Sample records for impacts economic assessment

  1. Economic Impact Assessment: Laser and Fiberoptic Power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00-3 Planning Report Economic Impact Assessment: NIST-EEEL Laser and Fiberoptic Power Office Strategic Planning and Economic Analysis Group August 2000 U.S Department of Commerce Technology Administration #12;FINAL REPORT ECONOMIC IMPACT ASSESSMENT: NIST-EEEL LASER AND FIBEROPTIC POWER AND ENERGY

  2. Planning Report 01-1 Economic Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planning Report 01-1 Economic Impact Assessment of the NIST's Josephson Volt Standard Program and Economic Analysis Group July 2001 U.S Department of Commerce Technology Administration #12;Economic Impact of Standards and Technology Program Office Strategic Planning and Economic Analysis Group Prepared under

  3. Integrated Economic and Climate Projections for Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paltsev, Sergey

    We designed scenarios for impact assessment that explicitly address policy choices and uncertainty in climate response. Economic projections and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions for the “no climate policy” scenario ...

  4. Research Summary Sustainability impact assessment: tools for environmental, social and economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary Sustainability impact assessment: tools for environmental, social and economic to produce Sustainability Impact Assessment Tools (SIATs) that will be used to predict the impacts) and will be used as part of the Impact Assessment (IA) process, as set out in the Impact Assessment Guidelines

  5. assessment economic impact: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  6. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) of the causative parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida bitten by infected insect vectors. There are 130 species in the subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera

  7. Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    economic loss from water shortages. But two points should befind that supply shortages for urban water users in Southernthat urban water agencies can finesse a shortage of up to 5%

  8. Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2: Projected Decrease in Water Equivalent of Sierra Snowpackof Averages Impacts on Water Sea Level Rise Temperature-Laboratory. Co-Director, Water Program, California Climate

  9. Economic Damages from Climate Change: An Assessment of Market Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanemann, W Michael; Dale, Larry

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the affects of climate change on agriculture in irrigatedmarket impacts from climate change on US agriculture and onimpacts of climate change on US agriculture. The first set

  10. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  11. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  12. Environmental, Economic, and Social Impacts of Concrete Pavement Material Choices: A Life-Cycle Assessment Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hyunsoung

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Agencies (STAs) in rendering better-informed decisions for the concrete pavement material choices, the major research objective is to analyze the environmental, economic, and social impacts of the four concrete pavement alternatives from...

  13. The Economic Impact of Binghamton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    The Economic Impact of Binghamton University, FY2010 (July 1, 2009-June 30, 2010) Office .......................................................................................................... 2 ECONOMIC OUTPUT and Tioga counties and the overall impact of New York State in terms of economic output, jobs, and human

  14. Economic Impacts from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program: Using Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Cliburn, J. K.; Coughlin, J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economic impacts (including job creation) from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program (CSLP), an example of Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. The CSLP was the first test of PACE financing on a multi-jurisdictional level (involving individual cities as well as the county government). It was also the first PACE program to comprehensively address energy efficiency measures and renewable energy, and it was the first funded by a public offering of both taxable and tax-exempt bonds.

  15. Assessing the economic revitalization impact of urban design improvements: the Texas Main Street Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozdil, Taner Recep

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................116 Table 5.8 Average Active Texas Main Street City Archival Economic Indicators ....118 Table 5.9 Main Street City Summary Results: Economic Restructuring....................122 Table 5.10 Average Main Street City Managers Response Summary..., and the Texas Main Street Program city managers for sharing their records and helping me to conduct my research. I would like to show my appreciation to my uncle Y?lmaz Özdil for fully supporting the decision of making this dream come true. I would also...

  16. Siting of Subsidized Housing in Neighborhoods: Assessing Economic, Neighborhood, and Social Equity Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woo, Ayoung

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    housing options is related to this ethical concern. A political decision according to the socioeconomic context of planning determines whether or not some neighborhoods have benefits (Beatley, 1984). In this context, the distribution of benefits (how... distribution of the disadvantaged (Beatley, 1984). Among those social primary goods, opportunity is the most significant factor to account for social equity because barriers to social and economic opportunities impede upward mobility of the least advantaged...

  17. 0 | P a g e Economic Impact of Medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    for Consideration 7 Economic Impact Evaluation of Medical School Models 8 Facility Considerations 10 Key Findings 110 | P a g e Economic Impact of Medical Education Expansion in Nevada EconomicImpact Assessment Table of Contents Page Introduction 2 Evaluation of Market Needs 3 Medical School Models

  18. Kainji hydroelectric project: a socio-economic post-impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ugochuku, R.O.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kainji hydroelectric dam was conceived in the early 1950s as a solution to Nigeria's urgent power needs. Considerable controversy surrounded the dam project. The initial controversial issue associated with the dam was centered on a decision whether to develop a thermal or hydro technology and whether the Federal Government's money was being used to develop a particular region to the economic disadvantage of other regions. When the power problems persisted even after the dam started operation, the question of whether the dam was delivering its projected functions also became an issue. This study is in the area of Social Management of Technology which is a concept that deals with decision processes for guiding technological changes such as those associated with the Kainji Dam, to derive maximum socioeconomic benefit from the technology and to minimize the undersirable side effects. The study found that electric power problems of Nigeria can be attributed to institutional problems and the general level of the country's development. This study also found that all the additional benefits of the dam have been overestimated and those reaping the additional benefits are different from those bearing the cost.

  19. Assessment of energy and economic impacts of particulate-control technologies in coal-fired power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract to Argonne National Laboratory, Midwest Research Institute has derived models to assess the economic and energy impacts of particulate-control systems for coal-fired power plants. The models take into account the major functional variables, including plant size and location, coal type, and applicable particulate-emission standards. The algorithms obtained predict equipment and installation costs, as well as operating costs (including energy usage), for five control devices: (1) cold-side electrostatic precipitators, (2) hot-side electrostatic precipitators, (3) reverse-flow baghouses, (4) shake baghouses, and (5) wet scrubbers. A steam-generator performance model has been developed, and the output from this model has been used as input for the control-device performance models that specify required design and operating parameters for the control systems under study. These parameters then have been used as inputs to the cost models. Suitable guideline values have been provided for independent variables wherever necessary, and three case studies are presented to demonstrate application of the subject models. The control-equipment models aggregate the following cost items: (1) first costs (capital investment), (2) total, first-year annualized costs, and (3) integrated cost of ownership and operation over any selected plant lifetime. Although the models have been programmed for rapid computation, the algorithms can be solved with a hand calculator.

  20. BY DR. PEARL KAMER ECONOMIC IMPACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and Workforce Development Programs................................. 9 ECONOMIC IMPACT OF BNL SPENDING: FISCAL and Workforce Development Programs................................. 9 ECONOMIC IMPACT OF BNL SPENDING: FISCAL Research...................................................................................... 8

  1. A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

  2. Assessment Report Department of Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    1 Assessment Report Department of Economics August, 2012 Mission Statement The mission of the Economics Department is to impart knowledge, to both majors and non- majors, about the methods, core theory. Relation to the University at Large Economics is an important part of a liberal arts education because

  3. Assessment Report Department of Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    1 Assessment Report Department of Economics September, 2009 Mission Statement The mission of the Economics Department is to impart knowledge, to both majors and non-majors, about the methods, core theory discipline. Relation to the University at Large Economics is an important part of a liberal arts education

  4. The Economic Impact of the University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    The Economic Impact of the University of British Columbia Walter Sudmant Planning and Institutional "economic impact"? 6 What do we mean by Economic Impact? 7 1. Direct spending by UBC 9 2. Student Spending 10 3. Visitor Spending 11 4. The Economic Impact of UBC Research 13 · Spillover Effect 14 a. A case

  5. Computable General Equilibrium Models for Eco-nomic Policy Evaluation and Impact Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    to the assessment of the economic impacts of policies ranging from tax reforms to the mitigation and adaptation

  6. The Economic and Community Impacts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    The Economic and Community Impacts of Freight Rail #12;Overview · 18 month project (started, Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) · Vann Cunningham, Assistant Vice President, Economic Development, BNSF · Kevin Kelleher, Economic Development Program Specialist, Minnesota Department

  7. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CENTURY ALUMINUM OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CENTURY ALUMINUM OF WEST VIRGINIA, INC. By Randall A. Childs Bureau of Business and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West Virginia more than 660 employees with a production capacity of 170,000 tonnes per year. The economic impact

  8. Reliability Assessment Incorporating Operational Considerations and Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PSERC Reliability Assessment Incorporating Operational Considerations and Economic Aspects Engineering Research Center Reliability Assessment Incorporating Operational Considerations and Economic and Economic Aspects for Large Interconnected Grids." We express our appreciation for the support provided

  9. Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00-1 Planning Report Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials for Sulfur in Fossil Fuels Administration #12;February 2000 Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials for Sulfur in Fossil Fuels Final-006 Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials for Sulfur in Fossil Fuels Final Report February 2000

  10. Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

  11. Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort D.

    We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

  12. SRS Economic Impact Study - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn theTreatmentSRS Economic Impact Study The

  13. Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Rafael

    Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering Rafael (IT); Concrete, precast; Economic factors; Three-dimensional models. Introduction "The application to this; but the funda- mental reason undoubtedly was economic." (Mitchell 1977). Intuitive assessments

  14. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Tawil, J.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this research was to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in developing methods for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts due to the effects of increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ on agricultural production. First, a comprehensive literature search was undertaken to determine what types of models and methods have been developed, which could be effectively used to conduct assessments of the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon models and methods for assessing the physical impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields; national and multi-regional agricultural sector models; and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The second task involved a thorough investigation of the research efforts being conducted by other public and private sector organizations in order to determine how more recent analytical methods being developed outside of DOE could be effectively integrated into a more comprehensive analysis of the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. The third and final task involved synthesizing the information gathered in the first two tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes originating in the agricultural sector of the US economy. It is concluded that the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ on the agricultural sector and the indirect economic impacts caused by spillover effects from agriculture to other sectors of the economy will be pervasive; however, the direction and magnitude of these impacts on producers and consumers cannot be determined a priori.

  15. Economic Assessment of the NIST Thermocouple Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    97-1 Planning Report Economic Assessment of the NIST Thermocouple Calibration Program U of Standards and Technology #12;ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF THE NIST THERMOCOUPLE CALIBRATION PROGRAM July 11, 1997 ............................................................................................................... 4 1.2 NIST Thermocouple Calibration Program

  16. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

  17. Department of Energy Analysis of Economic Impact

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Department of Energy Analysis of Economic Impact Final Rule, 10 CFR 810 February 3, 2015 1 Executive Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) published a Notice of Proposed...

  18. Economic Assessment of the NIST Ceramic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98-3 Planning Report Economic Assessment of the NIST Ceramic Phase Diagram Program Prepared by and Economic Analysis Group February 1998 U.S Department of Commerce Technology Administration #12;#12;ECONOMIC of Standards and Technology Program Office Strategic Planning and Economic Analysis Group Prepared under

  19. Economic Assessment of the NIST Alternative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    98-1 Planning Report Economic Assessment of the NIST Alternative Refrigerants Research Program and Economic Analysis Group January 1998 U.S Department of Commerce Technology Administration #12;ECONOMIC and Economic Analysis Group Prepared by: Matthew T. Shedlick Albert N. Link John T. Scott Approved by: David P

  20. Department of Energy Releases New Report on Economic Impact of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Releases New Report on Economic Impact of Recovery Act Advanced Vehicle Investments Department of Energy Releases New Report on Economic Impact of Recovery Act...

  1. DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More...

  2. DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for...

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Area and Regulatory Amendments for Bering Sea Habitat Conservation May 2008 Lead Agency: National Juneau, AK 99802 (907) 586-7228 Abstract: This Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review

  4. Impact assessment: Eroding benefits through streamlining?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom) [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia (United Kingdom); School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [Integral Sustainability (Australia) [Integral Sustainability (Australia); Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute (Australia); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: A.Morrison-Saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa) [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Environmental Science, Murdoch University (Australia); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa)] [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University (South Africa); Gunn, Jill A.E., E-mail: jill.gunn@usask.ca [Department of Geography and Planning and School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper argues that Governments have sought to streamline impact assessment in recent years (defined as the last five years) to counter concerns over the costs and potential for delays to economic development. We hypothesise that this has had some adverse consequences on the benefits that subsequently accrue from the assessments. This hypothesis is tested using a framework developed from arguments for the benefits brought by Environmental Impact Assessment made in 1982 in the face of the UK Government opposition to its implementation in a time of economic recession. The particular benefits investigated are ‘consistency and fairness’, ‘early warning’, ‘environment and development’, and ‘public involvement’. Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom and Western Australia are the jurisdictions tested using this framework. The conclusions indicate that significant streamlining has been undertaken which has had direct adverse effects on some of the benefits that impact assessment should deliver, particularly in Canada and the UK. The research has not examined whether streamlining has had implications for the effectiveness of impact assessment, but the causal link between streamlining and benefits does sound warning bells that merit further investigation. -- Highlights: • Investigation of the extent to which government has streamlined IA. • Evaluation framework was developed based on benefits of impact assessment. • Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and Western Australia were examined. • Trajectory in last five years is attrition of benefits of impact assessment.

  5. "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Environmental Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Appendixes Environmental Impact Statement NESHAPS for Radionuclides for Hazardous Air Pollutants Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS Radionuclides VOLUME 2 for Hazardous Air Pollutants EPA 520.1'1.-89-006,-2 Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS

  6. Quantifying regional economic impacts of intensity targets in China*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with kind permission from Elsevier B.V. Reprint 2013-24 TSINGHUA - MIT China Energy & Climate Project #12 of Technology, Cambridge, U.S. c Center for Economic Research at ETH (CER-ETH), Department of Management China's 30 prov- inces and includes energy system detail, and apply it to assess the impact

  7. Informatica 25 (2001) xxxyyy 1 Multi-attribute modelling of economic and ecological impacts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohanec, Marko

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanistic and realistic knowledge about economic and ecological impacts of GM crops on the soil. Economic material and validate their use. 4. Provide economic assessment of GM crops and conventional crops systems using GM or conventional crops, respectively. 2. Provide an ecological risk assessment of a GM

  8. Economic Impact of the American Clean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Economic Impact of the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 on the West Virginia Economy ........................................................................................................................ 1 American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines the impact of the American Clean Energy

  9. Economic Impact Report BInghamton UnIvERsIty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Economic Impact Report 2007 #12;BInghamton UnIvERsIty 8:1 return on investment The term "return will be returned to the state economy and $6 to the local economy -- delivering an economic impact of $8.65 billion as an engine of economic growth that improves the financial health of our region and state. EconomIc Impact

  10. Efficient Algorithms for Infrastructure Networks: Planning Issues and Economic Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Mei, Rob

    down description of the techno-economic model Efficient Algorithms for Infrastructure Networks: Planning Issues and Economic Impact Frank and Economic Impact Academisch Proefschrift ter verkrijging van de graad van Doctor aan de Vrije Universiteit

  11. Economic Impacts of the Florida Environmental Horticulture Industry in 20051

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    FE675 Economic Impacts of the Florida Environmental Horticulture Industry in 20051 Sponsored;1 Economic Impacts of the Florida Environmental Horticulture Industry in 2005 Sponsored Project Report ............................................................ 17 Impacts of Hurricanes on the Environmental Horticulture Industry in 2004 and 2005

  12. Assessment of economic impact of offshore and coastal discharge requirements on present and future operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, R. [Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high potential costs of compliance associated with new effluent guidelines for offshore and coastal oil and gas operations could significantly affect the economics of finding, developing, and producing oil and gas in the Gulf of Mexico. This report characterizes the potential economic impacts of alternative treatment and discharge regulations for produced water on reserves and production in Gulf of Mexico coastal, territorial and outer continental shelf (OCS) waters, quantifying the impacts of both recent regulatory changes and possible more stringent requirements. The treatment technologies capable of meeting these requirements are characterized in terms of cost, performance, and applicability to coastal and offshore situations. As part of this analysis, an extensive database was constructed that includes oil and gas production forecasts by field, data on existing platforms, and the current treatment methods in place for produced water treatment and disposal on offshore facilities. This work provides the first comprehensive evaluation of the impacts of alternative regulatory requirements for produced water management and disposal in coastal and offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico.

  13. Techno-Economics & Life Cycle Assessment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Davis, R.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of the techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and describes the value of working with NREL on TEA and LCA.

  14. 2011 Edition The Evaluation and Economic Impact of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    2011 Edition The Evaluation and Economic Impact of the Montana Manufacturing Extension Center Missoula, MT 59812 ECONOMIC BUREAU OF BUSINESS RESEARCH AND #12;iiThe Evaluation and Economic Impact Partnership of the U.S. Department of Commerce. Acknowledgements #12;iiiThe Evaluation and Economic Impact

  15. Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment 1 Equality Impact Assessment summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment 1 Equality Impact Assessment summary Step 10 Name and programmes by which Forestry Commission Wales will help to deliver Woodlands for Wales ­ the Wales woodland of Demographic Equality Strands (2006) National Assembly for Wales · Forestry Commission survey of visitors

  16. Analysis of the Load Impacts and Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Time of Use (TOU) rate plan, called "Analysis of the Load Impacts and Economic Benefits model. The TOU data was rerun through the new spreadsheet model and the results are reported here. · Participation in the TOU rate option also resulted in an average net reduction of 292 kWh/year in annual

  17. Air, Health, Clean Energy, and Related Economic Impacts: Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Reducing energy demand and/or increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiatives—such as goals, standards, codes, funds, and programs—can generate many benefits, including: ••Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. ••Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. ••Positive economic gains through energy costs saved, avoided medical costs, higher disposable incomes, increased labor productivity, and more jobs. This brief is part of a series and focuses on environmental and human health benefits. State and local governments can analyze their clean energy initiatives using methods and tools described in EPA’s Assessing the

  18. Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    . Research has targeted the assessment toward economic loss evaluation Grossman and Alan 1995; Ofiara 2001Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process and spatial characteristics of different water quality parameters, and simulating economic loss of water

  19. Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis ­ How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic There are a number of structural and conceptual differences between the information provided by climate change models of economic concepts applied to climate change impact and adaptation policy assessment, and to illustrate how

  20. Life-Cycle Assessment of Highway Pavement Alternatives in Aspects of Economic, Environmental, and Social Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Zhuting

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments EIO-LCA Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment EIS Environmental Impact Statements EO Executive Order EPA Environmental Protection Agency ESAL Equivalent Single Axle Loads FHWA Federal Highway Administration GWP... Transaction Cost ............................................. 48 Figure 11. Environmental Impact: Global Warming Potential ........................................ 50 Figure 12. Environmental Impact: CO2 Emissions...

  1. The Economic Impact of New Mexico State University in 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    The Economic Impact of New Mexico State University in 2010 #12; The Economic Impact of New Mexico State University in 2010 Prepared Analysis Arrowhead Center New Mexico State University Las Cruces, NM 88005

  2. Assessing economic consequences of radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.D.; Lee, J.C.; Grimshaw, C.A.; Kalb, P.D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project reviewed the literature on the economic consequences of accidents to determine the availability of assessment methods and data and their applicability to the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal system before closure; determined needs for expansion, revision, or adaptation of methods and data for modeling economic consequences of accidents of the scale projected for the disposal system; and gathered data that might be useful for the needed revisions. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  3. BA Economics and BA Financial Economics Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    BA Economics and BA Financial Economics ­ Assessment Plan Program Learning Objectives The program will prepare graduates: 1. Understand the "economic way model economic decisions. 3. The ability to analyze historical and current events

  4. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA The Economic Impact of The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA The Economic Impact of The University of British Columbia on the BC Economy An update for 2013 Sudmant, Walter 9/1/2013 An update on the 2009 study of UBC's economic impact. #12;The Economic Impact of The University of British Columbia on the B.C. Economy, an update

  5. The Economic Impact of One WVU Home Football Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    The Economic Impact of One WVU Home Football Game on the Monongalia County Economy Dr. Christiadi Demographer October 2012 #12; 1 The Economic Impact of One WVU Home Football Game on the Monongalia County Economy Executive Summary This study attempts to measure the economic impact of a single West

  6. Economic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (SPEE) parameters for evaluating Resource Plays 53 Appendix C: Detailed Play to traditional economic impacts, this report includes a petroleum engineering-based analysis that providesEconomic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry #12;The Economic Impact of the Permian Basin's Oil

  7. Economic and Environmental Impacts of Adoption of Genetically Modified Rice in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bond, Craig A.; Carter, C A; Farzin, Y. Hossein

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic and Environmental Impacts of Adoption ofgrowers. Economic and Environmental Impacts of Adoption of43–50. Economic and Environmental Impacts of Adoption of

  8. Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

  9. assessing health impacts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commission Equality Impact Assessment Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment Forestry...

  10. Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the...

  11. Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a process through which the environmental impacts potentially resulting from a proposed project are identified and assessed early in the planning process....

  12. Evaluating the Economic and Social Impact Your Cultural Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoiciu, Mihai

    Evaluating the Economic and Social Impact of Your Cultural Organization Webinar ­ June 10, 2013 a suite of web applications · Evaluate economic and social impacts · Communicate impacts to others for reporting When we are done, you should be able to use the web applications more effectively to evaluate

  13. Microsoft Word - REPORT Jefferson Lab Economic Impact FY2010...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expanding Jefferson Lab's capabilities has and will continue to create an additional economic impact for the ... * United States in the amount of 760.6 million in economic output...

  14. The Economic Impact of Aurora Health Care in Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    The Economic Impact of Aurora Health Care in Wisconsin A report prepared for Aurora Health Care #12; 2 ABOUT THIS REPORT This study was prepared for Aurora

  15. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model and provides four case studies of potential offshore wind deployment scenarios in different regions of the...

  16. Economic Impact of NREL on Colorado, FY2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY Economic Impact of NREL on Colorado, FY2012 STUDY FUNDED BY: Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC BUSINESS RESEARCH DIVISION Leeds School of Business University of...

  17. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison...

  18. Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in Forklifts and for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ANL-1309 Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in Forklifts and for Backup Power under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Systems Division About Argonne National...

  19. Carbon Cycling, Environmental & Rural Economic Impacts from Collecting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Area Review Steve Kelley, NCSU Rick Gustafson, U of WA Elaine Oneil, CORRIM Carbon Cycling, Environmental & Rural Economic Impacts from Collecting & Processing Specific...

  20. DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    systems cost. Suzanne Tegen, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL): Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios. This presentation...

  1. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of noxious facilities'' be identified and measured To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  2. The economic impacts of noxious facilities on wages and property values: An exploratory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Hemphill, R.C.; Clark, D.E.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent assessments of socioeconomic impacts resulting from the location of potentially hazardous facilities have concentrated on the issue of negative public perceptions and their resulting economic consequences. This report presents an analysis designed to answer the question: Can economic impacts resulting from negative perceptions of ``noxious facilities`` be identified and measured? To identify the impacts of negative perceptions, data on noxious facilities sited throughout the United States were compiled, and secondary economic and demographic data sufficient to analyze the economic impacts on the surrounding study areas were assembled. This study uses wage rate and property value differentials to measure impacts on social welfare so that the extent to which noxious facilities and their associated activities have affected surrounding areas can be determined.

  3. A comparative assessment of the economics of plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.A.; Miller, J.W.; Reid, R.L.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) has been evaluating three technologies for the disposition of approximately 50 metric tons of surplus plutonium from defense-related programs: reactors, immobilization, and deep boreholes. As part of the process supporting an early CY 1997 Record of Decision (ROD), a comprehensive assessment of technical viability, cost, and schedule has been conducted by DOE/MD and its national laboratory contractors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has managed and coordinated the life-cycle cost (LCC) assessment effort for this program. This paper discusses the economic analysis methodology and the results prior to ROD. A secondary intent of the paper is to discuss major technical and economic issues that impact cost and schedule. To evaluate the economics of these technologies on an equitable basis, a set of cost-estimating guidelines and a common cost-estimating format were utilized by all three technology teams. This paper also includes the major economic analysis assumptions and the comparative constant-dollar and discounted-dollar LCCs.

  4. Microsoft Word - Fish Impact Assessment 070512.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K Fish Habitat and Fish Population Impacts ASSESSMENT OF RELATIVE FISH HABITAT AND FISH POPULATION IMPACTS OF I-5 CORRIDOR REINFORCEMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES AND OPTIONS Report to:...

  5. The Roles and Economic Impacts of Technology Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Roles and Economic Impacts of Technology Infrastructure (version 3) Gregory Tassey Senior billion in economic benefits. Beyond measurement activities within an industry, increased specialization the need for interoperability for a wide range of information flows. NIST economic studies have shown

  6. The Economic Impact of Cancer in West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    The Economic Impact of Cancer in West Virginia January 2013 A report prepared for the American Virginia University #12;The Economic Impact of Cancer in West Virginia A Report Prepared for the American West Virginia University 150 Clay St. Morgantown, WV 26501 (304) 293-7831 bebureau@mail.wvu.edu Tami

  7. Final Report 527 Economic Impact Analysis of Short Line Railroads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    railroads. First described is the scope and presence of the eleven short line railroads currently operatingFinal Report 527 Economic Impact Analysis of Short Line Railroads by Jared J. Llorens, Ph.D. James's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Economic Impact Analysis of Short Line Railroads 5. Report Date October

  8. BMW in South Carolina: The Economic Impact of a Leading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    BMW in South Carolina: The Economic Impact of a Leading Sustainable Enterprise at the University of South Carolina conducted a study of the economic impact of BMW Manufacturing Co., LLC (BMW years, BMW has evolved to become more than a manufacturing branch plant of the famous German automaker

  9. Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudarri, David; Fisk, William J.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.

  10. Environmental and economic assessment of microalgae-derived jet fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Nicholas Aaron

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant efforts must be undertaken to quantitatively assess various alternative jet fuel pathways when working towards achieving environmental and economic United States commercial and military alternative aviation ...

  11. Life-cycle assessments: Linking energy, economics, and the environment. Paper No. 571

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankle, S.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been involved in a number of life-cycle assessment (LCA) projects that assess the complete lifetime energy, economic, and environmental impacts of alternative technology options. Life-cycle assessments offer one-stop shopping answers to the total energy and environmental implications of alternative technologies, as well as providing employment and income consequences. In one recently completed study, the lifetime impacts of scenarios involving the production and use of biomass ethanol transportation fuels were assessed. In an ongoing study, the lifetime impacts of electric-powered vehicles versus conventional fuels are being assessed. In a proposed study, the impacts of recycled office paper versus office paper from virgin sources would be assessed. A LCA proceeds by developing mass and energy inventories during all phases of the life-cycle. Special attention is given to energy consumption and environmental releases. Economics are incorporated by evaluating the macroeconomic impacts of the alternative policies, such as employment, wages, and output. Economics can also be incorporated by attempting to place values on the damages imposed by the environmental releases associated with alternative scenarios. This paper discusses life-cycle assessment techniques and their application to building energy issues. Life-cycle assessments show great promise for analysis of buildings energy policy questions.

