure limit of 30CrMnSiA interference bolt using stress wave, but fatigue test results were not ideal. Being

  13. Electrochemical polishing of thread fastener test specimens of nickel-chromium iron alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kephart, Alan R. (Scotia, NY)

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical polishing device and method for selective anodic dissolution of the surface of test specimens comprised, for example, of nickel-chromium-iron alloys, which provides for uniform dissolution at the localized sites to remove metal through the use of a coiled wire electrode (cathode) placed in the immediate proximity of the working, surface resulting in a polished and uniform grain boundary.

  14. Dotiki saves money and time with power tool and belt fasteners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargo, K.

    2009-11-15

    The use of a Hilti power tool to improve belt splice installations to minimise downtime is described. 3 photos.

  15. ALL GRADE 5 AND GRADE 8 FASTENERS WHICH DO NOT BEAR ANY MANUFACTURERS'

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1AGGIEAL2007-04.pdfALF HOUSE WesternALL GRADE

  16. An implantable instrument for studying the long-term flight biology of migratory birds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spivey, Robin J. E-mail: c.bishop@bangor.ac.uk; Bishop, Charles M. E-mail: c.bishop@bangor.ac.uk

    2014-01-15

    The design of an instrument deployed in a project studying the high altitude Himalayan migrations of bar-headed geese (Anser indicus) is described. The electronics of this archival datalogger measured 22 × 14 × 6.5 mm, weighed 3 g, was powered by a ˝AA-sized battery weighing 10 g and housed in a transparent biocompatible tube sealed with titanium electrodes for electrocardiography (ECG). The combined weight of 32 g represented less than 2% of the typical bodyweight of the geese. The primary tasks of the instrument were to continuously record a digitised ECG signal for heart-rate determination and store 12-bit triaxial accelerations sampled at 100 Hz with 15% coverage over each 2 min period. Measurement of atmospheric pressure provided an indication of altitude and rate of ascent or descent during flight. Geomagnetic field readings allowed for latitude estimation. These parameters were logged twice per minute along with body temperature. Data were stored to a memory card of 8 GB capacity. Instruments were implanted in geese captured on Mongolian lakes during the breeding season when the birds are temporarily flightless due to moulting. The goal was to collect data over a ten month period, covering both southward and northward migrations. This imposed extreme constraints on the design's power consumption. Raw ECG can be post-processed to obtain heart-rate, allowing improved rejection of signal interference due to strenuous activity of locomotory muscles during flight. Accelerometry can be used to monitor wing-beat frequency and body kinematics, and since the geese continued to flap their wings continuously even during rather steep descents, act as a proxy for biomechanical power. The instrument enables detailed investigation of the challenges faced by the geese during these arduous migrations which typically involve flying at extreme altitudes through cold, low density air where oxygen availability is significantly reduced compared to sea level.

  17. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Jacob A.; Timmers, Heiko; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura

    2011-06-01

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes {sup 97}Ru, {sup 100}Pd, {sup 100}Rh, and {sup 101m}Rh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions in a {sup 92}Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 {mu}m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 deg. flexion angle removed (14{+-}1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12{+-}3) mm{sup 3}/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  18. Supersaturating silicon with transition metals by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recht, Daniel; Aziz, Michael J.; Smith, Matthew J.; Grade?ak, Silvija; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Williams, James S.; Sullivan, Joseph T.; Winkler, Mark T.; Buonassisi, Tonio; Mathews, Jay; Warrender, Jeffrey M.

