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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Assessing the Economic Impact of LLNL’s Additive Manufacturing ...  

Assessing the Economic Impact of LLNL’s Additive Manufacturing Technology Danny Katz / Hannah Farqquar Market Intelligence Industrial Partnerships Office

2

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

3

Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

4

Integrated Economic and Climate Projections for Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We designed scenarios for impact assessment that explicitly address policy choices and uncertainty in climate response. Economic projections and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions for the “no climate policy” scenario ...

Paltsev, Sergey

5

Economic impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In federal fiscal year 2000 (FY00), Berkeley Lab had 4,347 full- and part-time employees. In addition, at any given time of the year, there were more than 1,000 Laboratory guests. These guests, who also reside locally, have an important economic impact on the nine-county Bay Area. However, Berkeley Lab's total economic impact transcends the direct effects of payroll and purchasing. The direct dollars paid to the Lab's employees in the form of wages, salaries, and benefits, and payments made to contractors for goods and services, are respent by employees and contractors again and again in the local and greater economy. Further, while Berkeley Lab has a strong reputation for basic scientific research, many of the Lab's scientific discoveries and inventions have had direct application in industry, spawning new businesses and creating new opportunities for existing firms. This analysis updates the Economic Impact Analysis done in 1996, and its purpose is to describe the economic and geographic impact of Laboratory expenditures and to provide a qualitative understanding of how Berkeley Lab impacts and supports the local community. It is intended as a guide for state, local, and national policy makers as well as local community members. Unless otherwise noted, this analysis uses data from FY00, the most recent year for which full data are available.

Technology Transfer Department

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Appropriate Methodology for Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Interest in wind power development is growing as a means of expanding local economies. Such development holds promise as a provider of short-term employment during facility construction and long-term employment from ongoing facility operation and maintenance. It may also support some expansion of the local economy through ripple effects resulting from initial increases in jobs and income. However, there is a need for a theoretically sound method for assessing the economic impacts of wind power development. These ripple effects stem from subsequent expenditures for goods and services made possible by first-round income from the development, and are expressed in terms of a multiplier. If the local economy offers a wide range of goods and services the resulting multiplier can be substantial--as much as three or four. If not, then much of the initial income will leave the local economy to buy goods and services from elsewhere. Loss of initial income to other locales is referred to as a leakage. Northwest Economic Associates (NEA), under contract to the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), investigated three case study areas in the United States where wind power projects were recently developed. The full report, ''Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power,'' is available at NWCC's website http://www.nationalwind.org/. The methodology used for that study is summarized here in order to provide guidance for future studies of the economic impacts of other wind power developments. The methodology used in the NEA study was specifically designed for these particular case study areas; however, it can be generally applied to other areas. Significant differences in local economic conditions and the amount of goods and services that are purchased locally as opposed to imported from outside the will strongly influence results obtained. Listed below are some of the key tasks that interested parties should undertake to develop a reasonable picture of local economic impacts that may accrue from existing or future wind development.

NWCC Economic Development Work Group

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

Assessing the socio-economic impact of 3D visualization in cultural heritage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the multitude of impact measurement techniques available to heritage site managers there is a case for the bigger strategic picture to figure more strongly in impact measurement decision making for ICT and 3D applications in the heritage sector. ... Keywords: 3D visualisation, economics, socio-economic impact

Jaime Kaminski; Jim McLoughlin; Babak Sodagar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NWCC Guidelines for Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 The primary objective of this study is to provide examples of thorough and consistent analysis and documentation of economic impacts from wind power development.

Michael Taylor, Northwest Economic Associates Alan Fox, Northwest Economic Associates Jill Chilton, Northwest Economic Associates NWCC Economic Development Work Group Contributors Steve Clemmer, Lisa Daniels, Ed DeMeo, Rick Halet, Ron Lehr, Michael Milligan Vince Robinson

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

10

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Petroleum Displacement: A Regional Economic Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in alternatives to conventional vehicles such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) has risen because of the environmental and energy security concerns associated with petroleum dependence, but what would be the economic impact of the widespread use of such vehicles? This study quantified the regional economic impacts associated with an increased market penetration of PHEVs in the household vehicle market.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

11

Minority Economic Impact | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minority Economic Impact Minority Economic Impact Diversity and Inclusion Supporting Small Businesses Minority Economic Impact Partnering with Minority Serving Institutions...

12

On Impacts of Economic Growth.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents four papers on impacts of economic growth. The results indicate that faster economic growth improves the short-run political survival prospects of national… (more)

Burke, Paul John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Economic Impact & Diversity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECONOMIC IMPACT AND DIVERSITY ECONOMIC IMPACT AND DIVERSITY FOURTH QUARTER STATUS (As of August 10, 2006) Executive Summary: ED is responsible for managing the department's on-going small business programs, Affirmative Action programs, Employee Concerns program, EEO programs, and the Department's Minority Education program. ED serves as the support office for department-wide efforts to broaden and/or diversify the Department's base as it relates to employment, contracting and financial assistance awards. Where we are today: ED finalized the reorganization/restructuring process which reduced the offices within ED from five to three. Along with this process, ED moved the Employee Concerns and Special Emphasis activities and personnel to the Office of Civil Rights and Diversity

14

Economic Impacts from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program: Using Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the economic impacts (including job creation) from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program (CSLP), an example of Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. The CSLP was the first test of PACE financing on a multi-jurisdictional level (involving individual cities as well as the county government). It was also the first PACE program to comprehensively address energy efficiency measures and renewable energy, and it was the first funded by a public offering of both taxable and tax-exempt bonds.

Goldberg, M.; Cliburn, J. K.; Coughlin, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

An economic assessment of the impact of two crude oil price scenarios on households  

SciTech Connect

The impact of two possible future crude oil price scenarios -- high and low price cases -- is assessed for three population groups: majority (non-Hispanic and nonblack), black, and Hispanic. The two price scenarios were taken from the energy security'' report published by the US Department of Energy in 1987. Effects of the two crude oil price scenarios for the 1986--95 period are measured for energy demand and composition and for share of income spent on energy by the three population groups at both the national and census-region levels. The effects on blacks are marginally more adverse than on majority householders, while effects on Hispanics are about the same as those on the majority. Little change is seen in percentage of income spent on energy over the forecast period. Both Hispanic and black households would spend a larger share of their incomes on energy than would majority households. The relatively adverse effects in the higher price scenario shift from the South and West Census regions to the Northeast and Midwest. 24 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.; Hemphill, R.C.; Hill, L.G.; Marinelli, J.L.; Rose, K.J.; Santini, D.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of High Purity Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies August 30, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1432 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States (U.S.) government. Neither the U.S., nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

17

An assessment of the economic impact of the wind turbine supply chain in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The enormous growth of wind energy in Illinois and around the country has led to a shortage of wind turbines. Turbine manufacturers have sold out their capacity into 2010. To the extent that Illinois manufacturing can integrate itself into the wind turbine supply chain, Illinois can enjoy the economic benefits from both having wind farms and supplying the parts to build them. (author)

Carlson, J. Lon; Loomis, David G.; Payne, James

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

NYCCS | Economic Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biotechnology, national security and finance, is accomplished through high performance computing. Some examples of impactful areas are listed below: Modeling, simulation and...

19

The Economic Impact of Oil Spills  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil spills not only affect environmentally but also economically. The economic impacts are directly or indirectly related to the environmental impacts ...

20

Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) Economic Impact & Diversity (WCF) The purpose of the workforce Plan is to provide focus and direction to Human Resources (HR) strategy. This will...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Economic Assessment Environmental impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-72 ...........................8.5.1.1.1 Phosphate Rock 8-74 ...................................8.5.1.1.2 Coke 8

22

A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any economic analysis of climate change policy requires some model that describes the impact of warming on future GDP and consumption. Most integrated assessment models (IAMs) relate temperature to the level of real GDP ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

24

Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

Webster, Mort D.

25

Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act A study recently released shows the $1.6 billion the Savannah River Site (SRS) received from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has had a positive economic impact on the adjacent five-county region. The study's findings were presented at the University of South Carolina Aiken's (USC Aiken) Convocation Center. More than 75 people attended the meeting, where presenters commended the Recovery Act for accelerating Cold War cleanup at SRS and boosting employment and business in the local community. Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act More Documents & Publications EA-1605: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0220: Final Environmental Impact Statement

26

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Sandia National Laboratories: News: Economic Impact  

Sandia National Laboratories has a robust and widespread economic impact. Spending by the Labs exceeds $2 billion a year. Nearly $1 billion goes to the procurement of ...

29

Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report (April 2013) Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report (April 2013) The Economic...

30

Economic Development Impacts of 20% Wind (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Meeting 20% of the nation's electricity demand with wind energy will require enourmous investment in wind farms, manufacturing, and infrastructure. This investment will create substantial economic development impacts on local, regional, and national levels. This conference poster for Windpower 2007 outlines the various economic development impacts from a 20% wind scenario.

Kelly, M.; Tegen, S.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CENTURY ALUMINUM OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that supported nearly 1,600 jobs and $111 million in employee compensation. This report documents the economic. The economic impacts estimated in this report are business volume, employee compensation, employment's presence in the state in 2007 generated a total business volume impact in excess of $579 million

Mohaghegh, Shahab

32

Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy  

SciTech Connect

Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

Callaway, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

2010 Sandia Economic Impact on New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 Sandia Economic Impact on New Mexico 2010 data is based on Sandia's fiscal year beginning 100109 and ending 93010. While Sandia spends a large portion of its funding...

34

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Partnership for Economic Policy Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.pep-net.org/programs/mpia/ Cost: Free Related Tools Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Poverty Social Impact Analysis ... further results A computable general equilibrium model that accounts for the interactions among sectors and institutions, and their links with the global economy. A

35

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Coal model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts from coal power generation projects. Applying a...

36

About Fermilab | Fermilab Fact Sheets | Archives | Economic Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic Impacts Economic Impact FY2010 FY2009 FY2008 FY2007 Procurement Distribution Payroll by Zip Code last modified 0207...

37

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia/California Economic Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SandiaCalifornia Economic Impact Summary Making an impact Sandia generates nearly 1 billion in economic output in California with nearly half coming from the San Francisco Bay...

38

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from...

39

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Photovoltaics (PV) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from PV projects. JEDI PV has default...

40

DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

IPv6 Economic Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IPv4 and IPv6 addresses in a dual-stake environment. ... on the removal and/or restructuring of middleware ... Network management software (upgrade) ...

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextineword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site August 1, 2009 U.S. Department of Energy; Office of Science; Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) System location - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA Name of Information iPASS System for DOE Office of Science laboratory fellowship programs, including

43

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office of Information Resources - FOIAXpress Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Depamnf!l1tal Elel1l~nt&$ite july 23, 2009 Office of Information Resources Office of Management DOE Headquarters, Germantown, Germantown Computer Center Server Room Nameonl1fol'l11i1tion Sysleijlprl'f 'Project FOIAXpress ExhibitProj~tUID TBD NeWPIA ~ Update D Please indicate whether this is a new

44

ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs ARRA Economic Impact and Jobs Center Map Learn More Risk Management Assessment Tool Recovery Act Top Line Messages EM Recovery Act Lessons Learned Report to Congress EM Recovery Act Videos News Flashes January 29, 2013 "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP November 2, 2012 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated August 14, 2012 SRS Recovery Act Completes Major Lower Three Runs Project Cleanup More Recovery Act news flashes Newsletters October 1, 2011 2011 ARRA Newsletters December 1, 2010 2010 ARRA Newsletters November 1, 2009 2009 ARRA Newsletters More Recovery Act newsletters Press Releases December 22, 2011

45

Economic Impact of the Texas Poultry Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is estimated that the Texas poultry industry contributes more than $1.6 billion to the state's economy, according to results of a survey of broiler, egg and turkey producers operating in 2003. Details about industry income, employees and economic impact are presented in this publication.

Carey, John B.

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

The economic impact of cyber terrorism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What is the economic impact of cyber terrorism? Can organizations achieve strategic advantage in the cyber terrorism game? A general game theoretical model is proposed to study the optimal information systems (ISs) security investment and then applied ... Keywords: Cyber terrorism, Game theory, Information systems security, Security investment

Jian Hua, Sanjay Bapna

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assessment of economic impact of offshore and coastal discharge requirements on present and future operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high potential costs of compliance associated with new effluent guidelines for offshore and coastal oil and gas operations could significantly affect the economics of finding, developing, and producing oil and gas in the Gulf of Mexico. This report characterizes the potential economic impacts of alternative treatment and discharge regulations for produced water on reserves and production in Gulf of Mexico coastal, territorial and outer continental shelf (OCS) waters, quantifying the impacts of both recent regulatory changes and possible more stringent requirements. The treatment technologies capable of meeting these requirements are characterized in terms of cost, performance, and applicability to coastal and offshore situations. As part of this analysis, an extensive database was constructed that includes oil and gas production forecasts by field, data on existing platforms, and the current treatment methods in place for produced water treatment and disposal on offshore facilities. This work provides the first comprehensive evaluation of the impacts of alternative regulatory requirements for produced water management and disposal in coastal and offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico.

Lindsey, R. [Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar (Redirected from How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/webinar_2009 How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Screenshot References: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy[1] Logo: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Project for

49

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Assessment Toolkit Impact Assessment Toolkit (Redirected from Gateway:International/Economic and Environmental Impacts) Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

50

Techno-Economics & Life Cycle Assessment (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of the techno-economic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) capabilities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and describes the value of working with NREL on TEA and LCA.

Dutta, A.; Davis, R.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation from 1603 Renewable Energy Grant Program NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic...

52

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpreting Results Interpreting Results Sample Results from JEDI. Download a text-version (MS Excel 44 KB) The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models estimate the number of jobs and economic impacts associated with power generation, fuel production, and other projects. Economic activity in input-output models is typically assessed in three categories. NREL's JEDI models classify the first category of results-on-site labor and professional services results-as dollars spent on labor from companies engaged in development and on-site construction and operation of power generation and transmission. These results include labor only-no materials. Companies or businesses that fall into this category of results include project developers, environmental and permitting consultants, road builders, concrete-pouring

53

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Agency/Company /Organization: DG Joint Research Centre, European Commission, University of Heidelberg Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Other Website: iatools.jrc.ec.europa.eu/docs/ecol_econ_2006.pdf Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Screenshot References: Computable general equilibrium models[1] Abstract "Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) of economic, environmental, and

54

The economic impacts of highway widening projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highway widening is one alternative for increasing capacity on a particular section of roadway. Capacity is the maximum hourly rate at which vehicles can reasonably be expected to traverse a uniform section of a roadway during a given time under prevailing roadway, traffic, and control conditions. Added capacity has economic, environmental, and social impact tradeoffs that must be considered. Economic tradeoffs of land value impacts were considered for this research study. Land scarcity, as related to value, was analyzed with respect to highway widening improvements on abutting land use. Previous literature included several modelling techniques used for measuring economic impacts of highway improvements. The before-and-after study approach was selected for analyzing land values, rather than parallel-area or control-area study approaches. This study involved a before-and-after economic analysis, where the before period d represented economic make-up of land parcels without Improvements, while the after period represented market value on land parcels once construction was completed. A design matrix was developed from data available for two highway types, multilane highway and freeway, on pre-selected sites. Location selection was based on prior knowledge and availability of land value data. Study variables included four design characteristics and four property types. These variables were used to determine whether increases in land value occurred on adjacent properties as a result of widening. A paired data statistical analysis was performed for both facility types. Results of the statistical analysis indicated that property values generally decreased for both facilities. Impacts on abutting property for each location reflected minimal changes in value. Therefore, the results do not suggest an increase in property values because of highway widening. The most important recommendation from this research study includes a combination of two factors.- 1) further research needed to look at areas outside of the construction zone and 2) consideration for lengthening the after study period. The parallel-area or control-area study approach is recommended for further study of economic impacts on land values. In addition, more data for the after construction period, preferably five to ten years, could be applied to better estimate effects.

Jackson, Patricia Ann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Limitations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limitations of JEDI Models Limitations of JEDI Models Results are an estimate, not a precise forecast. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are input-output based models, also appropriately called calculators or screening tools. As such, they share important limitations with all models based on input-output calculation methodologies. For the interested user, the Environmental Protection Agency recently published EPA Assessing the Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy: A Resource for States1, which discusses and compares different types of models and screening tools for assessing economic impacts and jobs, including JEDI (see Chapter 5, pp. 136-142). The most important limitation to note is that JEDI results are estimates, not precise forecasts, for the following reasons.

56

Economic Impacts of Carbon Taxes: Detailed Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the possibility that rising concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases might cause undesirable climate change, policies to restrict emissions of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, have been proposed. Such proposals frequently take the form of carbon taxes. This report presents the detailed results of an examination of the economic costs of carbon taxes, including where and how the U.S. economy would be impacted.

1995-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Economic Impacts of Carbon Taxes: Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the possibility that rising concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases might cause undesirable climate change, policies to restrict emissions of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, have been proposed. Such proposals frequently take the form of carbon taxes. This report presents an overview of the results of a detailed examination of the economic costs of carbon taxes, including where and how the U.S. economy would be impacted.

1995-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

58

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Models Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version About JEDI Geothermal Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Geothermal model allows users...

59

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties Title Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties...

60

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Assessment Toolkit Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar NREL-How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/webinar_2009 How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Screenshot References: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy[1] Logo: How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Project for state and local officials, this Webinar featured information for

62

Environmental impact assessment Geopressure Subprogram  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental impact assessment (EIA) addresses the expected programmatic activities of the Geopressure Subprogram of the Division of Geothermal Energy. The goal of the Geopressure Subprogram is to stimulate development of geopressured resources as an economic, reliable, operationally safe, and environmentally acceptable energy source. The subprogram includes activities in the areas of engineering research and development; resource exploration, assessment, and development; resource utilization including pilot and demonstration facilities; and environmental research and control technology development. It should be recognized that most of the subprogram activities extend over several years and are in their early stages of implementation at this time. The zones of potential geopressure development are in the region located along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coasts extending up to 200 miles (300 km) inland. Geopressured zones are sedimentary basins where water is trapped at high pressures within or below thick, nearly impermeable shale sequences. The confined water supports most or all of the weight of the overburden. This inhibits sediment compaction and causes formation pore pressure to exceed hydrostatic pressure. in sedimentary basins that are underlain by thin oceanic crust, upward thermal conduction from the mantle heats geopressured fluids and sediments to abnormally high temperatures, often in excess of 260 C (500 F).

None

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Assessing Forecast Accuracy Measures Department of Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing Forecast Accuracy Measures Zhuo Chen Department of Economics Heady Hall 260 Iowa State forecast accuracy measures. In the theoretical direction, for comparing two forecasters, only when the errors are stochastically ordered, the ranking of the forecasts is basically independent of the form

64

Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Jobs and Economic Development Impact  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Resources & Tools Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet Thumbnail of the JEDI fact sheet. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind

66

Economic Impacts of a Wide Area Release of Anthrax  

SciTech Connect

This analysis explores economic impacts that might result from a wide-area release of anthrax. The intent is not to provide a quantitative analysis of such a disaster, but to: 1. Define the general categories of economic impacts that the region should be concerned about; and, 2. Explore what types of private sector businesses or industries, if any, may have the greatest impact on speeding the economic recovery of the region.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

Economic impact analysis for the petroleum refineries NESHAP. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An economic analysis of the industries affected by the Petroleum Refineries National Emmissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) was completed in support of this standard. The industry for which economic impacts was computed was the petroleum refinery industry. Affected refineries must reduce HAP emissions by the level of control required in the standard. Several types of economic impacts, among them price product changes, output changes, job impacts, and effects on foriegn trade, were computed for the selected regulatory alternative.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Planning Report 12-1: The Economic Impacts of Documentary ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Planning Report 12-1 The Economic Impacts of Documentary Standards: A Case Study of the Flat Panel Display Measurement ...