  12. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model section on the Wind Powering America website.

  13. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE APPALACHIAN GATEWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    May 2010 © 2010 West Virginia University Research Corporation Funding for this report was provided Bureau of Business and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West Virginia University and do not necessarily represent those of the West Virginia University Board of Trustees or Dominion

  14. To appear in, Proc. of NAS Workshop on Assessing the Economic Impacts of Climate Change, April 2010, and special issue of, Energy Economics Uncertainties in Technology Experience Curves for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and special issue of, Energy Economics Uncertainties in Technology Experience Curves for Energy curves) relating reductions in the unit cost of energy and environmental technologies to their cumulative: Experience curve, learning curve, learning-by-doing, uncertainties, endogenous technological change, energy

  15. A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoudi, Hossein, E-mail: mahmoudi@uni-hohenheim.de [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany) [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Renn, Ortwin [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany)] [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany); Vanclay, Frank [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Volker [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany)] [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Karami, Ezatollah [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, ‘risk and social impact assessment’ (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: • A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. • RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. • RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. • For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

  16. The efficiency of environmental impact assessments relating to noise issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The efficiency of environmental impact assessments relating to noise issues Z. Krukle University of environmental impact assessments (EIA) relating to noise issues. The goal is attained through evaluation, effectiveness, environmental impact assessment, noise 1 Introduction Environmental impact assessment (EIA

  17. How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Project (TAP) for state and local officials; Gail Mosey and Eric Lantz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Wind Model.

  18. New tool predicts economic impacts of natural gas stations |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    announced a new tool today for analyzing the economic impacts of building new compressed natural gas fueling stations. Called JOBS NG, the tool is freely available to the public....

  19. Economic impact of emerging rural agribusiness centers: the cooperative linkage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuhrenberg, Stephen Blaine

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the states of Texas, 10 Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Kansas as a base for defining and measuring agribusiness center growth. In each state, regions were selected for analysis based on agriculture as a dominant economic activity. Counties within a... of this study was to determine the economic impacts of current and emerging rural business centers on cooperatives in the Texas High Plains and vice versa. The study determines the impact of cooperative business activity on a county's agribusiness center...

  20. Statewide and Electricity-Sector Models for Economic Assessments of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statewide and Electricity-Sector Models for Economic Assessments of Hawai`i Clean Energy Policies 9.2 Deliverable Economic and Environmental Modeling of Island Energy Systems By the Hawai`i Natural of Hawai`i Economic Research Organization August 2012 #12;2 Acknowledgement: This material is based upon

  1. The Economic Impacts of Agriculture in Wisconsin Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    The Economic Impacts of Agriculture in Wisconsin Counties Steven Deller Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics University of Wisconsin­Madison/Extension David Williams Agricultural and Natural-Extension, Cooperative Extension program areas of Agriculture and Natural Resources and Community, Natural Resource

  2. Assessing the economic case for stratified medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goren, Amir, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to explore the economic conditions that favor the joint development of therapeutics and companion diagnostics. I hypothesize that predictive biomarkers can generate economic value in drug development ...

  3. Environmental Impact Assessment (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Province of PEI has established an environmental impact assessment process for projects that could have an impact on the environment. The Province and the Federal Government cooperate in the...

  4. Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

  5. The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peach, James; Starbuck, C.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economic impact of coal mining in New Mexico is examined in this report. The analysis is based on economic multipliers derived from an input-output model of the New Mexico economy. The direct, indirect, and induced impacts of coal mining in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment, and labor income for calendar year 2007. Tax, rental, and royalty income to the State of New Mexico are also presented. Historical coal production, reserves, and price data are also presented and discussed. The impacts of coal-fired electricity generation will be examined in a separate report.

  6. Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, S; Merrill, S

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research evaluates approaches to measuring the returns on federal research investments. This report identifies new methodologies and metrics that can be developed and used for assessing returns on research across a wide range of fields (biomedical, information technology, energy, agriculture, environment, and other biological and physical sciences, etc.), while using one or more background papers that review current methodologies as a starting point for the discussion. It focuses on tools that are able to exploit available data in the relatively near term rather than on methodologies that may require substantial new data collection. Over the last several years, there has been a growing interest in policy circles in identifying the payoffs from federal agency research investments, especially in terms of economic growth, competitiveness, and jobs. The extraordinary increase in research expenditures under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and the President�������¢����������������s commitment to science and technology (S&T) funding increases going forward have heightened the need for measuring the impacts of research investments. Without a credible analysis of their outcomes, the recent and proposed increases in S&T funding may not be sustained, especially given competing claims for federal funding and pressures to reduce projected federal budget deficits. Motivated by these needs and requirements, Measuring the Economic Impacts of Federal Investments in Research reviews and discusses the use of quantitative and qualitative data to evaluate the returns on federal research and development (R&D) investments. Despite the job-focused mandate of the current ARRA reporting requirements, the impact of S&T funding extend well beyond employment. For instance, federal funding in energy research may lead to innovations that would reduce energy costs at the household level, energy imports at the national level, and greenhouse gas emissions at the global level. In principle, these benefits can be measured as a return on research investments, with appropriate consideration of time lags to research outcomes and attribution to private as well as public expenditure. With appropriate metrics, the same could be true for benefits to public health, environmental quality, and food productivity and security. Federal funding of research leads to the development of human capital that is deployed in a variety of occupations with economic and social impacts. Research also produces information that is used in formal (e.g., regulatory and judicial) and informal (e.g., firm and consumer) decision making processes. In addition to reviewing the range of work (by academics, consultants, and research agencies themselves) that has been done in measuring research outcomes and providing a forum to discuss their methods, this report also considers the different methodologies used across fields of research (e.g., agriculture and energy research) to identifies which are applicable to a range of federal S&T funding.

  7. Economic Impact of the Texas Poultry Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carey, John B.

    2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is estimated that the Texas poultry industry contributes more than $1.6 billion to the state's economy, according to results of a survey of broiler, egg and turkey producers operating in 2003. Details about industry income, employees and economic...

  8. DECEMBER 2000 Economic Impact of the University of Hawai`i System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPORT ON THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I SYSTEM DECEMBER 2000 #12;Economic Impact of the University of Hawai`i System Prepared by: University of Hawai`i: Economic Research Organization (UHERO Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism. #12;1 Economic Impact of the University of Hawai

  9. Impacts assessment for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bay Area Economics

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the economic and other impacts that will be created by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction and ongoing operation, as well as the impacts that may be created by new technologies that may be developed as a result of NIF development and operation.

  10. Conceptualising the effectiveness of impact assessment processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanchitpricha, Chaunjit, E-mail: chaunjit@g.sut.ac.th [School of Environmental Health, Suranaree University of Technology, 111 University Avenue, Maung District, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand)] [School of Environmental Health, Suranaree University of Technology, 111 University Avenue, Maung District, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom) [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Unit for Environmental Sciences and Management School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Internal Box 375, North West University (Potchefstroom campus) (South Africa)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims at conceptualising the effectiveness of impact assessment processes through the development of a literature-based framework of criteria to measure impact assessment effectiveness. Four categories of effectiveness were established: procedural, substantive, transactive and normative, each containing a number of criteria; no studies have previously brought together all four of these categories into such a comprehensive, criteria-based framework and undertaken systematic evaluation of practice. The criteria can be mapped within a cycle/or cycles of evaluation, based on the ‘logic model’, at the stages of input, process, output and outcome to enable the identification of connections between the criteria across the categories of effectiveness. This framework is considered to have potential application in measuring the effectiveness of many impact assessment processes, including strategic environmental assessment (SEA), environmental impact assessment (EIA), social impact assessment (SIA) and health impact assessment (HIA). -- Highlights: • Conceptualising effectiveness of impact assessment processes. • Identification of factors influencing effectiveness of impact assessment processes. • Development of criteria within a framework for evaluating IA effectiveness. • Applying the logic model to examine connections between effectiveness criteria.

  11. Environmental Impact Assessment Biologist Biologist R24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Environmental Impact Assessment Biologist Biologist R24 Annual Salary: $58,332.28 - $66,652.94 Please note: While the current vacancy exists in Prince George or Smithers*, Environmental Impact, but at a lower classification. A great opportunity to make an impact on the province's environmental protection

  12. Economic Impacts and Business Opportunities | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hostedEconomic

  13. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  14. Economic assessment of CO? capture and disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.; Jacoby, Henry D.; Ellerman, A. Denny.; Leung, Wing-Chi.; Yang, Zili.

    A multi-sector multi-region general equilibrium model of economic growth and emissions is used to explore the conditions that will determine the market penetration of CO2 capture and disposal technology.

  15. Economic impacts on the United States of siting decisions for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peerenboom, J.P.; Hanson, M.E.; Huddleston, J.R. [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study that examines and compares the probable short-term economic impacts of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) on the United States (U.S.) if (1) ITER were to be sited in the U.S., or (2) ITER were to be sited in one of the other countries that, along with the U.S., is currently participating in the ITER program. Life-cycle costs associated with ITER construction, operation, and decommissioning are analyzed to assess their economic impact. A number of possible U.S. host and U.S. non-host technology and cost-sharing arrangements with the other ITER Parties are examined, although cost-sharing arrangements and the process by which the Parties will select a host country and an ITER site remain open issues. Both national and local/regional economic impacts, as measured by gross domestic product, regional output, employment, net exports, and income, are considered. These impacts represent a portion of the complex, interrelated set of economic considerations that characterize U.S. host and U.S. non-host participation in ITER. A number of other potentially important economic and noneconomic considerations are discussed qualitatively.

  16. Economic Impacts of the Arkstorm Scenario1 Ian Sue Wing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Economic Impacts of the Arkstorm Scenario1 Ian Sue Wing1 ; Adam Z. Rose2 ; and Anne M. Wein3 2 3 equilibrium model of the California economy to perform this economic consequence analysis.8 Economic and wind damages, economic impacts; business18 interruption; economic resilience; computable general

  17. The Energy and Economic Impacts of Expanding International Emissions Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Energy and Economic Impacts of Expanding International Emissions Trading Tianyu Qi, Niven Trading Tianyu Qi* , Niven Winchester , Valerie J. Karplus and Xiliang Zhang Abstract Emissions trading of the European Union's Emissions Trading System with a new system in Australia in 2015, this paper simulates

  18. The Economic Impact of Drought and Mitigation in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    The Economic Impact of Drought and Mitigation in Agriculture Texas Drought and Beyond CIESS Austin · In Agriculture, it Began in 2010 ­ Wheat and other winter grazing crops are planted in the Fall ­ Lost value ­ Infrastructure losses #12;Agricultural Costs of Drought · Estimated $7.62 Billion ­ Corn, cotton, wheat, hay $4

  19. Tourism's Impact on Economic Growth and Development in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Tourism's Impact on Economic Growth and Development in Spain Jessica Dennis #12;Spanish Civil War as a % of Spain's GDP #12;50,000,000 5,050,000,000 10,050,000,000 15,050,000,000 20,050,000,000 25,050,000,000 30 International Tourism Receipts, Foreign Direct Investment Reciepts & Remittances as % of Spain's GDP Int

  20. The Potential Economic Impacts of a Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    , hydropower, and biomass) according to a specified schedule. Many states are prioritizing renewable energyThe Potential Economic Impacts of a Renewable Portfolio Standard in Delaware Briefing Paper of Figures Figure 1. State Renewable Portfolio Standards in the U.S. ..................... 1 Figure 2. Retail

  1. The Economic Impact of South Carolina's Automotive Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    or industry. Significant investments in the automotive and ground transportation industry began in 1973The Economic Impact of South Carolina's Automotive Cluster Developed by: Division of Research Moore's Automotive Cluster 1 Study Prepared by: Dr. Douglas P. Woodward Director, Division of Research woodward

  2. Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment Publishing Template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment Publishing Template Name of policy, function) used Population Census 2001, Public Opinion Survey 2009, local visitor surveys, staff records, customer visitor survey, staff survey, events feedback forms and other feedback from customers via staff, mail

  3. Environmental Impact Assessment in Canadian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    to Know This? Why Do Project Engineers Need to Know This? As the Keystone Pipeline and Prosperity Gold ­ you may not have a "project" When approvals are given the basis for limits, design criteria the beginning to the end, should not be limited to problems of engineering and construction. Social, economic

  4. Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support...

  5. Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment Publishing Template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment Publishing Template Step 10 Name of policy, function, Public Opinion Survey 2009, local visitor surveys, staff records, customer feedback. Summary of Impact visitor survey, staff survey, events feedback forms and other feedback from customers via staff, mail

  6. Office of Economic Impact and Diversity 2003 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers a one-year period in which the Office successfully completed several major activities. The Office of Economic Impact and Diversity (ED) is responsible for the development and implementation of Department-wide polices in the areas of small business, diversity and minority economic development. ED oversees civil rights laws, rules, and regulations, and establishes Department-wide civil rights policy. Additionally, ED promotes excellence in the workplace and adheres to the objectives stated below relative to the President’s Management Agenda (PMA): Strategic management of human capital; Competitive sourcing; Improved financial performance; Expanded electronic government, and Budget and performance integration

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives

  8. Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns Rev Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment on Water Quality #12;Prepared with a planned 150 MW offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, an assessment was made of the effects the wind farm would for the preparation of EIA studies for offshore wind farms." Horns Rev is situated off Blĺvands Huk, which is Denmark

  9. An Impact Assessment Model for Distributed Adaptive Security Situation Assessment*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1 An Impact Assessment Model for Distributed Adaptive Security Situation Assessment* Mark Heckman mechanism is not simply to stop attacks, but to protect a computing resource so that the resource can continue to perform its function. A computing resource, however, is only a component of a larger system

  10. Economic Concepts AppliedEconomic Concepts Applied toto the Evaluation ofthe Evaluation of RegionalRegional Climate ImpactsClimate Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Concepts AppliedEconomic Concepts Applied toto the Evaluation ofthe Evaluation of Regional Centre #12;Purpose of Establishment of Links between Physical Climate Change Information and Economic Activity 1. To relate detailed climate change impact scenarios to socio-economic development trends

  11. Sick of Soot: The Public Health and Economic Impacts of Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sick of Soot: The Public Health and Economic Impacts of Diesel Pollution in California Sick of Soot: The Public Health and Economic Impacts of Diesel Pollution in California 2004...

  12. DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model Download the presentation slides from the...

  13. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

  14. Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

  15. Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Brazil through life- cycle assessment (LCA), and findin Brazil through life-cycle assessment (LCA), and findLCA inventory: How this affects Life Cycle impact Assessment.

  16. Page 1 of 13 Institutional Strategies for Capturing Socio-Economic Impact of Academic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    Corresponding author: Rosa Scoble, rosa.scoble@brunel.ac.uk, +44 (0)1895266031 Abstract Evaluation of socio-economic and evaluation of socio-economic impact. Furthermore, it argues that understanding the typology of impactsPage 1 of 13 Institutional Strategies for Capturing Socio-Economic Impact of Academic Research Rosa

  17. Methods for Estimating the Economic Impact of Transportation Improvements: An Interpretive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    ://nexus.umn.edu 1 #12;Abstract This chapter reviews several methods of evaluating the economic impacts-Based Evaluation 2.1 State of Practice and Limitations The majority of economic impact studies are undertaken usingMethods for Estimating the Economic Impact of Transportation Improvements: An Interpretive Review

  18. Evaluating the Economic Impact of Film Production Incentives in South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Evaluating the Economic Impact of Film Production Incentives in South Carolina Prepared by Division (2008) February 2008 #12;Evaluating the Economic Impact of Film Production Incentives in South Carolina. #12;Evaluating the Economic Impact of Film Production Incentives in South Carolina, 2 This model

  19. The Economic Impact of The Coca-Cola System on South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    The Economic Impact of The Coca-Cola System on South Africa Prepared by Division of Research March 2005 SOUTH AFRICA SOUTH AFRICA #12;The Economic Impact of The Coca-Cola System on South Africa-Cola system's economic impact on South Africa. Conducted during 2003-04, the study represents a wide

  20. An assessement of global energy resource economic potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an assessment of global economic energy potentials for all major natural energy resources. This work is based on both an extensive literature review and calculations using natural resource assessment data. Economic potentials are presented in the form of cost-supply curves, in terms of energy flows for renewable energy sources, or fixed amounts for fossil and nuclear resources, with strong emphasis on uncertainty, using a consistent methodology that allow direct comparisons to be made. In order to interpolate through available resource assessment data and associated uncertainty, a theoretical framework and a computational methodology are given based on statistical properties of different types of resources, justified empirically by the data, and used throughout. This work aims to provide a global database for natural energy resources ready to integrate into models of energy systems, enabling to introduce at the same time uncertainty over natural resource assessments. The supplementary mate...

  1. Economic Assessment ofEconomic Assessment of BiofuelBiofuel Support PoliciesSupport Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , country costs Co-product value Net price gasoline Net costs, total #12;Impact ofImpact of biofuelbiofuel? · How are agricultural prices affected? #12;AA majormajor challengechallenge:: ProductionImpact of biofuelbiofuel support removal on world commodity prices,support removal on world commodity prices, 20132013

  2. Privacy Impact Assessment Chandra Digest Request

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Privacy Impact Assessment Chandra Digest Request I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: Chandra EPO Digest (http://chandra.harvard.edu/chronicle/news_priv.html) 2. IT System Sponsor: Van Mc digest. 4. With whom the information will be shared. #12;Only the providers of the material (certain CXC

  3. Air quality resolution for health impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .M. Thompson, R.K. Saari and N.E. Selin *Reprinted from Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 14: 969­978, doi: 10 for health impact assessment: influence of regional characteristics T. M. Thompson1,*, R. K. Saari1,2, and N

  4. Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) I. System Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: NPM Current Public editing done at the time of entry. 2. Why the information is being collected. The NPM Education Department of the current permanent NPM Education Department staff only. The file resides on a server and access

  5. Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) I. System Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: NPM Public Program is being collected. The NPM Education Department manages numerous volunteers. A spreadsheet is required is shared with members of the current permanent NPM Education Department staff only. The file resides

  6. DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department of Energy -StateOffshore Wind Economic ImpactsStudent

  7. Economic impacts of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic : a cross-sectional analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Shaneyfelt, Calvin R.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A NISAC study on the economic effects of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic was done in order to assess the differential impacts at the state and industry levels given changes in absenteeism, mortality, and consumer spending rates. Part of the analysis was to determine if there were any direct relationships between pandemic impacts and gross domestic product (GDP) losses. Multiple regression analysis was used because it shows very clearly which predictors are significant in their impact on GDP. GDP impact data taken from the REMI PI+ (Regional Economic Models, Inc., Policy Insight +) model was used to serve as the response variable. NISAC economists selected the average absenteeism rate, mortality rate, and consumer spending categories as the predictor variables. Two outliers were found in the data: Nevada and Washington, DC. The analysis was done twice, with the outliers removed for the second analysis. The second set of regressions yielded a cleaner model, but for the purposes of this study, the analysts deemed it not as useful because particular interest was placed on determining the differential impacts to states. Hospitals and accommodation were found to be the most important predictors of percentage change in GDP among the consumer spending variables.

  8. The Economic Impact of BMW on South Carolina The Division of Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    The Economic Impact of BMW on South Carolina The Division of Research May 2002 #12;The Economic Impact of BMW on South Carolina Executive Summary In 1992 South Carolina reached a milestone in economic development. While the U.S. economy was mired in re- cession, BMW AG announced it would construct an ad

  9. ITP Petroleum Refining: Impacts of Condition Assessment on Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ITP Petroleum Refining: Impacts of Condition Assessment on Energy Use: Selected Applications in Chemicals Processing and Petroleum Refining ITP Petroleum Refining: Impacts of...

  10. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ignored in life cycle assessment (LCA). Some productionexplicit manner, while life cycle assessment (LCA) does notuse impacts in life cycle assessment. Int J LCA 11(5):363–

  11. Conference Proceedings, 2011 Low Impact Development Symposium, Submitted, March 2012 Economic and Adaptation Benefits of Low Impact Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conference Proceedings, 2011 Low Impact Development Symposium, Submitted, March 2012 1 Economic.ballestero@unh.edu; web: www.unh.edu/unhsc/. #12;Conference Proceedings, 2011 Low Impact Development Symposium, Submitted

  12. Economic impacts of wild hogs on selected Texas agriculture operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bach, Joel Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to them, TABLE OF CO~S Page ABSTRACT DEDICATION 1V ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS vn1 LIST OF TABLES CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION xi Problem Statement Goals and Research Objectives Information Needs Process and Purpose of Research... Methods Impact Assessment Methods 14 18 19 20 24 24 IV RESEARCH FINDINGS 26 Case Studies and Enterprise Budget Explanations Respondent ff1 Case Study . . Budget Explanations 27 27 27 32 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CHAPTER Page...

  13. A comparative assessment of the economics of plutonium disposition including comparison with other nuclear fuel cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.A.; Miller, J.W.; Reid, R.L.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has been evaluating three technologies for the disposition of approximately 50 metric tons of surplus plutonium from defense-related programs: reactors, immobilization, and deep boreholes. As part of the process supporting an early CY 1997 Record of Decision (ROD), a comprehensive assessment of technical viability, cost, and schedule has been conducted. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has managed and coordinated the life-cycle cost (LCC) assessment effort for this program. This paper discusses the economic analysis methodology and the results prior to ROD. Other objectives of the paper are to discuss major technical and economic issues that impact plutonium disposition cost and schedule. Also to compare the economics of a once-through weapons-derived MOX nuclear fuel cycle to other fuel cycles, such as those utilizing spent fuel reprocessing. To evaluate the economics of these technologies on an equitable basis, a set of cost estimating guidelines and a common cost-estimating format were utilized by all three technology teams. This paper also includes the major economic analysis assumptions and the comparative constant-dollar and discounted-dollar LCCs.

  14. Turbocharged PFBC Power Plant Technical and Economic Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leppke, D.

    scale modularization techniques to both a bubbling-bed type PFBC, a circulating-bed type PFBC, and a 250MWe turbine-generator plant. Alternate PFBC designs using field construction techniques and prOViding more space for major maintenance...TURBOCHARGED PFBC POWER PLANT TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENTS DELBERT M. LEPPKE Senior Technical Manager Fluor Daniel Chicago, Illinois Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boilers are receiving considerable attention by the utility...

  15. Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J., Brown; B., Hoen; E., Lantz; J., Pender; R., Wiser

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show that penetrations of at least 20 percent are feasible. Several studies have used input-output models to predict direct, indirect, and induced economic development impacts. These analyses have often been completed prior to project construction. Available studies have not yet investigated the economic development impacts of wind development at the county level using post-construction econometric evaluation methods. Analysis of county-level impacts is limited. However, previous county-level analyses have estimated operation-period employment at 0.2 to 0.6 jobs per megawatt (MW) of power installed and earnings at $9,000/MW to $50,000/MW. We find statistically significant evidence of positive impacts of wind development on county-level per capita income from the OLS and spatial lag models when they are applied to the full set of wind and non-wind counties. The total impact on annual per capita income of wind turbine development (measured in MW per capita) in the spatial lag model was $21,604 per MW. This estimate is within the range of values estimated in the literature using input-output models. OLS results for the wind-only counties and matched samples are similar in magnitude, but are not statistically significant at the 10-percent level. We find a statistically significant impact of wind development on employment in the OLS analysis for wind counties only, but not in the other models. Our estimates of employment impacts are not precise enough to assess the validity of employment impacts from input-output models applied in advance of wind energy project construction. The analysis provides empirical evidence of positive income effects at the county level from cumulative wind turbine development, consistent with the range of impacts estimated using input-output models. Employment impacts are less clear.

  16. Feng and Figliozzi 1 Impacts of Economic, Technological and Operational Factors on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    of a complete economic and logistics evaluation of the competitiveness of the new vehicle type. In additionFeng and Figliozzi 1 Impacts of Economic, Technological and Operational Factors on the Economic a purely economic perspective, there is a cost tradeoff between the low operating and maintenance costs

  17. The Economic Impact of Oregon's Urban Research University $1.4 billion and growing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    The Economic Impact of Oregon's Urban Research University $1.4 billion and growing #12;From this in the face of tough economic times. This report offers a snapshot of the economic benefits Portland State are an economic catalyst through our partnerships, our research and our programs. Continue to expect great things

  18. Species for the screening assessment. Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O`Neil, T.K.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of past nuclear production operations along the Columbia River, there is intense public and tribal interest in assessing any residual Hanford Site related contamination along the river from the Hanford Reach to the Pacific Ocean. The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment was proposed to address these concerns. The assessment of the Columbia River is being conducted in phases. The initial phase is a screening assessment of the risk, which addresses current environmental conditions for a range of potential uses. One component of the screening assessment estimates the risk from contaminants in the Columbia River to the environment. The objective of the ecological risk assessment is to determine whether contaminants from the Columbia River pose a significant threat to selected receptor species that exist in the river and riparian communities of the study area. This report (1) identifies the receptor species selected for the screening assessment of ecological risk and (2) describes the selection process. The species selection process consisted of two tiers. In Tier 1, a master species list was developed that included many plant and animal species known to occur in the aquatic and riparian systems of the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam and the Columbia River estuary. This master list was reduced to 368 species that occur in the study area (Priest Rapids Dam to McNary Dam). In Tier 2, the 181 Tier 1 species were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF METHODS USED TO INVESTIGATE THE IMPACT OF OFFSHORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    ASSESSMENT OF METHODS USED TO INVESTIGATE THE IMPACT OF OFFSHORE WIND FARMS ON SEABIRDS Kate Louise....................................................................................2 Environmental impact assessments for offshore wind developments..................7 Study aims Chapter three: Offshore marine surveillance radar installation and methods for ensuring data quality

  20. Recent trends in automobile recycling: An energy and economic assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Rizy, C.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexanyder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent and anticipated trends in the material composition of domestic and imported automobiles and the increasing cost of landfilling the non-recyclable portion of automobiles (automobile shredder residue or ASR) pose questions about the future of automobile recycling. This report documents the findings of a study sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Analysis to examine the impacts of these and other relevant trends on the life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles and on the economic viability of the domestic automobile recycling industry. More specifically, the study (1) reviewed the status of the automobile recycling industry in the United States, including the current technologies used to process scrapped automobiles and the challenges facing the automobile recycling industry; (2) examined the current status and future trends of automobile recycling in Europe and Japan, with the objectives of identifying ``lessons learned`` and pinpointing differences between those areas and the United States; (3) developed estimates of the energy system impacts of the recycling status quo and projections of the probable energy impacts of alternative technical and institutional approaches to recycling; and (4) identified the key policy questions that will determine the future economic viability of automobile shredder facilities in the United States.