    2013-09-28

    We investigate the possibility of creating an intermediate band semiconductor by supersaturating Si with a range of transition metals (Au, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pd, Pt, W, and Zn) using ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting (PLM). Structural characterization shows evidence of either surface segregation or cellular breakdown in all transition metals investigated, preventing the formation of high supersaturations. However, concentration-depth profiling reveals that regions of Si supersaturated with Au and Zn are formed below the regions of cellular breakdown. Fits to the concentration-depth profile are used to estimate the diffusive speeds, v{sub D,} of Au and Zn, and put lower bounds on v{sub D} of the other metals ranging from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} m/s. Knowledge of v{sub D} is used to tailor the irradiation conditions and synthesize single-crystal Si supersaturated with 10{sup 19} Au/cm{sup 3} without cellular breakdown. Values of v{sub D} are compared to those for other elements in Si. Two independent thermophysical properties, the solute diffusivity at the melting temperature, D{sub s}(T{sub m}), and the equilibrium partition coefficient, k{sub e}, are shown to simultaneously affect v{sub D}. We demonstrate a correlation between v{sub D} and the ratio D{sub s}(T{sub m})/k{sub e}{sup 0.67}, which is exhibited for Group III, IV, and V solutes but not for the transition metals investigated. Nevertheless, comparison with experimental results suggests that D{sub s}(T{sub m})/k{sub e}{sup 0.67} might serve as a metric for evaluating the potential to supersaturate Si with transition metals by PLM.

  19. James Earthman -Research Mechanical Behavior of Open Cellular Materials at Ambient and Elevated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Mechanisms of Corrosion Fatigue Damage in Implant and density into account. The present approach promises to provide improved predictions of corrosion fatigue Fasteners Riveted joint assemblies are common sites for the early onset of fatigue damage in aircraft

  20. Remote Sensing and In-Situ Observations of Arctic Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds Acquired During Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Uninhabited Aerospace Vehicle Participation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarquhar, G.M.; Freer, M.; Um, J.; McCoy, R.; Bolton, W.

    2005-03-18

    The Atmospheric Radiation Monitor (ARM) uninhabited aerospace vehicle (UAV) program aims to develop measurement techniques and instruments suitable for a new class of high altitude, long endurance UAVs while supporting the climate community with valuable data sets. Using the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft, ARM UAV participated in Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), obtaining unique data to help understand the interaction of clouds with solar and infrared radiation. Many measurements obtained using the Proteus were coincident with in-situ observations made by the UND Citation. Data from M-PACE are needed to understand interactions between clouds, the atmosphere and ocean in the Arctic, critical interactions given large-scale models suggest enhanced warming compared to lower latitudes is occurring.

  1. Surgically Implanted JSATS Micro-Acoustic Transmitters Effects on Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Tag Expulsion and Survival, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Royer, Ida M.; Knox, Kasey M.; Kim, Jin A.; Gay, Marybeth E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Brown, Richard S.

    2011-09-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate survival model assumptions associated with a concurrent study - Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Dam Passage Survival and Associated Metrics at John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2010 by Thomas Carlson and others in 2010 - in which the Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss) migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The micro-acoustic transmitter used in these studies is the smallest acoustic transmitter model to date (12 mm long x 5 mm wide x 4 mm high, and weighing 0.43 g in air). This study and the 2010 study by Carlson and others were conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to meet requirements set forth by the 2008 FCRPS Biological Opinion. In 2010, we compared survival, tag burden, and tag expulsion in five spring groups of yearling Chinook salmon (YCH) and steelhead (STH) and five summer groups of subyearling Chinook salmon (SYC) to evaluate survival model assumptions described in the concurrent study. Each tagging group consisted of approximately 120 fish/species, which were collected and implanted on a weekly basis, yielding approximately 600 fish total/species. YCH and STH were collected and implanted from late April to late May (5 weeks) and SYC were collected and implanted from mid-June to mid-July (5 weeks) at the John Day Dam Smolt Monitoring Facility. The fish were collected once a week, separated by species, and assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) Control (no surgical treatment), (2) Sham (surgical implantation of only a passive integrated transponder [PIT] tag), and (3) Tagged (surgical implantation of JSATS micro-acoustic transmitter [AT] and PIT tags). The test fish were held for 30 days in indoor circular tanks at the Bonneville Dam Juvenile Monitoring Facility. Overall mortality ranged weekly from 45 to 72% for YCH, 55 to 83% for STH, and 56 to 84% for SYC. The high background mortality in all groups and species made it difficult to discern tag effects. However, for YCH, STH, and SYC, the Tagged treatment groups had the highest overall mean mortality - 62%, 79%, and 76%, respectively. Fungal infections were found on 35% of all fish. Mean tag burden for the Tagged treatment group was relatively low for YCH (1.7%) and moderate for SYC (4.2%), while STH had a very low mean tag burden (0.7%). Tag burden was significantly higher in the Tagged treatment group for all species when compared to the Sham treatment group because of the presence of two tags. Surgeon performance did not contribute to the difference in mortality between the Sham and Tagged treatment groups. Tag expulsion from fish that survived to the end of the 30-day experiment was low but occurred in all species, with only two PIT tags and one AT lost, one tag per species. The high background mortality in this experiment was not limited to a treatment, temperature, or month. The decreased number of surviving fish influenced our experimental results and thus analyses. For future research, we recommend that a more natural exposure to monitor tag effects and other factors, such as swimming ability and predator avoidance, be considered to determine the effects of AT- and PIT- implantation on fishes.