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the 1603 Treasury Grant Program Daniel Steinberg and Gian Porro National Renewable Energy...

70

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering...

71

NETL: News Release - New Study Indicates Positive Economic Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

17, 2007 New Study Indicates Positive Economic Impact of DOE Laboratory NETL Contributes 283 Million, 3,200 Jobs to Pennsylvania, West Virginia Region WASHINGTON, DC - A recently...

72

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels Models The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) biofuel models include JEDI Dry Mill Corn Ethanol, JEDI Lignocellulosic Ethanol, and JEDI Biopower. These JEDI...

73

Office of Economic Impact and Diversity | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Women @ Energy features the stories, tips, and ideas of STEM employees who are making a difference at the Energy Department. Read about...

74

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimated Economic Impacts of Utility Scale Wind Power in Iowa Sandra Halvatzis and David Keyser National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-6A20-53187 November...

75

Economic assessment of the thin polymer icemaker  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have constructed and tested a small device to produce ice in ice/water mixtures using a cold fluid as the heat sink. The device is a flexible heat exchanger constructed from a thin film of a suitable polymer. When filled with circulating liquid coolant the heat exchanger consists of an inflated series of parallel tubes; Ice forms on the outside in complementary half cylinders. When the circulation in cut off, gravity drains the coolant and the static head of the water bath crushes the tubes, freeing them from the ice which floats to the surface. We here report an economic assessment of this device. In its present form, we find it competitive with existing commercial ice making systems. The analysis also points out two areas where further technical progress could lead to a significant economic advantage for the polymer film ice maker.

Leigh, R.W. (Pratt Inst., Brooklyn, NY (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Impact Assessments | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Assessments Impact Assessments Impact Assessments PIA Template with Guidance (MS Word) Management and Administration (MA) Open Gov User Voice System (3WP) (pdf) DOE Open Government Plan Comment Box (pdf) Energy Contractor Registration System (EnCoRe) (pdf) Hiring Management Enterprise Solutions (HMES) (pdf) Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) (pdf) FOIAXpress (pdf) Electronic Document Online Correspondence and Concurrence (eDOCS) (pdf) DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Management) (pdf) FORM EIA 457-A/G Residential Energy Consumption Survey (pdf) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Tracking System (pdf) Corporate Human Resources Information System (CHRIS) (pdf) Energy Inspector General Project Tracking System (EIGPT) (pdf) Electronic DOE Information Security System (eDISS) (pdf)

77

Economic Impacts of Early Care and Education in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impacts of Early Care and Education in California by Jenifer MacGillvary and Laurel Lucia August 2011 #12;#12;Economic Impacts of Early Care and Education in California by Jenifer MacGillvary and Laurel Lucia University of California, Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education August 2011 #12

Militzer, Burkhard

78

The Economic Impact of One WVU Home Football Game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Demographer October 2012 #12; 1 The Economic Impact of One WVU Home Football Game on the Monongalia. On average, a single WVU home football game in 2011 generated a total economic impact of $1.6 million in business volume in the Monongalia County economy. This included $360,000 in employee compensation and $55

Mohaghegh, Shahab

79

Health impact assessment in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

Kang, Eunjeong, E-mail: marchej@kihasa.re.r [Division for Health Promotion Research, Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs, 268 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngsoo, E-mail: leeys@kei.re.k [Centre for Environmental Impact Assessment Review, Korea Environment Institute, 290 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu (Korea, Republic of); Harris, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1981 (Australia); Koh, Kwangwook, E-mail: kwkoh@hanafos.co [Department of Preventive Medicine, Kosin University, 149-1 Dongsam-1-dong, Youngdo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keonyeop, E-mail: pmkky@knu.ac.k [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine and Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Public Health, KyungPook National University, 101 Dongin 2 , Jung-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Farm Economic Impact Studies  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Bookmark and Share Publications Success Stories Webinars Podcasts Videos Stakeholder Interviews Lessons Learned Wind Working Groups Economic Impact Studies Wind Turbine Ordinances Wind Farm Economic Impact Studies Wind Powering America compiled studies about the economic impact of wind farms in rural communities in order to compared them side by side. The studies explore the types of information gathered when undertaking an economic impact study, what kind of information is most helpful in using these studies to further promote wind energy development in rural communities, and the limitations on collecting data for these studies. Pedden, M. (September 2004). "Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities." Overview of data collection and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Jump to: navigation, search Site head analysis jedi.jpg Overview Originally developed in 2002 for the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America project, the Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model was designed to be an easy-to-use, excel based calculator which uses IMPLAN's economic multipliers to estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. It comes as a separate model for wind, PV, natural gas, CSP, coal, and biofuels. Job's, earnings, and impact are outputs. Inputs are construction costs, equipment costs, O&M costs, financing parameters and any other costs associated with the project. With its success in

82

Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act A study recently released shows the $1.6 billion the Savannah River Site (SRS) received from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has had a positive economic impact on the adjacent five-county region. The study's findings were presented at the University of South Carolina Aiken's (USC Aiken) Convocation Center. More than 75 people attended the meeting, where presenters commended the Recovery Act for accelerating Cold War cleanup at SRS and boosting employment and business in the local community. Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act More Documents & Publications 2010 ARRA Newsletters 2011 ARRA Newsletters Audit Report: OAS-RA-L-11-12

83

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume I. Economic impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis identifies the economic impacts associated with OTEC development and quantifies them at the national, regional, and industry levels. It focuses on the effects on the United States' economy of the domestic development and utilization of twenty-five and fifty 400 MWe OTEC power plants by the year 2000. The methodology employed was characteristic of economic impact analysis. After conducting a literature review, a likely future OTEC scenario was developed on the basis of technological, siting, and materials requirements parameters. These parameters were used to identify the industries affected by OTEC development; an economic profile was constructed for each of these industries. These profiles established an industrial baseline from which the direct, indirect, and induced economic impacts of OTEC implementation could be estimated. Each stage of this analysis is summarized; and the economic impacts are addressed. The methodology employed in estimating the impacts is described.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

Economic impact study of consumer product efficiencies. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The economic impact study of household appliance efficiencies is briefly reported. Task I, Direct Impact on Industry, contains 4 subtasks: materials, labor inputs, energy inputs, and investment. Task II, Direct Impact on Consumers, contains 3 subtasks: life-cycle cost to the consumer, usage patterns, and long-term demand forecast and analysis. The 2 subtasks in Task III, Energy Savings and Impact on Utilities, are residential energy savings and cost and impact on utility generating capacity.

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model section on the Wind Powering America website.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Assessing economic impacts of clean diesel engines. Phase 1 report: U.S.- or foreign-produced clean diesel engines for selected light trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light trucks' share of the US light vehicle market rose from 20% in 1980 to 41% in 1996. By 1996, annual energy consumption for light trucks was 6.0 x 10{sup 15} Btu (quadrillion Btu, or quad), compared with 7.9 quad for cars. Gasoline engines, used in almost 99% of light trucks, do not meet the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. These engines have poor fuel economy, many getting only 10--12 miles per gallon. Diesel engines, despite their much better fuel economy, had not been preferred by US light truck manufacturers because of problems with high NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. The US Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, has funded research projects at several leading engine makers to develop a new low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine, first for large trucks, then for light trucks. Recent advances in diesel engine technology may overcome the NO{sub x} and particulate problems. Two plausible alternative clean diesel (CD) engine market penetration trajectories were developed, representing an optimistic case (High Case) and an industry response to meet the CAFE standards (CAFE Case). However, leadership in the technology to produce a successful small, advanced diesel engine for light trucks is an open issue between U.S. and foreign companies and could have major industry and national implications. Direct and indirect economic effects of the following CD scenarios were estimated by using the Standard and Poor's Data Resources, Inc., US economy model: High Case with US Dominance, High Case with Foreign Dominance, CAFE Case with US Dominance, and CAFE Case with Foreign Dominance. The model results demonstrate that the economic activity under each of the four CD scenarios is higher than in the Base Case (business as usual). The economic activity is highest for the High Case with US dominance, resulting in maximum gains in such key indicators as gross domestic product, total civilian employment, and federal government surplus. Specifically, the cumulative real gross domestic product surplus over the Base Case during the 2000--2022 period is about $56 x 10{sup 9} (constant 1992 dollars) under this high US dominance case. In contrast, the real gross domestic product gains under the high foreign dominance case would be only about half of the above gains with US dominance.

Teotia, A.P.; Vyas, A.D.; Cuenca, R.M.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

87

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Deschutes County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be Deschutes County. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Deschutes County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economical impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result for the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Harney County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Harney Count. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Harney County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Geothermal energy is defined as the heat of the earth. For purposes of this study, geothermal energy is heat capable of economically generating electricity (using available technology). That translates to steam or hot water over 300{degrees}F. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued respending as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. The workers associated with plant development bring their families to the area. Additional labor is required to provide support services for the new population. Local government services must also increase to support the new community growth and the geothermal plant itself. These changes yield indirect and induced employment impacts associated with the geothermal plant.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Sandia National Laboratories: News: Economic Impact  

Partnerships Annual Report; Sandia Research Magazine; Videos; ... Nuclear Weapons; Defense Systems & Assessments; Energy, Climate, & ...

90

A semantic approach to life cycle assessment applied on energy environmental impact data management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental impact assessment of goods and services is nowadays a major challenge for both economic and ethical reasons. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a well-accepted methodology for modelling environmental impacts of human activities. One stage ... Keywords: energy impact data management, life cycle assessment, ontology

Benjamin Bertin; Vasile-Marian Scuturici; Emmanuel Risler; Jean-Marie Pinon

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More November 20, 2013 - 11:54am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars November 20: Live Webinar on Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office

92

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Speaker(s): Gregory Rosenquist Date: August 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of...

93

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Power Development's Economic Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power Development's Economic Impact on Rural Communities June 12, 2013 Audio with Jason Brown, Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank Economist (MP3 2.5 MB). Download Windows Media...

94

Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts Jump to: navigation, search Wind turbine blades wind their way by train through Denver. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 20894 Meeting 20% of the nation's electricity demand with wind energy will lead to benefits to rural landowners and towns, the manufacturing sector, and infrastructure across America.[1] The following provide more information about wind energy and economic development: Resources European Wind Energy Association. Economic Benefits of Wind This page outlines the economic benefits of wind energy in Europe. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (March 2013). Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado. Accessed November 29, 2013. This fact sheet summarizes a recent analysis, commissioned by the Wyoming

95

Brookhaven National Lab Economic Impact Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New York State economy Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Future of New York State's Economy Brookhaven National Laboratory's impact on New York State's (and Long Island's)...

96

Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Impact Analysis for EGS Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Economic Impact Analysis for EGS Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Analysis Project Description This proposed study will involve studying the impacts associated with jobs, energy and environment (as a result of investments in geothermal industry and specific EGS technologies) through the creation of a Geothermal Economic Calculator tool (GEC). The study will cover Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), conventional hydrothermal, low temperature geothermal and coproduced fluid technologies resulting in electric power production. The GEC created will be capable of helping end users (public and the industry) perform region specific economic impact analyses using a web platform that will be hosted by EGI for different geothermal technologies under EGS that will be used for electric power production.

97

Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Malheur County, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study provides local economic impact estimates for a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power project in Oregon. The hypothetical project would be in Malheur County, shown in Figure 1. Bonneville Power Administration commissioned this study to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council and its advisors. Malheur County was chosen as it has both identified resources and industry interest. Local economic impacts include direct, indirect, and induced changes in the local economy. Direct economic impacts result from the costs of plant development, construction, and operation. Indirect impacts result from household and local government purchases. Induced impacts result from continued responding as goods and services to support the households and local governments are purchased. Employment impacts of geothermal development follow a pattern similar to the economic impacts. Public service impacts include costs such as education, fire protection, roads, waste disposal, and water supply. The project assumption discussion notes experiences at other geothermal areas. The background section compares geothermal with conventional power plants. Power plant fuel distinguishes geothermal from other power sources. Other aspects of development are similar to small scale conventional thermal sources. The process of geothermal development is then explained. Development consists of well drilling, gathering system construction, power plant construction, plant operation and maintenance, and wellfield maintenance.

Sifford, Alex; Beale, Kasi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Environmental and economic assessment of microalgae-derived jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Significant efforts must be undertaken to quantitatively assess various alternative jet fuel pathways when working towards achieving environmental and economic United States commercial and military alternative aviation ...

Carter, Nicholas Aaron

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The economic impact of coal mining in New Mexico is examined in this report. The analysis is based on economic multipliers derived from an input-output model of the New Mexico economy. The direct, indirect, and induced impacts of coal mining in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment, and labor income for calendar year 2007. Tax, rental, and royalty income to the State of New Mexico are also presented. Historical coal production, reserves, and price data are also presented and discussed. The impacts of coal-fired electricity generation will be examined in a separate report.

Peach, James; Starbuck, C.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Impact of Climate on Energy Sector in Economic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessments of economic conditions by region or sector attempt to include relevant climatic variability through residual adjustment techniques. There is no direct consideration of climatic fluctuations. Three recent severe winters combined with ...

Henry E. Warren; Sharon K. LeDuc

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Economic Impact Assessment of NIST's Text REtrival ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 6Between 1981 and 1988, DIALOG was owned ... 1 Abstracts of US Department of Energy (DOE) ... Evaluation Measure Stability.” Proceedings of the ...

2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

102

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Whatcom County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Whatcom County, Washington, near Mt. Baker, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Whatcom County was chosen due to both identified geotherrnal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Whatcom County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Skamania County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Skamania County, Washington, near Mt. Adams, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Skamania County was chosen due to both identified geothermal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Skamania County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

105

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Line Model Transmission Line Model The Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts associated with transmission line projects. Applying a similar user interface as other JEDI models, Transmission Line JEDI requires a few additional user inputs such as: Transmission Line Type Line Length Terrain Type Right-of-Way Characteristics. Results are presented in the same manner as those in other JEDI models. This allows the transmission line JEDI model to be used by itself or in conjunction with electricity generation JEDI models. As with all JEDI models, reasonable default values are provided. Individual projects may vary and when possible project specific data should be used to obtain the best estimate of economic development impacts.

106

Economic assessment of CO? capture and disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multi-sector multi-region general equilibrium model of economic growth and emissions is used to explore the conditions that will determine the market penetration of CO2 capture and disposal technology.

Eckaus, Richard S.; Jacoby, Henry D.; Ellerman, A. Denny.; Leung, Wing-Chi.; Yang, Zili.

107

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Environmental Impact Assessment (Prince Edward Island, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Province of PEI has established an environmental impact assessment process for projects that could have an impact on the environment. The Province and the Federal Government cooperate in the...

109

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

110

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

111

NERC ECONOMIC IMPACT BASELINE 2007-08 Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NERC ECONOMIC IMPACT BASELINE 2007-08 Executive Summary The Natural Environment Research Council environmental markets. NERC provides timely forewarning of major environmental changes allowing the UK economy highly skilled people to the labour market · Improving the performance of existing businesses · Improving

Edinburgh, University of

112

Economic Impact of West Virginia Higher Education Institutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Technology) The economic impacts estimated in this report are for fiscal year (FY) 2008 (July 1, 2007 ­ June West Virginia University May 2010 Funding for this report was provided by the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. The report includes financial and other data provided by member HEPC

Mohaghegh, Shahab

113

A Critique of Energy and Economic Policy Assessments: The Missing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Critique of Energy and Economic Policy Assessments: The Missing Physics and Behavioral Perspectives Speaker(s): John "Skip" Laitner Date: March 12, 2013 - 12:00pm Location:...

114

Social Theory, Impact Assessment and Northern Native Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provides a useful list of 21 social impact categories in ''Issues in Social Impact Assessment, "' Plan Canada, 18 (Junen d S. Rittenberg, . . Social Impact Assessment: A State of

Weaver, Clyde; Cunningham, Alain M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSP Model CSP Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from CSP projects. JEDI CSP has default information that can be utilized to run a generic impacts analysis assuming industry averages. Model users are encouraged to enter as much project-specific data as possible. Download the JEDI CSP Model Printable Version JEDI Home About JEDI Biofuels Models Coal Model CSP Model Geothermal Model Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model Natural Gas Model Photovoltaics Model Transmission Line Model Wind Model Download JEDI Methodology Interpreting Results Advanced Users Limitations of JEDI Models Publications Forum Webinars Contact Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback.

116

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) has developed a spreadsheet-based wind model (Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI)) that incorporates economic multipliers for jobs, income, and output. Originally developed with state-specific parameters, it can also be used to conduct county and regional analyses. NREL has enlisted the Wind Powering America (WPA) State Wind Working Groups (SWWGs) to conduct county-specific economic impact analyses and has encouraged them to use JEDI if they do not have their own economic model. The objective of the analyses is to identify counties within WPA target states, and preferably counties with a significant agricultural sector, that could economically benefit from wind development. These counties could then explore opportunities to tap into the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill Section 9006 grants and loans to stimulate wind development. This paper describes the JEDI model and how i t can be used. We will also summarize a series of analyses that were completed to fulfill a General Accounting Office (GAO) request to provide estimates of the economic development benefits of wind power.

Sinclair, K.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

3D Simulations in Environmental Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase of petrol cost and the failure of Kyoto agreement generated huge investments in renewable energy sources. In recent times a lot of local authorities allowed wind farm location. In many cases, environmental impact assessments do not take ... Keywords: 3D CAD models, 3D GIS analysis, Multimedia techniques, Viewshed, Visual impact assessment, Wind farm

Maria Danese; Giuseppe Las Casas; Beniamino Murgante

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Job and Economic Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects Preprint March 2004 * NREL/CP-500-35953 M. Goldberg MRG & Associates K. Sinclair and M. Milligan (Consultant) National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at the 2004 Global WINDPOWER Conference Chicago, Illinois March 29-31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US

119

Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and Grid Electrification Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid,...

120

Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 03, 2011 May 03, 2011 Study Shows Significant Economic Impact from Recovery Act AIKEN, S.C. - A study recently released shows the $1.6 billion the Savannah River Site (SRS) received from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has had a positive economic impact on the adjacent five-county region. The study's findings were presented at the University of South Carolina Aiken's (USC Aiken) Convocation Center. More than 75 people attended the meeting, where presenters commended the Recovery Act for accelerating Cold War cleanup at SRS and boosting employment and business in the local community. "I go out to the sites and talk to the people in the communities," EM Chief Operations Officer Cynthia Anderson said at the meeting. "The Recovery Act is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Energy and Economic Impacts From Recent Energy Conservation Standards Speaker(s): Gregory Rosenquist Date: August 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Louis-Benoit Desroches In the last several years, there has been a significant growth in the activities of the Department of Energy's Appliance and Commercial Equipment Standards program. EETD's Energy Efficiency Standards group has been heavily involved in the analyses supporting recently published federal energy conservation standards, for a diverse set of appliances and commercial equipment. In this talk, I will review the EES group's efforts supporting these energy conservation standards. Collectively, they are estimated to save the nation between 14.15 to 15.17 quads (quadrillion Btu)

122

Assess economic and market potential of technologies and initiatives | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess economic and market potential of technologies and initiatives Assess economic and market potential of technologies and initiatives Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

123

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties Title Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication...