  1. Assessing corporate project impacts in changeable contexts: A human rights perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salcito, Kendyl, E-mail: kendyl.salcito@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.edu [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.com [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Weiss, Mitchell G., E-mail: mitchell-g.weiss@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Wielga, Mark, E-mail: wielga@nomogaia.org [NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Utzinger, Jürg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project-level impact assessment was originally conceived as a snapshot taken in advance of project implementation, contrasting current conditions with a likely future scenario involving a variety of predicted impacts. Current best practice guidance has encouraged a shift towards longitudinal assessments from the pre-project stage through the implementation and operating phases. Experience and study show, however, that assessment of infrastructure-intensive projects rarely endures past the project's construction phase. Negative consequences for environmental, social and health outcomes have been documented. Such consequences clarify the pressing need for longitudinal assessment in each of these domains, with human rights impact assessment (HRIA) as an umbrella over, and critical augmentation of, environmental, social and health assessments. Project impacts on human rights are more closely linked to political, economic and other factors beyond immediate effects of a company's policy and action throughout the project lifecycle. Delineating these processes requires an adequate framework, with strategies for collecting longitudinal data, protocols that provide core information for impact assessment and guidance for adaptive mitigation strategies as project-related effects change over time. This article presents general principles for the design and implementation of sustained, longitudinal HRIA, based on experience assessing and responding to human rights impact in a uranium mining project in Malawi. The case study demonstrates the value of longitudinal assessment both for limiting corporate risk and improving human welfare. - Graphical abstract: Assessing changes in human rights condition as affected by both project and context, over time. - Highlights: • Corporate capital projects affect human rights in myriad ways. • Ongoing, longitudinal impact assessment techniques are needed. • We present an approach for conducting longitudinal human rights impact assessment. • Our methodology allows distinguishing corporate impacts from contextual changes. • Promptly observing context changes and impacts enables companies to react nimbly.

  2. Advancing the theory and practice of impact assessment: Setting the research agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Jenny, E-mail: jenny@integral-sustainability.net [Integral Sustainability, PO Box 79, South Fremantle WA 6162 (Australia) [Integral Sustainability, PO Box 79, South Fremantle WA 6162 (Australia); School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, GPO Box U1987, Perth WA 6845 (Australia); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa) [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [Integral Sustainability, PO Box 79, South Fremantle WA 6162 (Australia) [Integral Sustainability, PO Box 79, South Fremantle WA 6162 (Australia); School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa); School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University, South St, Murdoch WA 6150 (Australia); Retief, Francois, E-mail: francois.retief@nwu.ac.za [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)] [School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact assessment has been in place for over 40 years and is now practised in some form in all but two of the world's nations. In this paper we reflect on the state of the art of impact assessment theory and practice, focusing on six well-established forms: EIA, SEA, policy assessment, SIA, HIA and sustainability assessment. We note that although the fundamentals of impact assessment have their roots in the US National Environmental Policy Act 1969 (NEPA) each branch of the field is distinct in also drawing on other theoretical and conceptual bases that in turn shape the prevailing discourse in each case, generating increasing degrees of specialisation within each sub-field. Against this backdrop, we consider the strengths and weaknesses of collective impact assessment practice, concluding that although there are substantial strengths, the plethora of specialist branches is generating a somewhat confusing picture and lack of clarity regarding how the pieces of the impact assessment jigsaw puzzle fit together. We use this review to suggest an overarching research agenda that will enable impact assessment to evolve in line with changing expectations for what it should deliver. -- Highlights: ? Strengths, weakness, opportunities and threats for IA are explored in this paper ? EIA, SEA, policy assessment, SIA, HIA and sustainability assessment are reviewed ? Diversity of practice is both a strength and weakness in the current economic climate ? There are opportunities to simplify IA by focusing on common and fundamental elements ? Continued research into theory related to IA effectiveness is also essential.

  3. Uncovering the Stealth Cluster The Economic Impact of Civilian and Military

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Uncovering the Stealth Cluster The Economic Impact of Civilian and Military Aerospace on South on advanced composite materials, precision metal parts, and systems integration, the jobs

  4. Webinar: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model, originally presented on May 22, 2012.

  5. Review of Methods for Estimating the Economic Impact of Transportation Improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    attention to the role of induced demand in economic evaluation, since it is of- ten one of the most uncertain and confounding factors faced by those charged with conducting economic evaluationReview of Methods for Estimating the Economic Impact of Transportation Improvements Michael Iacono

  6. The Economic Impact of the Charles Town Thoroughbred Horse Racing Industry on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    The Economic Impact of the Charles Town Thoroughbred Horse Racing Industry on the Jefferson County Research Assistant Tom S Witt, Director and Associate Dean Bureau of Business and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West Virginia University November 2011 Funding for this research was provided

  7. Estimating the Economic Impact for the Commercial Hard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    1 Estimating the Economic Impact for the Commercial Hard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy that the economic impact of the cultured hard clam industry on the economy of Florida was approximately $34 million communities and the statewide economy Florida. A follow-up study to the 2000 study was recently funded

  8. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for Offshore Wind, is a computer tool for studying the economic impacts of fixed-bottom offshore wind projects in the United States. This presentation provides the results of an analysis of four offshore wind development scenarios in the Southeast Atlantic, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions.

  9. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  10. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  11. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.; Flores, F.; Zammit, D.; Kraemer, M.; Miles, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Mid-Atlantic region.

  12. Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment Indices Link Importance Numerical Examples Summary a Environmental Impact Assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Examples Summary a Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links Environmental Impact Assessment Indices #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment is gratefully acknowledged. Anna Nagurney, Qiang Qiang,, Ladimer S. Nagurney Environmental Impact Assessment

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR THE PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS WITHIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1Environmental Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.2Regulatory Impact Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOLOGICAL IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Atka Mackerel Biology

  14. Valuing Climate Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models: The MIT IGSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a strategy for investigating the impacts of climate change on Earth’s physical, biological and human resources and links to their socio-economic consequences. The features of the integrated global system framework ...

  15. The economic impact of the Department of Energy on the State of New Mexico Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansford, Robert R.; Adcock, Larry D.; Gentry, Lucille M.; Ben-David, Shaul; Temple, John

    1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides a major source of economic benefits in New Mexico, second only to the activities of the U.S. Department of Defense. The agency's far-reaching economic influence within the state is the focus of this report. Economic benefits arising from the various activities and functions of both the Department and its contractors have accrued to the state continuously for over 50 years. For several years, DOE/Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) have maintained inter-industry, input-output modeling capabilities to assess DOE's impacts on the state of New Mexico and the other substate regions most directly impacted by DOE activities. One of the major uses of input-output techniques is to assess the effects of developments initiated outside the economy such as Federal DOE monies that flow into the state, on an economy. The information on which the models are based is updated periodically to ensure the most accurate depiction possible of the economy for the period of reference. For this report, the reference periods are Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997), and FY 1998 (October 1, 1997, through September 30, 1998). Total impact represents both direct and indirect impacts (resending by business), including induced (resending by households) effects. The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models uniquely developed for New Mexico. This report includes seven main sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Profile of DOE Activities in New Mexico; (3) DOE Expenditure Patterns; (4) Measuring DOE/New Mexico's Economic Impact: (5) Technology Transfer within the Federal Labs funded by DOE/New Mexico; (6) Glossary of Terms; and (7) Technical Appendix containing a description of the model.

  16. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power, and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  17. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  18. Environmental impact assessment: Retrospect and prospect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay, Stephen [Faculty of Development and Society, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard Street, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.a.jay@shu.ac.uk; Jones, Carys [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: carys.jones@manchester.ac.uk; Slinn, Paul [Sefton Borough Council, Southport, Merseyside (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: paul.slinn@eas.sefton.gov.uk; Wood, Christopher [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: chris.wood@manchester.ac.uk

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread experience of environmental impact assessment (EIA) as an anticipatory environmental management tool has generated a considerable debate over the extent to which it is achieving its purposes. This has been measured in terms of EIA 'effectiveness', especially as discussion has moved away from issues of procedural implementation, to the more substantive goals of EIA and its place within broader decision-making contexts. Empirical studies have revealed the relatively weak degree of influence on planning decisions that is being exerted by EIA, which is increasingly being attributed to its rationalist beginnings. This article seeks to direct this debate towards the founding political purposes of EIA which, it is argued, provide a neglected, yet strong, basis for EIA reform. A number of illustrative suggestions are made as a result of this redirection, to enable EIA to adopt a more determinative role in decision making and to contribute to more sustainable patterns of development planning.

  19. A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through Validity Testing of a Comparitive-Projection Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, J. E.; Heideman, K. E.

    An established economic simulation model for reservoir development was applied to ten reservoir projects throughout Texas. The model as a predictor of economic impact was given a difficult test because of the diversity of geographic, economic...

  20. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 5. Social and economic impacts of geothermal development in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canon, P.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overview statement of the socio-economic effects of developing geothermal energy in the State of Hawaii is presented. The following functions are presented: (1) identification of key social and economic issues, (2) inventory of all available pertinent data, (3) analysis and assessment of available data, and (4) identification of what additional information is required for adequate assessment.

  1. Catalysis-by-design impacts assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, L L; Young, J K [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Sen, R K [Sen (R.K.) and Associates, Washington, DC (USA)

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalyst researchers have always recognized the need to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of catalytic processes, and have hoped that it would lead to developing a theoretical predictive base to guide the search for new catalysts. This understanding allows one to develop a set of hierarchical models, from fundamental atomic-level ab-initio models to detailed engineering simulations of reactor systems, to direct the search for optimized, efficient catalyst systems. During the last two decades, the explosions of advanced surface analysis techniques have helped considerably to develop the building blocks for understanding various catalytic reactions. An effort to couple these theoretical and experimental advances to develop a set of hierarchical models to predict the nature of catalytic materials is a program entitled Catalysis-by-Design (CRD).'' In assessing the potential impacts of CBD on US industry, the key point to remember is that the value of the program lies in developing a novel methodology to search for new catalyst systems. Industrial researchers can then use this methodology to develop proprietary catalysts. Most companies involved in catalyst R D have two types of ongoing projects. The first type, what we call market-driven R D,'' are projects that support and improve upon a company's existing product lines. Project of the second type, technology-driven R D,'' are longer term, involve the development of totally new catalysts, and are initiated through scientists' research ideas. The CBD approach will impact both types of projects. However, this analysis indicates that the near-term impacts will be on market-driven'' projects. The conclusions and recommendations presented in this report were obtained by the authors through personal interviews with individuals involved in a variety of industrial catalyst development programs and through the three CBD workshops held in the summer of 1989. 34 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. assessing radiation impacts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  3. assessing habitat impacts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an easyEnvironmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU-...

  4. assessment environmental impact: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction to HIA Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan HIA Lessons learned 12;Health Impact Assessment Screening Scoping Bertini, Robert L. 209 VTAC:...

  5. assessing environmental impacts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction to HIA Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan HIA Lessons learned 12;Health Impact Assessment Screening Scoping Bertini, Robert L. 209 VTAC:...

  6. Institutional Design for Strategic Environmental Assessment on Urban Economic and Social Development Planning in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song Guojun, E-mail: Songguojun@vip.sohu.com; Zhou Li; Zhang Lei

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Economic and Social Development Plans (NESDPs) of cities in China, given their comprehensive, integrated and strategic nature, have significant and profound impacts on the development of cities and their embedded ecological environments. Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEAs) on city NESDPs have the potential to improve environmental policy integration at strategic level and to safeguard the sustainable development of cities. However, these plans are normally exempted from the current SEA requirement in China. We argue that it is more feasible to apply SEAs on city NESDPs before SEAs are expanded to higher level NESDPs in China. This article attempts to propose a China-specific institutional design for SEAs on city NESDPs based on experiments in selected cities and within the current legal framework. To obtain a holistic view about the long-term development of cities, more qualitative and descriptive analysis-based assessment methods should be adopted to broaden participation, to encourage the exchange of information and to reach consensus. - Highlights: > National Economic and Social Development Plans for Cities (NESDPs) in China is a very popular and significant decision made by municipal government. > We propose a institutional framework to conduct strategic environmental assessment to NESDPs. > The key features of the institutional framework are the independent SEA approval committee and a professional consulting agency.

  7. Screening assessment and requirements for a comprehensive assessment: Volume 1, Draft. Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the impact to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site-derived contaminants, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, tribal, stockholder, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. The Team agreed to conduct CRCIA using a phased approach. The initial phase, includes two components: 1) a screening assessment to evaluate the potential impact to the river, resulting from current levels of Hanford-derived contaminants in order to support decisions on Interim Remedial Measures, and 2) a definition of the essential work remaining to provide an acceptable comprehensive river impact assessment. The screening assessment is described in Part I of this report. The essential work remaining is Part II of this report. The objective of the screening assessment is to identify areas where the greatest potential exists for adverse effects on humans or the environment. Part I of this report discusses the scope, technical approach, and results of the screening assessment. Part II defines a new paradigm for predecisional participation by those affected by Hanford cleanup decisions.

  8. 2014 Evaluation and Economic Impact of the Montana Manufacturing Extension Center 1BY Paul Polzin, Emeritus Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    2014 Evaluation and Economic Impact of the Montana Manufacturing Extension Center 1BY Paul Polzin, Emeritus Director 2013 Montana Manufacturing Extension Center 2014 Evaluation and Economic Impact Research University of Montana Missoula, Montana 59812 #12;2014 Evaluation and Economic Impact

  9. Report Title: The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico Type of Report: Final Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Report Title: The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico Type of Report: Final Technical The economic impact of coal mining in New Mexico is examined in this report. The analysis is based on economic impacts of coal mining in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment, and labor

  10. WINDExchange Webinar: Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind: Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will moderate, and the following speakers will discuss recent developments in the economics of offshore wind: Bruce Hamilton, Navigant: Offshore Wind Market Report. This...

  11. www.sida.se The Impact of the Global Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansky, Joshua

    , December 02, 2010 Publication series: Women's Economic Empowerment A worker at a steel recycling mill the metal. There are no safety measures in place, and the work can be extremely dangerous. Photo: © G....................................................................................50 #12;Foreword Women's economic empowerment is a top priority in the work to reduce poverty. Women

  12. Research Summary Critical assessment of evidence of net economic benefits of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary Critical assessment of evidence of net economic benefits of initiatives to create infrastructure in sustainable development and the creation of attractive and economically vibrant communities. This study provides a critical review of evidence of the net economic benefits, both direct and indirect

  13. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.

  14. Determining Vulnerability Importance in Environmental Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toro, Javier, E-mail: jjtoroca@unal.edu.co [Institute of Environmental Studies, National University of Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Duarte, Oscar, E-mail: ogduartev@unal.edu.co [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, National University of Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Requena, Ignacio, E-mail: requena@decsai.ugr.es [Department of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, University of Granada (Spain); Zamorano, Montserrat, E-mail: zamorano@ugr.es [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada (Spain)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of vulnerability has been used to describe the susceptibility of physical, biotic, and social systems to harm or hazard. In this sense, it is a tool that reduces the uncertainties of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) since it does not depend exclusively on the value assessments of the evaluator, but rather is based on the environmental state indicators of the site where the projects or activities are being carried out. The concept of vulnerability thus reduces the possibility that evaluators will subjectively interpret results, and be influenced by outside interests and pressures during projects. However, up until now, EIA has been hindered by a lack of effective methods. This research study analyzes the concept of vulnerability, defines Vulnerability Importance and proposes its inclusion in qualitative EIA methodology. The method used to quantify Vulnerability Importance is based on a set of environmental factors and indicators that provide a comprehensive overview of the environmental state. The results obtained in Colombia highlight the usefulness and objectivity of this method since there is a direct relation between this value and the environmental state of the departments analyzed. - Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concept of vulnerability could be considered defining Vulnerability Importance included in qualitative EIA methodology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of the concept of environmental vulnerability could reduce the subjectivity of qualitative methods of EIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method to quantify the Vulnerability Importance proposed provides a comprehensive overview of the environmental state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results in Colombia highlight the usefulness and objectivity of this method.

  15. Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Starting more than a year ago, NREL initiated work to expand the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model to include fixed-bottom offshore wind technology. Following the completion of the...

  16. Economic and emissions impacts of renewable fuel goals for aviation in the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnachie, Dominic

    The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuel is consumed by the US aviation industry each year from 2018. We examine the economic and emissions impacts of this goal ...

  17. Inventory of Data and Research on the Economic and Community Impacts of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Inventory of Data and Research on the Economic and Community Impacts of the Hiawatha LRT Prepared ................. 7 Methodology used to develop the inventory............................................................................... 7 How is the inventory organized

  18. The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations of Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschenes, Olivier.

    This paper measures the economic impact of climate change on agricultural land in the United States by estimating the effect of the presumably random year-to-year variation in temperature and precipitation on agricultural ...

  19. Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

  20. Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use requirements of modern wind power plants in the United2002. Economic impacts of wind power in Kittitas County:Office, 2004. Renewable energy: Wind power’s contribution to

  1. Economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme : evidence from the refining sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacombe, Romain H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I study the economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) on the refining industry in Europe. I contrast previous ex-ante studies with the lessons from a series of interviews I conducted with ...

  2. Webinar: DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model, originally presented on December 11, 2012.

  3. Economic impact of M.I.T. on Cambridge and Metropolitan Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finberg, Irving William

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigated the economic impact of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on its host city, Cambridge, and upon the Boston Metropolitan Area. The primary purpose was to develop sufficient information about ...

  4. Impact of Air Transportation on Regional Economic and Social Connectivity in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Ryan

    This paper identifies some of the forces that influence the impact of air transportation on regional connectivity and economic productivity in the United States. In light of recent threats to the financial viability of the ...

  5. Estimation of economic impact of freight distribution due to highway closure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Shiyin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main aim of this study is to provide a theoretical framework and methodology to estimate and analyze the economic impact of freight disruption due to highway closure. The costs in this study will be classified into ...

  6. The economic impacts of climate change : evidence from agricultural profits and random fluctuations in weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschęnes, Olivier

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper measures the economic impact of climate change on US agricultural land by estimating the effect of the presumably random year-to-year variation in temperature and precipitation on agricultural profits. Using ...

  7. Regional catalytic economic impacts and noise-damage costs of aviation growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Ryan Aung Min, 1973-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing recognition that transportation or infrastructure improvements can have longer-term catalytic impacts economic productivity, which are in addition to the direct, indirect, or induced household spending ...

  8. The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodu

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

  9. Input-Output as a Method of Evaluahon of the Economic Impact of Water Resources Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canion, R. L.; Trock, W. L.

    In this report the results of a study of the use of input-output analysis to evaluate the economic impact of water resources development are presented. Blackburn Crossing reservoir on the Upper Neches river was the subject development...

  10. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  11. Trade policy and its impact on economic growth: Can openness speed up output growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Trade policy and its impact on economic growth: Can openness speed up output growth? Felicitas Nowak-Lehmann D. 1. Introduction ''Economic theory generally supports the conclusion that trade trade, while others have failed to demonstrate this linkage''. (U. S. International Trade Commission

  12. Economic Impact and Job Creation aspects of Geothermal Heat Pumps Don Penn, PE, CGD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , geothermal, geothermal heat pumps and other non-petroleum or coal based energy production" for the Renewable Energy Industry. #12;GEOTHERMAL PRESENTATION 1.REMI is an economic-demographic forecasEconomic Impact and Job Creation aspects of Geothermal Heat Pumps Don Penn, PE, CGD Grapevine

  13. Human impacts on leaf economics in heterogeneous landscapes: the effect of harvesting non-timber forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sack, Lawren

    Human impacts on leaf economics in heterogeneous landscapes: the effect of harvesting non tested the effect of foliage harvest by indigenous Fulani people on leaf stoichiometry and eco- nomics with world-wide trends in leaf economics. The effect of foliage harvest on foliar nutrient concentrations

  14. The Recent National Academy of Sciences Study on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    The Recent National Academy of Sciences Study on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel, Renewable Fuel Standard: Potential Economic and Environmental Effects of U.S. Biofuel Policy. Professor was that the U.S. is unlikely to meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) for 2022 for cellulosic biofuels. Wally

  15. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  16. Economic Impact of Control and Optimization on Industrial Utilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, D.; Lang, R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that can be a major cost savings opportunity and a strategic contributor to corporate profit. This paper will discuss the economic justifications for boiler control, a methodology to identify and address energy savings, case studies of successful energy...

  17. Human health and wellbeing in environmental impact assessment in New South Wales, Australia: Auditing health impacts within environmental assessments of major projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Patrick J., E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Thompson, Susan, E-mail: s.thompson@unsw.edu.a [Faculty of the Built Environment, UNSW, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: b.harris-roxas@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Kemp, Lynn, E-mail: l.kemp@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Internationally the inclusion of health within environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been shown to be limited. While Australian EIA documentation has not been studied empirically to date, deficiencies in practice have been documented. This research developed an audit tool to undertake a qualitative descriptive analysis of 22 Major Project EAs in New South Wales, Australia. Results showed that health and wellbeing impacts were not considered explicitly. They were, however, included indirectly in the identification of traditional public health exposures associated with the physical environment and to a lesser extent the inclusion of social and economic impacts. However, no health data was used to inform any of the assessments, there was no reference to causal pathways between exposures or determinants and physical or mental health effects, and there was no inclusion of the differential distribution of exposures or health impacts on different populations. The results add conceptually and practically to the long standing integration debate, showing that health is in a position to add value to the EIA process as an explicit part of standard environmental, social and economic considerations. However, to overcome the consistently documented barriers to integrating health in EIA, capacity must be developed amongst EIA professionals, led by the health sector, to progress health related knowledge and tools.

  18. ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL OF OTEC ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilde, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Division of Solar Energy, Environmental and Resource1978. Solar Program Assessment: Environmental Factors -

  19. A regional economic impact model for identifying the relationship between transportation investments and economic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freyre, German Eleodoro

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allocation of Project Investment Calculation for Efficiency Savings Calculation of Mobility Savings Calculation of Safety Savings FHWA-47 Form Program Structure Basic Procedures Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Urban Interstate System... Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Urban Primary System Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Rural Interstate System Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Rural Primary System 15 17 18 20 . 23 27 56 58 95 96 97...

  20. A qualitative method proposal to improve environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toro, Javier, E-mail: jjtoroca@unal.edu.co [Institute of Environmental Studies, National University of Colombia at Bogotá (Colombia)] [Institute of Environmental Studies, National University of Colombia at Bogotá (Colombia); Requena, Ignacio, E-mail: requena@decsai.ugr.es [Department of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, University of Granada (Spain)] [Department of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, University of Granada (Spain); Duarte, Oscar, E-mail: ogduartev@unal.edu.co [National University of Colombia at Bogotá, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics (Colombia)] [National University of Colombia at Bogotá, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics (Colombia); Zamorano, Montserrat, E-mail: zamorano@ugr.es [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada (Spain)] [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada (Spain)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In environmental impact assessment, qualitative methods are used because they are versatile and easy to apply. This methodology is based on the evaluation of the strength of the impact by grading a series of qualitative attributes that can be manipulated by the evaluator. The results thus obtained are not objective, and all too often impacts are eliminated that should be mitigated with corrective measures. However, qualitative methodology can be improved if the calculation of Impact Importance is based on the characteristics of environmental factors and project activities instead on indicators assessed by evaluators. In this sense, this paper proposes the inclusion of the vulnerability of environmental factors and the potential environmental impact of project activities. For this purpose, the study described in this paper defined Total Impact Importance and specified a quantification procedure. The results obtained in the case study of oil drilling in Colombia reflect greater objectivity in the evaluation of impacts as well as a positive correlation between impact values, the environmental characteristics at and near the project location, and the technical characteristics of project activities. -- Highlights: • Concept of vulnerability has been used to calculate the importance impact assessment. • This paper defined Total Impact Importance and specified a quantification procedure. • The method includes the characteristics of environmental and project activities. • The application has shown greater objectivity in the evaluation of impacts. • Better correlation between impact values, environment and the project has been shown.

  1. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiversity impacts . Bioethanol . Evenness . Geographicto produce a liter of bioethanol depends on where thethen assessed for three bioethanol feedstocks at different

  2. Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

  3. Economic and emissions impacts of renewable fuel goals for aviation in the US*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    t The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuelEconomic and emissions impacts of renewable fuel goals for aviation in the US* Niven Winchester and emissions impacts of renewable fuel goals for aviation in the US q Niven Winchester a, , Dominic Mc

  4. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Southeast Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Southeast (defined here as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia).

  5. ECONOMICS WITHIN SOCIAL STUDIES: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE ON THE 2012 KANSAS HISTORY-GOVERNMENT ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deplazes, Svetlana

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    research questions in order to: (1) determine the level of student knowledge of assessed economic indicators and concepts; (2) investigate how student demographics relate to economic understanding; (3) compare test results in economics with those in other...

  6. Introducing SHRP2's Economic Impact Estimator / Sketch Planning Tool -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Impact Case Studies (T-PICS) University of Minnesota Center for Transportation Studies 25th Annual Transportation Research Conference May 21, 2014 #12;http://tpics.us Transportation Project Impact Case Studies (T are the components of T-PICS? · Data base of 100 case studies representing broad range of project type and scale

  7. Unanswered Questions About the Economic Impact of Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    on fossil fuel extraction · Higher growth rates · More diverse economies · Better-educated populations · Lobbying · Political Contributions · Economic Studies JM Barth & Associates, Inc. #12;Tax Subsidies or not they produce gas · Industry lobbyists talked the Senate out of removing subsidies, in part on the basis of job

  8. A techno-economic and environmental assessment of hydroprocessed renewable distillate fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearlson, Matthew Noah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a model to quantify the economic costs and environmental impacts of producing fuels from hydroprocessed renewable oils (HRO) process. Aspen Plus was used to model bio-refinery operations and supporting ...

  9. Assessing environmental benefits and economic costs of aviation environmental policy measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahashabde, Anuja (Anuja Anil)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the recent global economic downturn, longer term growth is anticipated for aviation with an increasing environmental impact, specifically in the areas of noise, air quality, and climate change. To ensure sustainable ...

  10. Waste collection systems for recyclables: An environmental and economic assessment for the municipality of Aarhus (Denmark)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, A.W., E-mail: awl@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Merrild, H.; Moller, J.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of paper and glass from household waste is an integrated part of waste management in Denmark, however, increased recycling is a legislative target. The questions are: how much more can the recycling rate be increased through improvements of collection schemes when organisational and technical limitations are respected, and what will the environmental and economic consequences be? This was investigated in a case study of a municipal waste management system. Five scenarios with alternative collection systems for recyclables (paper, glass, metal and plastic packaging) were assessed by means of a life cycle assessment and an assessment of the municipality's costs. Kerbside collection would provide the highest recycling rate, 31% compared to 25% in the baseline scenario, but bring schemes with drop-off containers would also be a reasonable solution. Collection of recyclables at recycling centres was not recommendable because the recycling rate would decrease to 20%. In general, the results showed that enhancing recycling and avoiding incineration was recommendable because the environmental performance was improved in several impact categories. The municipal costs for collection and treatment of waste were reduced with increasing recycling, mainly because the high cost for incineration was avoided. However, solutions for mitigation of air pollution caused by increased collection and transport should be sought.