  2. Determine the Influence of Time Held in “Knockdown” Anesthesia on Survival and Stress of Surgically Implanted Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Knox, Kasey M.

    2012-01-31

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Portland District (USACE) to address questions related to survival and performance measures of juvenile salmonids as they pass through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Researchers using JSATS acoustic transmitters (ATs) were tasked with standardizing the surgical implantation procedure to ensure that the stressors of handling and surgery on salmonids were consistent and less likely to cause effects of tagging in survival studies. Researchers questioned whether the exposure time in 'knockdown' anesthesia (or induction) to prepare fish for surgery could influence the survival of study fish (CBSPSC 2011). Currently, fish are held in knockdown anesthesia after they reach Stage 4 anesthesia until the completion of the surgical implantation of a transmitter, varies from 5 to 15 minutes for studies conducted in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Surgical Protocol Steering Committee (CBSPSC ) expressed concern that its currently recommended 10-minute maximum time limit during which fish are held in anesthetic - tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222, 80 mg L-1 water) - could increase behavioral and physiological costs, and/or decrease survival of outmigrating juvenile salmonids. In addition, the variability in the time fish are held at Stage 4 could affect the data intended for direct comparison of fish within or among survival studies. Under the current recommended protocol, if fish exceed the 10-minute time limit, they are to be released without surgical implantation, thereby increasing the number of fish handled and endangered species 'take' at the bypass systems for FCRPS survival studies.

  3. Potential hazards to embryo implantation: A human endometrial in vitro model to identify unwanted antigestagenic actions of chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, L.; Deppert, W.R. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Pfeifer, D. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Stanzel, S.; Weimer, M. [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)] [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Hanjalic-Beck, A.; Stein, A.; Straßer, M.; Zahradnik, H.P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Schaefer, W.R., E-mail: wolfgang.schaefer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    Embryo implantation is a crucial step in human reproduction and depends on the timely development of a receptive endometrium. The human endometrium is unique among adult tissues due to its dynamic alterations during each menstrual cycle. It hosts the implantation process which is governed by progesterone, whereas 17?-estradiol regulates the preceding proliferation of the endometrium. The receptors for both steroids are targets for drugs and endocrine disrupting chemicals. Chemicals with unwanted antigestagenic actions are potentially hazardous to embryo implantation since many pharmaceutical antiprogestins adversely affect endometrial receptivity. This risk can be addressed by human tissue-specific in vitro assays. As working basis we compiled data on chemicals interacting with the PR. In our experimental work, we developed a flexible in vitro model based on human endometrial Ishikawa cells. Effects of antiprogestin compounds on pre-selected target genes were characterized by sigmoidal concentration–response curves obtained by RT-qPCR. The estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) was identified as the most responsive target gene by microarray analysis. The agonistic effect of progesterone on SULT1E1 mRNA was concentration-dependently antagonized by RU486 (mifepristone) and ZK137316 and, with lower potency, by 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A and apigenin. The negative control methyl acetoacetate showed no effect. The effects of progesterone and RU486 were confirmed on the protein level by Western blotting. We demonstrated proof of principle that our Ishikawa model is suitable to study quantitatively effects of antiprogestin-like chemicals on endometrial target genes in comparison to pharmaceutical reference compounds. This test is useful for hazard identification and may contribute to reduce animal studies. -- Highlights: ? We compare progesterone receptor-mediated endometrial effects of chemicals and drugs. ? 4-Nonylphenol, bisphenol A and apigenin exert weak antigestagenic activity. ? SULT1E1 is a significant marker for endometrial antiprogestin effects. ? Ishikawa cells are a tissue-specific approach for characterization of SPRMs. ? Chemicals acting as progesterone receptor antagonists may exert antifertility effects.