124

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

Tegen, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Communications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessments, for reqUirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http:www.directives.doe.govpdfsdoedoetextlneword206o2061.pdf Please complete electronically:...

126

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

An assessement of global energy resource economic potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an assessment of global economic energy potentials for all major natural energy resources. This work is based on both an extensive literature review and calculations using natural resource assessment data. Economic potentials are presented in the form of cost-supply curves, in terms of energy flows for renewable energy sources, or fixed amounts for fossil and nuclear resources, with strong emphasis on uncertainty, using a consistent methodology that allow direct comparisons to be made. In order to interpolate through available resource assessment data and associated uncertainty, a theoretical framework and a computational methodology are given based on statistical properties of different types of resources, justified empirically by the data, and used throughout. This work aims to provide a global database for natural energy resources ready to integrate into models of energy systems, enabling to introduce at the same time uncertainty over natural resource assessments. The supplementary mate...

Mercure, J F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Economic impacts of wild hogs on selected Texas agriculture operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the present, wild hogs exist in Texas in free-ranging populations numbering in the millions. These populations continue to expand, and now are pervasive in almost all land resource areas of the state. Wild hogs have a noted presence in the ranching and farming industry. This presence is both biophysical and socioeconomic in nature. The hogs financially influence agriculture as both a valuable asset and expensive liability. The economic presence of this influence reflects opposing personal preferences which play an important part in opposing valuations. Biological information is available which concerns the hogs, but no research has centered specifically around the economic effects of the hog's presence upon agricultural producers. To properly perform any economic analysis of wild hog impacts on the state's agricultural producers, good data was needed and became a primary focus of this study. A second need and focus of the study was the employment of enterprise budgeting as an economic research method to discover values for the positive and negative financial effects of the hogs. These methods were used to yield sound values for the economic effects of the wild hogs on the Texas agriculture producers which were the focus of this study. This research effort demonstrates the economic effects of wild hogs on eight selected Texas agricultural producers. An intensive survey was conducted which involved gathering primary data which focused on the effects the hogs have on the respondent's operations. This data was used to construct both full and partial combination effect enterprise budgets for the respondent's agriculture enterprises. These budgets yield values for the benefits and damages that result from the hog's growing influence on landowners / managers. The values for the economic effects of the hogs are presented and discussed in an attempt to offer information and alternatives which may help efficiently manage populations of the hogs in Texas. This information can be used to evaluate biophysical and socioeconomic options for that management effort in several areas. These are the establishment of legal ownership of the hogs, legal liability, and creation of rules, regulations, and programs which increase the efficiency of management efforts.

Bach, Joel Paul

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Economic Sector Data for Modeling the Impact of Less Ignition ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... U S. Department of Agriculture. Economic Researcti Service. National Economics Division Tobacco Outlook and Situation Report. Washington DC. ...

2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

high-impact-assessment-bulletins high-impact-assessment-bulletins Office of the Chief Information Officer 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202-586-0166 en V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities http://energy.gov/cio/articles/v-215-networkminer-directory-traversal-and-insecure-library-loading-vulnerabilities V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities

132

JC3 Low Impact Assessment Bulletins  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

low-impact-assessment-bulletins low-impact-assessment-bulletins Office of the Chief Information Officer 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202-586-0166 en V-207: Wireshark Multiple Denial of Service Vulnerabilities http://energy.gov/cio/articles/v-207-wireshark-multiple-denial-service-vulnerabilities V-207: Wireshark Multiple Denial of Service Vulnerabilities

133

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show that penetrations of at least 20 percent are feasible. Several studies have used input-output models to predict direct, indirect, and induced economic development impacts. These analyses have often been completed prior to project construction. Available studies have not yet investigated the economic development impacts of wind development at the county level using post-construction econometric evaluation methods. Analysis of county-level impacts is limited. However, previous county-level analyses have estimated operation-period employment at 0.2 to 0.6 jobs per megawatt (MW) of power installed and earnings at $9,000/MW to $50,000/MW. We find statistically significant evidence of positive impacts of wind development on county-level per capita income from the OLS and spatial lag models when they are applied to the full set of wind and non-wind counties. The total impact on annual per capita income of wind turbine development (measured in MW per capita) in the spatial lag model was $21,604 per MW. This estimate is within the range of values estimated in the literature using input-output models. OLS results for the wind-only counties and matched samples are similar in magnitude, but are not statistically significant at the 10-percent level. We find a statistically significant impact of wind development on employment in the OLS analysis for wind counties only, but not in the other models. Our estimates of employment impacts are not precise enough to assess the validity of employment impacts from input-output models applied in advance of wind energy project construction. The analysis provides empirical evidence of positive income effects at the county level from cumulative wind turbine development, consistent with the range of impacts estimated using input-output models. Employment impacts are less clear.

J., Brown; B., Hoen; E., Lantz; J., Pender; R., Wiser

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

134

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power--Case Studies Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Interest in wind power development is growing as a means of expanding local economies. Such development holds promise as a provider of short-term employment during facility construction and long-term employment from ongoing facility operation and maintenance (O&M). It may also add to the supply of electric power in the area and support some expansion of the local economy through ripple effects resulting from initial increases in jobs and income. These ripple effects stem from subsequent expenditures for goods and services made possible by first-round income from the development, and are expressed in terms of a multiplier. If the local economy offers a wide range of goods and services the resulting multiplier can be substantial--as much as three or four. If not, then much of the initial income will leave the local economy to buy goods and services from elsewhere. Loss of initial income to other locales is referred to as a leakage. While there is a growing body of information about the local impacts of wind power, the economic impacts from existing wind power developments have not been thoroughly and consistently analyzed. Northwest Economic Associates, under contract to the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), conducted a study and produced a report entitled ''Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power.'' The primary objective of the study was to provide examples of appropriate analyses and documentation of economic impacts from wind power development, using case studies of three existing projects in the United States. The findings from the case studies are summarized here; more detail is available in the report, available at NWCC's website http://www.nationalwind.org/. It should be noted that specific results presented apply only to the respective locales studied and are not meant to be representative of wind power in general. However, qualitative findings, discussed below, are likely to be replicated in most areas where wind development occurs.

NWCC Economic Development Work Group

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

135

Comparing Two Approaches for Assessing Observation Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Langland and Baker introduced an approach to assess the impact of observations on the forecasts. In that approach, a state-space aspect of the forecast is defined and a procedure is derived ultimately relating changes in the aspect with changes in ...

Ricardo Todling

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Recent trends in automobile recycling: An energy and economic assessment  

SciTech Connect

Recent and anticipated trends in the material composition of domestic and imported automobiles and the increasing cost of landfilling the non-recyclable portion of automobiles (automobile shredder residue or ASR) pose questions about the future of automobile recycling. This report documents the findings of a study sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Analysis to examine the impacts of these and other relevant trends on the life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles and on the economic viability of the domestic automobile recycling industry. More specifically, the study (1) reviewed the status of the automobile recycling industry in the United States, including the current technologies used to process scrapped automobiles and the challenges facing the automobile recycling industry; (2) examined the current status and future trends of automobile recycling in Europe and Japan, with the objectives of identifying ``lessons learned`` and pinpointing differences between those areas and the United States; (3) developed estimates of the energy system impacts of the recycling status quo and projections of the probable energy impacts of alternative technical and institutional approaches to recycling; and (4) identified the key policy questions that will determine the future economic viability of automobile shredder facilities in the United States.

Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Rizy, C.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexanyder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Launches JOBS and DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Digg

138

Berkeley ReadyMade Impact Assessment: Developing an Effective and Efficient Assessment Template for Social Enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work lead to broader social impact. For example, a nonprofitand Resources for Assessing Social Impact (TRASI). 3 2.need to evaluate broad social impact of proposed programs

Brown, Clair; Chait, Ariel; Freeman, Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Cost and economic impact of tire reserve load requirements. Final report, July-October 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inadequate maintenance of proper tire inflation by consumers and low tire reserve loads by auto manufacturers have contributed to unsafe driving conditions and tire failure. This report assesses the cost and economic impact of increased minimum tire reserve load requirements on the auto and tire industries, and the feasibility of regulation implementation for 3, 5, 7, 10, and 12% tire reserve loads. These are analyzed for the years 1981 through 1984. The costs and projections are based on the conditions found in the 1980 vehicle fleet and tire population and upon industry projections of future conditions.

Viergutz, O.; Marek, S.; Kelley, C.; Wakeley, H.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Medicine Assistant PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medicine Medicine - Assistant PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Deparlment of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT iDafe 'Depauwerltal El.ment& iSlte June 10, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name :of,lnfonnation Systetnol"'ITiPtoJect Occupational Medicine - Assistant Exhlblt;ProJect UID Indirect funded Occupational Safety and Health NewPIA 0 Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne I e . , Phone, Email System Owner Local Privacy Act Offtcer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL E-IDR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL INL E-IDR (Invention Disclosure Record) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. I MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date O..parlmental Element & Site 6/10/09 Idaho National Laboratory Building: 654 BUilding Name: EROS Name of Information System or IT Project E-IDR (Invention Disclosure Record) Exhibit Project UID 61104 NewPIA GJ Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne, I e Ph E ' I one, mal System Owner Wendy Skinner Local Privacy Act

142

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Visitor Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetexUneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 11, 2009 Deparbnental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Building 616 Willow Creek Building Name of Information Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 217975 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title I Contact Information Phone, Email Lynn Rockhold System Owner I' 1\ I \ \ ( y P II 114 I' "I

143

Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet - Potential Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site. It examines the potential environmental consequences from conducting particular types of scientific experiments in an area of the WIPP underground called the experiment gallery. The environmental assessment also looks at the potential cumulative impacts of conducting experiments and operating the WIPP as a transuranic waste repository. This fact sheet presents questions and answers about potential impacts to human health and the environment and proposed protections and mitigations, based on the draft environmental assessment. The deep geologic repository at the WIPP could be the most favorable U.S. environment currently available for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astro-

144

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Energy Employees' Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance Is provided In the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building 616 Willow Creek Building Name of Information Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) System or IT ProJect Tracking Database Exhibit Project

145

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCCUPATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL SUVEILLANCE SYSTEM (OMSS) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Dllte DepartmentAll Element~&Slte 06-16-2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building Number: WCB Building Name: WCB Name of Information System!«)r IT Project Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) ExhlbllProJect UIO 72 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - OMSS Finallxw.doc

146

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 12, 2009 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Name of Infonnatlon Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 136 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title Contact Information Phone, Email Anthony J. Kavran (208) 526-5826

147

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Integrated Safety Management Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element&·Slte 16/Jun/09 Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Research Office Building (EROB) Name of-Information System or IT Project Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration Exhibit Project UID 207765 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - ISMS Workshop Finallxw.doc N T "tl I

148

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Human Resources Personal Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Engineering Research Office Building (EROB) Name of Information Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request System or IT Project Business Enclave Exhibit Project UID 106800 NewPIA ~ Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne,

149

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Manchester Software  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manchester Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program. Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date 06/09/09 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element &Site Building Name: lAB Name of Infonnatlon Manchester Software 1099 Reporting System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 202021 New PIA GJ Update D Name, Title I Contact Information Phone, Email Bryan Larson, System Owner 208-526-8685 Technical Lead, Manchester

150

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCIO HSPD-12 Physical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCIO OCIO - HSPD-12 Physical and Logical System PIA Template Version 4- June, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site August 27,2009 Office of the Chief Information Officer DOE Headquarters, Forrestal, 8H-065 Name of Information System or IT Project HSPD-12 Physical and Logical Access System Exhibit Project UID Project's Unique 10: 019-60-01-17-01-8062-04-404-140 (2010 UID) NewPIA D Update ~ HSPD-12

151

Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S.2191, the Lieberman-Warner ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SR/OIAF/2008-01. Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 2191, the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act of 2007 . April 2008. Energy Information Administration

152

EIA - Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Forecasts & Analysis >Response to Congressionals and Other Requests > Energy market and Economic Impacts of th American Power Act of 2010 > Preface and Contacts

153

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing how JEDI II calculates economic impacts from wind projects.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Impacts of Utility Rates and Building Type on the Economics...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaic Systems Jump to: navigation, search Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems1 Authors:Sean...

155

Technical and economic assessment of solar hybrid repowering. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) has performed a Technical and Economic Assessment of Solar Hybrid Repowering under funding by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Western Energy Supply and Transmission (WEST) Associates, and a number of southwestern utilities. Solar hybrid repowering involves placement of solar hardware adjacent to and connected to existing gas- and oil-fueled electric generation units to displace some of or all the fossil fuel normally used during daylight hours. The subject study assesses the technical economic viability of the solar hybrid repowering concept within the southwestern United States and the PNM system. This document is a final report on the study and its results. The study was divided into the six primary tasks to allow a systematic investigation of the concept: (1) market survey and cost/benefit analysis, (2) study unit selection, (3) conceptual design and cost estimates, (4) unit economic analysis, (5) program planning, future phases, and (6) program management. Reeves Station No. 2 at Albuquerque, New Mexico, was selected for repowering with a design goal of 50 percent (25 MWe). The solar system design is based on the 10 MW solar central receiver pilot plant preliminary design for Barstow, California. SAN--1608-4-2 contains the technical drawings. (WHK)

None

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three categories: Project Development and Onsite Labor Impacts Local Revenue and Supply Chain Impacts Induced Impacts JEDI model defaults are based on interviews with industry...

157

Background information for the economic assessment of solvent fermentation processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An economic assessment of solvent fermentation processes was made. The question of whether or not the increased costs for petrochemical raw materials are sufficiently high now (or their projected costs in the 1980's), such that certain chemicals could be produced commercially from a cheaper raw material, say cellulosics, via various fermentation routes is considered. Specific examples under consideratin are n-butanol, propionic acid, and acetic acid. A qualitative approach was developed, based on major cost factors of alternative routes for making such projections. The technique described can be made as quantitative as desired by applying accepted engineering design and economic analysis principles to the complex, interacting factors that are involved. Some broad qualitative conclusions are made.

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Thermal simulation and economic assessment of unglazed transpired collector systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unglazed transpired collectors (UTCs) have recently emerged as a new solar air heating technology. They are relatively inexpensive, efficient, and particularly suited to applications in which a high outdoor air requirement must be met. A TRNSYS model has been created for UTC systems. Annual simulations are performed for several representative buildings. The statewide economic potential of UTC systems is assessed for Wisconsin. UTC systems on existing buildings are competitive with electric heating systems but not with gas or oil heating. Electric heating is not widely used in most buildings that are well-suited for UTC systems, with the exception of large apartment buildings. Therefore, there is no significant statewide economic potential for retrofit of UTC systems on existing buildings except in the residential sector. However, UTC systems are cost effective for new buildings because their low first cost allows them to compete with gas and oil heating.

Summers, D.N.; Mitchell, J.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction

160

Gateway:U.S. OpenLabs/Environmental and Economic Impacts | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. OpenLabs/Environmental and Economic Impacts U.S. OpenLabs/Environmental and Economic Impacts Jump to: navigation, search Where can I find out about potential economic and environmental impacts related to clean energy development? Exploring the environmental and economic impacts of different energy choices is an increasingly important aspect of project and program planning in developing countries. With many competing technologies and resources available, it is important to understand how different clean energy portfolios will affect the economic, environmental and social settings in which they are to be applied. Environmental Impacts Center for Bioenergy Sustainability at ORNL The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for BioEnergy Sustainability (CBES) analyzes the impact of biomass use for energy and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

medium-impact-assessment-bulletins medium-impact-assessment-bulletins Office of the Chief Information Officer 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202-586-0166 en V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities http://energy.gov/cio/articles/v-237-typo3-security-bypass-vulnerabilities V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities

162

Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report Now  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report Now Available Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report Now Available April 25, 2013 - 1:04pm Addthis A report on the Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid is now available. This study analyzes the economy-wide impacts of the Recovery Act funding for smart grid project deployment in the United States, administered by Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. Key findings include: ARRA funding and matching support from utilities and the private sector in the SGIG and SGDP programs generated a significant impact on the U.S. economy; Smart grid deployment had a positive impact on employment and labor income throughout the economy;

163

Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report (April  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report (April 2013) Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report (April 2013) The Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid report analyzes the economy-wide impacts of the Recovery Act funding for smart grid project deployment in the United States, administered by Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. Key findings include: ARRA funding and matching support from utilities and the private sector in the SGIG and SGDP programs generated a significant impact on the U.S. economy; Smart grid deployment had a positive impact on employment and labor income throughout the economy; Investment in core smart grid industries supports high-paying jobs;

164

Impacts of the national energy programme on solar economics  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Plan (NEP) sets as a goal the use of solar energy in two and a half million homes in 1985. A key provision of the NEP (as well as congressional alternatives) provides for the subsidization of solar equipment. The extent to which these subsidies (income tax credits) might offset the impact of continued energy-price control is examined. Regional prices and availability of conventional energy sources (oil, gas, and electricity) were compiled to obtain a current and consistent set of energy prices by state and energy type. These prices are converted into equivalent terms ($/10/sup 6/ Btu) that account for combustion and heat-generation efficiencies. Projections of conventional-fuel price increases (or decreases) are made under both the NEP scenario and a projected scenario where all wellhead price controls are removed on natural gas and crude oil production. The economic feasibility (life-cycle cost basis) of solar energy for residential space heating and domestic hot water is examined on a state-by-state basis. Solar-system costs are developed for each state by fraction of Btu heating load provided. The total number of homes, projected energy savings, and sensitivity to heating loads, alternative energy costs, and prices are included in the analysis.

Ben-David, S.; Noll, S.; Roach, F.; Schulze, W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation from 1603  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation from 1603 Renewable Energy Grant Program NREL Report Highlights Positive Economic Impact and Job Creation from 1603 Renewable Energy Grant Program April 6, 2012 - 10:26am Addthis Table: Estimates of the Direct and Indirect Jobs, Earnings, and Economic Output Supported by PV and Large Wind Projects Funded Under the §1603 Grant Program. Table: Estimates of the Direct and Indirect Jobs, Earnings, and Economic Output Supported by PV and Large Wind Projects Funded Under the §1603 Grant Program. Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, issued a study on Friday estimating the economic impact

167

The impact of valence shifters on mining implicit economic opinions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the influence of valence shifters on sentiment analysis within a new model built to extract opinions from economic texts. The system relies on implicit convictions that emerge from the studied texts through co-occurrences of economic ... Keywords: diminishers, economic predictions, negations, opinion mining, valence shifters

Claudiu Musat; Stefan Trausan-Matu

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Economic Impact of Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling What Have We Learned? What are the Limitations?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: What is the issue? Several studies have projected large positive economic impacts of shale gas development in the Marcellus region. To make informed choices for their communities, policy makers need to understand the strengths and limitations of these studies. Most importantly, they need to understand that there is a tenuous relationship between positive economic impacts in the short run and long term economic development based on an extractive, exhaustible natural resource. In addressing the relationship, proactive policy can make a difference.

David Kay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Environmental Economics, I. (2007) Wind Resources, Cost, andWind power planning: assessing long-term costs and benefits, Energy

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

now: Project Development and On-site Labor (re-labeled from Direct) Turbine and Supply Chain Impacts (re-labeled from Indirect) Induced Impacts Impacts during the operating...