  11. Motivation Literature Trans. Networks and Emissions Assessment Indices Link Importance Numerical Examples Summary Environmental Impact Assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Examples Summary Environmental Impact Assessment of Transportation Networks with Degradable Links in an Era S. Nagurney Environmental Impact Assessment Indices #12;Motivation Literature Trans. Networks. This support is gratefully acknowledged. Anna Nagurney, Qiang Qiang, Ladimer S. Nagurney Environmental Impact

  12. COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    i COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: A CASE STUDY OF KLONG Fecal sludge (FS) is widely acknowledged as a major source of infectious pathogens. However, the proper

  13. Economic Impact Analysis for EGS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributionsreduction system is most economicalInc.

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    purposes. A life cycle assessment (LCA) was carried out on two of the event arenas built for the 2010UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle AssessmentC: Life Cycle Assessment Report Thunderbird Old Arena Group Members: Dennis Fan, Sean Geyer, Hillary

  15. Report Title: The Economic Impact of U.S. Department of Energy Expenditures in New Mexico: FY 1993-FY2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Report Title: The Economic Impact of U.S. Department of Energy Expenditures in New Mexico: FY 1993: Arrowhead Center New Mexico State University P. O. Box 30001/MSC 3CQ Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 #12 of Department of Energy Impacts in New Mexico 9 Economic Impacts of DOE Expenditures in New Mexico 10 State

  16. Economic assessment of nine geothermal direct use applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, L.C.; Breton, T.R.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an economic analysis of nine federally-supported geothermal direct heat applications which were part of DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program. Three of the projects analyzed were user-owned systems, and six were district heating systems. Five of the nine projects are successful from an economic standpoint and the majority of these projects are in areas where geothermal energy has long been used for heating. The results of this analysis indicate that geothermal energy projects can be economic under certain conditions, but these conditions may not be very widespread.

  17. Environmental impact assessment of the Dulang oilfield development project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, M.N. (U. Kebangsaan Malaysia (MY)); (Ismail, M.Y. (Petronas Cangali Sdn. Bhd. (MY)))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss an environmental impact assessment (EIA) of the Dulang Oilfield Development Project, conducted to determine whether the project could proceed in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner. This is the first EIA for an offshore oilfield in Malaysian waters, and was conducted in anticipation of the Environmental Quality (Prescribed Activities) (Environmental Impact Assessment Order(1987)) which requires an EIA to be conducted for major oil and gas field development projects.

  18. A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through Validity Testing of a Comparitive-Projection Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, J. E.; Heideman, K. E.

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An established economic simulation model for reservoir development was applied to ten reservoir projects throughout Texas. The model as a predictor of economic impact was given a difficult test because of the diversity of ...

  19. assessing economic social: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from among the statically stable networks and c... Matthew O. Jackson; Alison Watts 1999-01-01 48 Department of Economic and Social Affairs CiteSeer Summary: global policies in...

  20. Golbal Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increased Bioenergy Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace Tyner

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project had three main objectives: to build and incorporate an explicit biomass energy sector within the GTAP analytical framework and data base; to provide an analysis of the impact of renewable fuel standards and other policies in the U.S. and E.U, as well as alternative biofuel policies in other parts of the world, on changes in production, prices, consumption, trade and poverty; and to evaluate environmental impacts of alternative policies for bioenergy development. Progress and outputs related to each objective are reported.

  1. A Global Assessment of Salmon Aquaculture Impacts on Wild Salmonids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    A Global Assessment of Salmon Aquaculture Impacts on Wild Salmonids Jennifer S. Ford* , Ransom A, wild salmon catch and abundance have declined dramatically in the North Atlantic and in much of farmed salmon. Previous studies have shown negative impacts on wild salmonids, but these results have

  2. Planning Report 02-5 Economic Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . STEP End Users 4-1 4.1 The Automotive Industry ................................................... 4.................................................................. 4-2 4.1.2 The U.S. Automotive Supply Chain ........................ 4-6 4.2 Aerospace Industry of Product Model Data (STEP) in Transportation Equipment Industries Prepared by: RTI International

  3. Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniX Ltd Jump to:

  4. Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) Jump to: navigation, search

  5. Economic, organizational, and institutional impact of the survivability validation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, G. [Kaman Sciences Corp., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses some of the key economic, organizational, and institutional issues associated with the development and use of survivability validation protocols. It discusses factors affecting protocols, considerations for protocol selection, test- bed/simulator/analysis tool availability, organizational issues affecting protocol use, deviations precluding adherence to validated protocols, and protocol advantages. Knowledge of these factors will assist developers of survivability validation protocols in designing more flexible protocols that can be tailored for differing circumstances without losing the fidelity or assurance that the protocol will produce the desired survivability level.

  6. Economic Impact Analysis for EGS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributionsreduction system is most economicalInc. |Inc.

  7. Office of Economic Impact and Diversity | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu, StephenNationalEnergy Congressional andEconomic

  8. Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedden, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to compile completed studies on the economic impact of wind farms in rural communities and then to compare these studies. By summarizing the studies in an Excel spreadsheet, the raw data from a study is easily compared with the data from other studies. In this way, graphs can be made and conclusions drawn. Additionally, the creation of a database in which economic impact studies are summarized allows a greater understanding of the type of information gathered in an economic impact study, the type of information that is most helpful in using these studies to promote wind energy development in rural communities, and the limitations on collecting data for these studies.

  9. Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

  10. Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

  11. The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathre, Roger

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EG. 2010. Human and environmental impact assessment ofof the overall environmental impacts and benefits of theand reducing environmental impacts of CCS Roger Sathre and

  12. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

  13. A Techno-Economic Assessment of Hydrogen Production by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 Resource Assessment of Biomass Feedstocks 1.1 Bagasse, Sw itch Grass, and Nut Shell Availability and Cost 1

  14. Assessment of methane-related fuels for automotive fleet vehicles: technical, supply, and economic assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of methane-related fuels, derived from a variety of sources, in highway vehicles is assessed. Methane, as used here, includes natural gas (NG) as well as synthetic natural gas (SNG). Methanol is included because it can be produced from NG or the same resources as SNG, and because it is a liquid fuel at normal ambient conditions. Technological, operational, efficiency, petroleum displacement, supply, safety, and economic issues are analyzed. In principle, both NG and methanol allow more efficient engine operation than gasoline. In practice, engines are at present rarely optimized for NG and methanol. On the basis of energy expended from resource extraction to end use, only optimized LNG vehicles are more efficient than their gasoline counterparts. By 1985, up to 16% of total petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel could be displaced by large fleets with central NG fueling depots. Excluding diesel vehicles, which need technology advances to use NG, savings of 8% are projected. Methanol use by large fleets could displace up to 8% of petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel from spark-ignition vehicles and another 9% from diesel vehicles with technology advances. The US NG supply appears adequate to accommodate fleet use. Supply projections, future price differential versus gasoline, and user economics are uncertain. In many cases, attractive paybacks can occur. Compressed NG now costs on average about $0.65 less than gasoline, per energy-equivalent gallon. Methanol supply projections, future prices, and user economics are even more uncertain. Current and projected near-term methanol supplies are far from adequate to support fleet use. Methanol presently costs more than gasoline on an equal-energy basis, but is projected to cost less if produced from coal instead of NG or petroleum.

  15. Economic Impacts from Indiana's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.; Flores-Espino, F.; Hauser, R.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of Indiana's available wind resource indicates that the development of wind power infrastructure has the potential to support millions of dollars of economic activity in the state. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, are tools used to estimate some of the economic impacts of energy projects at the state level. JEDI calculates results in the form of jobs, earnings, and economic output in three categories: project development and onsite labor, local revenue and supply chain, and induced impacts. According to this analysis, the first 1,000 MW of wind power development in Indiana (projects built between 2008 and 2011): supported employment totaling more than 4,400 full-time-equivalent jobs in Indiana during the construction periods; supports approximately 260 ongoing Indiana jobs; supported nearly $570 million in economic activity for Indiana during the construction periods; supported and continues to support nearly $40 million in annual Indiana economic activity during the operating periods; generates more than $8 million in annual property taxes; generates nearly $4 million annually in income for Indiana landowners who lease their land for wind energy projects.

  16. Inspection Report- Alleged Waste and Abuse in the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, INS-L-12-07

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Economic Impact and Diversity (ED) develops and executes Department-wide policies affecting equal employment opportunities, small and disadvantaged...

  17. Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

  18. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis was done to determine if small-scale wind energy could be economically feasible on a cotton farm with 1,200 irrigated acres, a house, and a barn. Lubbock and Midland were locations chosen for this model farm and the twenty-year analysis. A...

  19. assessing economic energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Utilization Websites Summary: Renewable Energy Center California Off-shore Wind Technology Assessment 12;California Renewable EnergyRESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE...

  20. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

  1. Environmental and economic assessment of alternative transportation fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Mitch Russell

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative fuels have the potential to mitigate transportation's impact on the environment and enhance energy security. In this work, we investigate two alternative fuels: liquefied natural gas (LNG) as an aviation fuel, ...

  2. Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marten, Alex; Kopp, Robert E.; Shouse, Kate C.; Griffiths, Charles; Hodson, Elke L.; Kopits, Elizabeth; Mignone, Bryan K.; Moore, Chris; Newbold, Steve; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Wolverton, Ann

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The social cost of carbon (SCC) is a monetized metric for evaluating the benefits associated with marginal reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. It represents the expected welfare loss from the future damages caused by the release of one tonne of CO2 in a given year, expressed in consumption equivalent terms. It is intended to be a comprehensive measure, taking into account changes in agricultural productivity, human health risks, loss of ecosystem services and biodiversity, and the frequency and severity of flooding and storms, among other possible impacts. Estimating the SCC requires long-term modeling of global economic activity, the climate system, and the linkages between the two through anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of changing climatic conditions on economic activity and human well-being. The United States government currently uses the SCC in regulatory benefit-cost analyses to assess the welfare effects of changes in CO2 emissions. Consistent application of the SCC to federal rulemaking analyses began in 2009-2010 with the development of a set of global SCC estimates that employed three prominent integrated assessment models (IAMs) -- DICE, FUND, and PAGE. The U.S. government report identified a number of limitations associated with SCC estimates in general and its own assumptions in particular: an incomplete treatment of damages, including potential “catastrophic” impacts; uncertainty regarding the extrapolation of damage functions to high temperatures; incomplete treatment of adaptation and technological change; and the evaluation of uncertain outcomes in a risk-neutral fashion. External experts have identified other potential issues, including how best to model long-term socio-economic and emissions pathways, oversimplified physical climate and carbon cycle modeling within the IAMs, and an inconsistency between non-constant economic growth scenarios and constant discount rates. The U.S. government has committed to updating the estimates regularly as modeling capabilities and scientific and economic knowledge improves. To help foster further improvements in estimating the SCC, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a pair of workshops on “Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis.” The first focused on conceptual and methodological issues related to integrated assessment modeling and the second brought together natural and social scientists to explore methods for improving damage assessment for multiple sectors. These two workshops provide the basis for the 13 papers in this special issue.

  3. Impacts of high energy prices on long-term energy-economic scenarios for Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of high energy prices on long-term energy-economic scenarios for Germany Volker Krey1 , Dag and Technology Evaluation (IEF-STE), 52425 Jülich, Germany 2) DIW Berlin, Königin-Luise-Str. 5, 14195 Berlin, Germany 3) Öko-Institut, Novalisstr. 10, 10115 Berlin, Germany Abstract Prices of oil and other fossil

  4. Economic Impacts of Relaxing Travel and Financial Restrictions on U.S. Exports to Cuba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Impacts of Relaxing Travel and Financial Restrictions on U.S. Exports to Cuba Flynn Adcock Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000 allows for the exportation of U.S. agricultural products and medicines to Cuba. Since passage of the TSREEA, U.S. agricultural and food exports to Cuba have expanded

  5. Economic Impacts of the Forest Industry in Florida, 2003 Final Report to the Florida Forestry Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    1 Economic Impacts of the Forest Industry in Florida, 2003 Final Report to the Florida Forestry was made possible by a grant provided by the Florida Forestry Association, Tallahassee, FL, under-Division of Forestry, represented by Eric Ford. Collaboration for the survey of forest product manufacturers

  6. Working Nine to Five: Economic Impacts on the Gender Gap in Macro Politics .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Holly Katherine

    2013-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    ways, which lead to a dynamic policy preference gap between genders. I test the impact of economic differences created by careers in “gender divisive,” or male dominated and non-male dominated industries on the differences between men and women’s policy...

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Economic Impact of Electricity Market Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cańizares, Claudio A.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Economic Impact of Electricity Market Price Forecasting Errors to forecast electricity market prices and improve forecast accuracy. However, no studies have been reported, the application of electricity market price forecasts to short-term operation scheduling of two typical

  8. February 22, 2010 Economic Impact of Mining on Levy County, Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    for job creation. #12;3 King Road Mine, Test Quarry Pit, May 2009 Crystal River Nuclear Plant Table 2.1A Imports of Aggregate & Cement, Vessel Metric Tons, 2003-2009, thru Dec. Table 2.1B Exports of Aggregate & Cement, Vessel Metric tons, 2006-2009, thru Dec. Table 2.2 Economic Impacts for a 35-person

  9. Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group Analysis from Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group The exploration and development of the Marcellus Shale natural gas play has significant potential to affect in the Barnett Shale region of north Texas. The Barnett Shale play is very similar in geology to the Marcellus

  10. The Potential Economic Impact of the National Broadband Plan on the New Mexico Exchange Carriers Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    The Potential Economic Impact of the National Broadband Plan on the New Mexico Exchange Carriers Center New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico #12;Arrowhead Center New Mexico Exchange List of Maps ii Executive Summary iii Introduction 1 New Mexico Exchange Carriers Group 1 New Mexico

  11. Potential Economic Impacts of Zebra Mussels on the Hydropower Facilities in the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potential Economic Impacts of Zebra Mussels on the Hydropower Facilities in the Columbia River mussel infestation. We estimated hydropower maintenance costs associated with zebra mussels by examining, and a survey of zebra mussel mitigation costs at other hydropower generation facilities in North America. We

  12. Modeling economic impacts of climate change on U.S. forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, Claudio Ney Martins De

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is expected to modify forest growth. As a result, the forestry sector of the United States could be affected. The primary objective of this study was to examine the economic impacts of climate change on the U.S. forestry sector...

  13. Assessing Network Applications for Economic Development Sustainable Access in Rural India (SARI) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    Assessing Network Applications for Economic Development Sustainable Access in Rural India (SARI Department of Electric Engineering MIT Media Laboratory- eDevelopment Group #12;SUSTAINABLE ACCESS IN RURAL) Project Pilot Phase Assessment ­ Madurai District, Tamil Nadu, India Professor Michael Best Director, eDevelopment

  14. Chapter Five Assessing the Economic Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Given the strong link between economic performance and energy use, it is important for states to account for the macroeconomic effects of potential clean energy policies and programs during the process of selecting and designing these policies. Many studies have shown that when a state makes cost-effective investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy, the state’s entire economy will benefit. For example, Wisconsin’s Focus on Energy Program was created to manage rising energy costs, promote in-state economic development, protect the environment, and control the state’s growing demand for electricity. An analysis conducted by the Wisconsin Department of Administration anticipates that it will meet these objectives while creating more than 60,000 job years, generating more than eight billion dollars in sales for Wisconsin businesses, increasing value added or gross state product by more than five billion dollars, and increasing disposable income for residents by more than four billion dollars

  15. Impact of Different Economic Performance Metrics on the Perceived Value of Solar Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaic (PV) systems are installed by several types of market participants, ranging from residential customers to large-scale project developers and utilities. Each type of market participant frequently uses a different economic performance metric to characterize PV value because they are looking for different types of returns from a PV investment. This report finds that different economic performance metrics frequently show different price thresholds for when a PV investment becomes profitable or attractive. Several project parameters, such as financing terms, can have a significant impact on some metrics [e.g., internal rate of return (IRR), net present value (NPV), and benefit-to-cost (B/C) ratio] while having a minimal impact on other metrics (e.g., simple payback time). As such, the choice of economic performance metric by different customer types can significantly shape each customer's perception of PV investment value and ultimately their adoption decision.

  16. Counting Jobs and Economic Impacts from Distributed Wind in the United States (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference poster describes the distributed wind Jobs and Economic Development Imapcts (JEDI) model. The goal of this work is to provide a model that estimates jobs and other economic effects associated with the domestic distributed wind industry. The distributed wind JEDI model is a free input-output model that estimates employment and other impacts resulting from an investment in distributed wind installations. Default inputs are from installers and industry experts and are based on existing projects. User input can be minimal (use defaults) or very detailed for more precise results. JEDI can help evaluate potential scenarios, current or future; inform stakeholders and decision-makers; assist businesses in evaluating economic development impacts and estimating jobs; assist government organizations with planning and evaluating and developing communities.

  17. Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet summarizes the findings of a report authored by Sandra Reategui and Suzanne Tegen of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A confluence of events ignited soaring growth in the number of Colorado?s wind power installations in recent years, from 291 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity in 2006 to 1,067 MW (nameplate capacity) in 2007. Analyzing the economic impact of Colorado?s first 1,000 MW of wind energy development not only provides a summary of benefits now enjoyed by the state?s population, but it also provides a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other new wind project scenarios, including the U.S. Department of Energy?s 20% Wind Energy by 2030 scenario. The analysis can be used by interested parties in other states as an example of the potential economic impacts if they were to adopt 1,000 MW of wind power development.

  18. Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community wind projects have long been touted (both anecdotally and in the literature) to increase the economic development impacts of wind projects, but most analyses of community wind have been based on expected results from hypothetical projects. This report provides a review of previous economic development analyses of community wind projects and compares these projected results with empirical impacts from projects currently in operation. A review of existing literature reveals two primary conclusions. First, construction-period impacts are often thought to be comparable for both community-and absentee-owned facilities. Second, operations-period economic impacts are observed to be greater for community-owned projects. The majority of studies indicate that the range of increased operations-period impact is on the order of 1.5 to 3.4 times. New retrospective analysis of operating community wind projects finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are estimated to be on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. In addition, when comparing retrospective results of community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed community wind projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa indicates that construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. Ultimately, wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and community wind projects are shown to have increased impact both during the construction and operations-period of a wind power plant. The extent of increased impact is primarily a function of local ownership and return on investment. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. Furthermore, the increased economic development impact of community wind shown here should not be undervalued. As the wind industry grows and approaches penetrations in the U.S. electricity market of 20%, social opposition to new wind power projects may increase. Community wind could provide a valuable strategy for building community support of wind power - especially in communities that are new to wind power. This analysis finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. Furthermore, when comparing community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa shows construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. As the wind industry has grown, community wind has largely been a peripheral development model. However, this analysis shows that wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and that community wind projects have greater economic development impacts than absentee-owned projects. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. While the magnitude of increased benefit is primarily a function of local ownership and project profitability, the increased economic development impact of all community wind projects should not be undervalued. The ability of community wind projects to disperse economic impacts within the states and communities where they are built and to engage local community members

  19. Economics Ph.D Assessment Plan 1 May 1, 2012 Assessment Plan Field of Economics Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the ability to design and execute a long-term research program that addresses a sequence of well after the Ph.D. is completed, most students will enter the international Economics Ph.D. job market expect to search for a university-based teaching position should develop their teaching skills

  20. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Process of V1 NPP Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matejovic, Igor [DECOM A.S., Jana Bottu, 2. SK-91701 Trnava (Slovakia); Polak, Vincent [STM POWER, a.s., Jana Bottu 2, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the adoption of Governmental Resolution No. 801/99 the Slovak Republic undertook a commitment to shutdown units 1 and 2 of Jaslovske Bohunice V 1 NPP (WWER 230 reactor type) in 2006 and 2008 respectively. Therefore the more intensive preparation of a decommissioning documentation has been commenced. Namely, the VI NPP Conceptual Decommissioning Plan and subsequently the Environmental Impact Assessment Report of VI NPP Decommissioning were developed. Thus, the standard environmental impact assessment process was performed and the most suitable alternative of V1 NPP decommissioning was selected as a basis for development of further decommissioning documents. The status and main results of the environmental impact assessment process and EIA report are discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  1. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-U-14 Ditch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, K.M.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater impact assessments are conducted at liquid effluent receiving sites on the Hanford Site to determine hydrologic and contaminant impacts caused by discharging wastewater to the soil column. The assessments conducted are pursuant to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00A and M-17-00B, as agreed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (Ecology et al. 1992). This report assesses impacts on the groundwater and vadose zone from wastewater discharged to the 216-U-14 Ditch. Contemporary effluent waste streams of interest are 242-S Evaporator Steam Condensate and UO{sub 3}/U Plant wastewater.

  2. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector...

  3. Report Title: The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico: 2008 Update Type of Report: Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Report Title: The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico: 2008 Update Type of Report 88003-8001 At Madrid Coal Mine, New Mexico by Carl Redin 1934. * *At Madrid Coal Mine, New Mexico 1934: The economic impact of coal mining in New Mexico is examined in this report. This report is an update

  4. A state-impact-state methodology for assessing environmental impact in land use planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Longgao [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Yang, Xiaoyan [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Chen, Longqian, E-mail: cumt_chenlongqian@163.com [School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Potter, Rebecca; Li, Yingkui [Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of land use planning (LUP) has a large impact on environmental quality. There lacks a widely accepted and consolidated approach to assess the LUP environmental impact using Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). In this paper, we developed a state-impact-state (SIS) model employed in the LUP environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). With the usage of Matter-element (ME) and Extenics method, the methodology based on the SIS model was established and applied in the LUPEA of Zoucheng County, China. The results show that: (1) this methodology provides an intuitive and easy understanding logical model for both the theoretical analysis and application of LUPEA; (2) the spatial multi-temporal assessment from base year, near-future year to planning target year suggests the positive impact on the environmental quality in the whole County despite certain environmental degradation in some towns; (3) besides the spatial assessment, other achievements including the environmental elements influenced by land use and their weights, the identification of key indicators in LUPEA, and the appropriate environmental mitigation measures were obtained; and (4) this methodology can be used to achieve multi-temporal assessment of LUP environmental impact of County or Town level in other areas. - Highlights: • A State-Impact-State model for Land Use Planning Environmental Assessment (LUPEA). • Matter-element (ME) and Extenics methods were embedded in the LUPEA. • The model was applied to the LUPEA of Zoucheng County. • The assessment shows improving environment quality since 2000 in Zoucheng County. • The method provides a useful tool for the LUPEA in the county level.

  5. Environmental impact assessment in the Fijian state sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turnbull, Jane

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over 20 years, the South Pacific state of Fiji has required developers to conduct more than 70 environmental impact assessments (EIA), without specifying the environmental quality or impacts it considers (in)appropriate. It has ignored aspects of EIA to which agencies funding development have paid little attention--assessing alternatives, monitoring outcomes and enforcing consent conditions. This infers the Fijian state is not serious about using EIA to control environmental quality. Factors other than technical shortcomings are shaping the way the state constrains EIA practice. Unless these factors change, the comprehensive EIA system proposed in Sustainable Development legislation will not prevent environmental degradation.

  6. Assessing Development Impacts Associated with Low Emission Development Strategies: Lessons Learned from Pilot Efforts in Kenya and Montenegro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, S.; Katz, J.; Wurtenberger, L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate economy-wide policies and implementation plans designed to enable a country to meet its long-term development objectives while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A development impact assessment tool was developed to inform an analytically robust and transparent prioritization of LEDS actions based on their economic, social, and environmental impacts. The graphical tool helps policymakers communicate the development impacts of LEDS options and identify actions that help meet both emissions reduction and development goals. This paper summarizes the adaptation and piloting of the tool in Kenya and Montenegro. The paper highlights strengths of the tool and discusses key needs for improving it.

  7. Comparative assessment of health and safety impacts of coal use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing the use of coal to replace oil and gas consumption is considered beneficial for economic and political reasons. The evaluation of this report, however, is that the shift to coal can involve significant health, safety, and environmental impacts compared to those from oil and natural gas systems, which are considerably less adverse than those of any coal energy system in use today. An evaluation and comparison of the potential impacts from the various alternative coal technologies would be useful to both governmental and industrial policy planners and would provide them with information relevant to a decision on assistance, incentives, and prioritization among the energy technologies. It is, therefore, the main objective of this report to review the key health, safety, and environmental impacts of some promising coal energy technologies and to compare them.

  8. Assessing the influence of environmental impact assessments on science and policy: An analysis of the Three Gorges Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Assessing the influence of environmental impact assessments on science and policy: An analysis Keywords: Environmental impact assessment Dams Three Gorges Project Uncertainty Prioritization a b s t r exist between the scientific interest (via number of publications) in environmental impacts and (a

  9. Impacts of Federal Tax Laws and Economic Developments on the Texas Cattle Industry.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, J.R.; Dietrich, R.A.; Richardson, J.W.; Nixon, C.J.; Davis, E.E

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiment Station Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas Execu ti ve Summary Recent changes in the U.S. federal income tax provisions enacted in the Tax Reform Act of 1986 (TRA) will significantly alter the manner in which costs and revenues... of the TRA and other recent economic developments on future land and cattle prices are examined. Second, the impacts on the economic viability of representative ranch firms in selected major beef producing areas of Texas are analyzed using a firm -level...