  4. Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.; Kuzbyt, R.; Sinclair, R.

    2012-11-06

    Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirement for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and test methods have been developed that deliver accurate and repeatable data, which will be described.

  5. Proceedings of the 3rd IEEE Workshop on Applications of Computer Vision, Dec. 2-4, 1996, Sarasota, Florida, pp. 181-186. Pose Estimation of Artificial Knee Implants in Fluoroscopy Images Using A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, William A.

    1 Proceedings of the 3rd IEEE Workshop on Applications of Computer Vision, Dec. 2-4, 1996, Sarasota, Florida, pp. 181-186. Pose Estimation of Artificial Knee Implants in Fluoroscopy Images Using A Template the position and orientation (pose) of artificial knee implants from X-ray fluoroscopy images using computer

  6. Composite structures 4; Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference, Paisley College of Technology, Scotland, July 27-29, 1987. Volume 1 - Analysis and design studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, I.H.

    1987-01-01

    Various papers on analysis and design studies in composite structures are presented. The general topics addressed include: space studies, mechanical fasteners, buckling and postbuckling of platework structures, aerospace structures, wind turbine design, pipes and pressure vessels, analysis and buckling of shell-type structures. Also considered are: structural sections and optimization, thermal loading, vibration of platework structures and shell-type structures, dynamic loading, and finite element analysis.

  7. Training considerations for the intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags in fish with a summary of common surgical errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Wagner, Glenn N.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Training is a fundamental part of all scientific and technical disciplines. This is particularly true for all types of surgeons. For surgical procedures, a number of skills are necessary to reduce mistakes. Trainees must learn an extensive yet standardized set of problem-solving and technical skills to handle challenges as they arise. There are currently no guidelines or consistent training methods for those intending to implant electronic tags in fish; this is surprising, considering documented cases of negative consequences of fish surgeries and information from studies having empirically tested fish surgical techniques. Learning how to do fish surgery once is insufficient for ensuring the maintenance or improvement of surgical skill. Assessment of surgical skills is rarely incorporated into training, and is needed. Evaluation provides useful feedback that guides future learning, fosters habits of self-reflection and self-remediation, and promotes access to advanced training. Veterinary professionals should be involved in aspects of training to monitor basic surgical principles. We identified attributes related to knowledge, understanding, and skill that surgeons must demonstrate prior to performing fish surgery including a “hands-on” assessment using live fish. Included is a summary of common problems encountered by fish surgeons. We conclude by presenting core competencies that should be required as well as outlining a 3-day curriculum for training surgeons to conduct intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags. This curriculum could be offered through professional fisheries societies as professional development courses.

  8. A phenomenological electronic stopping power model for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation of ion implantation into silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, D; Snell, C M; Beardmore, K M; Cai, David; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels; Snell, Charles M.; Beardmore, Keith M.

    1996-01-01

    It is crucial to have a good phenomenological model of electronic stopping power for modeling the physics of ion implantation into crystalline silicon. In the spirit of the Brandt-Kitagawa effective charge theory, we develop a model for electronic stopping power for an ion, which can be factorized into (i) a globally averaged effective charge taking into account effects of close and distant collisions by target electrons with the ion, and (ii) a local charge density dependent electronic stopping power for a proton. This phenomenological model is implemented into both molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. There is only one free parameter in the model, namely, the one electron radius rs0 for unbound electrons. By fine tuning this parameter, it is shown that the model can work successfully for both boron and arsenic implants. We report that the results of the dopant profile simulation for both species are in excellent agreement with the experimental profiles measured by secondary-ion mass spectrometry(...