171

User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind: The Expanded Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI II); Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the impacts of building new coal, gas, or wind plants in three states: Colorado, Michigan, and Virginia. Our findings indicate that local/state economic impacts are directly related to the availability and utilization of local industries and services to build and operate the power plant. For gas and coal plants, the economic benefit depends significantly on whether the fuel is obtained from within the state, out of state, or some combination. We also find that the taxes generated by power plants can have a significant impact on local economies via increased expenditures on public goods.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the construction phase and for the ongoing operations phase. For the construction phase, the impacts are broken out by project development and on-site labor impacts,...

173

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning, and output (total economic activity) for a given power generation...

174

Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada) Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada) Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Environmental Regulations Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a process through which the environmental impacts potentially resulting from a proposed project are identified and assessed early in the planning process. EIA identifies steps

175

DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More November 7, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars November 20: Live Webinar on Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Jobs and Economic

176

Socioeconomic impact assessment: a methodology applied to synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Report is a supporting document for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Alternative Fuels Demonstration Program, which was filed with the Council on Environmental Quality in November, 1977. It describes the methodology developed for the socioeconomic impact assessments contained in the Environmental Impact Statement, and highlights the findings. Part I of this Report explains clearly how the numbers are derived, and presents the salient planning issues. Starting with the labor force of a synthetic fuels facility, a public official, decision-maker, or student of socioeconomic impacts can use this Report to derive a reasonable set of estimates which reflect the resultant population, income, employment, land use, public facility costs, and local public revenues. Part II of this Report is the application of this methodology to synthetic fuels. Numerical estimates are given for the social and economic effects resulting from such energy technologies as coal gasification and liquefaction, oil shale, and the conversion of solid wastes and agricultural products to energy. Although the methodology is not site specific, illustrative sites, chosen from the major coal-bearing counties in the United States, have been included. This allows a user to compare the relative impacts of a given energy facility in various geographical locations and types of communities. The section on mitigating measures may be of special interest because of its treatment of problem areas and its broad range of suggested solutions. One advantage of the methodology is that it derives from a broad data base that is readily accessible: the United States Census. Another advantage is that impacts can be calculated by hand. Finally, it is applicable to a wide variety of energy technologies and not restricted to synthetic fuels.

Not Available

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Energy Market and Economic Impacts Proposal to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Intensity with a Cap and Trade System  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), in response to a September 27, 2006, request from Senators Bingaman, Landrieu, Murkowski, Specter, Salazar, and Lugar. The Senators requested that EIA assess the impacts of a proposal that would regulate emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) through an allowance cap-and-trade system. The program would set the cap to achieve a reduction in emissions relative to economic output, or greenhouse gas intensity.

John J. Conti

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Impacts of Utility Rates and Building Type on the Economics of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impacts of Utility Rates and Building Type on the Economics of Impacts of Utility Rates and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems Jump to: navigation, search Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems[1] Authors:Sean Ong, Clinton Campbell, and Nathan Clark National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 2012. Abstract To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories. The digital appendix is available with results for the different locations

179

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcards), Wind Powering America (WPA), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Development Impacts Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model is a user-friendly tool that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. EERE Information Center

180

Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) and 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved continued data analysis and report writing. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) was issued as a final report during the previous reporting period. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities included the preparation of the final report. There were no Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities to report. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

Gettleson, D.A.

1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan  

SciTech Connect

With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

Tegen, S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power, and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

Tegen, S.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Southeast...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Induced Impacts 170 2,760 Total Impacts during Operation 410 6,700 The U.S. DOE Wind & Water Power Technologies Office funded James Madison University and the National Renewable...

184

Long-term Environmental and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-term Environmental and Economic Long-term Environmental and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Background The growth of the economy and the accompanying increase in energy consumption in the People's Republic of China (China) are impacting the world's energy markets and global environment. That impact was seen in rising oil prices prior to the economic collapse of 2008. China plans to move ahead in the use of its coal resources as a source of transportation fuels. It is important that the U.S. have the best possible

185

Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 5. Social and economic impacts of geothermal development in Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overview statement of the socio-economic effects of developing geothermal energy in the State of Hawaii is presented. The following functions are presented: (1) identification of key social and economic issues, (2) inventory of all available pertinent data, (3) analysis and assessment of available data, and (4) identification of what additional information is required for adequate assessment.

Canon, P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Economic impact of corrosion and scaling problems in geothermal energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion and scaling problems have a significant impact on geothermal plant economics. A power plant must amortize the capital investment over a 20-year period and achieve satisfactory operating efficiency to achieve financial success. Corrosion and scale incrustations have been encountered in all geothermal plants, and to various degrees, adversely affected plant life times and power output. Using published data this report analyzes known geothermal corrosion and scaling phenomena for significant cost impacts on plant design and operation. It has been necessary to speculate about causes and mechanisms in order to estimate impacts on conceptual geothermal plants. Silica is highly soluble in hot geothermal water and solubility decreases as water is cooled in a geothermal power plant. Calculations indicate as much as 30,000 tons/year could pass through a 100 MWe water cycle plant. The major cost impact will be on the reinjection well system where costs of 1 to 10 mills/kwhr of power produced could accrue to waste handling alone. On the other hand, steam cycle geothermal plants have a definite advantage in that significant silica problems will probably only occur in hot dry rock concepts, where steam above 250 C is produced. Calculation methods are given for estimating the required size and cost impact of a silica filtration plant and for sizing scrubbers. The choice of materials is significantly affected by the pH of the geothermal water, temperature, chloride, and H{sub s} contents. Plant concepts which attempt to handle acid waters above 180 C will be forced to use expensive corrosion resistant alloys or develop specialized materials. On the other hand, handling steam up to 500 C, and pH 9 water up to 180 C appears feasible using nominal cost steels, typical of today's geothermal plants. A number of factors affecting plant or component availability have been identified. The most significant is a corrosion fatigue problem in geothermal turbines at the Geyser's geothermal plant which is presently reducing plant output by about 10%. This is equivalent to over $3 million per year in increased oil consumption to replace the power. In the course of assessing the cost implications of corrosion and scaling problems, a number of areas of technological uncertainty were identified which should be considered in R and D planning in support of geothermal energy. Materials development with both laboratory and field testing will be necessary. The economic analysis on which this report is based was done in support of an AEC Division of Applied Technology program to assess the factors affecting geothermal plant economics. The results of this report are to be used to develop computer models of overall plant economics, of which corrosion and scaling problems are only a part. The translation of the economic analysis to the report which appears here, was done on AEC Special Studies Funds.

Shannon, D.W.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Economic impact of corrosion and scaling problems in geothermal energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion and scaling problems have a significant impact on geothermal plant economics. A power plant must amortize the capital investment over a 20-year period and achieve satisfactory operating efficiency to achieve financial success. Corrosion and scale incrustations have been encountered in all geothermal plants, and to various degrees, adversely affected plant life times and power output. Using published data this report analyzes known geothermal corrosion and scaling phenomena for significant cost impacts on plant design and operation. It has been necessary to speculate about causes and mechanisms in order to estimate impacts on conceptual geothermal plants. Silica is highly soluble in hot geothermal water and solubility decreases as water is cooled in a geothermal power plant. Calculations indicate as much as 30,000 tons/year could pass through a 100 MWe water cycle plant. The major cost impact will be on the reinjection well system where costs of 1 to 10 mills/kwhr of power produced could accrue to waste handling alone. On the other hand, steam cycle geothermal plants have a definite advantage in that significant silica problems will probably only occur in hot dry rock concepts, where steam above 250 C is produced. Calculation methods are given for estimating the required size and cost impact of a silica filtration plant and for sizing scrubbers. The choice of materials is significantly affected by the pH of the geothermal water, temperature, chloride, and H{sub s} contents. Plant concepts which attempt to handle acid waters above 180 C will be forced to use expensive corrosion resistant alloys or develop specialized materials. On the other hand, handling steam up to 500 C, and pH 9 water up to 180 C appears feasible using nominal cost steels, typical of today's geothermal plants. A number of factors affecting plant or component availability have been identified. The most significant is a corrosion fatigue problem in geothermal turbines at the Geyser's geothermal plant which is presently reducing plant output by about 10%. This is equivalent to over $3 million per year in increased oil consumption to replace the power. In the course of assessing the cost implications of corrosion and scaling problems, a number of areas of technological uncertainty were identified which should be considered in R and D planning in support of geothermal energy. Materials development with both laboratory and field testing will be necessary. The economic analysis on which this report is based was done in support of an AEC Division of Applied Technology program to assess the factors affecting geothermal plant economics. The results of this report are to be used to develop computer models of overall plant economics, of which corrosion and scaling problems are only a part. The translation of the economic analysis to the report which appears here, was done on AEC Special Studies Funds.

Shannon, D.W.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Solar PV Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model Webinar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Join the DOE SunShot Initiative, in conjunction with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, for a webinar on August 21, 2013, at 2-3 p.m. EST highlighting the Scenario Solar PV Jobs and Economic...

189

Practitioners, professional cultures, and perceptions of impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The very nature of impact assessment (IA) means that it often involves practitioners from a very wide range of disciplinary and professional backgrounds, which open the possibility that how IA is perceived and practised may vary according to the professional background of the practitioner. The purpose of this study is to investigate the extent to which a practitioner's professional background influences their perceptions of the adequacy of impact assessment in New Zealand under the Resource Management Act (RMA). Information gathered concerned professional affiliations, training, understanding of impact assessment practise, and perceptions of adequacy in relation to impact assessment. The results showed a dominance of a legalistic, operational perspective of impact assessment under the Resource Management Act, across all the main professions represented in the study. However, among preparers of impact assessments there was clear evidence of differences between the four main professional groups - surveyors, planners, engineers and natural scientists - in the way they see the nature and purpose of impact assessment, the practical steps involved, and what constitutes adequacy. Similarly, impact assessment reviewers - predominantly planners and lawyers - showed variations in their expectations of impact assessment depending on their respective professional affiliation. Although in many cases the differences seem to be more of a matter of emphasis, rather than major disputes on what constitutes a good process, even those differences can add up to rather distinct professional cultures of impact assessment. The following factors are seen as leading to the emergence of such professional cultures: different professions often contribute in different ways to an impact assessment, affecting their perception of the nature and purpose of the process; impact assessment training will usually be a secondary concern, compared with the core professional training, which will be reflected in the depth and length of such training; and any impact assessment training provided within a profession will often have the 'cultural' imprint of that profession.

Morgan, Richard K., E-mail: rkm@geography.otago.ac.nz [Centre for Impact Assessment Research and Training, Department of Geography, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Hart, Andrew [Centre for Impact Assessment Research and Training, Department of Geography, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Freeman, Claire, E-mail: cf@geography.otago.ac.nz [Department of Geography, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Coutts, Brian, E-mail: bcoutts@surveying.otago.ac.nz [School of Surveying, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Colwill, David; Hughes, Andrew [Centre for Impact Assessment Research and Training, Department of Geography, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Institutional Design for Strategic Environmental Assessment on Urban Economic and Social Development Planning in China  

SciTech Connect

The National Economic and Social Development Plans (NESDPs) of cities in China, given their comprehensive, integrated and strategic nature, have significant and profound impacts on the development of cities and their embedded ecological environments. Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEAs) on city NESDPs have the potential to improve environmental policy integration at strategic level and to safeguard the sustainable development of cities. However, these plans are normally exempted from the current SEA requirement in China. We argue that it is more feasible to apply SEAs on city NESDPs before SEAs are expanded to higher level NESDPs in China. This article attempts to propose a China-specific institutional design for SEAs on city NESDPs based on experiments in selected cities and within the current legal framework. To obtain a holistic view about the long-term development of cities, more qualitative and descriptive analysis-based assessment methods should be adopted to broaden participation, to encourage the exchange of information and to reach consensus. - Highlights: > National Economic and Social Development Plans for Cities (NESDPs) in China is a very popular and significant decision made by municipal government. > We propose a institutional framework to conduct strategic environmental assessment to NESDPs. > The key features of the institutional framework are the independent SEA approval committee and a professional consulting agency.

Song Guojun, E-mail: Songguojun@vip.sohu.com; Zhou Li; Zhang Lei

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics - Digital Appendix | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics - Digital Appendix Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics - Digital Appendix Jump to: navigation, search Welcome to the Digital Appendix for The Impacts of Utility Rates and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems. This digital appendix contains supplement material for the NREL technical report, The Impacts of Utility Rates and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems. Detailed results for each building type, location, and rate structure are provided in this appendix. Users may browse either by building type, or location using one of the two links in the "Detailed Charts and Data" section. Summary tables are also provided for reference. Summary Results Tables The summary tables provide overview results for all locations and building

192

Department of Energy Releases New Report on Economic Impact of Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on Economic Impact of Report on Economic Impact of Recovery Act Advanced Vehicle Investments Department of Energy Releases New Report on Economic Impact of Recovery Act Advanced Vehicle Investments July 14, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Ahead of President Obama's trip to Holland, MI tomorrow for the official groundbreaking of the new Compact Power plant, the Department of Energy today released a new report on the economic impact of Recovery Act investments in advanced batteries and vehicles. The report, "Recovery Act Investments: Transforming America's Transportation Sector," documents how Recovery Act funds are being matched with private capital to create new jobs, construct new plants, add new manufacturing lines, install electric vehicle charging stations across the country and help build the

193

Economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme : evidence from the refining sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I study the economic impact of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) on the refining industry in Europe. I contrast previous ex-ante studies with the lessons from a series of interviews I conducted with ...

Lacombe, Romain H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Estimation of economic impact of freight distribution due to highway closure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is to provide a theoretical framework and methodology to estimate and analyze the economic impact of freight disruption due to highway closure. The costs in this study will be classified into ...

Hu, Shiyin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

Wang, Xiaodu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Economic impact of M.I.T. on Cambridge and Metropolitan Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigated the economic impact of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on its host city, Cambridge, and upon the Boston Metropolitan Area. The primary purpose was to develop sufficient information about ...

Finberg, Irving William

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy Market and Economic Impacts of H.R. 2454, the American ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SR/OIAF/2009-05. Energy Market and Economic Impacts of H.R. 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 . August 2009. Energy Information Administration

199

The economic impacts of climate change : evidence from agricultural profits and random fluctuations in weather  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper measures the economic impact of climate change on US agricultural land by estimating the effect of the presumably random year-to-year variation in temperature and precipitation on agricultural profits. Using ...

Deschênes, Olivier

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Economic Impacts of Climate Change: Evidence from Agricultural Profits and Random Fluctuations of Weather  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper measures the economic impact of climate change on agricultural land in the United States by estimating the effect of the presumably random year-to-year variation in temperature and precipitation on agricultural ...

Deschenes, Olivier.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Technical and Economic Assessment of Hydrogen and Methanol Poweredd Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to assess and compare the technical and economic status and prospects of hydrogen and methanol powered fuel cell electric vehicles.

Patrick Jung; Chalmers Tekniska Hgskola; Kristian Lindgren; Ingrid Rde

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Economic Impacts of Advanced Weather Forecasting on Energy ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2010 ... Abstract: We analyze the impacts of adopting advanced weather forecasting systems at different levels of the decision-making hierarchy of the ...

203

NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Development Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy impacts, JEDI has been expanded to analyze...

204

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Model Kcmil Thousand Circular Mils kV kilovolts MW Megawatt NESC National Electrical Safety Code NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory O&M Operations and Maintenance...

205

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Catalysis-by-design impacts assessment  

SciTech Connect

Catalyst researchers have always recognized the need to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of catalytic processes, and have hoped that it would lead to developing a theoretical predictive base to guide the search for new catalysts. This understanding allows one to develop a set of hierarchical models, from fundamental atomic-level ab-initio models to detailed engineering simulations of reactor systems, to direct the search for optimized, efficient catalyst systems. During the last two decades, the explosions of advanced surface analysis techniques have helped considerably to develop the building blocks for understanding various catalytic reactions. An effort to couple these theoretical and experimental advances to develop a set of hierarchical models to predict the nature of catalytic materials is a program entitled Catalysis-by-Design (CRD).'' In assessing the potential impacts of CBD on US industry, the key point to remember is that the value of the program lies in developing a novel methodology to search for new catalyst systems. Industrial researchers can then use this methodology to develop proprietary catalysts. Most companies involved in catalyst R D have two types of ongoing projects. The first type, what we call market-driven R D,'' are projects that support and improve upon a company's existing product lines. Project of the second type, technology-driven R D,'' are longer term, involve the development of totally new catalysts, and are initiated through scientists' research ideas. The CBD approach will impact both types of projects. However, this analysis indicates that the near-term impacts will be on market-driven'' projects. The conclusions and recommendations presented in this report were obtained by the authors through personal interviews with individuals involved in a variety of industrial catalyst development programs and through the three CBD workshops held in the summer of 1989. 34 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

Fassbender, L L; Young, J K [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Sen, R K [Sen (R.K.) and Associates, Washington, DC (USA)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Recent National Academy of Sciences Study on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Recent National Academy of Sciences Study on the Economic and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel, Renewable Fuel Standard: Potential Economic and Environmental Effects of U.S. Biofuel Policy. Professor was that the U.S. is unlikely to meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) for 2022 for cellulosic biofuels. Wally

208

Estimating the Economic Impact for the Commercial Hard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Estimating the Economic Impact for the Commercial Hard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy Commercially cultured hard clams have become the single most economically important food item grown hard clams have equaled or exceeded the growth realized by the more established aquaculture sectors

Florida, University of

209

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind Power (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using economic multipliers, JEDI II measures the potential employment (job and earnings) and economic development impacts (output) from new power plants by calculating the dollar flow from construction and annual operations. In its default form, JEDI II conducts state-specific analyses. County or regional analyses require additional multipliers.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final reprot, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluations, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to Evaluate Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans January to conduct HIAs in the Gothenburg Consensus Paper [8] (see http

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

213

Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-3562E Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Annoyance: A Preliminary Analysis in Vinalhaven, Maine Ben Hoen, Haftan Eckholdt, and Ryan...

214

Second National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Impacts By...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment: Climate Change Impacts By Sector Print E-mail alt An affiliated website was created specifically for the 2009 National Climate Assessment so that the report would be...

215

Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Screening assessment and requirements for a comprehensive assessment: Volume 1, Draft. Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the impact to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site-derived contaminants, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, tribal, stockholder, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. The Team agreed to conduct CRCIA using a phased approach. The initial phase, includes two components: 1) a screening assessment to evaluate the potential impact to the river, resulting from current levels of Hanford-derived contaminants in order to support decisions on Interim Remedial Measures, and 2) a definition of the essential work remaining to provide an acceptable comprehensive river impact assessment. The screening assessment is described in Part I of this report. The essential work remaining is Part II of this report. The objective of the screening assessment is to identify areas where the greatest potential exists for adverse effects on humans or the environment. Part I of this report discusses the scope, technical approach, and results of the screening assessment. Part II defines a new paradigm for predecisional participation by those affected by Hanford cleanup decisions.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

EIA-Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act of 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Response to Congressionals and Other Requests > Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act of 2010 Response to Congressionals and Other Requests > Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act of 2010 Energy Market and Economic Impacts of the American Power Act of 2010 This report responds to a request from Senators Kerry, Graham, and Lieberman for an analysis of the American Power Act of 2010 (APA). APA, as released by Senators Kerry and Lieberman on May 12, 2010, regulates emissions of greenhouse gases through market-based mechanisms, efficiency programs, and other economic incentives. Contents complete report PDF GIF Errata - as of July 20, 2010 Preface and Contacts Request Summary Analysis Cases Findings Additional Insights Study Table Results Browse data results Regional and supplemental tables available here also. Data can be charted and downloaded.