  10. SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SECRETARIAL REVIEW DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ INITIAL REGULATORY The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from disadvantaging non for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007, the Council began developing options

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Amendment and Need The purpose of the non-AFA crab sideboard limits was to prevent vessels with crab QS from paper of all GOA sideboards for non-American Fisheries Act (AFA) crab vessels. In April 2007

  12. Effects of Topography on Assessing Wind Farm Impacts Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Liming

    Effects of Topography on Assessing Wind Farm Impacts Using MODIS Data Liming Zhou* Department) there is a pattern of LST change associated with the de- velopment of wind farms and (ii) the warming effect over wind farms reported previously is an artifact of varied surface topography. Spatial pattern and time

  13. REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    REVIEW Open Access Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind farms: lessons learned offshore wind farm, Horns Rev 1 (160 MW with 80 turbines of 2 MW), became operational in 2002. The aver- age capacity of turbines and size of offshore wind farms have been increasing since then

  14. HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT Clark County Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    % Health care 10% Contribution to Premature Death #12;Recommended physical activity: 30 min per day x 5HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT Clark County Bicycle & Pedestrian Master Plan October, 2010 Brendon Haggerty, Clark County Public Health Brendon.haggerty@clark.wa.gov #12;Overview · Introduction to HIA

  15. White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    professionals, decision makers, and communities § Saves health care dollars by considering short and longWhite Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to Evaluate Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans January of the Federal Highway Administration. Introduction Where we live, work, and play influences health, as well

  16. The EqIA Publishing Template Impact Assessment Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or a Full Impact Assessment. London Regional Business plan covering the financial year 2010/11. Partial and identify any specific groups where appropriate. The main beneficiaries are: The Greater London Authority including the London Development Agency and Transport for London - benefit through enhanced tree

  17. Potential economic impact of sediment quality criteria on the Army Corps of Engineers O and M dredging program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiley, M.C.; Lunz, J.; Thompson, T.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency has requested public comment on the first five sediment quality criteria (SQC) for the protection of benthic organisms. Aquatic sediments are a sink for water column contaminants that become a source of contamination and adverse effects on benthic organisms, aquatic life, and benthic supported food chains. The proposed criteria are an effort to assess the severity and extent of contamination for risk assessment and remediation, predict future contamination, and prevent contamination in uncontaminated sites. An unanswered question has been the potential economic impact of the SQC implementation on federal regulatory programs involved in aquatic resource protection, contaminated sediment remediation, and dredging and disposal of aquatic sediments. The potential costs have been of primary concern for the Corps of Engineers operation and maintenance dredging program which removes 300 million cubic yards of aquatic sediments from harbors, channels, etc. each year. Sediments found to be contaminated may have to undergo special handling/management practices which add costs to both dredging and disposal. EPA`s goal was to determine the increased percentage of dredged material requiring special handling/management if the SQC were applied under several scenarios, and thus the potential cost increase to dredging programs. The report is a basis for dialogue on the most environmentally and economically sound implementation of the SOC in the dredging program.

  18. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  19. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  20. Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

  1. Bench-scale co-processing economic assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gala, H.B.; Marker, T.L.; Miller, E.N.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UOP Co-Processing scheme is a single-stage slurry catalyzed process in which petroleum vacuum resid and coal are simultaneously upgraded to a high-quality synthetic oil. A highly active dispersed catalyst has been developed which enables the operation of the co-processing unit at relatively moderate and high temperatures and relatively high pressure. Under the current contract, a multi-year research program was undertaken to study the technical and economic feasibility of this technology. All the contractual tasks were completed. Autoclave experiments were carried out to evaluate dispersed vanadium catalysts, molybdenum catalysts, and a less costly UOP-proprietary catalyst preparation technique. Autoclave experiments were also carried out in support of the continuous pilot plant unit operation and to study the effects of the process variables (pressure, temperature, and metal loading on the catalyst). A total of 24 continuous pilot plant runs were made. Research and development efforts during the pilot plant operations were concentrated on addressing the cost effectiveness of the UOP single-stage slurry catalyzed co-processing concept based on UOP experience gained in the previous DOE contract. To this end, effect of catalyst metal concentration was studied and a highly-active Mo-based catalyst was developed. This catalyst enabled successful long-term operation (924 hours) of the continuous bench-scale plant at highly severe operating conditions of 3,000 psig, 465{degree}C temperature, and 2:1 resid-to-MAF (moisture- and ash-free) coal ratio with 0.1 wt % active metal. The metal loading of the catalyst was low enough to consider the catalyst as a disposable slurry catalyst. Also, liquid recycle was incorporated in the pilot plant design to increase the, reactor back mixing and to increase the flow of liquid through the reactor (to introduce turbulence in the reactor) and to represent the design of a commercial-scale reactor.

  2. Economic impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Transfer Department

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop new potentialAND GO! Operating under a CRADA between Berkeley Lab andand Development Agreement (CRADA). • When a company wants a

  3. Economic Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational EarthDepartmentTri Cities50 million

  4. Economic Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational EarthDepartmentTri Cities50

  5. Economic Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational EarthDepartmentTri Cities5091.4

  6. Economic Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational EarthDepartmentTri

  7. A Prototype System for Economic, Environmental and Sustainable Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    development Eco-efficiency (economic and ecological) #12;4 Broader assessment of current and future Evaluations for impacts associated with green house gases, finite resources, etc. Collaboration

  8. Economic Impact of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the State of Washington in Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a large economic entity, with $1.06 billion in annual funding, $936 million in total spending, and 4,344 employees in fiscal year (FY) 2013. Four thousand, one hundred and one (4,101) employees live in Washington State. The Laboratory directly and indirectly supports almost $1.31 billion in economic output, 6,802 jobs, and $514 million in Washington State wage income from current operations. The state also gains more than $1.21 billion in output, more than 6,400 jobs, and $459 million in income through closely related economic activities, such as visitors, health care spending, spending by resident retirees, and spinoff companies. PNNL affects Washington’s economy through commonly recognized economic channels, including spending on payrolls and other goods and services that support Laboratory operations. Less-commonly recognized channels also have their own impacts and include company-supported spending on health care for its staff members and retirees, spending of its resident retirees, Laboratory visitor spending, and the economic activities in a growing constellation of “spinoff” companies founded on PNNL research, technology, and managerial expertise. PNNL also has a significant impact on science and technology education and community nonprofit organizations. PNNL is an active participant in the future scientific enterprise in Washington with the state’s K-12 schools, colleges, and universities. The Laboratory sends staff members to the classroom and brings hundreds of students to the PNNL campus to help train the next generation of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and technicians. This investment in human capital, though difficult to measure in terms of current dollars of economic output, is among the important lasting legacies of the Laboratory. Finally, PNNL contributes to the local community with millions of dollars’ worth of cash and in-kind corporate and staff contributions, all of which strengthen the economy. This report quantifies these effects, providing detailed information on PNNL’s revenues and expenditures, as well as the impacts of its activities on the rest of the Washington State economy. This report also describes the impacts of the four closely related activities: health care spending, spinoff companies with roots in PNNL, visitors to the Laboratory, and PNNL retirees.

  9. The value of coal combustion products: an economic assessment of CCP unitization for the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, A.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently released study by the American Coal Council (ACC) on 'The Value of Coal Combustion Products' provides a detailed economic assessment of CCP utilization for US markets and the US economy. Over 125 million tons of CCPs are produced in the US each year. The projected growth in the nation's utility-coal industry will result in the production of even greater volumes of CCPs. The ACC study details: how CCPs are currently being utilized; what factors are affecting utilization growth; what are the economic benefits of avoiding disposal costs; what is the annual revenue potential of CCP utilization; what direct economic benefits in employment and tax revenues can be gained; and what indirect economic benefits are available for support industries, coal consumers and the building industry. 9 refs., 16 tabs.

  10. An idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    a c t This paper discusses the technology of direct capture of carbon dioxide from the atmo- sphereAn idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy- ture,'' which refers to the direct removal of carbon dioxide from the ambient air. Air capture has

  11. Efficiency, Economic and Environmental Assessment of Ground-Source Heat Pumps in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumsack, Seth

    the potential for significant energy savings [1]. The performance of ground-source heat pumps for residential1 Efficiency, Economic and Environmental Assessment of Ground-Source Heat Pumps in Central, the efficiency gain for the ground-source heat pump compared to electricity is 43% for cooling and 81

  12. SATELLITE-BASED SOLAR RESOURCE ASSESSMENT: SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL CHALLENGES AND BARRIERS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    SATELLITE-BASED SOLAR RESOURCE ASSESSMENT: --- SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL CHALLENGES solar resource information opens door to a solid analysis capability which often opens door to new solutions, better planning, better targeted R&D, and faster, more intelligent, development of solar energy

  13. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Assessing the Sustainability of the UBC Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scale. The group has developed a tool by which sustainability of the UBC campus may be periodically defined "sustainable development as `development that meets the needs of the present without compromisingUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Assessing

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT -CENTER FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findingsUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report JIAN SUN LIFE CYCLE which has one of the largest life cycle inventory database in North America. Assumptions and According

  15. Strain selection, biomass to biofuel conversion, and resource colocation have strong impacts on the economic performance of algae cultivation sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.; Skaggs, Richard

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Decisions involving strain selection, biomass to biofuel technology, and the location of cultivation facilities can strongly influence the economic viability of an algae-based biofuel enterprise. In this contribution we summarize our past results in a new analysis to explore the relative economic impact of these design choices. We present strain-specific growth model results from two saline strains (Nannocloropsis salina, Arthrospira sp.), a fresh to brackish strain (Chlorella sp., DOE strain 1412), and a freshwater strain of the order Sphaeropleales. Biomass to biofuel conversion is compared between lipid extraction (LE) and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) technologies. National-scale models of water, CO2 (as flue gas), land acquisition, site leveling, construction of connecting roads, and transport of HTL oil to existing refineries are used in conjunction with estimates of fuel value (from HTL) to prioritize and select from 88,692 unit farms (UF, 405 ha in pond area), a number sufficient to produce 136E+9 L yr-1 of renewable diesel (36 billion gallons yr-1, BGY). Strain selection and choice of conversion technology have large economic impacts, with differences between combinations of strains and biomass to biofuel technologies being up to $10 million dollars yr-1 UF-1. Results based on the most productive species, HTL-based fuel conversion, and resource costs show that the economic potential between geographic locations within the selection can differ by up to $4 million yr-1 UF-1, with 2.0 BGY of production possible from the most cost-effective sites. The local spatial variability in site rank is extreme, with very high and low rank sites within 10s of km of each other. Colocation with flue gas sources has a strong influence on site rank, but the most costly resource component varies from site to site. The highest rank sites are located predominantly in Florida and Texas, but most states south of 37°N latitude contain promising locations. Keywords: algae, biofuels, resource assessment, geographic information systems, techno-economics

  16. assessment environmental health: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOI 10.3310hta18690 and economic evaluation. Health Technol Assess 2014;18(69). Health Technology Assessment is indexed 298 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTREGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW...

  17. Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind #12;1 Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind November 15, 2010 Author.....................................................................................................................3 Marcellus Shale Natural Gas

  18. Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment of Sea Bottom and Marine Biology #12 Design ApS 01.03.2000 #12;Bio/consult A/S Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1........................................................................................................................................................... 36 #12;Bio/consult A/S ELSAM Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1 Page 4

  19. Data for the screening assessment. Volume 1: Text, Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, T.B.; O`Neil, T.K.; Gilbert, R.O.; Klevgard, L.A.; Walters, T.B.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River is a critical resource for residents of the Pacific Northwest. This resource drew the Manhattan Project`s planners to the site now called Hanford to produce nuclear weapon materials. Production of those materials has left behind a legacy of chemical and radioactive contamination and materials that have, are, and will continue to pose a threat to the Columbia river for the foreseeable future. To evaluate the impact to the river from this Hanford-derived contamination, the US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, and State of Washington Department of Ecology (the Tri-Party agencies) initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, stakeholder, tribal, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. A major CRCIA Team decision was to organize CRCIA into phases, with additional phases to be identified as warranted after completion of the initial phase. The initial phase is comprised of two parts: (1) a screening assessment to evaluate the current impact to the river resulting from Hanford-derived contamination and (2) identification of requirements considered necessary by the CRCIA Management Team for a comprehensive assessment of impact to the river. The purpose of the screening assessment is to support cleanup decisions. The scope of the screening assessment is to evaluate the current risk to humans and the environment resulting from Hanford-derived contaminants. The screening assessment has the primary components of: identifying contaminants to be assessed; identifying a variety of exposure scenarios to evaluate human contaminant exposure; identifying a variety of other species to evaluate ecological contaminant exposure; and assessing risks posed by exposure of humans and other species to the contaminants.

  20. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  1. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  2. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (2007) 294313 Environmental impact assessment of different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (2007) 294­313 Environmental impact assessment environmental impacts. Therefore, it is vital to evaluate the environmental impacts of the symbiosis in order is proposed. In this paper, an LCA-type environmental impact assessment of different design schemes

  3. Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel. A technology, market, and economic assessment for Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

  4. Estimates of the long-term U.S. economic impacts of global climate change-induced drought.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Loose, Verne W.; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While climate-change models have done a reasonable job of forecasting changes in global climate conditions over the past decades, recent data indicate that actual climate change may be much more severe. To better understand some of the potential economic impacts of these severe climate changes, Sandia economists estimated the impacts to the U.S. economy of climate change-induced impacts to U.S. precipitation over the 2010 to 2050 time period. The economists developed an impact methodology that converts changes in precipitation and water availability to changes in economic activity, and conducted simulations of economic impacts using a large-scale macroeconomic model of the U.S. economy.

  5. The Biofuels Revolution: Understanding the Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Biofuels Development on Rural Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Theresa L. Selfa; Dr. Richard Goe; Dr. Laszlo Kulcsar; Dr. Gerad Middendorf; Dr. Carmen Bain

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this research was an in-depth analysis of the impacts of biofuels industry and ethanol plants on six rural communities in the Midwestern states of Kansas and Iowa. The goal was to provide a better understanding of the social, cultural, and economic implications of biofuels development, and to contribute to more informed policy development regarding bioenergy.Specific project objectives were: 1. To understand how the growth of biofuel production has affected and will affect Midwestern farmers and rural communities in terms of economic, demographic, and socio-cultural impacts; 2. To determine how state agencies, groundwater management districts, local governments and policy makers evaluate or manage bioenergy development in relation to competing demands for economic growth, diminishing water resources, and social considerations; 3. To determine the factors that influence the water management practices of agricultural producers in Kansas and Iowa (e.g. geographic setting, water management institutions, competing water-use demands as well as producersâ?? attitudes, beliefs, and values) and how these influences relate to bioenergy feedstock production and biofuel processing; 4. To determine the relative importance of social-cultural, environmental and/or economic factors in the promotion of biofuels development and expansion in rural communities; The research objectives were met through the completion of six detailed case studies of rural communities that are current or planned locations for ethanol biorefineries. Of the six case studies, two will be conducted on rural communities in Iowa and four will be conducted on rural communities in Kansas. A â??multi-methodâ?ť or â??mixed methodâ?ť research methodology was employed for each case study.

  6. Assessment of the Impacts of Standards and Labeling Programs inMexico (four products).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Itha; Pulido, Henry; McNeil, Michael A.; Turiel, Isaac; della Cava, Mirka

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes impacts from energy efficiency standards and labeling in Mexico from 1994 through 2005 for four major products: household refrigerators, room air conditioners, three-phase (squirrel cage) induction motors, and clothes washers. It is a retrospective analysis, seeking to assess verified impacts on product efficiency in the Mexican market in the first ten years after standards were implemented. Such an analysis allows the Mexican government to compare actual to originally forecast program benefits. In addition, it provides an extremely valuable benchmark for other countries considering standards, and to the energy policy community as a whole. The methodology for evaluation begins with historical test data taken for a large number of models of each product type between 1994 and 2005. The pre-standard efficiency of models in 1994 is taken as a baseline throughout the analysis. Model efficiency data were provided by an independent certification laboratory (ANCE), which tested products as part of the certification and enforcement mechanism defined by the standards program. Using this data, together with economic and market data provided by both government and private sector sources, the analysis considers several types of national level program impacts. These include: Energy savings; Environmental (emissions) impacts, and Net financial impacts to consumers, manufacturers and utilities. Energy savings impacts are calculated using the same methodology as the original projections, allowing a comparison. Other impacts are calculated using a robust and sophisticated methodology developed by the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in a collaboration supported by the Collaborative Labeling and Standards Program (CLASP).

  7. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

  8. Economic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) mandated that minimum energy efficiency standards be established for classes of refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers, freezers, clothes dryers, water heaters, room air conditioners, home heating equipment, kitchen ranges and ovens, central air conditioners, and furnaces. EPCA requires that standards be designed to achieve the maximum improvement in energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter Two describes the methodology used in the economic analysis and its relationship to legislative criteria for consumer product efficiency assessment; details how the CPES Value Model systematically compared and evaluated the economic impacts of regulation on the consumer, manufacturer and Nation. Chapter Three briefly displays the results of the analysis and lists the proposed performance standards by product class. Chapter Four describes the reasons for developing a baseline forecast, characterizes the baseline scenario from which regulatory impacts were calculated and summarizes the primary models, data sources and assumptions used in the baseline formulations. Chapter Five summarizes the methodology used to calculate regulatory impacts; describes the impacts of energy performance standards relative to the baseline discussed in Chapter Four. Also discussed are regional standards and other program alternatives to performance standards. Chapter Six describes the procedure for balancing consumer, manufacturer, and national impacts to select standard levels. Details of models and data bases used in the analysis are included in Appendices A through K.

  9. Department of Energy: Allegations about the Director of the Office of Minority Economic Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rosslee G. Douglas was nominated to be Director of the Office of Minority Economic Impact in March 1981. She requested a reorganization (proposed reduction in force) of her office May 1985. Shortly after she proposed the RIF, allegations were made that the purpose of her proposal was to get rid of two employees whom she did not trust. Other allegations were made against Mrs. Douglas, including allegations that she abused travel, telephone, and Department of Energy motor pool privileges, and that she engaged in illegal contracting practices. GAO found support for some of the allegations regarding the proposed RIF.

  10. The Evaluation of Multimodal Transportation Systems for Economic Efficiency and Other Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Robert A.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Then, we the economic evaluation modeling in Intermodal ofurban economyand and economic evaluations. for devising andtransportation for the economic evaluation of regional

  11. Coal mining and the resource community cycle: A longitudinal assessment of the social impacts of the Coppabella coal mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockie, S.; Franettovich, M.; Petkova-Timmer, V.; Rolfe, J.; Ivanova, G. [CQUniversity of Australia, Rockhampton, Qld. (Australia). Inst. of Health & Social Science Research

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two social impact assessment (SIA) studies of Central Queensland's Coppabella coal mine were undertaken in 2002-2003 and 2006-2007. As ex post studies of actual change, these provide a reference point for predictive assessments of proposed resource extraction projects at other sites, while the longitudinal element added by the second study illustrates how impacts associated with one mine may vary over time due to changing economic and social conditions. It was found that the traditional coupling of local economic vitality and community development to the life cycle of resource projects - the resource community cycle - was mediated by labour recruitment and social infrastructure policies that reduced the emphasis on localised employment and investment strategies. and by the cumulative impacts of multiple mining projects within relative proximity to each other. The resource community cycle was accelerated and local communities forced to consider ways of attracting secondary investment and/or alternative industries early in the operational life of the Coppabella mine in order to secure significant economic benefits and to guard against the erosion of social capital and the ability to cope with future downturns in the mining sector.

  12. Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

  13. Quantitative estimation in Health Impact Assessment: Opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatia, Rajiv, E-mail: rajiv.bhatia@sfdph.or [San Francisco Department of Public Health, CA (United States); Seto, Edmund [University of California at Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) considers multiple effects on health of policies, programs, plans and projects and thus requires the use of diverse analytic tools and sources of evidence. Quantitative estimation has desirable properties for the purpose of HIA but adequate tools for quantification exist currently for a limited number of health impacts and decision settings; furthermore, quantitative estimation generates thorny questions about the precision of estimates and the validity of methodological assumptions. In the United States, HIA has only recently emerged as an independent practice apart from integrated EIA, and this article aims to synthesize the experience with quantitative health effects estimation within that practice. We use examples identified through a scan of available identified instances of quantitative estimation in the U.S. practice experience to illustrate methods applied in different policy settings along with their strengths and limitations. We then discuss opportunity areas and practical considerations for the use of quantitative estimation in HIA.

  14. Economic analysis and assessment of syngas production using a modeling approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hakkwan; Parajuli, Prem B.; Yu, Fei; Columbus, Eugene P.

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic analysis and modeling are essential and important issues for the development of current feedstock and process technology for bio-gasification. The objective of this study was to develop an economic model and apply to predict the unit cost of syngas production from a micro-scale bio-gasification facility. An economic model was programmed in C++ computer programming language and developed using a parametric cost approach, which included processes to calculate the total capital costs and the total operating costs. The model used measured economic data from the bio-gasification facility at Mississippi State University. The modeling results showed that the unit cost of syngas production was $1.217 for a 60 Nm-3 h-1 capacity bio-gasifier. The operating cost was the major part of the total production cost. The equipment purchase cost and the labor cost were the largest part of the total capital cost and the total operating cost, respectively. Sensitivity analysis indicated that labor costs rank the top as followed by equipment cost, loan life, feedstock cost, interest rate, utility cost, and waste treatment cost. The unit cost of syngas production increased with the increase of all parameters with exception of loan life. The annual cost regarding equipment, labor, feedstock, waste treatment, and utility cost showed a linear relationship with percent changes, while loan life and annual interest rate showed a non-linear relationship. This study provides the useful information for economic analysis and assessment of the syngas production using a modeling approach.

  15. Constraints on implementing environmental impact assessments in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakonge, J.O. (UNDP, Maseru (South Africa)); Imevbore, A.M. (Univ. of Ile-ife (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Africa can benefit from the experience of other areas in implementing environmental impact assessments (EIAs), but African countries face a greater challenge in achieving this goal due to such problems as inadequate environmental legislation; inappropriate institutional framework for coordination and monitoring government activities; a shortage of qualified manpower, inadequate financial resources; absence of public awareness of the need for EIAs; and lack of suitable screening procedures to determine which development projects require an EIA. Despite these difficulties, African countries can realize short- and long-term benefits from the incorporation of the EIA into their decision-making process.

  16. European Commission Impact Assessment Tools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGerman Aerospace Center (DLR) SectorEurelImpact Assessment

  17. Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern ILSunseeker Energy HoldingEnergyLand-use Impact Assessment

  18. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.

  19. Is environmental impact assessment regulation a 'burden' to private firms?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annandale, David; Taplin, Ross

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of environmental regulation on macroeconomic performance has been studied in some depth over the last 15 years. Similarly, impact on profit performance, investment intention and location decisions of firms has also been studied, although in less depth. There has been less academic interest, however, in the impact that environmental regulation has on the strategic objectives of companies. This article reports on a research project that focused on the impact that environmental approvals regulation (predominantly environmental impact assessment, EIA) has on proposed new development in the international mining sector. Based on a large and externally valid survey of senior mining company executives in Australia and Canada in the late 1990s, the research indicated that a significant majority of firms consider the environmental approvals process to be an important determinant of investment strategy. An initial reaction to these figures might suggest that the majority of respondents believe the environmental approvals process to be a negative influence. However, further questioning indicated that only a small proportion of companies in both countries thought of the environmental approvals process as an impediment to development. Instead, it is clear that most firms see EIA as a catalyst for integrating environmental design into the early planning of a project, thereby alleviating the need to spend money on overcoming environmental problems once a poorly designed project has been commissioned. The somewhat surprising conclusion that companies see environmental approvals regulation as important, but as an encouragement to development rather than as an impediment, goes against much previous industry and academic comment and, at least in relation to the mining sector, refutes the idea that EIA is ''burdensome''.

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The informationUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;2 | P a g e Life Cycle Assessment of UBC Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences Building CIVL 498E

  1. Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

  2. Economic Life Cycle Assessment as element of sustainability certification – a key success factor moving beyond Life Cycle Costing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinius, W.; Hirsch, H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    considering environmental impacts in building design, commissioning and operation to the consideration of sustainability aspects has significantly enlarged the scope of aspects to be addressed, especially in assessment schemes. While assessments now turn...

  3. How social impact assessment can contribute to conflict management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prenzel, Paula V., E-mail: p.v.prenzel@student.rug.nl; Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: frank.vanclay@rug.nl

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for conflict is omnipresent in all projects, and even in all human interactions, and conflict itself leads to many second-order social impacts. This article examines the contribution of the methodological approach used in social impact assessment (SIA) to conflict management. We view conflict as a process that has its own dynamic, and is to be expected in all situations. By using game theory (prisoner's dilemma), we describe and conceptualize this process and highlight the importance of communication in managing conflict. We demonstrate the potential use of SIA in preventing, managing and resolving conflict. Emphasis is placed on the participatory character of SIA and the role of public media. In contrast to existing literature, our focus is not restricted to the typical fields of study of SIA (e.g. environmental conflicts), but understands conflict itself as a field of application. In this sense, conflict-sensitive SIA can be understood both as an extension to the SIA tool kit and a broadening of the scope of SIA application. -- Highlights: • Conflict is omnipresent and creates both positive and negative social impacts. • Conflict itself represents a possible field of application for SIA. • Conflict escalation is a process that can be modeled in a game-theoretic framework. • There needs to be concerted effort to prevent escalation to avoid harmful outcomes. • Conflict-sensitive SIA can support conflict management and sustainable resolution.

  4. Assessing the prospective environmental impacts of photovoltaic systems based on a simplified LCA model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Assessing the prospective environmental impacts of photovoltaic systems based on a simplified LCA the environmental impacts of PV systems are small during their operating phase, they are more significant during the use of LCA to assess the environmental impacts of one electricity-production technology. To address

  5. Assessing the impacts of military vehicle traffic on natural areas. Introduction to the special

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehmi, Jeffrey S.

    Assessing the impacts of military vehicle traffic on natural areas. Introduction to the special issue and review of the relevant military vehicle impact literature Alan B. Anderson a,*, Antonio J, and the International Society for Terrain-Vehicle Systems cosponsored a symposium titled ``Assessing the Impacts

  6. Revision of three-stakeholder signaling game for environmental impact assessment in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pu Xiao [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875 (China); Cheng Hongguang, E-mail: chg@bnu.edu.c [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875 (China); Gong Li; Hao Fanghua [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University No. 19, Xinjiekouwai Street, Beijing 100875 (China); Qi Ye [School of Public Policy and Management, Tsinghua University No. 1, Qinghuayuan Street, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since environmental impact assessment (EIA) regulations were adopted in China 30 years ago, the implementation rate of EIA policies for development projects has been steadily increasing while national environmental quality keeps deteriorating. This contradiction prevents achievement of the goals that the regulations were originally created for, raising concerns regarding the EIA implementation process. One of the objectives of EIA is the evaluation of socio-economic costs introduced by various commercial activities. However, independent economic entities are inclined to break away from these cost related responsibilities, making it necessary for government agencies and EIA organizations to participate in the evaluation process. The practice of avoiding costs may also bring forth other issues, such as rent-seeking behavior and conspiracies. Reducing private costs and the tendency of the three EIA stakeholders to evade social responsibility are intertwined in every EIA process. Their activities are as follows: The government is the lawmaker whose attitude toward the EIA organization determines how business owners react in the EIA process. The government inclination can be interpreted as a signal from which enterprises can determine the nature of the government, which helps the enterprise owners formulate their future actions. A similar relationship also exists among the government, EIA organizations, and enterprise entities. Fundamentally, the correlations between the EIA stakeholders are determined by their socio-economic situation, namely, the economic costs and benefits they encounter. In this article, signaling game theory derived from the classic game theory is applied to describe the EIA process in China by analyzing the activities of the stakeholders and searching for game equilibrium solutions. The optimal reaction schema for stakeholders was obtained by transforming the equilibrium.