  9. Quantitative characterization of collagen in the fibrotic capsule surrounding implanted polymeric microparticles through second harmonic generation imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akilbekova, Dana; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Abraham, Thomas

    2015-06-30

    The collagenous capsule formed around an implant will ultimately determine the nature of its in vivo fate. To provide a better understanding of how surface modifications can alter the collagen orientation and composition in the fibrotic capsule, we used second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to evaluate collagen organization and structure generated in mice subcutaneously injected with chemically functionalized polystyrene particles. SHG is sensitive to the orientation of a molecule, making it a powerful tool for measuring the alignment of collagen fibers. Additionally, SHG arises from the second order susceptibility of the interrogated molecule in response to the electric field. Variation in these tensor components distinguishes different molecular sources of SHG, providing collagen type specificity. Here, we demonstrated the ability of SHG to differentiate collagen type I and type III quantitatively and used this method to examine fibrous capsules of implanted polystyrene particles. Data presented in this work shows a wide range of collagen fiber orientations and collagen compositions in response to surface functionalized polystyrene particles. Dimethylamino functionalized particles were able to form a thin collagenous matrix resembling healthy skin. These findings have the potential to improve the fundamental understanding of how material properties influence collagen organization and composition quantitatively.

  10. Quantitative characterization of collagen in the fibrotic capsule surrounding implanted polymeric microparticles through second harmonic generation imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Akilbekova, Dana; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Abraham, Thomas

    2015-06-30

    The collagenous capsule formed around an implant will ultimately determine the nature of its in vivo fate. To provide a better understanding of how surface modifications can alter the collagen orientation and composition in the fibrotic capsule, we used second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to evaluate collagen organization and structure generated in mice subcutaneously injected with chemically functionalized polystyrene particles. SHG is sensitive to the orientation of a molecule, making it a powerful tool for measuring the alignment of collagen fibers. Additionally, SHG arises from the second order susceptibility of the interrogated molecule in response to the electric field. Variationmore »in these tensor components distinguishes different molecular sources of SHG, providing collagen type specificity. Here, we demonstrated the ability of SHG to differentiate collagen type I and type III quantitatively and used this method to examine fibrous capsules of implanted polystyrene particles. Data presented in this work shows a wide range of collagen fiber orientations and collagen compositions in response to surface functionalized polystyrene particles. Dimethylamino functionalized particles were able to form a thin collagenous matrix resembling healthy skin. These findings have the potential to improve the fundamental understanding of how material properties influence collagen organization and composition quantitatively.« less

  11. Comparison of thermal annealing effects on electrical activation of MBE grown and ion implant Si-doped In0.53Ga0.47As

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Comparison of thermal annealing effects on electrical activation of MBE grown and ion implant Si are metastable and susceptible to deactivation upon subsequent thermal treatments after growth. Active Si doping.47As Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 042113 (2014); 10.1063/1.4892079 Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In0

  12. An Energy Management IC for Bio-Implants Using Ultracapacitors for Energy Storage William Sanchez, Charles Sodini, and Joel L. Dawson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Joel

    energy storage elements. The IC, fabricated in a 0.18 m CMOS process, consists of a switched-capacitor DCAn Energy Management IC for Bio-Implants Using Ultracapacitors for Energy Storage William Sanchez tradition- ally relying on batteries as energy storage elements, there is emerging interest in using

  13. Gold nanoparticle formation in diamond-like carbon using two different methods: Gold ion implantation and co-deposition of gold and carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Araujo, W. W. R.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Spirin, R. E.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-10-01

    We describe work in which gold nanoparticles were formed in diamond-like carbon (DLC), thereby generating a Au-DLC nanocomposite. A high-quality, hydrogen-free DLC thin film was formed by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition, into which gold nanoparticles were introduced using two different methods. The first method was gold ion implantation into the DLC film at a number of decreasing ion energies, distributing the gold over a controllable depth range within the DLC. The second method was co-deposition of gold and carbon, using two separate vacuum arc plasma guns with suitably interleaved repetitive pulsing. Transmission electron microscope images show that the size of the gold nanoparticles obtained by ion implantation is 3-5 nm. For the Au-DLC composite obtained by co-deposition, there were two different nanoparticle sizes, most about 2 nm with some 6-7 nm. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the implanted sample contains a smaller fraction of sp{sup 3} bonding for the DLC, demonstrating that some sp{sup 3} bonds are destroyed by the gold implantation.