218

Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Southeast Region (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Southeast (defined here as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia).

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Golbal Economic and Environmental Impacts of Increased Bioenergy Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project had three main objectives: to build and incorporate an explicit biomass energy sector within the GTAP analytical framework and data base; to provide an analysis of the impact of renewable fuel standards and other policies in the U.S. and E.U, as well as alternative biofuel policies in other parts of the world, on changes in production, prices, consumption, trade and poverty; and to evaluate environmental impacts of alternative policies for bioenergy development. Progress and outputs related to each objective are reported.

Wallace Tyner

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assess technical and economic potential for land-use initiatives...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for sector technologies Renewable Energy Technical Potential Toolkit Building Energy Assessment Toolkit Power System Screening and Design Toolkit Land Use Assessment...

222

Economic, organizational, and institutional impact of the survivability validation process  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses some of the key economic, organizational, and institutional issues associated with the development and use of survivability validation protocols. It discusses factors affecting protocols, considerations for protocol selection, test- bed/simulator/analysis tool availability, organizational issues affecting protocol use, deviations precluding adherence to validated protocols, and protocol advantages. Knowledge of these factors will assist developers of survivability validation protocols in designing more flexible protocols that can be tailored for differing circumstances without losing the fidelity or assurance that the protocol will produce the desired survivability level.

Brock, G. [Kaman Sciences Corp., Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Assessing environmental benefits and economic costs of aviation environmental policy measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the recent global economic downturn, longer term growth is anticipated for aviation with an increasing environmental impact, specifically in the areas of noise, air quality, and climate change. To ensure sustainable ...

Mahashabde, Anuja (Anuja Anil)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A techno-economic and environmental assessment of hydroprocessed renewable distillate fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a model to quantify the economic costs and environmental impacts of producing fuels from hydroprocessed renewable oils (HRO) process. Aspen Plus was used to model bio-refinery operations and supporting ...

Pearlson, Matthew Noah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Economic assessment of nine geothermal direct use applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an economic analysis of nine federally-supported geothermal direct heat applications which were part of DOE's Program Opportunity Notice (PON) program. Three of the projects analyzed were user-owned systems, and six were district heating systems. Five of the nine projects are successful from an economic standpoint and the majority of these projects are in areas where geothermal energy has long been used for heating. The results of this analysis indicate that geothermal energy projects can be economic under certain conditions, but these conditions may not be very widespread.

Gordon, L.C.; Breton, T.R.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Economic impact of integrating photovoltaics with conventional electric utility operation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the parameters which impact the value of photovoltaics (PV) to the electric utility. We have, therefore, chosen the high, medium and low load days in winter (January) and summer (July). The daily peak load has varied from 5838 MW to 9712 MW. These six days are studied for reference (no PV), high, medium, low and intermittent PV output cases. Results from these 30 case studies are summarized in this paper. In order to study the impact of operating photovoltaic (PV) systems on the electric utility production cost (fuel and variable O and M) we have chosen the load profile of a southeastern utility and the PV output data from solar test facilities in Virginia and North Carolina. In order to incorporate the short-term variations we have used 10-minute resolution data for both load and PV output.

Rahman, S. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Economic impacts of wood energy in the Northeast, 1985: State report: Northeast Regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the economic impacts of wood energy for the 11 Northeastern states. The report begins with a brief description of the types of economic impacts estimated in the study. The direct economic impacts are the jobs and income directly attributable to wood energy activities. They are referred to as first round impacts since they reflect the economic activity generated by the first spending of the fuelwood dollar, from the consumer to the supplier. Direct impacts include employment in logging, transport, and end-use operations such as chimney sweeping and boiler operating. Direct impacts also include personal income to employees, payments of stumpage fees to landowners, and profits earned by fuelwood enterprises. Indirect employment and income result from purchases made by fuelwood supply businesses, purpose made by the employees of fuelwood supply businesses, and purchases made by wood burning households or companies for wood combustion system installation, construction, and maintenance. They include purchases of equipment, spare parts, supplies, and services, including financial services.

Chamberlin, R.; High, C.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Methods for Assessing the Economic Impacts of Government ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the input-output matrix (transportation equipment). ... as national defense and energy independence have ... applicants to obtain data for descriptive ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Economic Impact Assessment of the International Standard for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... service. NIST's Manufacturing Systems Integration Division served as the home of the secretariat for ISO SC4 until 1999. ...

2012-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

Economic Impact Assessment of the NIST's Josephson Volt ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Department of Energy's weapons development laboratories, represent ... significant share of annual revenue is ... Industry & Trade Outlook '99, McGraw ...

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

231

Quantifying the Local Economic Growth Impact of Hurricane Strikes: An Analysis from Outer Space for the Caribbean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the impact of hurricanes on economic activity typically are restricted to very aggregate analysis due to lack of spatially disaggregated data. In this paper we employ nightlight satellite imagery as a measure of local economic activity ...

Luisito Bertinelli; Eric Strobl

232

Category:Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location Jump to: navigation, search Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics Montgomery, AL Little Rock, AR Flagstaff, AZ Phoenix, AZ Tucson, AZ Arcata, CA LA, CA San Francisco, CA Boulder, CO Eagle County, CO Pueblo, CO Bridgeport, CT Wilmington, DE Miami, FL Tampa, FL Atlanta, GA Savannah, GA Des Moines, IA Mason, IA Boise, ID Chicago, IL Springfield, IL Indianapolis, IN Goodland, KS Wichita, KS Lexington, KY New Orleans, LA Shreveport, LA Boston, MA Baltimore, MD Caribou, ME Portland, ME Detroit, MI Houghton-Lake, MI Traverse City, MI International Falls, MN Minneapolis, MN Kansas City, MO Jackson, MS Billings, MT Greensboro, NC Wilmington, NC Bismarck, ND Minot, ND Omaha, NE Concord, NH Atlantic City, NJ Albuquerque, NM Las Vegas, NV Reno, NV New York, NY

233

Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Analysis: Economic Impacts Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities June 18, 2004 - January 31, 2005 M. Pedden Eugene, Oregon Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-39099 January 2006 Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities June 18, 2004 - January 31, 2005 M. Pedden Eugene, Oregon NREL Technical Monitor: L. Flowers Prepared under Subcontract No(s). LEE-4-44834-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-39099 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

234

Category:Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Building Type | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Building Type Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Building Type Jump to: navigation, search Impact of Utility Rates on PV Economics Full Service Restaurant Hospital Large Hotel Large Office Medium Office Midrise Apartment Outpatient Primary School Quick Service Restaurant Secondary School Small Hotel Small Office Stand-alone Retail Strip Mall Supermarket Warehouse Subcategories This category has the following 16 subcategories, out of 16 total. F [×] FullServiceRestaurant‎ 1 pages H [×] Hospital‎ L [×] LargeHotel‎ [×] LargeOffice‎ M [×] MediumOffice‎ [×] MidriseApartment‎ O [×] OutPatient‎ P [×] PrimarySchool‎ Q [×] QuickServiceRestaurant‎ S [×] SecondarySchool‎ [×] SmallHotel‎ [×] SmallOffice‎ S cont. [×] StandAloneRetail‎ [×] StripMall‎ [×] Supermarket‎ W [×] Warehouse‎

235

Economic Impact of 8(a) and Native American Contractors | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Impact of 8(a) and Native American Contractors Economic Impact of 8(a) and Native American Contractors Economic Impact of 8(a) and Native American Contractors August 14, 2012 - 2:25pm Addthis Jennine Elias Jennine Elias Director of External Affairs for the Native American Contractors Association Editor's Note: This blog post was guest written by Jennine Elias, Director of External Affairs for the Native American Contractors Association (www.nativecontractors.org) What is Native 8(a) and how do Tribes, Alaska Native Corporation, and Native Hawaiian Organizations fit into the Small Business Administration's (SBA) 8(a) Business Development Program? According to the SBA, this program, which was named for Section 8(a) of the Small Business Act, was created to help small and disadvantaged businesses compete in the marketplace. It also helps these companies gain access to

236

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to compile completed studies on the economic impact of wind farms in rural communities and then to compare these studies. By summarizing the studies in an Excel spreadsheet, the raw data from a study is easily compared with the data from other studies. In this way, graphs can be made and conclusions drawn. Additionally, the creation of a database in which economic impact studies are summarized allows a greater understanding of the type of information gathered in an economic impact study, the type of information that is most helpful in using these studies to promote wind energy development in rural communities, and the limitations on collecting data for these studies.

Pedden, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of are the economic development impacts on U.S. counties of wind power projects, as defined by growth in per capita income and employment? Objective To address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Background * Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. * Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. * Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show

239

Waste collection systems for recyclables: An environmental and economic assessment for the municipality of Aarhus (Denmark)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling of paper and glass from household waste is an integrated part of waste management in Denmark, however, increased recycling is a legislative target. The questions are: how much more can the recycling rate be increased through improvements of collection schemes when organisational and technical limitations are respected, and what will the environmental and economic consequences be? This was investigated in a case study of a municipal waste management system. Five scenarios with alternative collection systems for recyclables (paper, glass, metal and plastic packaging) were assessed by means of a life cycle assessment and an assessment of the municipality's costs. Kerbside collection would provide the highest recycling rate, 31% compared to 25% in the baseline scenario, but bring schemes with drop-off containers would also be a reasonable solution. Collection of recyclables at recycling centres was not recommendable because the recycling rate would decrease to 20%. In general, the results showed that enhancing recycling and avoiding incineration was recommendable because the environmental performance was improved in several impact categories. The municipal costs for collection and treatment of waste were reduced with increasing recycling, mainly because the high cost for incineration was avoided. However, solutions for mitigation of air pollution caused by increased collection and transport should be sought.

Larsen, A.W., E-mail: awl@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Merrild, H.; Moller, J.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Environmental Impact Statement and to Conduct Scoping Meetings Hualapai Valley Solar Interconnection Project in Mohave County, Arizona July 30, 2009 EIS-0425: Notice of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17, 2010 EIS-0455: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA December 17, 2010 EIS-0403: EPA Notice of...

242

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico...

243

Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and Grid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and Grid Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and Grid Electrification Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and Grid Electrification Technologies Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/EXTENERGY/Resources/336805-1157034157861/E References: Technical and Economic Assessment of Off-grid, Mini-grid and Grid Electrification Technologies[1] Summary "This report is part of the Energy and Water Department's commitment to providing new techniques and knowledge which complement the direct investment and other assistance to electrification as provided by the

244

Essays on Modeling the Economic Impacts of a Foreign Animal Disease on the United States Agricultural Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign animal disease can cause serious damage to the United States (US) agricultural sector and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), in particular, poses a serious threat. FMD causes death and reduced fecundity in infected animals, as well as significant economic consequences. FMD damages can likely be reduced through implementing pre-planned response strategies. Empirical studies have evaluated the economic consequences of alternative strategies, but typically employ simplified models. This dissertation seeks to improve US preparedness for avoiding and/or responding to an animal disease outbreak by addressing three issues related to strategy assessment in the context of FMD: integrated multi region economic and epidemic evaluation, inclusion of risk, and information uncertainty. An integrated economic/epidemic evaluation is done to examine the impact of various control strategies. This is done by combining a stochastic, spatial FMD simulation model with a national level, regionally disaggregated agricultural sector mathematical programming economic model. In the analysis, strategies are examined in the context of California's dairy industry. Alternative vaccination, disease detection and movement restriction strategies are considered as are trade restrictions. The results reported include epidemic impacts, national economic impacts, prices, regional producer impacts, and disease control costs under the alternative strategies. Results suggest that, including trade restrictions, the median national loss from the disease outbreak is as much as $17 billion when feed can enter the movement restriction zone. Early detection reduces the median loss and the standard deviation of losses. Vaccination does not reduce the median disease loss, but does have a smaller standard deviation of loss which would indicate it is a risk reducing strategy. Risk in foreign animal disease outbreaks is present from several sources; however, studies comparing alternative control strategies assume risk neutrality. In reality, there will be a desire to minimize the national loss as well as minimize the chance of an extreme outcome from the disease (i.e. risk aversion). We perform analysis on FMD control strategies using breakeven risk aversion coefficients in the context of an outbreak in the Texas High Plains. Results suggest that vaccination while not reducing average losses is a risk reducing strategy. Another issue related to risk and uncertainty is the response of consumers and domestic markets to the presence of FMD. Using a highly publicized possible FMD outbreak in Kansas that did not turn out to be true, we examine the role of information uncertainty in futures market response. Results suggest that livestock futures markets respond to adverse information even when that information is untrue. Furthermore, the existence of herding behavior and potential for momentum trading exaggerate the impact of information uncertainty related to animal disease.

Hagerman, Amy Deann

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type Publications Website http://www.worldagroforestry.o Country Philippines UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed[1] Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Screenshot This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

246

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart This chart represents anticipated activity and is not a commitment for documentation or dates. October 21, 2011 EIS-0426: Notice of Extension of Public Comment Period for the Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Continued Operation of the Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada September 26, 2011 EA-1792: Finding of No Significant Impact University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine September 26, 2011 EA-1792: Final Environmental Assessment University of Maine's DeepWater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and

247

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power (Poster)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS FROM COAL, NATURAL GAS, AND WIND POWER Marshall Goldberg MRG & Associates Nevada City, California Suzanne Tegen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado The information contained in this poster is subject to a government license. * WINDPOWER 2006 * Pittsburgh, PA * June 4-7, 2006 * NREL/PO-500-39908 Michael Milligan, Consultant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado How does JEDI II work? The user enters data specific to the new coal, gas, or wind plant: * Year of installation * Size of the project * Location * Cost ($/kW) * Any other site-specific information

248

Economic assessment of polymer concrete usage in geothermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a study established to review the Heber and Niland, California 50 MWe conceptual geothermal power plants designs and to identify areas where non-metallic materials, such as polymer concrete, can be technically and economically employed are reported. Emphasis was directed toward determining potential economic advantages and resulting improvements in plant availability. It is estimated that use of polymer concrete in the Heber plant will effect a savings of 6.18 mills per KWH in the cost of power delivered to the network, a savings of 9.7%. A similar savings should be effected in the Niland plant.

Not Available

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

European Commission Impact Assessment Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Commission Impact Assessment Tools European Commission Impact Assessment Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPTS-IA Tools Agency/Company /Organization: European Commission Joint Research Centre Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Other Website: iatools.jrc.ec.europa.eu/bin/view/IQTool/WebHome.html IPTS-IA Tools Screenshot References: IPTS-IA Tools[1] Overview "IA TOOLS is an online platform that provides Commission policy actors and impact assessment practitioners throughout Europe with a repository of guidance, information and best practices for the impact assessment of new policies and legislative measures. At one click, the IA TOOLS website provides expert and non-expert with guidance on the main steps to be

250

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodiversity impacts . Bioethanol . Evenness . Geographicto produce a liter of bioethanol depends on where thethen assessed for three bioethanol feedstocks at different

Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Inspection Report- Alleged Waste and Abuse in the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, INS-L-12-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Economic Impact and Diversity (ED) develops and executes Department-wide policies affecting equal employment opportunities, small and disadvantaged...

252

Economic impact of an improved methanol catalyst. [Forecasting to 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic future of methanol is reviewed in light of its potential uses as a substitute for traditional hydrocarbon fuels and feedstocks as well as some evolving new uses. Methanol's future market position will depend strongly on its production cost in comparison with competitive products. One promising way to reduce the production cost is by use of an improved catalyst in the process by which methanol is obtained from the feedstock - which can be either natural gas or a similar product such as synthesis gas from coal gasification. To estimate the potential cost savings with an improved catalyst, we have based our analysis on a recent study which assumed use of synthesis gas from underground coal gasification as a feedstock for making methanol. The improved catalyst we studied was an actinide oxide whose features include high tolerance to sulfur and heat, and a yield of about 4 mol% methanol per pass with a 2/1 mixture of H/sub 2//CO. We calculated the effect of this catalyst on methanol production costs in a 12,000-bbl/day plant. The result was a saving of from 1 cent to 2.5 cent per gallon on the total methanol synthesis cost of 23 cents per gallon (i.e., a saving in the conversion process of 4.4% to 10.9%), excluding the cost of the raw feed gas. We conclude from this study that the improved catalyst could bring important savings in methanol production. The estimated savings range from 4.4% to 10.9% in the cost of methanol synthesis from the feedstock material. Another possibility for lowering methanol production costs in the future may lie in switching from a natural-gas-based feedstock to a coal-based feedstock - for example, using synthesis gas from underground coal gasification as the raw material. Our projections suggest that coal will eventually become a less expensive feedstock than natural gas.

Grens, J.; Borg, I.; Stephens, D.; Colmenares, C.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

253

Technical and economic assessment of three solar conversion technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photoelectric energy conversion, solar electric thermal conversion, and direct solar thermal conversion are examined from the point of view of technical and economic viability. The key conclusions of this examination are that all three of these solar thermal conversion technologies are technically viable today. However, only the direct solar thermal heat applications appear to be close to economically viability. If it is assumed that a lead time of approximately 25 years is required before a technical innovation can be placed on the market in a large scale, only direct applications of solar thermal energy, such as for heating water or providing industrial process heat, appear to have the potential of making major market penetration in this century. At the present time, the useful energy delivered from an industrial process heat system is within a factor of two of competing with systems using electric resistance heating or fossil fuel such as oil or coal. The technologies for direct application of solar thermal energy are mature and within technical and economical reach of mass production and installation. There exists no economically viable energy storage system compatible with industrial heat application temperatures, but a large penetration of the market appears feasible by designing solar systems that do not exceed the minimal load requirement of the industrial process and thereby utilize all available thermal energy directly.

Kreith, F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Assessment of methane-related fuels for automotive fleet vehicles: technical, supply, and economic assessments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of methane-related fuels, derived from a variety of sources, in highway vehicles is assessed. Methane, as used here, includes natural gas (NG) as well as synthetic natural gas (SNG). Methanol is included because it can be produced from NG or the same resources as SNG, and because it is a liquid fuel at normal ambient conditions. Technological, operational, efficiency, petroleum displacement, supply, safety, and economic issues are analyzed. In principle, both NG and methanol allow more efficient engine operation than gasoline. In practice, engines are at present rarely optimized for NG and methanol. On the basis of energy expended from resource extraction to end use, only optimized LNG vehicles are more efficient than their gasoline counterparts. By 1985, up to 16% of total petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel could be displaced by large fleets with central NG fueling depots. Excluding diesel vehicles, which need technology advances to use NG, savings of 8% are projected. Methanol use by large fleets could displace up to 8% of petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel from spark-ignition vehicles and another 9% from diesel vehicles with technology advances. The US NG supply appears adequate to accommodate fleet use. Supply projections, future price differential versus gasoline, and user economics are uncertain. In many cases, attractive paybacks can occur. Compressed NG now costs on average about $0.65 less than gasoline, per energy-equivalent gallon. Methanol supply projections, future prices, and user economics are even more uncertain. Current and projected near-term methanol supplies are far from adequate to support fleet use. Methanol presently costs more than gasoline on an equal-energy basis, but is projected to cost less if produced from coal instead of NG or petroleum.