  7. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils: Its environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harness, J.; Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.; Zhang, H.; Maggon, D.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to conduct an environmental impact assessment study for selenium from coal mine spoils. The use of in-situ lysimetry to predict selenium speciation, transformation, and mobility under natural conditions was evaluated. The scope of the study was to construct and test field-scale lysimeter and laboratory mini-column to assess mobility and speciation of selenium in coal mine overburden and soil systems; to conduct soil and groundwater sampling throughout the state of Oklahoma for an overall environmental impact assessment of selenium; and to conduct an in-depth literature review on the solubility, speciation, mobility, and toxicity of selenium from various sources. Groundwater and surface soil samples were also collected from each county in Oklahoma. Data collected from the lysimeter study indicated that selenium in the overburden of the abandoned mine site was mainly found in the selenite form. The amount of selenite found was too low and immobile to be of concern to the environment. The spoil had equilibrated long enough (over 50 years) that most of the soluble forms of selenium have already been lost. Examination of the overburden indicated the presence of pyrite crystals that precipitated over time. The laboratory mini-column study indicated that selenite is quite immobile and remained on the overburden material even after leaching with dilute acid. Data from groundwater samples indicated that based on the current permissible level for selenium in groundwater (0.01 mg Se/L), Oklahoma groundwater is widely contaminated with the element. However, according to the new regulation (0.05 mg Se/L), which is to be promulgated in 1992, only 9 of the 77 counties in the state exceed the limit.

  8. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; Thompson, Lisa; Letschert, Virginie

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a rulemaking process in which it amended the existing energy efficiency standards for residential water heaters. A key factor in DOE?s consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers. Determining such impacts requires a comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This paper describes the method used to conduct the life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period analysis for gas and electric storage water heaters. It presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment, including heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters, for a representative sample of U.S. homes. The study included a detailed accounting of installation costs for the considered design options, with a focus on approaches for accommodating the larger dimensions of more efficient water heaters. For heat pump water heaters, the study also considered airflow requirements, venting issues, and the impact of these products on the indoor environment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design reduces the LCC in the majority of homes for both gas and electric storage water heaters, and heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters provide a lower LCC for homes with large rated volume water heaters.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT Environmental and Resource Studies ERST 311H Winter 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT Environmental and Resource Studies ERST 311H ­ Winter 2009 TRENT is by email. Course Summary Description Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a process by which is a process by which a balance among these three primary environmental aspects is assessed and the optimal

  10. Multi-jurisdictional environmental impact assessment: Canadian experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, Patricia, E-mail: p.fitzpatrick@uwinnipeg.c [Department of Geography, The University of Winnipeg 515 Portage Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada); Sinclair, A. John, E-mail: Jsincla@ms.umanitoba.c [Natural Resources Institute, Sinnott Building, 70 Dysart Rd., University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This research examines complexities surrounding environmental impact assessment (EIA) in a multi-jurisdictional environment, with a specific focus on opportunities for public participation. With almost universal adoption of EIA, projects are increasingly subject to more than one assessment process. Thus there is demand to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination of EIAs. Canada has growing expertise with multijuristictional EIA that serves to illustrate the costs and opportunities associated with three different approaches to coordination: standardization, harmonization and substitution. Findings suggest that, although fraught with issues, harmonization is the most realistic approach for coordinating efforts. Harmonization has the potential to minimize duplication, avoid process uncertainty and increase efficiency and effectiveness in EIA. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrates that a bilateral agreement between jurisdictions is the best approach to harmonization, so long as negotiation of the agreement includes opportunities for meaningful participation, and implementation includes activities designed to communicate the assessment responsibilities of each jurisdiction, activities and schedules to the public. The experience of participants of different coordinated EIAs in Canada serves as counsel for on-going and future efforts to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination.

  11. Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following a postulated accident in PHWRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, N.; Kansal, M.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K. [Reactor Safety and Analysis, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., Nabhkiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai Maharashtra 400094 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following postulated accident i.e Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with failed Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), performed as part of the reactor safety analysis of a typical 700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). The rationale behind the assessment is that the public needs to be protected in the event that the postulated accident results in radionuclide release outside containment. Radionuclides deliver dose to the human body through various pathways namely, plume submersion, exposure due to ground deposition, inhalation and ingestion. The total exposure dose measured in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is the sum of doses to a hypothetical adult human at exclusion zone boundary by all the exposure pathways. The analysis provides the important inputs to decide upon the type of emergency counter measures to be adopted during the postulated accident. The importance of the various pathways in terms of contribution to the total effective dose equivalent(TEDE) is also assessed with respect to time of exposure. Inhalation and plume gamma dose are the major contributors towards TEDE during initial period of accident whereas ingestion and ground shine dose start dominating in TEDE in the extended period of exposure. Moreover, TEDE is initially dominated by I-131, Kr-88, Te-132, I-133 and Sr-89, whereas, as time progresses, Xe-133,I-131 and Te-132 become the main contributors. (authors)

  12. Economic Impacts Associated With Commercializing Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles in California: An Analysis of the California Road Map Using the JOBS H2 Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report by Argonne National Laboratory summarizing an analysis of the economic impacts associated with commercializing fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) in California.

  13. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  14. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

  15. Impacts of Farm Policies and Technology on the Economic Viability of Texas Southern High Plains Wheat Farms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, James W.; Smith, Edward G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lOC :A245.7 H3~ :) ,'---( _..----' I ... - Impacts of Farm Policies and Technology on the Economic Viability of Southern High Plains Wheat Farms tiD'" A".,V SEP 04 1985 8-1506 August 1985 THE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.../Neville P. Clarke, DirectorlThe Texas A&M University System/College Station, Texas (Blank Pale In OrigIIW BuUetinl :. ' , ' .. ; ~ :.' IMPACTS OF? FARM POLICIES AND TECHNOLOGY ON THE ECONOMIC VIABILITY OF SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS WHEAT FARMS James W...

  16. Impacts of Farm Policies and Technology on the Economic Viability of Texas Southern High Plains Cotton Farms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, James W.; Smith, Edward G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    we fA245 .7 B73 0, )'505 Impacts of Farm Policies and Technology on the Economic Viability of ' Texas Southern High Plains Cotton Farms ~ --rfii~tt'{ APR 201981 8-1505 August 1985 THE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION/Neville P.... Clarke, Director/The Texas A&M University System/College Station, Texas (Blank Pa,ge In Origbral-BuUetlai k "",", ~- . Ai! IMPACTS OF FARM POLICIES AND TECHNOLOGY ON THE ECONOMIC VIABILITY OF TEXAS SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS COTTON FARMS James W...

  17. Economic analysis: impact of CS/R process on benzene market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spielberger, L.; Klein, J.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contract No. DE-AC01-78ET10159 (formerly ET-78-C-01-3117) between UOP/SDC and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) requires UOP/SDC to provide specific engineering and technical services to the DOE Office of Coal Processing in support of the Coal Gasification Program. This report covers an economic study on the projected price of benzene through the next decade based on the market factors and production costs. The impact of the CS/R process on the benzene market was evaluated. In addition, the cost of gas from the CS/R process was determined as a function of the byproduct credit for benzene.

  18. Environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities. A MITE Program evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFs) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. The MITE Program is sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency to foster the demonstration and development of innovative technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). This project was also funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Material recovery facilities are increasingly being used as one option for managing a significant portion of municipal solid waste (MSW). The owners and operators of these facilities employ a combination of manual and mechanical techniques to separate and sort the recyclable fraction of MSW and to transport the separated materials to recycling facilities.

  19. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  20. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  1. Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

  2. Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

  3. Data Compendium for the Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, P.W.; Huesties, L.R.; Maughan, A.D.; Miley, T.B.; Walters, W.H.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). The CRCIA is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The purpose of the CRCIA is to evaluate the current human and ecological risk from the Columbia River attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. Human risk will be addressed for radioactive and hazardous materials over a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The initial effort for the CRCIA is the development of a compendium of existing data on Columbia River contamination. This document provides the data compendium. It also includes a discussion of data sources, descriptions of the physical format of the data, and descriptions of the search process used to identify data.

  4. Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of Concentrating Solar Power in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoddard, L.; Abiecunas, J.; O'Connell, R.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a summary assessment of concentrating solar power and its potential economic return, energy supply impact, and environmental benefits for the State of California.

  5. Evaluation of environmental impact assessment system in Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadeem, Obaidullah [Department of City and Regional Planning, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: obaidnadeem@yahoo.com; Hameed, Rizwan [Department of City and Regional Planning, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: d_rizwan@hotmail.com

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) was first introduced in Pakistan based on the Environmental Protection Ordinance 1983. The EIA process was further strengthened under the Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997, which became operational under EIA Regulations 2000. Despite a sound legal basis and comprehensive guidelines, evidence suggests that EIA has not yet evolved satisfactorily in Pakistan. An evaluation of the EIA system against systematic evaluation criteria, based on interviews with EIA approval authorities, consulting firms and experts, reveals various shortcomings of the EIA system. These mainly include; inadequate capacity of EIA approval authorities, deficiencies in screening and scoping, poor EIA quality, inadequate public participation and weak monitoring. Overall, EIA is used presently as a project justification tool rather than as a project planning tool to contribute to achieving sustainable development. Whilst shortcomings are challenging, central government has recently shown a high degree of commitment to the environmental protection by making EIA compulsory for all the public sector projects likely to have adverse environmental impacts. The paper identifies opportunities for taking advantage of the current environment for strengthening the EIA process.

  6. Ecological compensation and Environmental Impact Assessment in Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villarroya, Ana, E-mail: avillarroya@alumni.unav.e [Department of Zoology and Ecology, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Navarra) (Spain); Puig, Jordi, E-mail: jpbaguer@unav.e [Department of Zoology and Ecology, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Navarra) (Spain)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve meaningful sustainable development, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) should avoid the net losses in the environment resource base. But EIA practice does not always avoid the losses caused by the implementation of the projects under EIA regulation. Some environmental impacts are, simply, admitted, even without enforcing any form of compensation. When applied, compensation is sometimes just a monetary payment to offset the environmental loss. This paper looks for evidence on the role that compensation is given at present in EIA practice in Spain, and for some of its conceptual and regulatory roots. Specifically, it explores how compensation is addressed in 1302 records of decision (RODs) on those projects subject to the Spanish EIA regulation published during the years 2006 and 2007, to know how far Spain is from preserving the environmental resource base managed through this particular aspect of EIA practice. As a result, it is concluded that the practice of ecological compensation in EIA in Spain is much lower than it could be expected in a theoretical sustainability context committed to avoid net losses in the environment resource base, mainly due to an EIA practice focused on on-site mitigation that allows these net losses.

  7. Effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessment system in Estonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinma, Kaupo, E-mail: kaupo@environment.e [Institute of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Tallinn University, 25 Narva Road, 10120 Tallinn (Estonia); Poder, Tonis, E-mail: tonisp@tlu.e [Institute of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Tallinn University, 25 Narva Road, 10120 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To be effective, an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) system, first, has to minimize the probability that projects with significant environmental effects are implemented without EIA, and second, minimize the number of EIAs, which do not provide decision makers with essential information, so that the decision is improved as a result of EIA. The objective of this study was to find out how frequently in Estonia the projects implemented without EIA have caused significant environmental effects, and to measure the relative frequency of EIAs that have no influence on decision. An extensive survey with e-mail distributed questionnaires was carried out to reveal information from governmental agencies, local self-governments, and developers. There was no evidence that projects authorized without EIA have had environmental impacts, which could have been mitigated as a result of EIA. In contrast, about half of EIAs did not alter the decision of relevant authorities. This proportion was valid to both mandatory EIAs and those initiated on judgement basis. In our view, the proportion of no-influence EIAs was excessive and indicated the need to reconsider the provisions applying to the projects with a mandatory EIA requirement as well as judgements practice.

  8. Text Alternative Version: Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products" webcast, held March 28, 2013.

  9. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    indicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human Ecologicalindicators in life-cycle assessment (LCA). Human EcologicalI explore how life-cycle assessment (LCA) results can

  10. Strategic environmental assessment can help solve environmental impact assessment failures in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alshuwaikhat, Habib M. [Department of City and Regional Planning, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, PO Box 1632, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: habibms@kfupm.edu.sa

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The current trend of industrialization and urbanization in developing nations has a huge impact on anthropogenic and natural ecosystems. Pollution sources increase with the expansion of cities and cause contamination of water, air and soil. The absence of urban environmental planning and management strategies has resulted in greater concern for future urban development. This paper advocates the adoption of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) as a means to achieve sustainable development in developing countries. It investigates project-level environmental impact assessment (EIA) and its limitations. The exploration of SEA and its features are addressed. The effective implementation of SEA can create a roadmap for sustainable development. In many developing countries, the lack of transparency and accountability and ineffective public participation in the development of the policy, plan and program (PPP) would be mitigated by the SEA process. Moreover, the proactive and broadly based characteristics of SEA would benefit the institutional development of the PPP process, which is rarely experienced in many developing countries. The paper also explores the prospects for SEA and its guiding principles in developing countries. Finally, the paper calls for a coordinated effort between all government, nongovernment and international organizations involved with PPPs to enable developing countries to pursue a path of sustainable development through the development and application of strategic environmental assessment.

  11. An environmental impact assessment of quantum dot photovoltaics (QDPV) from raw material acquisition through use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    An environmental impact assessment of quantum dot photovoltaics (QDPV) from raw material of Environmental Engineering, Beytepe, Ankara, Turkey b Institute for Environmental Science and Policy, University: Life cycle assessment Quantum dots Nanophotovoltaics Quantum dot photovoltaic modules Solar energy

  12. Dynamic Model for Assessing Impact of Regeneration Actions on System Availability: Application to Weapon Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dynamic Model for Assessing Impact of Regeneration Actions on System Availability: Application) Key Words: failure, damage, regeneration, availability assessment, stochastic activity networks, Monte Carlo simulations SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS Availability is a determining factor in systems characterization

  13. Figure 4-4 Photos of Site and Long-Term Visual Impact Assessments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Assessments Final EA Page 4-51 June 2003 Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of FINAL National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site and Denver West Office...

  14. Public participation in environmental impact assessment: why, who and how?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glucker, Anne N., E-mail: anne.glucker@gmx.de [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC (Netherlands); Driessen, Peter P.J., E-mail: p.driessen@uu.nl [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC (Netherlands); Kolhoff, Arend, E-mail: akolhoff@eia.nl [Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment, P.O. Box 2345, 3500 GH Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment, P.O. Box 2345, 3500 GH Utrecht (Netherlands); Runhaar, Hens A.C., E-mail: h.a.c.runhaar@uu.nl [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80115, 3508 TC (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Even a cursory glance at the literature on environmental impact assessment (EIA) reveals that public participation is being considered as an integral part of the assessment procedure. Public participation in EIA is commonly deemed to foster democratic policy-making and to render EIA more effective. Yet a closer look at the literature unveils that, beyond this general assertion, opinions of the precise meaning, objectives and adequate representation of public participation in EIA considerably diverge. Against this background, in this article we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the academic debate on public participation in EIA concerning its meaning, objectives and adequate level of inclusiveness. In so doing, we hope to stimulate a more focused debate on the subject, which is key to advancing the research agenda. Furthermore, this paper may serve as a starting point for practitioners involved in defining the role of public participation in EIA practice. -- Highlights: • There is little reflection on the meaning, objectives and adequate level of inclusiveness of public participation in EIA. • We provide a comprehensive overview of the academic debate on public participation in EIA concerning the meaning, objectives and adequate level of inclusiveness. • Theoretical claims put forth by scholars are contrasted with empirical evidence. • Overview shall stimulate a more focused debate on the subject. • This paper may serve as a starting point for practitioners involved in defining the role of public participation in EIA.

  15. Treatment of biodiversity issues in impact assessment of electricity power transmission lines: A Finnish case review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soederman, Tarja [Senior Researcher, Lic. Phil., Finnish Environment Institute, Nature Division, P.O. Box 140, FIN-00251 Helsinki (Finland)]. E-mail: tarja.soderman@ymparisto.fi

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process concerning the route of a 400 kV power transmission line between Loviisa and Hikiae in southern Finland was reviewed in order to assess how biodiversity issues are treated and to provide suggestions on how to improve the effectiveness of treatment of biodiversity issues in impact assessment of linear development projects. The review covered the whole assessment process, including interviews of stakeholders, participation in the interest group meetings and review of all documents from the project. The baseline studies and assessment of direct impacts in the case study were detailed but the documentation, both the assessment programme and the assessment report, only gave a partial picture of the assessment process. All existing information, baseline survey and assessment methods should be addressed in the scoping phase in order to promote interaction between all stakeholders. In contrast to the assessment of the direct effects, which first emphasized impacts on the nationally important and protected flying squirrel but later expanded to deal with the assessment of impacts on ecologically important sites, the indirect and cumulative impacts of the power line were poorly addressed. The public was given the opportunity to become involved in the EIA process. However, they were more concerned with impacts on their properties and less so on biodiversity and species protection issues. This suggests that the public needs to become more informed about locally important features of biodiversity.

  16. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings contained in this report have not been, 2013 Final Report #12;CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research LaboratoryUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Daniel Tse Life Cycle

  17. Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to estimate the impact (energy, emissions and economics) of United Fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic actuation) is the generation, control, and application of pumped or compressed fluids when this power is used to provide force and motion to mechanisms. This form of mechanical power is an integral part of United States (U.S.) manufacturing and transportation. In 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, sales of fluid power components exceeded $17.7B, sales of systems using fluid power exceeded $226B. As large as the industry is, it has had little fundamental research that could lead to improved efficiency since the late 1960s (prior to the 1970 energy crisis). While there have been some attempts to replace fluid powered components with electric systems, its performance and rugged operating condition limit the impact of simple part replacement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) collaborated with 31 industrial partners to collect and consolidate energy specific measurements (consumption, emissions, efficiency) of deployed fluid power systems. The objective of this study was to establish a rudimentary order of magnitude estimate of the energy consumed by fluid powered systems. The analysis conducted in this study shows that fluid powered systems consumed between 2.0 and 2.9 Quadrillion (1015) Btus (Quads) of energy per year; producing between 310 and 380 million metric tons (MMT) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). In terms of efficiency, the study indicates that, across all industries, fluid power system efficiencies range from less than 9% to as high as 60% (depending upon the application), with an average efficiency of 22%. A review of case studies shows that there are many opportunities to impact energy savings in both the manufacturing and transportation sectors by the development and deployment of energy efficient fluid power components and systems.

  18. Assessment of Impacts from Adopting the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of Wyoming currently does not have a statewide building energy efficiency code for residential buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy has requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to estimate the energy savings, economic impacts, and pollution reduction from adopting the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). This report addresses the impacts for low-rise residential buildings only.

  19. The impact and effectiveness of health impact assessment: A conceptual framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: ben@harrisroxashealth.com; Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.au

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of health impact assessment (HIA) has expanded rapidly and there are increasing demands for it to demonstrate its effectiveness. This paper presents a conceptual framework for evaluating HIA and describes its development through (i) a review of the literature, (ii) a review of work undertaken as part of a major HIA capacity building project and (iii) an in-depth study of seven completed HIAs. The framework emphasises context, process and impacts as key domains in understanding and evaluating the effectiveness of an HIA. This new framework builds upon the existing approaches to evaluating HIA and extends them to reflect the broad range of factors that comprise and influence the effectiveness of HIAs. It may be of use in evaluating completed HIAs and in planning HIAs that are yet to be undertaken. -- Highlights: ? The first empirically-derived conceptual framework for evaluating HIA ? It may also be useful for planning and reporting on HIAs. ? The framework emphasises context, process and impacts as key domains. ? A broad range of factors influence the effectiveness of HIAs.

  20. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy-storage system. Volume II. Introduction and technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results are described of a study subcontracted by PNL to the United Technologies Research Center on the engineering feasibility and economics of a CAES concept which uses a coal fired, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) to heat the air being returned from storage during the power production cycle. By burning coal instead of fuel oil, the CAES/FBC concept can completely eliminate the dependence of compressed air energy storage on petroleum fuels. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume II presents a discussion of program background and an in-depth coverage of both fluid bed combustion and turbomachinery technology pertinent to their application in a CAES power plant system. The CAES/FBC concept appears technically feasible and economically competitive with conventional CAES. However, significant advancement is required in FBC technology before serious commercial commitment to CAES/FBC can be realized. At present, other elements of DOE, industrial groups, and other countries are performing the required R and D for advancement of FBC technology. The CAES/FBC will be reevaluated at a later date when FBC technology has matured and many of the concerns now plaguing FBC are resolved. (LCL)

  1. How Beneficial is Tourism? An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Tourism in Il N'gwesi, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How Beneficial is Tourism? An Analysis of the Economic Impact of Tourism in Il N'gwesi, Kenya of tourism in Il N'gwesi, Kenya. Il N'gwesi is a Maasai group ranch located near Mt. Kenya which is primarily

  2. Report Title: The Economic Impact of Oil and Gas Extraction in New Mexico Type of Report: Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Report Title: The Economic Impact of Oil and Gas Extraction in New Mexico Type of Report: Technical of oil and gas extraction in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment presented. Historical oil and gas production, reserves, and price data are also presented and discussed. #12

  3. Impact of battery weight and charging patterns on the economic and environmental benefits of plug-in hybrid vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Jeremy J.

    Impact of battery weight and charging patterns on the economic and environmental benefits of plug, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890, USA c Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Article history: Received 22 July 2008 Accepted 24 February 2009 Available online 1 April 2009 Keywords

  4. The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    and wind power in three Canadian jurisdictions, namely British Columbia, Ontario and Alberta. An Optimal baseload mixtures. The large premium paid for displacing hydro or nuclear power with wind power does littleThe Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse

  5. The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West for this research was provided by the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association (WVONGA). The opinions herein Natural gas is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless fuel that is used by households, manufacturers

  6. Molasses for ethanol: The economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Molasses for ethanol: The economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol Anand R Gopal1,4,6 and Daniel M Kammen1,2,3,5 1 Energy supplying country for the production of sugarcane ethanol; fresh mill-pressed cane juice from a Brazilian

  7. What is the Economic Impact of 40 CFR 197 on Yucca Mountain?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foutes, C. E.; Czyscinski, K.; Bartlett, J.; Kozak, M.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, DOE's strategy for development of a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is reviewed to determine the impact of EPA's 40 CFR 197 rule making on the repository. This review is conducted through two major, converging perspectives. The first, an historical perspective, traces the evolution of the repository design from principal reliance for safety on natural barriers to a design having principal reliance on engineered barriers. This perspective demonstrates that this change evolved as a result of site characterization findings and their resulting impact on repository design, together with criticism and recommendations from external reviews of the DOE program. The second perspective, performance assessment, traces the evolution of strategy to achieve current performance, i.e., no expected radionuclide releases and no potential for radiation doses for more than 10,000 years. Together, these perspectives lead to the conclusion that the Yucca Mountain Repository has evolved in such a way that EPA's 40 CFR Part 197 standards have had and will have no impact on the costs of repository program development.

  8. An evaluation of the environmental impact assessment system in Vietnam: The gap between theory and practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clausen, Alison, E-mail: aliclausen@protocol.com.a [WWF Madagascar and Western Indian Ocean Programme Office, BP 738, Antananarivo 101 (Madagascar); Vu, Hoang Hoa, E-mail: hoanghoavu@yahoo.co [Water Resources University, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Pedrono, Miguel, E-mail: pedrono@cirad.f [CIRAD, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Vietnam has one of the fastest growing economies in the world and has achieved significant socio-economic development in recent years. However this growth is placing increased pressure on an already depleted natural environment. Environmental impact assessment (EIA) is recognised by the Government and international organizations as an important tool in the management of the impacts of future development on the country's natural resource base. The Government's commitment to EIA has been demonstrated through the development and adoption of the Law on Environment Protection (Revised) in 2005 which sets out the requirements for EIA and which represents a major step in the development of a robust legislative framework for EIA in Vietnam. The Law on Environment Protection (Revised) 2005 has now been operational for several years and we have undertaken an evaluation of the resulting EIA system in Vietnam. We argue that while significant improvements have been achieved in the EIA policy framework, an important gap remains between EIA theory and practice. We contend that the basis of the current EIA legislation is strong and that future developments of the EIA system in Vietnam should focus on improving capacity of EIA practitioners rather than further substantial legislative change. Such improvements would allow the Vietnamese EIA system to emerge as an effective and efficient tool for environmental management in Vietnam and as a model EIA framework for other developing countries.

  9. Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 ©2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1 Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 August 2011 www.msetc.org The Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center (MSETC

  10. Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Molasses for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis of sugarcane ethanol This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll for ethanol: the economic and environmental impacts of a new pathway for the lifecycle greenhouse gas analysis

  11. Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

  12. Groundwater impact assessment for the 216-U-17 Crib, 200 West Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Johnson, V.G.; Kline, N.W.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact to groundwater from discharge of process condensate to the ground at the 216-U-17 Crib. The assessment considers impacts associated with moisture movement through soil beneath the crib and the potential transport of contaminants to the groundwater.

  13. Tools for sustainability impact assessment of forestry policies: what role for social science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tools for sustainability impact assessment of forestry policies: what role for social science: · Models & tools developed for the forestry sector are typically under-used · Impact assessment has little involvement to be deliberative, we need analytical tools, commonly associated with `the experts'." · "The most

  14. Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (EA . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives . . . . . 15 2.2 Whale watching activity in Alaska

  15. Assessing Rural Transformations: Piloting a Qualitative Impact Protocol in Malawi and Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Assessing Rural Transformations: Piloting a Qualitative Impact Protocol in Malawi and Ethiopia a Qualitative Impact Protocol in Malawi and Ethiopia James Copestake and Fiona Remnant Abstract This paper impact evaluation of NGO sponsored rural development projects in Malawi and Ethiopia. Two of the projects

  16. 1992 North Dakota Economic Impact Study for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in North Dakota is to improve the environment and reduce the negative health effects associated with residual radioactive material (RRM) from the inactive processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. A secondary benefit of the UMTRA Project is economic gain. The 1992 North Dakota Economic Impact Study (NDEIS) analyzes the impact of the remedial actions at the inactive Belfield and Bowman processing sites and their associated vicinity properties. This analysis is based on the assumption that the state of North Dakota will provide 10 percent of the funding required for remediation. For every dollar the state of North Dakota invests in the Belfield and Bowman onsite portion of the UMTRA Project, it will realize $5.04 in gross labor income (i.e., gross labor income divided by the state's total funding requirement). For every dollar the state of North Dakota invests, it will realize a net return of $3.04 (i.e., net benefit divided by the state's total funding requirement). This reflects only labor expenditure and employment impact. ff state and local non-labor tax benefits were considered in the net economic benefit, North Dakota could receive significantly more than $3.04 for each dollar it invests. The UMTRA Project work at Belfield and Bowman will benefit the state of North Dakota. Benefits include a reduction in the negative health effects caused by low-level RRM, an improvement in the environment, and increased economic growth.