  14. Back-junction back-contact n-type silicon solar cell with diffused boron emitter locally blocked by implanted phosphorus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Müller, Ralph Schrof, Julian; Reichel, Christian; Benick, Jan; Hermle, Martin

    2014-09-08

    The highest energy conversion efficiencies in the field of silicon-based photovoltaics have been achieved with back-junction back-contact (BJBC) silicon solar cells by several companies and research groups. One of the most complex parts of this cell structure is the fabrication of the locally doped p- and n-type regions, both on the back side of the solar cell. In this work, we introduce a process sequence based on a synergistic use of ion implantation and furnace diffusion. This sequence enables the formation of all doped regions for a BJBC silicon solar cell in only three processing steps. We observed that implanted phosphorus can block the diffusion of boron atoms into the silicon substrate by nearly three orders of magnitude. Thus, locally implanted phosphorus can be used as an in-situ mask for a subsequent boron diffusion which simultaneously anneals the implanted phosphorus and forms the boron emitter. BJBC silicon solar cells produced with such an easy-to-fabricate process achieved conversion efficiencies of up to 21.7%. An open-circuit voltage of 674?mV and a fill factor of 80.6% prove that there is no significant recombination at the sharp transition between the highly doped emitter and the highly doped back surface field at the device level.

  15. PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH HEART RATE TELEMETRY IMPLANTS I MARK C. WALLACE,PAULR. KRAUSMAN,DONALDW. DEYOUNG,ANDMARA E. WEISENBERGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark C.

    PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH HEART RATE TELEMETRY IMPLANTS I I MARK C. WALLACE,PAULR. KRAUSMAN. Captive WITH HEART RA TE mountain sheep(n = 5)and desert mule deer (n = 6)were held at the University, AZ 8572) Heart rate (model ECG-2)and temperature transmitters (model TTE- Ig; J. Stuart Enterprises

  16. A Wireless and Battery less Data Acquisition System for Biomedical Implants V. Landge, H. Cao, S. Thakar, M. Sheth, Y-S. Seo, and J-C. Chiao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    a resonance at 1.3MHz. In the reader, modulated signals were processed by a microcontroller (dSPIC30F4013 to operate the signal processing and conditioning circuitry. The reader was powered with two lithium polymerA Wireless and Battery less Data Acquisition System for Biomedical Implants V. Landge, H. Cao, S

  17. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 02: Evaluation of Dosimetric Variations in Partial Breast Seed Implant (PBSI) due to Patient Arm Position (Up vs. Down)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watt, E; Long, K; Husain, S; Meyer, T

    2014-08-15

    The planning for PBSI is done with the patient's ipsilateral arm raised, however, anatomical changes and variations are unavoidable as the patient resumes her daily activities, potentially resulting in significant deviations in implant geometry from the treatment plan. This study aims to quantify the impact of the ipsilateral arm position on the geometry and dosimetry of the implant at eight weeks, evaluated on post-plans using the MIM Symphony™ software (MIM Software, Cleveland, OH). The average dose metrics for the three patients treated at the TBCC thus far using rigid fusion and contour transfer for the arms up position were 76% for the CTV V100, 61% for the PTV V100, and 37% for the PTV V200; and for the arms down position 81% for the CTV V100, 64% for the PTV V100, and 42% for the PTV V200. Qualitative analysis of the post-implant CT for one of the three patients showed poor agreement between the seroma contour transferred from the pre-implant CT and the seroma visible on the post-implant CT. To obtain a clinically accurate plan for that patient, contour modifications were used, yielding improved dose metric averages for the arms-up position for all three patients of 87% for the CTV V100, 68% for the PTV V100, and 39% for the PTV V200. Overall, the data available shows that dosimetric parameters increase with the patient's arm down, both in terms of coverage and in terms of the hot spot, and accrual of more patients may confirm this in a larger population.