Not Available

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development < LEDSGP‎ | analysis/impacts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate

256

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 1996 EIS-0240: Final Environmental Impact Statement Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 next Energy.gov Careers & Internships...

257

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply Jan von Appen1 , Chris. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power. Index Terms ­ microgrids

258

Estimating the economic and demographic impacts of solar technology commercialization on US regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop a framework through which these regional economic and demographic impacts of solar technology commercialization can be analyzed. Two models comprise the basis of this framework - a national input/output model and an interregional econometric model, the National-Regional Impact Evaluation System (NRIES). These models are used to convert projected sales of solar energy systems to gross output concepts, and to evaluate the impacts associated with these sales. Analysis is provided for the nine census regions and 50 states and the District of Columbia for the years 1980 through 1990. Impacts on major economic aggregates such as output, employment, income, and population are described. The methodology used in this study is described. The economic and demographic impacts of solar technology commercialization on US regions and states are presented. The major conclusions of the study are summarized, and direction is provided for further research. Detailed tables of regional and state solar energy expenditures and their impacts appear in the Appendix.

Kort, J.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

development Greenhouse Gas Inventory Development Toolkit 3a. Analytical Decision Making - Developing BAU Scenario 3b. Analytical Decision Making - Assessing Opportunities 3b.1....

260

Large-Scale Pyrolysis Oil Production: A Technology Assessment and Economic Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A broad perspective of pyrolysis technology as it relates to converting biomass substrates to a liquid bio-oil product and a detailed technical and economic assessment of a fast pyrolysis plant.

Ringer, M.; Putsche, V.; Scahill, J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCIO HSPD-12 Physical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http:www.directives.doe.govpdfsdoedoetextlneword206o2061.pdf Please complete electronically:...

262

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Project, Ector, Texas August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California...

263

An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability  

SciTech Connect

The System Assessment Capability is an integrated system of computer models and databases to assess the impact of waste remaining at Hanford. This tool will help decision makers and the public evaluate the cumulative effects of contamination from Hanford. This report describes the results of an initial assessment performed with the System Assessment Capability tools.

Bryce, Robert W.; Kincaid, Charles T.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Morasch, Launa F.

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

264

Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits Jump to: navigation, search Development Impacts Assessment Tools help country, regional, and local policymakers find tools and online resources to assess the impacts of low-emission development strategies (LEDS). These tools equip decision makers with information to explore policy options and build consensus with stakeholders to acheive low-emission development. LEDSGP/DIA-Toolkit Pages in category "LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits" The following 65 pages are in this category, out of 65 total.

265

Climate change impact assessment of air pollution levels in bulgaria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presented work is aiming at climate change impacts and vulnerability assessment in Bulgaria Climate change may affect exposures to air pollutants by affecting weather and thereby local and regional pollution concentrations Local weather patterns ...

D. Syrakov; M. Prodanova; N. Miloshev; K. Ganev; G. Jordanov; V. Spiridonov; A. Bogatchev; E. Katragkou; D. Melas; A. Poupkou; K. Markakis

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Second National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Impacts By...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Impacts By Region Print E-mail alt An affiliated website was created specifically for the 2009 National Climate Assessment so that the report would be more...

267

Economic Development Impacts from Wind Power in the Western Governors' Association States (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Western Governors' Association created the Clean and Diversified Energy Advisory Committee (CDEAC) "to utilize the region's diverse resources to produce affordable, sustainable, and environmentally reponsible energy." This conference poster, prepared for WINDPOWER 2007 in Los Angeles, outlines the economic impact to the Western United States from new wind energy projects.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Economic Impact of Electricity Market Price  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of circumstances. In the electric power industry, studying the costs of load forecasting errors has been a topic forecast in electric load forecasting models is discussed in [21]. The findings of [19]­[21] are consistentIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS 1 Economic Impact of Electricity Market Price Forecasting Errors

Cañizares, Claudio A.

269

Modeling the Economic Impact of Pandemic Influenza: A Case Study in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influenza pandemics have occurred intermittently throughout the 20th century and killed millions of people worldwide. It is expected that influenza pandemics will continue to occur in the near future. Huge number of deaths and cases is the most troublesome ... Keywords: Cost analysis, Economic impact, Pandemic influenza, Turkey

Elcin Yoldascan; Behice Kurtaran; Melik Koyuncu; Esra Koyuncu

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Economic Impact and Job Creation aspects of Geothermal Heat Pumps Don Penn, PE, CGD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impact and Job Creation aspects of Geothermal Heat Pumps Don Penn, PE, CGD Grapevine Scottsdale October 3, 2012 #12;GEOTHERMAL PRESENTATION Purpose: To create a large, private-sector infusion, geothermal, geothermal heat pumps and other non-petroleum or coal based energy production

271

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group Analysis from Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Reflections on the Perryman Group The exploration and development of the Marcellus Shale natural gas play has significant potential to affect in the Barnett Shale region of north Texas. The Barnett Shale play is very similar in geology to the Marcellus

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

272

JOBS FC 1.1 (JOBS and economic impacts of Fuel Cells)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 (JOBS and economic impacts of Fuel Cells)* Marianne Mintz, Jerry Gillette and John Molburg, Argonne National Laboratory Eric Stewart and Catherine Mertes, RCF Economic & Financial Consulting December 11, 2012 *Funded by EERE-FCT Program 2 Outline  Welcome and Introductions  Overview of JOBS FC - Marianne Mintz - Approach - Functionality  Demo - Eric Stewart  Acknowledgements & Next Steps - Marianne Mintz  Questions 3 JOBS FC models input-output effects of FC deployment (JOBS and economic impacts of Fuel Cells) * JOBS FC is a user-friendly spreadsheet- based tool that calculates direct, indirect and induced job creation, wages and sales resulting from FC production, installation, operation and fueling. * JOBS FC uses Regional Input-Output

273

Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes the findings of a report authored by Sandra Reategui and Suzanne Tegen of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A confluence of events ignited soaring growth in the number of Colorado?s wind power installations in recent years, from 291 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity in 2006 to 1,067 MW (nameplate capacity) in 2007. Analyzing the economic impact of Colorado?s first 1,000 MW of wind energy development not only provides a summary of benefits now enjoyed by the state?s population, but it also provides a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other new wind project scenarios, including the U.S. Department of Energy?s 20% Wind Energy by 2030 scenario. The analysis can be used by interested parties in other states as an example of the potential economic impacts if they were to adopt 1,000 MW of wind power development.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Impact of Different Economic Performance Metrics on the Perceived Value of Solar Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems are installed by several types of market participants, ranging from residential customers to large-scale project developers and utilities. Each type of market participant frequently uses a different economic performance metric to characterize PV value because they are looking for different types of returns from a PV investment. This report finds that different economic performance metrics frequently show different price thresholds for when a PV investment becomes profitable or attractive. Several project parameters, such as financing terms, can have a significant impact on some metrics [e.g., internal rate of return (IRR), net present value (NPV), and benefit-to-cost (B/C) ratio] while having a minimal impact on other metrics (e.g., simple payback time). As such, the choice of economic performance metric by different customer types can significantly shape each customer's perception of PV investment value and ultimately their adoption decision.

Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Community wind projects have long been touted (both anecdotally and in the literature) to increase the economic development impacts of wind projects, but most analyses of community wind have been based on expected results from hypothetical projects. This report provides a review of previous economic development analyses of community wind projects and compares these projected results with empirical impacts from projects currently in operation. A review of existing literature reveals two primary conclusions. First, construction-period impacts are often thought to be comparable for both community-and absentee-owned facilities. Second, operations-period economic impacts are observed to be greater for community-owned projects. The majority of studies indicate that the range of increased operations-period impact is on the order of 1.5 to 3.4 times. New retrospective analysis of operating community wind projects finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are estimated to be on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. In addition, when comparing retrospective results of community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed community wind projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa indicates that construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. Ultimately, wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and community wind projects are shown to have increased impact both during the construction and operations-period of a wind power plant. The extent of increased impact is primarily a function of local ownership and return on investment. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. Furthermore, the increased economic development impact of community wind shown here should not be undervalued. As the wind industry grows and approaches penetrations in the U.S. electricity market of 20%, social opposition to new wind power projects may increase. Community wind could provide a valuable strategy for building community support of wind power - especially in communities that are new to wind power. This analysis finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. Furthermore, when comparing community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa shows construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. As the wind industry has grown, community wind has largely been a peripheral development model. However, this analysis shows that wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and that community wind projects have greater economic development impacts than absentee-owned projects. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. While the magnitude of increased benefit is primarily a function of local ownership and project profitability, the increased economic development impact of all community wind projects should not be undervalued. The ability of community wind projects to disperse economic impacts within the states and communities where they are built and to engage local community members

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL# 5793E LBNL# 5793E Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties Jason P. Brown 1 USDA, Economic Research Service 355 E St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024 jbrown@ers.usda.gov John Pender USDA, Economic Research Service 355 E St. SW, Washington, D.C. 20024 jpender@ers.usda.gov Ryan Wiser Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 RHWiser@lbl.gov Eric Lantz National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 eric.lantz@nrel.gov Ben Hoen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 20 Sawmill Road, Milan, NY 1257 BHoen@lbl.gov Pre-print of article submitted for publication to Energy Economics. Download from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140988312001466

278

An Assessment of Economic Analysis Methods for Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration feasibility studies were conducted for eleven state agencies of Texas. A net present value (NPV) analysis was used to evaluate candidate cogeneration systems and select the optimum system. CELCAP, an hour-by-hour cogeneration analysis computer program was used to determine the costs used in the NPV analysis. The results of the studies showed that the state could save over $6,000,000 per year in reduced utility bills. Different methods of analyzing the economic performance of a cogeneration system are presented for comparison. Other implications of the study are also discussed.

Bolander, J. N.; Murphy, W. E.; Turner, W. D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medium Impact Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS December 4, 2012 V-039: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access Vulnerability Samsung has issued a security advisory and an optional firmware update for all current Samsung networked laser printers and multifunction devices to enhance Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) security. November 30, 2012 V-037: Wireshark Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service Several vulnerabilities were reported in Wireshark. November 29, 2012 V-036: EMC Smarts Network Configuration Manager Database Authentication Bypass Vulnerability Two vulnerabilities were reported in EMC Smarts Network Configuration Manager. November 27, 2012 V-034: RSA Adaptive Authentication (On-Premise) Input Validation Flaws

280

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds  

SciTech Connect

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Double Bottom Line Project Report:Assessing Social Impact In Double Bottom Line Ventures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ongoing Assessment of Social Impact (OASIS) rubicon programsHall, 1996). poverty and social impact analysis (psia) Datas Guide to Poverty and Social Impact Analysis” (World Bank,

Rosenzweig, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-. -. ., ,-- -.' * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM: ELECTRONIC RECORDS KEEPING SYSTEM PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1. Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A. Privacy Impact Assessments. for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Deparbnental Element & Site . June 4, 2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV :;:~:f~~r~;;:reC: LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Electronic Records Keeping System exhibit Project UID 019-10-01-31-02-1014-00

283

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL INGSM2009 PIA Template Version  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL INGSM2009 PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT D.. June 16, 2009 Deparlnient~", Element &Site Idaho National Laboratory N.....,e,df'llnformatlon 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site. ,SY8tem,orIT Project exhibit Project UID Enterprise Architecture Application 10 - 223419 NewPIA D Update 0 System

284

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL RECORDS DATABASE PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site June 4,2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV Name of Information LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Rocky Flats Environmental Records System or IT Project Database exhibit Project UID 019-10-01-31-02-1014-00

285

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate and prioritize policies across an economy and clearly explain the process

286

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,. - -i * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM: FERNALD HISTORICAL RECORDS SYSTEM PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written slibmisslons will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & SIte· June 4, 2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV Name of Information System or IT Project LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Fernald Historical Records System exhIbit Project UIO 019-10-01-31-02-1014-00

287

RIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: SPRO Business Operations General Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: SPRO - Business Operations General Support System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 iiiiiiiiiiiiiii Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/02061.pdf MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site July 21, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office - New Orleans, LA 70123 Name of Information System or IT Project Unclassified Business Operations General Support System (GSS) exhibit Project UID UPI Code: 019-20-01-16-02-3612-00 NewPIA 0 Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne, I e Ph E 'I one, mal System Owner Local Privacy

288

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'" '" " * .1 * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM: FREEDOM OF INFORMAnON ACT/ PRIVACY ACT PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Oeparbn~ntal Element" Site June 4, 2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV Name of Information System or IT Project LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Freedom of Information Act/Privacy

289

Economic Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50 million 50 million Employees · * Total 1,960 * Living in Fox Valley or western DuPage County 90 percent · * With Ph.D.'s 463 · * Scientists 380 · * Computer professionals 280 · * Engineers 300 · * Technicians/technical specialists 530 * Serving as community volunteers or on community public boards dozens Payroll $150.7 million Illinois income tax withheld 4.0 million Visiting researchers and college students · * Total 2,300 · * Out-of-state and international 1,844

290

Economic Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49.5 million 49.5 million Employees · * Total 1,960 * Living in Fox Valley or western DuPage County 90 percent · * With Ph.D.'s 473 · * Scientists 365 · * Computer professionals 284 · * Engineers 298 · * Technicians/technical specialists 465 * Serving as community volunteers or on community public boards dozens Wages paid $135.3 million Illinois income tax withheld $3.9 million Federal taxes withheld $41.5 million Visiting researchers and college students

291

Economic Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total purchases 117. 4 million * Total purchases in Illinois 47.4 million * Percentage of total purchases from Illinois providers 40 percent * Total purchases in the US...

292

Economic Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FY2010 * Total purchases 246.8 million * Total purchases in the US 234.4 million * Percentage of total purchases from US providers 95 percent Purchases from Illinois businesses *...

293

Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development Jump to: navigation, search Stage 2 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

294

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume V. Economics and systems analysis  

SciTech Connect

This NASAP assessment considers the economics of alternative nuclear reactor and fuel-cycle systems in the light of possible patterns of uranium supply and energy demand, as well as the economic implications of improvng the proliferation resistance of the various systems. The assessment focuses on the costs of alternative nuclear technologies and the possible timing of their implementation, based on their economic attractiveness.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar Power Generation Facilities in Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nevada has a vast potential for electricity generation using solar power. An examination of the stock of renewable resources in Nevada proves that the state has the potential to be a leader in renewable-electric generation--one of the best in the world. This study provides estimates on the economic impact in terms of employment, personal income, and gross state product (GSP) of developing a portion of Nevada's solar energy generation resources.

Schwer, R. K.; Riddel, M.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Regional Economic Impacts of Electric Drive Vehicles and Technologies: Case Study of the Greater Cleveland Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), which combine desirable aspects of battery electric vehicles and hybrid electric vehicles, offer owners the advantages of increased fuel efficiency and lower annual fuel bills without concern for dead batteries, long recharge time, or limited range. This study examines the potential regional economic impacts due to increasing electric transportation in the Greater Cleveland Area (GCA). By applying regional input-output (RIO) analysis, the study determines the imp...

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Shaw Areva MOX Services, LLC MOX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . ,-) ')7 73?„i5": )~"'f"YC-:;'~dt?f(~"'f9'FrrZ , . PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Shaw Areva MOX Services, LLC MOX Services Unclassified Information System Template - January 30, 2009, Version 2 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (pIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: hltp:llwww.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. (803) 819-22700 Dstlnson@moxprolect.com Dave Stinson, President and Chief Executive Officer, Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC NNSA Shaw AREVA MOX Services Savannah River Site, Aiken SC .. .. . ": .' . ' .... .- ...: ......

300

ADOPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT;  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADOPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT; ADOPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT; DETERMINATION OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT DOE/EA-1868: MANHATTAN PROJECT SITES Los Alamos, New Mexico; Hanford, Washington; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Dayton, Ohio BACKGROUND: 'The National Park Service (NPS) issued an Environmental Assessment (September 2010) in consultation with DOE for a proposed action of recommending that Congress authorize an innovative Manhattan Project National Historical Park. The Park Service selected an alternative for the proposed park that includes publicly and privately owned facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Los Alamos, New Mexico; and the Hanford, Washington area. 'The boundaries of the national historical park would be defined by enabling legislation and refined by the general management planning

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the status of ongoing NEPA documents at the Department of Energy, including the dates of important milestones in the NEPA process and references to more information (updated monthly). This chart represents anticipated activity and is not a commitment for documentation or date. Last Revised: 12/19/2013 StatusChart_December2013revised.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Western Area Power Administration 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Western Area Power Administration 2011 ANNUAL PLANNING SUMMARY FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH AND PROJECTS AGENCY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION

302

Assessment of Current Knowledge of Hybrid Vehicle Characteristics and Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has taken a leadership role in bringing together representatives from the utility and automotive industries, along with those of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other regulatory agencies to participate in a study: Assessment of Current Knowledge of Hybrid Vehicle Characteristics and Impacts. This study focused on key attribute areas of HEV energy efficiency, emissions, life cycle, and customer acceptance and HEV's potential impacts on private and public stakeholders.

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

303

Methodology for the Assessment of the Macroeconomic Impacts of Stricter CAF. Standards  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For a full documentation of the macroeconomic linkage refer to "Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System," January 2002 found on the EIA web site at http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/FTPROOT/modeldoc/m065(2002).pdf Methodology for the Assessment of the Macroeconomic Impacts of Stricter CAFÉ Standards This assessment of the economic impacts of CAFÉ standards marks the first time EIA has used the new direct linkage of the DRI-WEFA Macroeconomic Model to NEMS in a policy setting. This methodology assures an internally consistent solution between the energy market concepts forecast by NEMS and the aggregate economy as forecast by the DRI-WEFA Macroeconomic Model of the U.S. Economy. While we refer to DRI- WEFA model as a macro model, the full DRI-WEFA model forecasts more than 1600 detailed concepts covering

304

Technical-economic assessment of the production of methanol from biomass. Executive summary. Final research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of a comprehensive systems study which assessed the engineering and economic feasibilities of the production of methanol from biomass utilizing existing technology. The three major components of the biomass to methanol system assessed are the availability of biomass feedstocks, the thermochemical conversion of biomass to methanol fuels, and the distribution and markets for methanol fuels. The results of this study show that methanol fuel can be produced from biomass using commercially available technology in the near term, and could be produced economically in significant quantities in the mid-to-late 1980's when advanced technology is available.

Wan, E.I.; Simmons, J.A.; Price, J.D.; Nguyen, T.D.

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Risk Impact Assessment of Extended Integrated Leak Rate Testing Intervals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a risk impact assessment for extending integrated leak rate test (ILRT) surveillance intervals to 15 years. The assessment demonstrates that on an industry-wide basis there is small risk associated with the extension, provided that the performance bases and defense-in-depth are maintained. There is an obvious benefit in not performing costly, critical-path, time-consuming tests that provide a limited benefit from a risk perspective.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Scale-Up Potential of SOFC Technologies: An Assessment of Technical and Economic Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been conducting fuel cell technology assessments and sponsoring research and development of fuel cell technologies for distributed power market applications for the past 20 years. Recent technology assessments have identified solid oxide fuel cells to have the potential to significantly impact the electric utility business if cost, performance, durability, and scale-up issues can be resolved (EPRI Report 1008429).