  17. A multi-scale metrics approach to forest fragmentation for Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eunyoung, E-mail: eykim@kei.re.kr [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Wonkyong, E-mail: wksong79@gmail.com [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)] [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongkun, E-mail: dklee7@snu.ac.kr [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Forests are becoming severely fragmented as a result of land development. South Korea has responded to changing community concerns about environmental issues. The nation has developed and is extending a broad range of tools for use in environmental management. Although legally mandated environmental compliance requirements in South Korea have been implemented to predict and evaluate the impacts of land-development projects, these legal instruments are often insufficient to assess the subsequent impact of development on the surrounding forests. It is especially difficult to examine impacts on multiple (e.g., regional and local) scales in detail. Forest configuration and size, including forest fragmentation by land development, are considered on a regional scale. Moreover, forest structure and composition, including biodiversity, are considered on a local scale in the Environmental Impact Assessment process. Recently, the government amended the Environmental Impact Assessment Act, including the SEA, EIA, and small-scale EIA, to require an integrated approach. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish an impact assessment system that minimizes the impacts of land development using an approach that is integrated across multiple scales. This study focused on forest fragmentation due to residential development and road construction sites in selected Congestion Restraint Zones (CRZs) in the Greater Seoul Area of South Korea. Based on a review of multiple-scale impacts, this paper integrates models that assess the impacts of land development on forest ecosystems. The applicability of the integrated model for assessing impacts on forest ecosystems through the SEIA process is considered. On a regional scale, it is possible to evaluate the location and size of a land-development project by considering aspects of forest fragmentation, such as the stability of the forest structure and the degree of fragmentation. On a local scale, land-development projects should consider the distances at which impacts occur in the vicinity of the forest ecosystem, and these considerations should include the impacts on forest vegetation and bird species. Impacts can be mitigated by considering the distances at which these influences occur. In particular, this paper presents an integrated environmental impact assessment system to be applied in the SEIA process. The integrated assessment system permits the assessment of the cumulative impacts of land development on multiple scales. -- Highlights: • The model is to assess the impact of forest fragmentation across multiple scales. • The paper suggests the type of forest fragmentation on a regional scale. • The type can be used to evaluate the location and size of a land development. • The paper shows the influence distance of land development on a local scale. • The distance can be used to mitigate the impact at an EIA process.

  18. Economic Impacts of Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Agro-terrorism in the United States: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Rose, Adam [University of Southern California, Los Angeles] [University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Bumsoo, Lee [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus has high agro-terrorism potential because it is contagious, can be easily transmitted via inanimate objects and can be spread by wind. An outbreak of FMD in developed countries results in massive slaughtering of animals (for disease control) and disruptions in meat supply chains and trade, with potentially large economic losses. Although the United States has been FMD-free since 1929, the potential of FMD as a deliberate terrorist weapon calls for estimates of the physical and economic damage that could result from an outbreak. This paper estimates the economic impacts of three alternative scenarios of potential FMD attacks using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the US economy. The three scenarios range from a small outbreak successfully contained within a state to a large multi-state attack resulting in slaughtering of 30 percent of the national livestock. Overall, the value of total output losses in our simulations range between $37 billion (0.15% of 2006 baseline economic output) and $228 billion (0.92%). Major impacts stem from the supply constraint on livestock due to massive animal slaughtering. As expected, the economic losses are heavily concentrated in agriculture and food manufacturing sectors, with losses ranging from $23 billion to $61 billion in the two industries.

  19. Is Economic value an Effective Proxy for Embodied Energy and Environmental Impact in Material Systems?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Jeremy

    This paper uses economic value metrics to evaluate the retention of value of secondary materials and provides a framework for characterizing value throughout a material and product life-cycle. These economic value metrics ...

  20. Martha A. Hartmans & Edgar L. Michalson the Economic & Environmental Impacts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Martha A. Hartmans & Edgar L. Michalson Evaluating FARMING PRACTICES ON THE PALOUSE the Economic. Edgar L. Michalson is a retired professor of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociol- ogy, University

  1. Economic Impact of Harvesting Corn Stover under Time Constraint: The Case of North Dakota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maung, Thein A.; Gustafson, Cole R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the impact of stochastic harvest field time on profit maximizing potential of corn cob/stover collection in North Dakota. Three harvest options are analyzed using mathematical programming models. Our findings show that under the first corn grain only harvest option, farmers are able to complete harvesting corn grain and achieve maximum net income in a fairly short amount of time with existing combine technology. However, under the second simultaneous corn grain and cob (one-pass) harvest option, farmers generate lower net income compared to the net income of the first option. This is due to the slowdown in combinemore »harvest capacity as a consequence of harvesting corn cobs. Under the third option of separate corn grain and stover (two-pass) harvest option, time allocation is the main challenge and our evidence shows that with limited harvest field time available, farmers find it optimal to allocate most of their time harvesting grain and then proceed to harvest and bale stover if time permits at the end of harvest season. The overall findings suggest is that it would be more economically efficient to allow a firm that is specialized in collecting biomass feedstock to participate in cob/stover harvest business.« less

  2. Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

  3. Economic Assessment of a Conceptual Biomass to Liquids Bio-Syntrolysis Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. M. Plum; G. L. Hawkes

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of assessments evaluated the economic efficiency of integrating a nuclear electric power plant with a biomass to SynFuel plant under three market scenarios. Results strongly suggest that a nuclear assisted-BioSyntrolysis Process would be as cost competitive as other carbon feedstock to liquid fuels concepts while having significant advantages regarding CO2 greenhouse gas production. This concept may also be competitive for those energy markets where energy dense, fossil fuels are scarce while wind, hydroelectric, or other renewable energy sources can be produced at a relatively low cost. At this time, a realistic vision of this technology’s deployment of a biomass to synfuel plants powered by a nuclear 1100 MWe reactor. Accompanying an area of 25 miles by 25 miles, this integrated Enterprise could produce 24,000 BBLs of SynFuel daily; or 0.2% of the U.S.’s imported oil.

  4. Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appen, Jan von; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Klapp, David; Scheven, Alexander von

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As power generation from variable distributed energy resources (DER) grows, energy flows in the network are changing, increasing the requirements for ancillary services, including voltage support. With the appropriate power converter, DER can provide ancillary services such as frequency control and voltage support. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power and voltage support at its point of common coupling. The DER Customer Adoption Model assesses the costs of providing reactive power, given local utility rules. Depending on the installed DER, the cost minimizing solution for supplying reactive power locally is chosen. Costs include the variable cost of the additional losses and the investment cost of appropriately over-sizing converters or purchasing capacitors. A case study of a large health care building in San Francisco is used to evaluate different revenue possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power.

  5. Discovering Life Cycle Assessment Trees from Impact Factor Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Naren

    environmental impacts of a product, across its entire life cycle ­ from creation to use to discard. The key environmental category is a linear combination of the impacts of the children in that category. LCA has its life cycle as its children. Each node of the tree is associated with various environmental impact

  6. Walking the sustainability assessment talk - Progressing the practice of environmental impact assessment (EIA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North West University (South Africa); School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University (Australia); Retief, Francois [School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North West University (South Africa)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Internationally there is a growing demand for environmental impact assessment (EIA) to move away from its traditional focus towards delivering more sustainable outcomes. South Africa is an example of a country where the EIA system seems to have embraced the concept of sustainability. In this paper we test the existing objectives for EIA in South Africa against sustainability principles and then critique the effectiveness of EIA practice in delivering these objectives. The outcome of the research suggests that notwithstanding a strong and explicit sustainability mandate through policy and legislation, the effectiveness of EIA practice falls far short of what is mandated. This shows that further legislative reform is not required to improve effectiveness but rather a focus on changing the behaviour of individual professionals. We conclude by inviting further debate on what exactly practitioners can do to give effect to sustainability in EIA practice.

  7. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics, I. (2007) Wind Resources, Cost, and Performance (to higher generation costs than the Wind-heavy profile. The20% RPS, or Wind-heavy renewable profiles – cost increases

  8. Toward economic evaluation of climate change impacts : a review and evaluation of studies of the impact of climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to access climate change have generally been unsuccessful in describing the economic damages (or benefits) associated with climate change or the functional relationship of damage (or benefits) to climate. Existing ...

  9. Legal and institutional framework of environmental impact assessment in Nigeria: An initial assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olokesusi, F. [Nigerian Inst. of Social and Economic Research, Ibadan, Oyo (Nigeria)] [Nigerian Inst. of Social and Economic Research, Ibadan, Oyo (Nigeria)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, has high rates of urbanization and industrialization. Until recently, decisions on most large-scale projects such as expressways, harbors, industries, dams, and irrigation were considered with an emphasis on traditional technical and cost-benefit analysis. Spurred by massive environmental degradation and persistent community agitation in oil producing areas, environmental impact assessment (EIA) legislation was passed in late 1992. The main purpose of this article is to review and assess the content of this legislation and the guidelines produced by the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA), the institution responsible for EIA administration. Some EIA reports have been prepared and reviewed by FEPA since 1994. There are some positive outcomes and expectations, but some problems have been identified as well, including: deliberate restriction of public involvement and participation by proponents and/or their consultants, interagency conflict leading to high cost and project delays especially in the oil industry, and restriction of public access to final EIA reports. These are discussed, and recommendations for improving the process are made.

  10. A proposed tool to integrate environmental and economical assessments of products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senthil, Kumaran D.; Ong, S.K.; Nee, A.Y.C.; Tan, Reginald B.H

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt has been made to interpret the outcomes of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in terms of environmental costs. This attempt ensures the environmental accountability of the products while LCA ensures their eco-friendly nature. Keeping this as an objective, a Life Cycle Environmental Cost Analysis (LCECA) model was developed. This new tool incorporates costing into the LCA practice. This model prescribes a life cycle environmental cost model to estimate and correlate the effects of these costs in all the life cycle stages of the product. The newly developed categories of eco-costs are: costs of effluent treatment/control/disposal, environmental management systems, eco-taxes, rehabilitation, energy and savings of recycling and reuse strategies. The mathematical model of LCECA determines quantitative expressions between the total cost of products and the various eco-costs. The eco-costs of the alternatives are compared with the computational LCECA model. This method enables the environmental as well as the economic assessment of products, which leads to cost-effective, eco-friendly design of products.

  11. Colorado economic impact study on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1993. To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are: Direct employment was estimated at 894 workers; An estimated 89 percent of all direct employment was local; Secondary employment resulting from remedial action at the active Colorado UMTRA Project sites and the Grand Junction vicinity property program is estimated at 546 workers. Total employment (direct and secondary) is estimated at 1440 workers for the period of study (July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993). An estimated $24.1 million was paid in wages to UMTRA workers in Colorado during FY1993; Direct and secondary wage earnings were estimated at $39.9 million; Income tax payments to the state of Colorado were estimated at $843,400 during FY1993; The gross economic impact of UMTRA Project activities in the state of Colorado is estimated at $70 million during the 1-year study period; and the net economic benefit to the state of Colorado was estimated at $57.5 million, or $5.90 per dollar of funding provided by Colorado. This figure includes both direct and secondary benefits but does not include the impact of alternative uses of the state funding.

  12. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life-cycle assessment of coal fly ash disposal: Influence ofto the case of coal fly ash disposal. The influence ofLife-cycle assessment of coal fly ash disposal: Influence of

  13. assessing cumulative impact: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: CEC-500-2010-FS-016 Cumulative Biological Impacts Framework for Solar Energy Projects demand with renewable energy by the year 2020. Large-scale solar developments...

  14. Geographically Differentiated Life-cycle Impact Assessment of Human Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    environmental impacts are due to the energy-intensive production of Portland cement. Using coalimpacts of the coal-fired power plants. The potential environmental

  15. Assessing Impact of Biofuel Production on Regional Water Resource...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    12 webinar presentation on the environmental impacts attributable to wastewater from biofuels production. wuwebinar.pdf More Documents & Publications Breaking the Biological...

  16. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

  17. Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

  18. LNG as a fuel for railroads: Assessment of technology status and economics. Topical report, June-September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pera, C.J.; Moyer, C.B.

    1993-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research was to investigate the feasibility of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a fuel for railroads. The investigation included assessment of the status of relevant technologies (i.e., LNG-fueled locomotive engines, tender cars, refueling equipment), a review of current demonstration projects, and an analytical evaluation of LNG railroad economics.

  19. Report to Congress on Assessment of Potential Impact of Concentrating Solar Power for Electriicty Generation (EPACT 2005--Section 934(c))

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, F.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of DOE's assessment of issues regarding EPAct 2005, which requires the Secretary of Energy to assess conflicting guidance on the economic potential of concentrating solar power for electricity production.

  20. When Waste Becomes Intelligent: Assessing the Environmental Impact of Microchip Tagging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When Waste Becomes Intelligent: Assessing the Environmental Impact of Microchip Tagging Claudia Binder1 , Svetlana Domnitcheva2 1 Natural and Social Science Interface Department of Environmental recognition of several tags. Many shops are already successfully using such systems as prevention

  1. Identifying Steam Opportunity "Impact" Inputs for the Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrell, G.; Jendrucko, R.; Wright, A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IDENTIFYING STEAM OPPORTUNITY "IMPACT" INPUTS FOR THE STEAM SYSTEM ASSESSMENT TOOL (SSAT) Dr. Greg Harrell, University of Tennessee/Knoxville Dr. Richard Jendrucko, University of Tennessee/Knoxville Dr. Anthony Wright, Oak Ridge National...

  2. Assessing Regional Climate and Local Landcover Impacts on Vegetation with Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Pei-Ling; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Landcover change alters not only the surface landscape but also regional carbon and water cycling. The objective of this study was to assess the potential impacts of landcover change across the Kansas River Basin (KRB) by ...

  3. Assistance with Incorporating Impacts into Integrated Assessment PI: Thomas J. Wilbanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system modeling (CM/ESM), (b) integrated assess- ment modeling (IAM), and (c) impact, adaptation- quences of Climate Change. SIGNIFICANCE Climate change science is a combination of (a) climate science/earth

  4. Life cycle assessment of UK pig production systems: the impact of dietary protein source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen, Katie Louise

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was developed to evaluate the environmental impacts of producing 1 kg pig live weight. A comparison was made between dietary protein sources, i.e. imported soybean meal with the UK protein ...

  5. Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 2: Assessment of health impacts; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unnasch, S.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The task 2 report compares the relative health and hazard impacts of EV battery recycling technologies. Task 2 compared the relative impact of recycling EV batteries in terms of cancer, toxicity, and ecotoxicological potential, as well as leachability, flammability, and corrosivity/reactivity hazards. Impacts were evaluated for lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron sulfide and disulfide, lithium-polymer, lithium-ion, and zinc-air batteries. Health/hazard impacts were evaluated for recycling methods including smelting, electrowinning, and other appropriate techniques that apply to different battery technologies.

  6. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Generation Assessment: Sacramento Municipal UtilityDistributed Generation Assessment: San Francisco Public UtilitiesDistributed Generation: An Alternative to Electric Utility

  7. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Generation Assessment: Sacramento Municipal UtilityDistributed Generation Assessment: San Francisco Public UtilitiesDistributed Generation: An Alternative to Electric Utility

  8. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Generation Assessment: Sacramento Municipal UtilityDistributed Generation Assessment: San Francisco Public UtilitiesDistributed Generation: An Alternative to Electric Utility

  9. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 23 June 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A Sampling and Analysis Plan was prepared and submitted to a Scientific Review Committee for comment. Substantial comments relative to study objectives, sampling design, and sampling periods coupled with the passage of Hurricane Andrew precluded the scheduled initiation of sampling at offshore and coastal sites (Tasks 3 -- Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), Heavy Metals, and Organics and 4 -- Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas). A proposed revised schedule has been prepared for Tasks 3 and 4. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region), activities have involved identification and collection of the necessary data for the economic analysis. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Region Consumption and Use Patterns), activities have included near completion of the literature review and a reevaluation of the data collection efforts relative to the wholesaler, process plant, and restaurant components. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan), work has been delayed due to the Tasks 3 and 4 delay and cancellation of the annual US Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico Region Information Transfer Meeting.

  10. An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    zones. The results include: (a) the exposure dose rates assessed by a car-borne scintillation spectrometry system; (b) laboratory measurements of the activity...

  11. Assessment of Energy Impact of Window Technologies for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shades DOE-2.1E The energy and demand reductions provided bylarger impact on peak energy demand and on occupant comfort.Perimeter zone energy use and peak demand savings data by

  12. Life cycle assessment of concrete pavements : impacts and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loijos, Alex (Alexander Nikos)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concrete pavement network in the United States plays a crucial role in the economy by enabling the transport of people and goods, but it also leads to resource consumption and environmental impacts. This thesis is ...

  13. Economic Impacts of Reduced Delta Exports Resulting from the Wanger Interim Order for Delta Smelt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunding, David L.; Ajami, Newsha K; Hatchett, Steve; Mitchell, David; Zilberman, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts of Reduced Delta Exports Resulting from the WangerImpacts of Reduced Delta Exports Resulting from the WangerOrder restricts water exports from the Delta to agricultural

  14. Assessing the Impact of Wind Variability on Power System Small-Signal Reachability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    Assessing the Impact of Wind Variability on Power System Small-Signal Reachability Yu Christine-signal and transient stability [6]. In this regard, it has been acknowledged that, as the presence of wind in the power balancing in near real time [7]. This paper focuses on this last problem--the impact of wind penetration

  15. Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Environmental impact for offshore wind farms: Geolocalized Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach and floating offshore wind farms. This work was undertaken within the EU- sponsored EnerGEO project, aiming, and its use for the evaluation of environmental impacts of wind energy. The effects of offshore wind farms

  16. A Refined Ethical Impact Assessment Tool and a Case Study of its Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    A Refined Ethical Impact Assessment Tool and a Case Study of its Application Michael Bailey1 , Erin? What impact does the immediacy of an event (e.g., DDoS) have on our response to the event? [4 understanding, and (iii) retrospectively apply this EIA to an ethically challenging, original study in ICTR. 1

  17. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

  18. HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE (Spring Semester, 2009) Dr. Jonathan Patz, course director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE (Spring Semester, 2009) Dr. Jonathan Patz) ============================================================= Course Outline Section I. Assessment Frameworks & Intro to Environmental/Occupational Health Faculty (UW (& proj. mapping tool) Jonathan Patz 2. 1/26/09 Intro. to Environmental Health: Local to Global Scales

  19. Impact of Utility Costs on the Economics of Energy Cost Reduction & Conservation Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranade, S. M.; Chao, Y. T.

    This paper summarizes some key results obtained from an EPRI funded study the main objective of which was to investigate the principal economic and technical factors that influence the energy related investment strategy of industrial site operators...

  20. Modeling the Impact of Product Portfolio on the Economic and Environmental Performance of Recycling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmus, Jeffrey B.

    hrough the development of a general model of electronics recycling systems, the effect of product portfolio choices on economic and environmental system performance is explored. The general model encompasses the three main ...

  1. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF EXTREME CLIMATE EVENTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    .isse.ucar.edu/staff/katz/docs/pdf/samsirwk.pdf #12;Hurricane Andrew (1992) #12;Hurricane Irene (2011) #12;Quote John Tukey: "As I am sure almost Functions (5) Economic Damage Caused by Hurricanes (6) Return Levels Under Nonstationarity #12

  2. Growth strategy for hybrid organizations : balancing economic, environmental, and social impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamao, Gustavo Moreira

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid organizations combine the structure and culture of for-profit companies with the commitment to social good of non-profit organizations. This structure enables them to address social problems in an economically ...

  3. Impact of Utility Costs on the Economics of Energy Cost Reduction & Conservation Technologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranade, S. M.; Chao, Y. T.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes some key results obtained from an EPRI funded study the main objective of which was to investigate the principal economic and technical factors that influence the energy related investment strategy ...

  4. An analysis of the potential economic impact of natural gas production in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umeike, Ekenedilinna (Ekenedilinna Onyedikachi)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following substantial discoveries of natural gas in recent years, Tanzania has new options for economic development. The country's policy makers are faced with having to make decisions about how best to utilize the gas in ...

  5. Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Drop-In Heat Pump Water Heater, Oak Ridge National Lab.CA. Maxwell, J. 2004. Heat Pump Water Heater Economic Model.water heaters. For heat pump water heaters, the study also

  6. Application of Non-Human Biota Assessment Methodologies to the Assessment of Potential Impacts from a Nuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, K.L.; Robinson, C.A. [Enviros Consulting Ltd, D5 Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX (United Kingdom); Ikonen, A.T.K. [Posiva Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The protection of the environment from the effects of ionising radiation has become increasingly more topical over the last few years as the intentions enshrined in international principles and agreements have become more binding through national and international law. For example, the Directive on impact of certain projects on the environment (EIA Directive 85/337/EEC) [CEC, 1985], amended in 1997 [CEC, 1997], places a mandatory requirement on all EU Member States to conduct environmental impact assessments for a range of project having potential impact on the environment, including radioactive waste disposal. Such assessments must consider humans, fauna and flora, the abiotic environment (soil, water, air), material assets and cultural heritage as well as the interactions between these factors. In Finland, Posiva Oy are responsible for the overall repository programme for spent nuclear fuel and, as such, are conducting the Safety Case Assessment for a proposed geological repository for nuclear waste. Within the European legislation framework, the Finnish regulatory body requires that the repository safety case assessment should include not only human radiological safety, but also an assessment of the potential impact upon populations of non-human biota. Specifically, the Safety Case should demonstrate that there will be: - no decline in the biodiversity of currently living populations; - no significant detriment to populations of fauna and flora; and, - no detrimental effects on individuals of domestic animals and rare plants and animals. At present, there are no internationally agreed criteria that explicitly address protection of the environment from ionising radiation. However, over recent years a number of assessment methodologies have been developed including, at a European level, the Framework for the Assessment of Environmental impact (FASSET) and Environmental Risks from Ionising Contaminants (ERICA). The International Committee on Radiation Protection (ICRP) have also proposed an approach to allow for assessments of potential impacts on non-human species, in its report in 2003. This approach is based on the development and use of a small set of reference animals and plants, with their associated dose models and data sets. Such approaches are broadly applicable to the Posiva Safety Case. However, the specific biota of concern and the current climatic conditions within Finland present an additional challenge to the assessment. The assessment methods most applicable to the Posiva Safety Case have therefore been reviewed in consideration of the regulatory requirements for the assessment and recommendations made on a suitable assessment approach. This has been applied within a test case and adaptations to the overall assessment method have been made to enable both population and individual impacts to be assessed where necessary. The test case has been undertaken to demonstrate the application of the recommended methodology, but also to identify data gaps, uncertainties and other specific issues associated with the application of an assessment method within the regulatory context. (authors)

  7. Assessments of biofuel sustainability: air pollution and health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsao, Chi-Chung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of using corn stover for fuel ethanol. Journal of IndustrialL. , Lifecycle assessment of fuel ethanol from sugarcane in3), 257-267. 34. 2008 World Fuel Ethanol Production. http://

  8. Validating health impact assessment: Prediction is difficult (especially about the future)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petticrew, Mark [MRC Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, 4 Lilybank Gardens, Glasgow, G12 8RZ (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mark@msoc.mrc.gla.ac.uk; Cummins, Steven [Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Sparks, Leigh [Institute for Retail Studies, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA (United Kingdom); Findlay, Anne [Institute for Retail Studies, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been recommended as a means of estimating how policies, programmes and projects may impact on public health and on health inequalities. This paper considers the difference between predicting health impacts and measuring those impacts. It draws upon a case study of the building of a new hypermarket in a deprived area of Glasgow, which offered an opportunity to reflect on the issue of the predictive validity of HIA, and to consider the difference between potential and actual impacts. We found that the actual impacts of the new hypermarket on diet differed from that which would have been predicted based on previous studies. Furthermore, they challenge current received wisdom about the impact of food retail outlets in poorer areas. These results are relevant to the validity of HIA as a process and emphasise the importance of further research on the predictive validity of HIA, which should help improve its value to decision-makers.

  9. Negotiating river ecosystems: Impact assessment and conflict mediation in the cases of hydro-power construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karjalainen, Timo P., E-mail: timopauli.karjalainen@oulu.f [Thule Institute, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 7300, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Jaervikoski, Timo, E-mail: timo.jarvikoski@oulu.f [Unit of Sociology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 2000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we discuss how the legitimacy of the impact assessment process is a key issue in conflict mediation in environmental impact assessment. We contrast two EIA cases in hydro-power generation plans made for the Ii River, Finland in different decades, and evaluate how impact assessment in these cases has contributed to the creation, mediation and resolution of conflicts. We focus on the elements of distributional and procedural justice that made the former EIA process more legitimate and consensual and the latter more conflictual. The results indicate that it is crucial for conflict mediation to include all the values and interests of the parties in the goal-setting process and in the definition and assessment of alternatives. The analysis also indicates that procedural justice is the most important to help the people and groups involved to accept the legitimacy of the impact assessment process: how different parties and their values and interests are recognized, and how participation and distribution of power are organized in an impact assessment process. It is confirmed in this article that SIA may act as a mediator or a forum providing a process through which competing knowledge claims, various values and interests can be discussed and linked to the proposed alternatives and interventions.

  10. Impacts of the Kyoto Protocol on Energy Markets and Economic Activity

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzes the impacts on the Kyoto Protocol on U.S. energy markets and the economy in the 2008-2012 time frame.

  11. Setting boundaries of participation in environmental impact assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salomons, Geoffrey H., E-mail: gsalomon@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Political Science, 10-16 Henry Marshall Tory Building, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H4 (Canada); Hoberg, George, E-mail: george.hoberg@ubc.ca [University of British Columbia, Faculty of Forestry, Forest Sciences Centre 2045, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)] [University of British Columbia, Faculty of Forestry, Forest Sciences Centre 2045, 2424 Main Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Public participation processes are touted as an effective way to increase the capacity and legitimacy of environmental assessment and the regulatory process that rely on them. Recent changes to the Canadian environmental assessment process narrowed the criteria for who can participate in environmental assessments from any who were interested to those who were most directly affected. This article examines the potential consequences of this change by exploring other areas of Canadian regulatory law where a similar directed affected test has been applied. This new standard risks institutionalizing the long-understood representational bias confronted by more diffuse interest like environmental protection. Restricting participation to the “directly affected” is far too narrow a test for processes like environmental assessment that are designed to determine the public interest. -- Highlights: • Public participation can improve the legitimacy of environmental assessments. • New Canadian rules narrow the range of eligible participants. • Similar rules in Alberta have excluded environmental representation. • The new rules may institutionalize bias against more diffuse interests. • Restricting participation to the “directly affected” is far too narrow.