  18. Effect of annealing atmosphere on the structure and luminescence of Sn-implanted SiO{sub 2} layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, J.M.J.; Zawislak, F.C.; Fichtner, P.F.P.; Lovey, F.C.; Condo, A.M. [Instituto de Fisica - UFRGS, Cx. Postal 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre (Brazil); Departamento de Metalurgia, Escola de Engenharia - UFRGS, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 S.C. Bariloche (Argentina)

    2005-01-10

    Sn nanoclusters are synthesized in 180 nm SiO{sub 2} layers after ion implantation and heat treatment. Annealings in N{sub 2} ambient at high temperatures (T{>=}700 deg. C) lead to the formation of Sn nanoclusters of different sizes in metallic and in oxidized phases. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses revealed that the formed larger nanoparticles are composed by a Sn metallic core and a SnO{sub x} shell. The corresponding blue-violet photoluminescence (PL) presents low intensity. However, for heat treatments in vacuum, the PL intensity is increased by a factor of 5 and the TEM data show a homogeneous size distribution of Sn nanoclusters. The low intensity of PL for the N{sub 2} annealed samples is associated with Sn oxidation.

  19. High dose Xe ion irradiation of yttria stabilized zirconia : influence of sputtering on implanted ion profile and retained damage /.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afanasyev, I. V.; Sickafus, K.

    2001-01-01

    Fully-stabilized zirconia is known as a radiation resistant material. The objective of many experinients on zirconia has been to test the susceptibility of this material to amorphization. Because zirconia exhibits high radiation tolerance, this has made very high fluence ion irradiation experiments a necessity and so, additional iiradiation-inducetl effects such as surface sputtering become important. In this paper, we present results from 340 keV Xe' irradiations of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) to fluences ranging froiri 1.10' to 1.5.1OZ1 ions/m2. No iunorphization of YSZ was observed after irradiation to even the highest ion fluences. To assess sputtering effects at high fluence, an analytical model was developed, using ion range and damage distribulions calculated using Monte Carlo simulations for ion-solid interactions. Analysis results and experimental data revealed that at high fluences, the implanted ion and damago distribution profiles are significantly modified by sputtering.

  20. Influence of Vessel Size and Tortuosity on In-stent Restenosis After Stent Implantation in the Vertebral Artery Ostium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Zhiming; Yin Qin; Xu Gelin; Yue Xuanye; Zhang Renliang; Zhu Wusheng; Fan Xiaobing; Ma Minmin; Liu Xinfeng, E-mail: xfliu2@yahoo.com.cn [Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology (China)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting is emerging as an alternative for treating atherosclerotic stenosis in the vertebral artery ostium. However, in-stent restenosis (ISR) still remains a critical issue to be addressed. Little is known about the relationship between anatomic characteristics of the artery and ISR after stent implantation. In this study, we have evaluated influential factors for ISR in a cohort of the patients with stenting in the vertebral artery ostium. Methods: Sixty-one patients with 63 symptomatic lesions in vertebral artery ostium treated with stenting were enrolled onto this study. An average of 12.5 months' clinical and angiographic follow-up results were analyzed retrospectively. The possible influential factors for ISR, including conventional risk factors of cerebrovascular diseases and morphological characteristics of target lesions, were evaluated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis. Results: Technical success was achieved in all 63 interventional procedures. Stenosis was reduced from (mean {+-} standard deviation) 75.5 {+-} 12% before to 1 {+-} 3.6% after the procedure. During the mean 12.5-month angiographic follow-up, ISR was detected in 17 treated vessels (27.0%), with 2 treated arteries (3.2%) resulting in occlusion, and a stent fracture in 1 case (1.6%). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the tortuosity of V1 (hazard ratio 3.54, P = 0.01) and smaller diameter of the stent (hazard ratio 3.8, P = 0.04) were independent predictors of ISR. Conclusions: Angioplasty and stenting for symptomatic stenosis in the vertebral artery ostium stenosis seem to be feasible and effective. Tortuosity and smaller diameter may affect ISR after stent implantation.