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

307

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Project in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts Sandra Reategui Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 January 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2760 Acknowledgements ....................................................................................................................... 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................... 2 Report Overview ......................................................................................................................... 2

308

Finding of No Significant Impact Issued on Environmental Assessment for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Finding of No Significant Impact Issued on Environmental Assessment for Remote-handled Waste Disposition Project at DOEïżœs Idaho Site Finding of No Significant Impact Issued on Environmental Assessment for Remote-handled Waste Disposition Project at DOEïżœs Idaho Site The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on the Final Environmental Assessment for the Remote-handled Waste Disposition Project. The environmental assessment analyzed potential environmental impacts of processing for disposition approximately 322 cubic meters of remote-handled waste currently stored at the departmentïżœs Idaho Site near Idaho Falls, Idaho. An additional five cubic meters of waste stored at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington was also evaluated, since it is possible that waste may come to Idaho for treatment. Under the Departmentïżœs preferred alternative, workers will use sealed rooms called hot cells at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) to process the waste, treat it as necessary and repackage it so that it is ready for disposal. The document includes a description of modifications necessary to the hot cells to perform the work.

309

Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i LBNL-3562E Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Annoyance: A Preliminary Analysis in Vinalhaven, Maine Prepared from the turbines is unwelcome and annoying. Fox Islands Wind, the owner of the facility, hypothesized

310

Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Impact High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS August 9, 2013 V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities The vulnerabilities are reported in versions 1.4.1 and prior August 8, 2013 V-214: Mozilla Firefox Multiple Vulnerabilities The vulnerabilities are reported in versions prior to 23.0. August 5, 2013 V-211: IBM iNotes Multiple Vulnerabilities IBM iNotes has two cross-site scripting vulnerabilities and an ActiveX Integer overflow vulnerability August 2, 2013 V -209:Cisco WAAS (Wide Area Application Services) Arbitrary Code Execution Vulnerabilities Cisco Wide Area Application Services (WAAS) when configured as Central Manager (CM), contains a vulnerability that could allow an unauthenticated,

312

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Impact High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS June 28, 2013 V-188: Apache XML Security XPointer Expressions Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability The vulnerability addresses the possibility of a heap overflow condition June 27, 2013 V-187: Mozilla Firefox Multiple Vulnerabilities These vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting and spoofing attacks, disclose potentially sensitive information, bypass certain security restrictions, and compromise a user's system. June 19, 2013 V-181: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory - June 2013 Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Oracle Java. June 14, 2013 V-178: IBM Data Studio Web Console Java Multiple Vulnerabilities IBM Data Studio Web Console uses the IBM Java Runtime Environment (JRE) and

313

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Impact High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS November 7, 2012 V-018: Adobe Flash Player Buffer Overflows and Memory Corruption Errors Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code Several vulnerabilities were reported in Adobe Flash Player. November 5, 2012 V-016: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote Users Deny Service and Take Full Control of the Target System Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP Performance Insight. November 2, 2012 V-015: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Local Users Bypass the Screen Lock, and Applications Obtain Kernel Address Information Three vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. November 1, 2012 V-014: Cisco Prime Data Center Network Manager JBoss RMI Services Let

314

JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medium Impact Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS September 9, 2013 V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities TYPO3 comes with the possibility to restrict editors to certain file actions (copy, delete, move etc.) and to restrict these actions to be performed in certain locations September 4, 2013 V-234: EMC RSA Archer GRC Open Redirection Weakness and Security Bypass Security Issue This fixes multiple vulnerabilities, which can be exploited to bypass certain security restrictions and to conduct spoofing attacks September 3, 2013 V-233: Red Hat update for JBoss Fuse This fixes multiple vulnerabilities, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions and cause a DoS. August 28, 2013 V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting

315

JC3 Low Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Impact Low Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Low Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS July 31, 2013 V-207: Wireshark Multiple Denial of Service Vulnerabilities Successful exploitation of this vulnerability may allow execution of arbitrary code. July 30, 2013 V-206: Apache HTTP Server mod_rewrite and "httpOnly" Cookie Disclosure Vulnerabilities Two vulnerabilities have been reported in Apache HTTP Server July 29, 2013 V-205: IBM Tivoli System Automation for Multiplatforms Java Multiple Vulnerabilities The weakness and the vulnerabilities are caused due to a bundled vulnerable version of Java. November 30, 2011 U-048: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update Firmware with Arbitrary Code A remote user can upgrade the printer's firmware with arbitrary code

316

Inspection Report - Alleged Waste and Abuse in the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, INS-L-12-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste and Abuse in the Waste and Abuse in the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity INS-L-12-07 September 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 27, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF ECONOMIC IMPACT AND DIVERSITY FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Alleged Waste and Abuse in the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Office of Economic Impact and Diversity (ED) develops and executes Department-wide policies affecting equal employment opportunities, small and disadvantaged businesses, minority educational institutions, and historically under-represented communities. ED's

317

The Economic Impact of Hurricanes in History: Evidence from Sugar Exports in the Caribbean from 1700 to 1960  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study estimates the economic impact of hurricane strikes in the Caribbean from 1700 to 1960. More precisely, historical accounts of hurricane strikes and actual historical hurricane tracks, in conjunction with sugar export data taken from the ...

Preeya Mohan; Eric Strobl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Quantifying the Local Economic Growth Impact of Hurricane Strikes: An Analysis from Outer Space for the Caribbean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the impact of hurricanes on economic activity typically are restricted to a very aggregate level of analysis because of the lack of spatially disaggregated data. In this paper nightlight satellite imagery is employed as a measure of ...

Luisito Bertinelli; Eric Strobl

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The urban economic development impacts of ethnic entrepreneurship : a case study of Dominican entrepreneurs in Lawrence, Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the process through which ethnic entrepreneurship impacts urban economic development. In many urban places across the United States, demographic change has led to the rise of ethnic communities and the ...

Cheigh, Brian Chaneung

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY-TRAIN PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IDAHO IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY-TRAIN PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-wrltten submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name of Infonnatlon SY8tem or IT Project Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) Exhibit Project UID 70 NewPIA [!J Update D N T Otl I Contact Information ame, I e Ph E " I one, mal SY8tem Owner Carla J. Drake, Manager (208) 526-0841 Systems Approach

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM: ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance Is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 4, 2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV Name of Information LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness System or IT Project Compensation Program Act exhibit

322

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Education Programs PIA Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Education Education Programs PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Elernent'& (Site 24/Jun/09 Idaho National Laboratory Information Operations and Research Center (IORC) Nameofll,f..,rrnatlon INL Education Programs System or IfPi'()ject Business Enclave Exhibit Proj.ctlUO NA NewPIA D Update [~] DOE PIA - INL Education Program Finallxw.doc N T "tl I Contact Information arne,

323

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL PERSONNEL SECURITY SECIMS PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PERSONNEL PERSONNEL SECURITY - SECIMS PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element;& Site Name of Infonnatlon Syetemor Ilf Project Exhibit ProJect UIO NewPIA D Update ~ June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Willow Creek Building RIOT-Center INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE 311 DOE PIA - SECIMS Finallxw.doc N T 'tl I Contact Information arne I e . , Phone, Email

324

Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For a Federal agency, changes in the demand for business travel can be difficult to predict. Changes in the nature of the agency's work may have a substantial impact on the demand for business travel. It is therefore important to account for these changes when planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction. Conditions that may contribute to a significant increase or decrease in the agency's business travel, beyond specific efforts to reduce business travel demand, include: Significant changes in the agency's budget Addition or completion of major program activities that require

325

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 28, 2010 May 28, 2010 EIS-0419: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Whistling Ridge Energy Project, Construction and Operation of a 75-megawatt Wind Turbine Facility, City of White Salmon, Skamania County, WA May 13, 2010 EA-1707: Draft Environmental Assessment Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington April 9, 2010 EIS-0404: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California April 9, 2010 EIS-0455: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA April 9, 2010 EIS-0455: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA

326

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 5, 2011 August 5, 2011 EIS-0444: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Texas Clean Energy Project, Ector, Texas August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee to High Plains II, LLC for the California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County and Kern County, California July 29, 2011 EIS-0426: Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Continued Operation of the Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada July 29, 2011 EIS-0426: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Public Hearings

327

JOBS FC 1.0 (JOBS and economic impacts of Fuel Cells)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 (JOBS and economic impacts of Fuel Cells)* Marianne Mintz, Argonne National Laboratory Eric Stewart and Catherine Mertes, RCF Economic & Financial Consulting May 22, 2012 *Funded by EERE-FCT Program JOBS FC uses input-output approach to model deployment 2  JOBS FC is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool that calculates direct, indirect and induced job creation, wages and sales resulting from FC production, installation, operation and fueling.  JOBS FC uses Regional Input-Output Modeling System (RIMS II) multipliers to capture effect of expenditures on earnings, output and employment  JOBS FC models gross and net jobs created by 3 technologies, 3 applications, multiple FC capacities (defaults shown) $ Jobs are created at each stage in FC

328

Economic Impacts of Controlling Soil-Loss from Silviculture Activities: A Case STudy of Cherokee County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Section 208 of the 1972 Amendments to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Public Law 92-500) requires the states to develop plans which: (1) contain processes to identify nonpoint sources of pollution, and (2) set forth procedures and methods to control such sources of pollution to the extent feasible. Among the land use activities which are explicitly identified within Section 208 as potential sources of nonpoint pollution problems is silviculture. Texas, since it contains an estimated 12.5 million acres of commercial forest land (Murphy, 1976), has for some time been actively involved in developing the required planning procedures and materials. This document represents one component of this overall planning process. The "extent feasible" clause of Section 208 can be interpreted as recognizing the need to consider economic tradeoffs in reaching a decision as to what level of control, if any, should be exercised to limit nonpoint source pollution from whatever type of activity. This would seem to be a reasonable interpretation since it would be illogical to envision extending controls to the point that their marginal costs would exceed their marginal benefits. Broadly conceived, the purpose of this investigation has been to make a first approximation of the economic tradeoffs that would be associated with any effort to limit the extent of nonpoint pollution resulting from silvicultural activities in Texas. More specifically the study has sought to achieve the following objectives: 1. To develop a methodology For assessing the economic impacts associated with imposing alternative silvicultural nonpoint source controls at varying intensities. 2. To demonstrate how the methodology could be applied to a specific study area to facilitate decision-making about the economic rationality of imposing controls. As the study plan for this project was developed, choices had to be made regarding the range of potential pollutants to consider, the range of alternative control techniques to consider, and the range of economic impacts to consider. Since the nature of these choices represent limitations on the scope of the project, they should be made explicit from the outset. As regards the range of potential pollutants considered, it is recognized that silvicultural nonpoint source pollution can conceivably assume a variety of forms -- nutrients, chemical, thermal, and so on. Nonetheless, in this investigation sediment is the only potential silvicultural pollutant which has been addressed -- and this only indirectly.1 The focal point of the analysis is on the economic impacts of restricting soil loss (i.e. sheet and rill erosion) which is not directly equivalent to sediment yield. Conversion of soil loss figures to sediment yield figures requires knowledge of an appropriate sediment delivery ratio. While this might appear to be a significant limitation of the study, the investigators are of the opinion that it is not. This conclusion rests upon essentially two facts. First, the bulk of the available evidence pertaining to the potential impacts of silvicultural activities on water quality indicates that in those instances where such activities appear to be creating a problem sediment is generally the potential pollutant of greatest importance. Secondly, sediment yields will bear a constant proportional relationship to soil loss. Indeed, if the study unit used in this investigation had been a physical watershed instead of a county, the analysis could have dealt directly with sediment yields rather than soil loss.2 In turn, if actual sediment yields had been estimated, other potential pollutants could have been introduced into the analysis, if so desired, by the use of appropriate loading functions. As regards the range of alternative control techniques that might conceivably be used to limit silvicultural nonpoint source pollution, this investigation specifically considers four possibilities. These are: (1) a countywide limit on allowable soi

Hickman, C.A.; Jackson, B.D.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Biofuels Revolution: Understanding the Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Biofuels Development on Rural Communities  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this research was an in-depth analysis of the impacts of biofuels industry and ethanol plants on six rural communities in the Midwestern states of Kansas and Iowa. The goal was to provide a better understanding of the social, cultural, and economic implications of biofuels development, and to contribute to more informed policy development regarding bioenergy.Specific project objectives were: 1. To understand how the growth of biofuel production has affected and will affect Midwestern farmers and rural communities in terms of economic, demographic, and socio-cultural impacts; 2. To determine how state agencies, groundwater management districts, local governments and policy makers evaluate or manage bioenergy development in relation to competing demands for economic growth, diminishing water resources, and social considerations; 3. To determine the factors that influence the water management practices of agricultural producers in Kansas and Iowa (e.g. geographic setting, water management institutions, competing water-use demands as well as producersâ?? attitudes, beliefs, and values) and how these influences relate to bioenergy feedstock production and biofuel processing; 4. To determine the relative importance of social-cultural, environmental and/or economic factors in the promotion of biofuels development and expansion in rural communities; The research objectives were met through the completion of six detailed case studies of rural communities that are current or planned locations for ethanol biorefineries. Of the six case studies, two will be conducted on rural communities in Iowa and four will be conducted on rural communities in Kansas. A â??multi-methodâ? or â??mixed methodâ? research methodology was employed for each case study.

Dr. Theresa L. Selfa; Dr. Richard Goe; Dr. Laszlo Kulcsar; Dr. Gerad Middendorf; Dr. Carmen Bain

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

Estimates of the long-term U.S. economic impacts of global climate change-induced drought.  

SciTech Connect

While climate-change models have done a reasonable job of forecasting changes in global climate conditions over the past decades, recent data indicate that actual climate change may be much more severe. To better understand some of the potential economic impacts of these severe climate changes, Sandia economists estimated the impacts to the U.S. economy of climate change-induced impacts to U.S. precipitation over the 2010 to 2050 time period. The economists developed an impact methodology that converts changes in precipitation and water availability to changes in economic activity, and conducted simulations of economic impacts using a large-scale macroeconomic model of the U.S. economy.

Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Loose, Verne W.; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S.280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 280, the Climate Stewardship and Innovation Act of 2007 July 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by

333

Estimating the economic impact of climate change on the freshwater sportsfisheries of the Northeastern United States  

SciTech Connect

This study links models of global climate circulation, ecology, and economic valuation (hedonic travel cost and random utility models) to value the impact of global warming on freshwater sportfishing in the Northeast. An origin-specific linear random utility model (RUM) is introduced. The results of the RUM are shown to be comparable to those of a hedonic travel cost model. A doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is predicted to generate between a $4.6 million loss and a $20.5 million net benefit for the Northeastern United States, depending on the climate scenario.

Pendleton, L. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Economics; Mendelsohn, R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Forestry and Environmental Studies

1997-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

The economic, energy, and environmental impacts of the Energy-Related Inventions Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information on the economic, energy, and environmental impacts of inventions supported by the Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP) -- a program jointly operated by the US Department of Energy and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). It describes the results of the latest in a series of ERIP evaluation projects that have been completed since 1980. The period of interest is 1980 through 1992. The evaluation is based on data collected in 1993 through mail and telephone surveys of 253 program participants, and historical data collected during previous evaluations for an additional 189 participants.

Brown, M.A.; Wilson, C.R.; Franchuk, C.A.; Cohn, S.M.; Jones, D.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel. A technology, market, and economic assessment for Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The economic impacts of the September 11 terrorist attacks: a computable general equilibrium analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper develops a bottom-up approach that focuses on behavioral responses in estimating the total economic impacts of the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC) attacks. The estimation includes several new features. First, is the collection of data on the relocation of firms displaced by the attack, the major source of resilience in muting the direct impacts of the event. Second, is a new estimate of the major source of impacts off-site -- the ensuing decline of air travel and related tourism in the U.S. due to the social amplification of the fear of terrorism. Third, the estimation is performed for the first time using Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) analysis, including a new approach to reflecting the direct effects of external shocks. This modeling framework has many advantages in this application, such as the ability to include behavioral responses of individual businesses and households, to incorporate features of inherent and adaptive resilience at the level of the individual decision maker and the market, and to gauge quantity and price interaction effects across sectors of the regional and national economies. We find that the total business interruption losses from the WTC attacks on the U.S. economy were only slightly over $100 billion, or less than 1.0% of Gross Domestic Product. The impacts were only a loss of $14 billion of Gross Regional Product for the New York Metropolitan Area.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Rose, Adam [University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Bumsoo, Lee [University of Illinois; Asay, Gary [University of Southern California

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Residential Air Quality Policies Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer People spend the majority of their time in residences and the health burden of indoor air is significant. However, the definitions of "acceptable" and "good" indoor air quality (IAQ), and the most effective, energy efficient methods for achieving various levels of IAQ are still matters of research and debate. Current ventilation standards focus on minimum requirements for overall and mechanically provided ventilation rates, and vented combustion equipment, and require only the installation of kitchen and bath exhaust fans for source control. These standards generally are

339

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Little analysis has been performed to assess the economic impacts of the...

340

Cost study application of the guidebook on integrated community energy systems: indirect economic and energy impacts  

SciTech Connect

An ICES is being considered for a community located in a small New England city. (MCW) It is part of the city's newer development. It is a commercial park of offices, shopping center, bank, hospital, and hotel. The ICES for this community is designed to meet all heating, cooling, steam, and hot water needs. Electricity from the cogeneration unit is to be sold to the local utility, and electricity for the community will be purchased as at present. However, future electrical demand will be reduced, since absorption chillers, which will be powered by heat recovered from the central ICES unit, will partially replace electric air conditioners. In addition, hot-water heating from ICES will, in some cases, lower electrical use. Thus, the ICES involves substitution of energy forms as well as modification of fuel requirements. Examination of the integrated system, in comparison with existing energy systems, includes both indirect economic impacts (employment and fiscal effects on the city) and indirect energy impacts. The indirect economic analysis proceeds from an initial description of conditions that determine employment and fiscal results through specific estimates of employment and then revenues and costs to municipal government and finally to an evaluation of ICES's worth to the city. The indirect energy analysis compares energy resource requirements of the ICES with those for gas, oil, and electric systems now serving the community. (MCW)

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Assessing the Reliability and Economics of Wide-Scale Grid-Connected  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing the Reliability and Economics of Wide-Scale Grid-Connected Assessing the Reliability and Economics of Wide-Scale Grid-Connected Distributed Energy Generation with Application to Electric Power Systems Under Stress Speaker(s): Hisham Zerriffi Date: November 13, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Kristina LaCommare Electric power systems can be disrupted due to a variety of stress circumstances. These can range from constraints on the physical infrastructure as a result of under-capacity problems to deliberate attacks in times of conflict. Stress conditions can manifest themselves in a variety of ways and determining both the nature of the stress and the best mathematical representation of that stress in the model is complicated. This talk details a quantitative comparison of the reliability of an

344

Engineering and Economic Assessment of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Economic Assessment of and Economic Assessment of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Saline Formations Lawrence A. Smith (smithla@battelle.org; 614-424-3169) Neeraj Gupta (gupta@battelle.org; 614-424-3820)* Bruce M. Sass and Thomas A. Bubenik Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 *Corresponding Author Charles Byrer (a) and Perry Bergman (b) National Energy Technology Laboratory (a) P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV, 26507-0880 (b) P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA, 15236-0940 ABSTRACT Concern over the potential effects of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) on global climate has triggered research about ways to mitigate the release of these gases to the atmosphere. A project to study the engineering feasibility and costs of sequestering CO

345

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind #12;1 Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind November 15, 2010 Author.....................................................................................................................3 Marcellus Shale Natural Gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

347

Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program: 1986 annual report. [Economic planning, technical assessment, field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program activities were initiated to provide economic planning, technical assessment and field testing support for the thermal energy storage program, as well as management of the overall program for the DOE. Economic planning included two assessment studies. In technical assessment, issues that might affect an assessment were outlined for the development of a standard methodology to conduct assessments; work is underway to establish ''market-based'' cost and performance goals for cool storage technologies in residential applications; planning has begun for investigation of benefits in incorporating aquifer thermal energy storage with heat pumps; and plans are being formulated to evaluate the potential benefit of using aquifer thermal energy storage to augment power plant cooling. Field testing to develop technologies for the recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat began with the instrumentation design for the ceramic/salt matrix in an operating brick-making plant. Work in advanced studies by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory continued on thermochemical conversion and storage using small particles as the heat exchanger catalyst. In SO/sub 3/ dissociation experiments at 645/sup 0/C using light and dark conditions, results clearly demonstrated the benefit in directly radiantly heating the catalyst to accomplish the endothermic step of a thermochemical storage reaction.