  12. Volume 9: A Review of Socioeconomic Impacts of Oil Shale Development WESTERN OIL SHALE DEVELOPMENT: A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotariu,, G. J.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an oil shale industry in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah has been forecast at various times since early this century, but the comparatively easy accessibility of other oil sources has forestalled development. Decreasing fuel supplies, increasing energy costs, and the threat of a crippling oil embargo finally may launch a commercial oil shale industry in this region. Concern for the possible impacts on the human environment has been fostered by experiences of rapid population growth in other western towns that have hosted energy resource development. A large number of studies have attempted to evaluate social and economic impacts of energy development and to determine important factors that affect the severity of these impacts. These studies have suggested that successful management of rapid population growth depends on adequate front-end capital for public facilities, availability of housing, attention to human service needs, long-range land use and fiscal planning. This study examines variables that affect the socioeconomic impacts of oil shale development. The study region is composed of four Colorado counties: Mesa, Moffat, Garfield and Rio Blanco. Most of the estimated population of 111 000 resides in a handful of urban areas that are separated by large distances and rugged terrain. We have projected the six largest cities and towns and one planned company town (Battlement Mesa) to be the probable centers for potential population impacts caused by development of an oil shale industry. Local planners expect Battlement Mesa to lessen impacts on small existing communities and indeed may be necessary to prevent severe regional socioeconomic impacts. Section II describes the study region and focuses on the economic trends and present conditions in the area. The population impacts analyzed in this study are contingent on a scenario of oil shale development from 1980-90 provided by the Department of Energy and discussed in Sec. III. We recognize that the rate of development, the magnitude of development, and the technology mix that will actually take place remain uncertain. Although we emphasize that other energy and mineral resources besides oil shale may be developed, the conclusions reached in this study reflect only those impacts that would be felt from the oil shale scenario. Socioeconomic impacts in the region reflect the uneven growth rate implied by the scenario and will be affected by the timing of industry developments, the length and magnitude of the construction phase of development, and the shift in employment profiles predicted in the scenario. The facilities in the southern portion of the oil shale region, those along the Colorado River and Parachute Creek, show a peak in the construction work force in the mid-1980s, whereas those f acil it i es in the Piceance Creek Bas into the north show a construction peak in the late 1980s. Together, the facilities will require a large construction work force throughout the decade, with a total of 4800 construction workers required in 1985. Construction at the northern sites and second phase construction in the south will require 6000 workers in 1988. By 1990, the operation work force will increase to 7950. Two important characteristics of oil shale development emerge from the work force estimates: (1) peak-year construction work forces will be 90-120% the size of the permanent operating work force; and (2) the yearly changes in total work force requirements will be large, as much as 900 in one year at one facility. To estimate population impacts on individual communities, we devised a population distribution method that is described in Sec. IV. Variables associated with the projection of population impacts are discussed and methodologies of previous assessments are compared. Scenario-induced population impacts estimated by the Los Alamos method are compared to projections of a model employed by the Colorado West Area Council of Governments. Oil shale development in the early decade, as defined by the scenario, will produce growth primarily

  13. Towards a Benign and Viable Rhodium Catalyzed Hydroformylation of Higher Olefins: Economic and Environmental Impact Analyses, Solvent Effects and Membrane-based Catalyst Separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jing

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    rhodium catalyst based on economic and environmental assessments. The specific objectives of the current work are therefore to: 8 • Exploit CO 2 -expanded liquids as environmentally green solvents for hydroformylation of higher olefins and benchmark...

  14. Privatising national oil companies: Assessing the impact on firm performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, C; Pollitt, Michael G.

    government having to cede majority control. Key words Privatisation, ownership, corporate performance, anticipation, oil and gas industry JEL Classifications: C23, G32, L33, L71, M20, Q40 2 I. Introduction The impact of ownership... privatisation date, accrue over time, and level off after the initial ownership change rather than accelerate. Details of residual government ownership, control transfer, and size and timing of follow-on offerings provide limited incremental explanatory power...

  15. Assessing the environmental impact of energy generating clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie, A.C.D.; McMillen, M. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Pell, J. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is a partnership between government and industry designed for cleaner and more efficient use of coal, both for electric power generation and industrial applications. Approximately seven billion dollars have been committed to the CCT program (two and half-billion dollars from DOE and the rest by industry). The potential environmental effects of CCT projects are subject to review because a proposal by DOE to cost-share a CCT project constitutes a {open_quotes}major federal action{close_quotes} under section 102(2)(c) of NEPA. Consequently, by virtue of numerous NEPA impact evaluations of CCT projects, a great deal has been learned about environmental impact analyses for coal combustion sources. In the course of NEPA review of CCT projects, air quality is often a significant environmental issue. This paper focuses on CCT air quality issues from a NEPA perspective, including Prevention of Significant Deterioration, New Source Review, atmospheric visibility, global climate change, and acidic deposition. The analyses of the impacts of the proposed action, alternative actions, and cumulative effects will be examined. (It is a {open_quotes}given{close_quotes} that any action must comply with Federal and State requirements and the provision of the Clean Air Act and other regulatory statues.) NEPA is not a permitting process, but rather it is a process to provide decision makers with the information they require make an informed decision about the potential environmental consequences of undertaking an action. The NEPA review of environmental effects has been instrumental in effectuating beneficial changes in some past CCT projects-changes that have mitigated potentially adverse environmental impacts. Accordingly, NEPA has served as a constructive analytical tool, with similar implications for other actions related to the electric power generation industry that are subject to environmental review.

  16. Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy storage system. Volume III. Preconceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage systems is presented. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume III - Preconceptual Design contains the system analysis which led to the identification of a preferred component configuration for a fluidized bed combustion augmented compressed air energy storage system, the results of the effort which transformed the preferred configuration into preconceptual power plant design, and an introductory evaluation of the performance of the power plant system during part-load operation and while load following.

  17. Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power planning: assessing long-term costs and benefits, Energy Policy,wind energy: modeling the competition between gas turbines and compressed air energy storage for supplemental generation, Energy Policy,wind or solar power will singularly provide a majority of renewable generation in a future with energy policies

  18. Meeting Summary, Economic Development Panel, Business Meeting No.31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Bryan

    2003-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 The objectives of the meeting were as follows: (1) Learn more about and discuss economic impacts of wind power development in the U.S, highlighting the NWCC report, ''Assessing the Economic Impacts of Wind Power Development''; (2) Learn more about and discuss wind integration costs and the impacts of recent studies on wind energy development; and (3) Review activities and products planned for FY 2004.

  19. Social impact assessment in mining projects in Northern Finland: Comparing practice to theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suopajärvi, Leena, E-mail: leena.suopajarvi@ulapland.fi

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses social impact assessments (SIA) for mining projects in light of the international principles and guidelines for such assessments and the academic literature in the field. The data consist of environmental impact assessment (EIA) programmes and reports for six mining projects that have started up in northern Finland in the 2000s. A first observation is that the role of the SIAs in the EIA programmes and reports studied was quite minor: measured in number of pages, the assessments account for three or four percent of the total. This study analyses the data collection, research methodology and conceptual premises used in the SIAs. It concludes that the assessments do not fully meet the high standards of the international principles and guidelines set out for them: for example, elderly men are over-represented in the data and no efforts were made to identify and bring to the fore vulnerable groups. Moreover, the reliability of the assessments is difficult to gauge, because the qualitative methods are not described and where quantitative methods were used, details such as non-response rates to questionnaires are not discussed. At the end of the paper, the SIAs are discussed in terms of Jürgen Habermas' theory of knowledge interests, with the conclusion that the assessments continue the empirical analytical tradition of the social sciences and exhibit a technical knowledge interest. -- Highlights: • Paper investigates social impact assessments in Finnish mining projects. • Role of social impact assessment is minor in whole EIA-process. • Mining SIAs give the voice for elderly men, vulnerable groups are not identified. • Assessment of SIAs is difficult because of lacking transparency in reporting. • SIAs belong to empirical analytical tradition with technical knowledge interest.

  20. Potential Impact of Changes in Risk Assessment to Address Wicked Problems: A Case Study of British Petroleum’s Assessment Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koelsch, Cari J.

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    with wicked problems. Therefore, it should be of benefit to analyze whether broadened risk assessment and management principles for wicked problems are more environmentally sound and economically effective. Using BP as a case study, this thesis hypothesizes...

  1. Economic Impact of Low Income Health Program Spending on Select California Counties by Laurel Lucia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    . County health spending supports economic output and jobs in hospitals, clinics and other health care settings, at medical supply companies and other health care suppliers, and also at the grocery stores, retail stores and other local businesses in which health care workers shop. The federal matching dollars

  2. Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act of 2010

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report responds to a request from Senators Kerry, Graham, and Lieberman for an analysis of the American Power Act of 2010 (APA). APA, as released by Senators Kerry and Lieberman on May 12, 2010, regulates emissions of greenhouse gases through market-based mechanisms, efficiency programs, and other economic incentives.

  3. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF EXTREME CLIMATE EVENTS: AN APPROACH BASED ON PENULTIMATE EXTREME VALUE THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    .isse.ucar.edu/staff/katz/docs/pdf/jsmrwk12.pdf #12;Hurricane Andrew (1992) #12;#12;Outline (1) Motivation (2) Ultimate Extreme Value Theory (3) Penultimate Extreme Value Theory (4) Damage Functions (5) Economic Damage Caused by Hurricanes (6 assumed L V b , b > 0 (e. g., b = 3 argued on physical basis for hurricane damage as function

  4. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF EXTREME EVENTS: AN APPROACH BASED ON EXTREME VALUE THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    ;Hurricane Andrew (1992) #12;Outline (1) Motivation (2) Ultimate Extreme Value Theory (3) Penultimate Extreme Value Theory (4) Damage Functions (5) Economic Damage Caused by Hurricanes (6) Discussion #12 on physical basis for hurricane damage as function of intensity) #12;-- Assume stretched exponential

  5. Economic Impacts of the University of Florida and Affiliated Organizations in 2005-061

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    2005-06 using financial data together with regional economic models. Total revenues to UF were $3,894 jobs. Student enrollment in FY 2005-06 was 122,775 student-semesters. There were a total of 3.5 million

  6. POLICY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH USING SIMULATION TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uchitel, Kirsten; Tanana, Heather

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the relationship between simulation-based science and judicial assessments of simulations or models supporting evaluations of environmental harms or risks, considering both how it exists currently and how it might be shaped in the future. This report considers the legal standards relevant to judicial assessments of simulation-based science and provides examples of the judicial application of those legal standards. Next, this report discusses the factors that inform whether there is a correlation between the sophistication of a challenged simulation and judicial support for that simulation. Finally, this report examines legal analysis of the broader issues that must be addressed for simulation-based science to be better understood and utilized in the context of judicial challenge and evaluation. !

  7. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA This study used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental performance of the University at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;2013 CIVL498 C Ian Eddy LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF THE FOREST SCIENCE CENTER

  8. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse(Expired) | DepartmentINL E-IDROCCUPATIONAL * PRIVACY IMPACT

  9. The economic impact of the eradication of the screwworm on Mexican livestock producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinkins, John Edward

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 1. Division of Mexico Impact Study Into Zones for Screwworm Eradication lone State Year Baja California Norte Sonora Chihuahua 1978 Baja California Sur Coahuila Nuevo Leon Tamaulipas 1977 1976 Sinaloa Durango lacatecas San Luis...

  10. The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations in Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschenes, Olivier; Greenstone, Michael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1989): “Global Climate Change and Agriculture: An Economicclimate change will be modestly beneficial for the US agricultureAgriculture,” in Robert Mendelsohn and James E. Neumann (editors), The Impact of Climate Change

  11. The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations in Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschenes, Olivier; Greenstone, Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1989): “Global Climate Change and Agriculture: An Economicpart of climate change for agriculture. These predictedAgriculture,” in Robert Mendelsohn and James E. Neumann (editors), The Impact of Climate Change

  12. Comparative analysis of the life cycle impact assessment of available cement inventories in the EU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josa, Alejandro [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), School of Civil Engineering (ETSECCPB), C/Jordi Girona 1-3 Modul D2/C1, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)]. E-mail: alejandro.josa@upc.edu; Aguado, Antonio [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), School of Civil Engineering (ETSECCPB), C/Jordi Girona 1-3 Modul D2/C1, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Cardim, Arnaldo [Civil Engineering Department, Polytechnic School of Penambuco University, Rua Benfica, 455-Madalena, CEP 50.750-410 (Brazil); Byars, Ewan [Centre for Cement and Concrete, Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) is one of basic steps in life cycle assessment methodology (LCA). This paper presents a comparative study of the LCIA of different life cycle inventories (LCI) for EU cements. The analysis unit used is the manufacture of 1 kg of cement, from 'cradle to gate'. The impact categories considered are those resulting from the manufacture of cement and include greenhouse effects, acidification, eutrophication and summer and winter smog, amongst others. The results of the study highlighted some inconsistencies in existing inventories. As for the LCIA, the main environmental interventions related to cement manufacture were classified and characterised and their effect on different impact categories analysed. Differences observed in evaluation of the impact of cement type were essentially related to their clinker content.

  13. Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project Steamboat Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide the DOE and other public agency decision makers with the environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Kalina Geothermal Demonstration project. The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative impacts, possible ways to minimize effects associated with partial funding of the proposed project, and discusses alternatives to DOE actions. The DOE will use this EA as a basis for their decision to provide financial assistance to Exergy, Inc. (Exergy), the project applicant. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human or physical environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  14. Jobs and Economic Development Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Develop models to estimate jobs and economic impacts from geothermal project development and operation.

  15. A method of assessment of environmental impacts on remote campsites at Lake Ouachita

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhl, Jeffrey James

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Scope of Investigation This study examined recreational activity and the resulting changes in the environment (impacts) at a water based recreation area. The findings of this study are~ generalizable only to areas where conditions, both physically... (Chairman of Committee) E ward Heat (Member) De 1 ma r nke (Nembe r ) Leslie M. Reid (Head of Department) May 1983 111 ABSTRACT A Nethod of Assessment of Environmental Impacts on Remote Campsites at Lake Ouachita. (Nay 1983) Jeffrey James Kuhl, B...

  16. An Economic Assessment Of Uneven-Aged Forestry Based On The Modelling Of Forestry Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrimpton, Nicole H

    In recent years, interest in uneven-aged forestry has been increasing in Britain, particularly for sensitive areas such as recreation and amenity forests. Literature on the economics of uneven-aged forestry is scarce and ...

  17. Evaluation of the environmental impact assessment system in Syria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haydar, F., E-mail: firashaydar@yahoo.co [Rural Development Division, National Agricultural Policy Center, Ministry of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform, Airport Highway, 5th Bridge, Damascus, 4251 (Syrian Arab Republic); Pediaditi, K., E-mail: kalliapediaditi@hotmail.co [Department of Environmental Management, Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Chania, Alsylion Agrokepion, Chania, P.O. Box 185, 73100, Crete (Greece)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Syria is a country experiencing rapid change, undergoing a process of political and governance decentralisation, opening its markets to the private sector, and experiencing a rise in infrastructure development. In light of these economic growth targeted changes, knowledge of the status and capacity of the Syrian EIA system to ensure environmental protection becomes of paramount importance. Syria first introduced EIA as a Draft Decree in 1995, which was not formally adopted until 2008. To date, no structured evaluation of Syria's EIA system has been conducted, a knowledge gap addressed through this paper. The research presented herein comprises a review and comparative evaluation of Syrian legislation and procedures, to the EU EIA Directive and World Bank Operational Directive, as well as a series of interviews with Syrian stakeholders involved in EIA implementation. The investigation concluded that the new EIA provisions provide a sound legal basis. From interviews however, it was ascertained that EIA implementation faces a number of barriers such as, a lack of EIA integration into existing decision making and licensing processes and persistent exclusion of public projects from EIA. A number of recommendations are proposed, perceived necessary for the enhancement of EIA implementation in Syria.

  18. Development in Rural Texas: An Assessment of TEEX Economic Development Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calcaneo, Edgar Adrian; Cripe, Ramsey; Davis, Taylor; Gonzalez, Ramon; Grimes, Joshua; Hemby, Olivia; Humphrey, Colby; Keppy, Paul; Surgenor, Ken

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with public officials and other individuals involved with the TEEX reports, and making site visits. A demographic breakdown is also provided for each community, which includes economic, population, race/ethnicity and education information. Following this..., the organization should work towards tying the local economic and political conditions of the community with the report, particularly in cases dealing with site-specific development. Additionally, it is recommended that TEEX provide information detailing...

  19. A protocol for lifetime energy and environmental impact assessment of building insulation materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S., E-mail: shresthass@ornl.gov; Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre O.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist, which provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different building insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines. - Highlights: • We proposed a protocol to evaluate the environmental impacts of insulation materials. • The protocol considers all life cycle stages of an insulation material. • Both the direct environmental impacts and the indirect impacts are defined. • Standardized calculation methods for the ‘avoided operational energy’ is defined. • Standardized calculation methods for the ‘avoided environmental impact’ is defined.

  20. Environmental impact assessment practices in the sub-Saharan Africa: cases from Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngunjiri, P.G.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim for this research is to review environmental impact assessment (EIA) practices in sub-Saharan Africa, drawing upon appropriate theoretical and methodological work on EIA. This study uses a comparative evaluation method to examine the extent of environmental impact assessment (EIA) in project analysis. It uses site and services low cost housing projects from Kenya. The research has three major components: (1) review of environmental practice in Sub-Saharan Africa through literature review and case studies; (2) review of general literature on EIA as practiced by international agencies and developed countries; and (3) formulation of more suitable guidelines for EIA procedures in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  1. Kraft lignin recovery by ultrafiltration: economic feasibility and impact on the kraft recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkman, A.G.; Gratzl, J.S.; Edwards, L.L.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread use of the kraft pulping process could provide a ready supply of lignin materials for many uses. Simulation studies demonstrate that recovery of the high-molecular-weight kraft lignin by ultrafiltration of a fraction of the black liquor flow is attractive from both an economic and an operational standpoint. Benefits are derived from relief of a furnace-limited recovery system and from the marketing of the lignin or modified lignin products. 10 references.

  2. Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S., LLNL

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CARB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4%, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6%. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CARB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

  3. Effect of ageing on precipitation and impact energy of 2101 economical duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Wei [Shanghai Baosteel Technology Center, Baosteel Co., LTD. Shanghai 200431 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jiang Laizhu [Shanghai Baosteel Technology Center, Baosteel Co., LTD. Shanghai 200431 (China)], E-mail: zwatt@163.com; Hu Jincheng; Song Hongmei [Shanghai Baosteel Technology Center, Baosteel Co., LTD. Shanghai 200431 (China)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact energy and microstructure of a thermally aged 2101 duplex stainless steel with composition of Fe-21.4Cr-1.2Ni-5.7Mn-0.23 N-0.31Mo were studied. The results showed that the room temperature impact energy of specimens decreased gradually with ageing temperature up to 700 deg. C and then increased with aging over 700 deg. C. The minimum value of impact energy was 37 J after 700 deg. C aging, which was only 34% of that for as-annealed specimens. For specimens aged at 700 deg. C, the room temperature impact energy decreased significantly after 3 min and was halved after 10 min. Fractographs showed that, with increasing aging time, the fracture morphology changed from fibrous fracture to transgranular and intragranular fracture. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that many precipitates were distributed along {alpha}/{gamma} and {alpha}/{alpha} interfaces. The precipitates were extracted and confirmed by X-ray diffraction to be Cr{sub 2}N. Therefore, it can be concluded that precipitation of Cr{sub 2}N is the main reason for the decrease of impact energy in aged 2101 duplex stainless steel.

  4. Economic impact of country-of-origin labeling in the U.S. beef industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, Daniel David

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns over the total costs assessed to the beef industry from the implementation of mandatory country-of-origin labeling (COOL) regulations warranted an investigation into the estimation and distribution of marketing ...

  5. A Protocol for Lifetime Energy and Environmental Impact Assessment of Building Insulation Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL] [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a proposed protocol that is intended to provide a comprehensive list of factors to be considered in evaluating the direct and indirect environmental impacts of building insulation materials, as well as detailed descriptions of standardized calculation methodologies to determine those impacts. The energy and environmental impacts of insulation materials can generally be divided into two categories: (1) direct impact due to the embodied energy of the insulation materials and other factors, and (2) indirect or environmental impacts avoided as a result of reduced building energy use due to addition of insulation. Standards and product category rules exist that provide guidelines about the life cycle assessment (LCA) of materials, including building insulation products. However, critical reviews have suggested that these standards fail to provide complete guidance to LCA studies and suffer from ambiguities regarding the determination of the environmental impacts of building insulation and other products. The focus of the assessment protocol described here is to identify all factors that contribute to the total energy and environmental impacts of different insulation products and, more importantly, provide standardized determination methods that will allow comparison of different insulation material types. Further, the intent is not to replace current LCA standards but to provide a well-defined, easy-to-use comparison method for insulation materials using existing LCA guidelines.

  6. Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Website: siteresources.worldbank.org...

  7. 1991 New Mexico economic impact study for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research completed an abbreviated cost-benefit analysis of the income and employment impact of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor offices in Albuquerque. Since the Project Office will have a significant positive impact on the State`s economy (shown on Table 8), the impact is combined with the impact of remedial actions at the Ambrosia Lake site to highlight the cost-benefit of the entire Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project at the Ambrosia Lake site will generate $12.509 million in gross labor income in New Mexico between 1989 and 1994. This includes $1.161 million in federal tax revenue, $1.015 million in State personal income tax revenue, and seven thousand in local tax revenue. The UMTRA Project will generate the equivalent of 84 full-time jobs during the peak year of remedial action at Ambrosia Lake site. New Mexico`s total funding requirement for the UMTRA Project is estimated to be $2.963 million. The net economic benefit of the Ambrosia Lake portion of the UMTRA Project to New Mexico after the State`s share of the project`s cost, the federal income tax, and the $0.936 million income impact of the alternate use of the State funding are subtracted, will be $7.451 million between 1990 and 1994. In Fiscal Year 1990 the UMTRA Project DOE and contractor offices in Albuquerque directly employed 163 people. Another 78 jobs were also maintained in support of the industry sector and 166 jobs were also maintained in other sections of the New Mexico economy. It is estimated that $19 million dollars of income was generated and 1.949 million of State and local taxes were collected. The University of New Mexico study shows that for every dollar the State of New Mexico invests in the UMTRA Project, it will realize $95.05 in gross labor income. This corresponds to a net return on the States investment in the Project of $97.20 for every dollar invested.

  8. Assessment Of The Wind Farm Impact On The Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman, Evgeny D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study shows the means to evaluate the wind farm impact on the radar. It proposes the set of tools, which can be used to realise this objective. The big part of report covers the study of complex pattern propagation factor as the critical issue of the Advanced Propagation Model (APM). Finally, the reader can find here the implementation of this algorithm - the real scenario in Inverness airport (the United Kingdom), where the ATC radar STAR 2000, developed by Thales Air Systems, operates in the presence of several wind farms. Basically, the project is based on terms of the department "Strategy Technology & Innovation", where it has been done. Also you can find here how the radar industry can act with the problem engendered by wind farms. The current strategies in this area are presented, such as a wind turbine production, improvements of air traffic handling procedures and the collaboration between developers of radars and wind turbines. The possible strategy for Thales as a main pioneer was given as ...

  9. Energy and Economic Impacts of H.R.5049, the Keep America Competitive Global Warming Policy

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report responds to a May 2, 2006 request from Congressmen Tom Udall and Tom Petri asking the Energy Information Administration to analyze the impacts of their legislation implementing a market-based allowance program to cap greenhouse gas emissions at 2009 levels.

  10. Socio-economic and Environmental Impact Analysis of Khothagpa Gypsum Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galay, Karma

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Close-up view of the scar B. Health impacts A few interviewees of this study reported that the frequency of occurrence of diseases such as cold and cough which people believe are commonly caused by presence of more dusts, is more now as compared...

  11. Economic Impact of a Trans-loading Facility January 8, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    .0 Taxes in New Mexico 6 5.1 Indirect Tax Impacts 6 5.2 Direct Taxes on Oil Production 8 6.0 Summary-loading facility in Rancho Cielo's business park to serve oil activities in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico an incentive to drill for more oil. Coast Range Investments contracted with New Mexico State University

  12. Economic impact and preservation: a case study of the Big Thicket National Preserve in east Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powis, Jennifer

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and it is these same issues that remain at the forefront of any political discourse on environmental friendly policies. With the passage of the National Environment Policy Act in 1969, the National Park Service has been required to submit environmental impact...

  13. Economic impact and preservation: a case study of the Big Thicket National Preserve in east Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powis, Jennifer

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    and it is these same issues that remain at the forefront of any political discourse on environmental friendly policies. With the passage of the National Environment Policy Act in 1969, the National Park Service has been required to submit environmental impact...

  14. Economic Impact of Fuel Cell Deployment in Forklifts and for Backup Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributionsreduction system is most economicalInc.under the

  15. Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report (April

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributionsreduction system is most economicalInc.under

  16. > PAPER FOR THE SPECIAL SECTION ON TRANSMISSION INVESTMENT, PRICING AND CONSTRUCTION economic perspective, the appropriate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --From an economic perspective, the appropriate criterion for assessing the merits of a transmission investment, it must be capable of evaluating the economic impacts on the various effected stakeholders and account. Index Terms--Market power, network expansion planning, power system economics, power transmission

  17. Stennis Space Center Earth Observations to Assess Impact of Hurricane Katrina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stennis Space Center Earth Observations to Assess Impact of Hurricane Katrina on John C. Stennis Space Center Predicting Conditions of Hurricane Evacuation and Return Routes 2012 SSC Resilience Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2008 submission, Evaluation of Hurricane Evacuation Routes

  18. Impact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation in the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    forecast errors of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. Tropical mass­windImpact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation, De Bilt, Netherlands CHRISTOPHE ACCADIA AND PETER SCHL�SSEL European Organisation

  19. Assessing climate change impacts on the near-term stability of the wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    Assessing climate change impacts on the near-term stability of the wind energy resource over- ble emissions of carbon dioxide. The wind energy resource is natu- rally a function of the climate, leading some to question the continued viability of the wind energy industry. Here we briefly articulate

  20. Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review FOR AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN it would conflict with the Bering Sea non-roe season. At its January 1996 meeting, the Council considered/C Regulatory Areas must be made. Amendment 19 to the FMP, implemented as a measure to prevent roe stripping