Drost, M.K.; Bates, J.M.; Brown, D.R.; Weijo, R.O.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Energy Efficiency Design Options for Residential Water Heaters: Economic Impacts on Consumers  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a rulemaking process in which it amended the existing energy efficiency standards for residential water heaters. A key factor in DOE?s consideration of new standards is the economic impacts on consumers. Determining such impacts requires a comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This paper describes the method used to conduct the life-cycle cost (LCC) and payback period analysis for gas and electric storage water heaters. It presents the estimated change in LCC associated with more energy-efficient equipment, including heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters, for a representative sample of U.S. homes. The study included a detailed accounting of installation costs for the considered design options, with a focus on approaches for accommodating the larger dimensions of more efficient water heaters. For heat pump water heaters, the study also considered airflow requirements, venting issues, and the impact of these products on the indoor environment. The results indicate that efficiency improvement relative to the baseline design reduces the LCC in the majority of homes for both gas and electric storage water heaters, and heat pump electric water heaters and condensing gas water heaters provide a lower LCC for homes with large rated volume water heaters.

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve; Thompson, Lisa; Letschert, Virginie

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

349

Bates solar industrial process steam application environmental impact assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is planned to install 34,440 square feet of linear parabolic trough solar collectors at a new corrugator plant for making corrugated boxes. The system is to operate in parallel with a fossil fuel boiler. An assessment is presented of the impacts of the solar energy system on the existing environment and to determine whether or not a more detailed environmental impact statement is needed. The environmental assessment is based on actual operational data obtained on the collector, fluid, and heat transport system. A description of the design of the solar energy system and its application is given. Also included is a discussion of the location of the new plant in Fort Worth, Texas, and of the surrounding environment. Environmental impacts are discussed in detail, and alternatives to the solar industrial process steam retrofit application are offered. It is concluded that the overall benefits from the solar industrial process heat system outweigh any negative environmental factors. Benefits include reduced fossil fuel demand, with attending reductions in air pollutants. The selection of a stable heat transfer fluid with low toxicity and biodegradable qualities minimizes environmental damage due to fluid spills, personal exposure, and degradation byproducts. The collector is found to be aesthetically attractive with minimal hazards due to glare. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Geothermal power production: impact assessments and environmental monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role that baseline and postoperational environmental monitoring plays in assessing impacts of geothermal power production is emphasized. Based on experience in the Imperial Valley, where substantial geothermal resources exist, the important characteristics of monitoring programs involving subsidence, seismicity, and air and water quality are examined. The importance of environmental monitoring for situations where predictive models either do not exist (e.g., seismicity), or are still being developed (e.g., land subsidence) are discussed. In these cases the need for acquiring and analyzing data that can provide timely information on changes caused by geothermal operations are emphasized. Monitoring is also useful in verifying predictions of air quality changes - in particular, violations of ambient standards after control technologies are implemented. Water quality can be monitored with existing sampling programs where the potential for geothermal impacts is thought to be rather small. The significant issues in these environmental areas, the status of baseline data and predictive capability that currently exists, and the need for future monitoring and modeling programs to assess the impacts of geothermal development are summarized.

Layton, D.W.; Pimentel, K.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Economic analysis: impact of CS/R process on benzene market  

SciTech Connect

Contract No. DE-AC01-78ET10159 (formerly ET-78-C-01-3117) between UOP/SDC and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) requires UOP/SDC to provide specific engineering and technical services to the DOE Office of Coal Processing in support of the Coal Gasification Program. This report covers an economic study on the projected price of benzene through the next decade based on the market factors and production costs. The impact of the CS/R process on the benzene market was evaluated. In addition, the cost of gas from the CS/R process was determined as a function of the byproduct credit for benzene.

Spielberger, L.; Klein, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities. A MITE Program evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFs) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. The MITE Program is sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency to foster the demonstration and development of innovative technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). This project was also funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Material recovery facilities are increasingly being used as one option for managing a significant portion of municipal solid waste (MSW). The owners and operators of these facilities employ a combination of manual and mechanical techniques to separate and sort the recyclable fraction of MSW and to transport the separated materials to recycling facilities.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 Planned changes in a Federal agency's size, missions, transportation needs, and vehicle inventory all impact the strategic portfolio planning efforts that target greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation for vehicles and mobile equipment. Under Section 142 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) and Section 8 of Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, agencies are required to develop a plan that will reduce fleet GHG emissions to meet Federally mandated petroleum reduction and alternative fuel increase targets. Agencies can use these plans as a basis for determining potential changes in fleet size and

354

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Emissions Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis Federal agencies should establish planned changes in operations that could have a substantial impact on emissions for each greenhouse gas (GHG) emission source: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Such changes could represent either an additional significant hurdle to overcome or a significant reduction in the effort required to drive emissions down-in the absence of any direct GHG mitigation reduction strategies. This will help each organization establish its "business as usual" emission profile in 2020, the year agencies are expected to meet their Scope 1 and 2 and Scope 3 GHG emission-reduction goals.

355

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

358

Thermo-Economic Assessment of Advanced,High-Temperature CANDU Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research underway on the advanced CANDU examines new, innovative, reactor concepts with the aim of significant cost reduction and resource sustainability through improved thermodynamic efficiency and plant simplification. The so-called CANDU-X concept retains the key elements of the current CANDU designs, including heavy-water moderator that provides a passive heat sink and horizontal pressure tubes. Improvement in thermodynamic efficiency is sought via substantial increases in both pressure and temperature of the reactor coolant. Following on from the new Next Generation (NG) CANDU, which is ready for markets in 2005 and beyond, the reactor coolant is chosen to be light water but at supercritical operating conditions. Two different temperature regimes are being studied, Mark 1 and Mark 2, based respectively on continued use of zirconium or on stainless-steel-based fuel cladding. Three distinct cycle options have been proposed for Mark 1: the High-Pressure Steam Generator (HPSG) cycle, the Dual cycle, and the Direct cycle. For Mark 2, the focus is on simplification via a Direct cycle. This paper presents comparative thermo-economic assessments of the CANDU-X cycle options, with the ultimate goal of ascertaining which particular cycle option is the best overall in terms of thermodynamics and economics. A similar assessment was already performed for the NG CANDU. The economic analyses entail obtaining cost estimates of major plant components, such as heat exchangers, turbines and pumps. (authors)

Spinks, Norman J.; Pontikakis, Nikos; Duffey, Romney B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON KOJ 1J0 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Integrating health impact assessment into the triple bottom line concept  

SciTech Connect

This theoretical study explores the links between the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) concept and the principles of HIA and considers the potential role of HIA to provide a mechanism for integrating health concerns within a broader agenda of government and business. TBL is a framework linked to the broader sustainability agenda that underpins and reviews environmental, economic and social performance of organizations. In its simplest form, TBL acts as a tool for reporting to stakeholders/shareholders organizational performance and the nature of the impacts on the community. The links to HIA are clear as both seek to determine the impact (potential and actual) on the health and well-being of the population. The study found that TBL can operate at four levels within organizations ranging from reporting through to full integration with the organization's goals and practices. Health is narrowly defined and there are tensions about how to undertake the social accountability functions. The study shows the potential role for HIA within the broader policy and accountability agenda. As health is one of the main outcomes of an organization's activities it needs to be taken into account at all levels of activity.

Mahoney, Mary; Potter, Jenny-Lynn

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Presentation to the EAC - Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem, Economic Impacts, Green Button and Open Energy Data - Chris Irwin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Irwin - OE Smart Grid Investment Program Irwin - OE Smart Grid Investment Program EAC Update: Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem, Economic Impacts, Green Button and Open Energy Data October 2012 NIST Conceptual Reference Model GridWise Architecture Council Interoperability Framework Organizational (Pragmatics) 8: Economic/Regulatory Policy 7: Business Objectives 6: Business Procedures Political and Economic Objectives as Embodied in Policy and Regulation Strategic and Tactical Objectives Shared between Businesses Alignment between Operational Business Processes and Procedures Informational (Semantics) 5: Business Context 4: Semantic Understanding Relevant Business Knowledge that Applies Semantics with Process Workflow Understanding of Concepts Contained in the Message Data Structures Technical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Economic impacts of the total nuclear waste management program envisioned for the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents information on the costs of nuclear waste management and on the impacts of those costs on the price of power and on the capital and labor markets. It is assumed that the LWR would be the sole commercial reactor used through the year 2000. Two fuel cycle options are considered: the throwaway mode (spent fuel is waste), and the full recycle for comparison. Total costs are calculated for all facilities needed to store, package, and reposit all the spent fuel through the lifetime of 380 GW capacity installed by 2000 and operating for 30 y. The economic impact is: the price of power produced by the reactors would be increased by 1.4%; the capital for nuclear plants would apply to waste management; the average annual labor effort needed over the next 50 to 75 years is 3000 to 5000 man years; and the unit cost of spent fuel disposal is $129/kg ($119/kg for full recycle). 7 tables. (DLC)

Busch, L.; Zielen, A.J.; Parry, S.J.S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Economic Impact of the CommercialEconomic Impact of the CommercialEconomic Impact of the Commercial Hard Clam Culture IndustryHard Clam Culture IndustryHard Clam Culture Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hard Clam Culture IndustryHard Clam Culture IndustryHard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy;2 Introduction Commercially cultured hard clams have become the single most economically important food item sales of cultured hard clams have equaled or exceeded the growth realized by the more established

Florida, University of

365

Distributed Intelligence for Constructing Economic Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an integrated and distributed intelligent system being capable of automatically estimating and updating large-size economic models. The input-output model of economics uses a matrix representation of a nation's or a region's economy ... Keywords: Distributed Intelligence, Economic Models, Environmental Impact Assessment, Input-Output Tables, Machine Learning, Matrix Estimation, Parallel Optimization

Ting Yu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen R.

367

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen R.

368

Potential impacts of 316(B) regulatory controls on economics, electricity reliability, and the environment.  

SciTech Connect

Nearly half of the US utility-owned steam electric generating capacity is cooled by once-through cooling systems. These plants withdraw cooling water primarily from surface water bodies. Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available (BTA) for minimizing adverse environmental impacts. At present, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not yet promulgated applicable implementing regulations governing intake structures; however, the Agency is required by a Consent Decree to develop such regulations. EPA has presented a draft tiered regulatory framework approach that, depending on site-specific factors, may impose various regulatory burdens on affected utilities. Potential new requirements could range from compiling and submitting existing data to demonstrate that existing conditions at each unit represent BTA to retrofitting plants with closed-cycle cooling systems (primarily cooling towers). If the final regulations require installation of cooling towers or implementation of other costly plant modifications, utilities may elect to close some generating units rather than invest the finds necessary to upgrade them to meet the Section 316(b) requirements. Potentially, some regions of the country may then have a higher proportion of closed units than others, leading to a concern over the reliability of those regions' electricity supply. If a significant number of plants convert from once-through cooling systems to cooling towers, the environment will face secondary adverse impacts, such as additional fuel usage, air emissions, and water evaporation, and utilities will need to construct additional generating capacity. This paper describes a study that Argonne National Laboratory will conduct for the US Department of Energy to explore some of the potential outcomes of EPA's Section 316(b) regulatory process and their impact on economics, electricity supply reliability, and the environment.

Veil, J. A.

1999-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to estimate the impact (energy, emissions and economics) of United Fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic actuation) is the generation, control, and application of pumped or compressed fluids when this power is used to provide force and motion to mechanisms. This form of mechanical power is an integral part of United States (U.S.) manufacturing and transportation. In 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, sales of fluid power components exceeded $17.7B, sales of systems using fluid power exceeded $226B. As large as the industry is, it has had little fundamental research that could lead to improved efficiency since the late 1960s (prior to the 1970 energy crisis). While there have been some attempts to replace fluid powered components with electric systems, its performance and rugged operating condition limit the impact of simple part replacement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) collaborated with 31 industrial partners to collect and consolidate energy specific measurements (consumption, emissions, efficiency) of deployed fluid power systems. The objective of this study was to establish a rudimentary order of magnitude estimate of the energy consumed by fluid powered systems. The analysis conducted in this study shows that fluid powered systems consumed between 2.0 and 2.9 Quadrillion (1015) Btus (Quads) of energy per year; producing between 310 and 380 million metric tons (MMT) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). In terms of efficiency, the study indicates that, across all industries, fluid power system efficiencies range from less than 9% to as high as 60% (depending upon the application), with an average efficiency of 22%. A review of case studies shows that there are many opportunities to impact energy savings in both the manufacturing and transportation sectors by the development and deployment of energy efficient fluid power components and systems.

Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Impact of Electricity Deregulation on Industrial Assessment Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores many of the changes in typical industrial assessment recommendations, which have resulted from deregulation of the electric and gas industries. While anticipating that energy efficiency would almost always be a good idea, changes in rate structures and indeed the very nature of how energy is purchased can put some energy efficiency technologies outside of normal economically acceptable ranges. A major focus will be changes in and the elimination of time-of-use rates for electricity. An entire generation of DSM'ers (people working in "Demand-Side Management") worked under the principle that there was economic benefit to load leveling. Time-of-use rates are changing throughout the country and in many cases disappearing. Bulk purchase of electricity has even resulted in cases where, with minimum consumption requirements, industrial plants need to find ways to increase their electrical use to avoid penalties. Energy storage devices including thermal energy storage must be re-examined in terms of this new paradigm. There are applications where they are advisable, but for different reasons then demand management. Another area of particular interest is fuel selection, multiply fuel capability, and contracting. An industrial assessment at two neighboring plants can result in entirely different recommendations based on how energy is purchased and billed. In many cases, an industrial plant may be better off spending resources on energy purchasing agents as opposed to anything like an energy efficiency project. Onsite generation of power and the changing rationales for its adoption has also experienced big changes. Energy security is becoming a strong motivation for industrial plants, options are increased, and third party funding is also starting to appear. Intermediate solutions like gas driven compressors bring these two areas together and leave industrial clients with more options but often more confusion than ever before. Finally, the paper discusses some of the new challenges facing an industrial assessment team in terms of information gathering. It is becoming necessary to examine many possible energy purchase options and each has ramifications on energy efficiency projects. Use of the Internet, computer tools and other information sources is presented.

Kasten, D. J.; Muller, M. R.; Pavlovic, F.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Program on Technology Innovation: Economic Impacts of Compliance with Dose Based Regulations for Selected Nuclear Power Plant Progra ms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report explores the economic impact of complying with inconsistent federal and state regulations governing the management of radioactivity. It identifies areas where cost savings might occur if relevant regulations were made consistent with international regulations or if they were updated based on emerging science.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

373

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West Virginia in 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Economic Impact of the Natural Gas Industry and the Marcellus Shale Development in West for this research was provided by the West Virginia Oil and Natural Gas Association (WVONGA). The opinions herein reservoir being the Marcellus Shale play. The Marcellus Shale play stretches across an area of 95,000 square

Mohaghegh, Shahab

374

The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Canada by Brett Kerrigan B.Eng., Carleton UniversityThe Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Canada by Brett William Kerrigan B.Eng., Carleton University, 2008 A Thesis

Victoria, University of

375

Economic Impact of the Florida Clam Culture Industry: 2007 Results From small beginnings in the early 1990s,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impact of the Florida Clam Culture Industry: 2007 Results From small beginnings of the diverse mix of food items produced by the Florida aquaculture industry. The culture pro- cess the industry resides. And aside from the revenue generated by the sale and distribution of market ready clams

Florida, University of

376

Multi-jurisdictional environmental impact assessment: Canadian experiences  

SciTech Connect

This research examines complexities surrounding environmental impact assessment (EIA) in a multi-jurisdictional environment, with a specific focus on opportunities for public participation. With almost universal adoption of EIA, projects are increasingly subject to more than one assessment process. Thus there is demand to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination of EIAs. Canada has growing expertise with multijuristictional EIA that serves to illustrate the costs and opportunities associated with three different approaches to coordination: standardization, harmonization and substitution. Findings suggest that, although fraught with issues, harmonization is the most realistic approach for coordinating efforts. Harmonization has the potential to minimize duplication, avoid process uncertainty and increase efficiency and effectiveness in EIA. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrates that a bilateral agreement between jurisdictions is the best approach to harmonization, so long as negotiation of the agreement includes opportunities for meaningful participation, and implementation includes activities designed to communicate the assessment responsibilities of each jurisdiction, activities and schedules to the public. The experience of participants of different coordinated EIAs in Canada serves as counsel for on-going and future efforts to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination.

Fitzpatrick, Patricia, E-mail: p.fitzpatrick@uwinnipeg.c [Department of Geography, The University of Winnipeg 515 Portage Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada); Sinclair, A. John, E-mail: Jsincla@ms.umanitoba.c [Natural Resources Institute, Sinnott Building, 70 Dysart Rd., University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Printed on recycled paperTHERMAL SIMULATION AND ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF UNGLAZED TRANSPIRED COLLECTOR SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unglazed transpired collectors (UTCs) have recently emerged as a new solar air heating technology [l-4]. They are relatively inexpensive, efficient, and particularly suited to applications in which a high outdoor air requirement must be met. A TRNSYS [SJ model has been created for use in simulations to predict the energy savings for UTC systems. Annual simulations are performed for several representative buildings. The statewide economic potential of UTC. systems is assessed for Wisconsin. UTC systems on existing buildings are competitive with electric heating systems. but not with gas or oil heating. Electric heating is not widely-used in most buildings that are well-suited for UTC systems. with the exception of large apartment buildings. Therefore, there is no significant statewide economic potential for retrofit of UTC systems on existing buildings except in the residential sector. However, UTC systems are cost effective for new buildings because their low first cost allows them to compete with gas and oil heating. south-facing wall. Air is drawn through the holes in the plate, into the plenum, and finally into the building. Unlike most solar air heaters, they are not covered by a glazing,, which eliminates the reflection losses associated with glazings. UTC systems have achieved higher efficiencies at lower initial costs than current solar air heaters. Furthermore, they have been found to be cost effective in a number of specific applications. The objective of this research is to determine the economic potential of UTC systems on a statewide basis. 1.

B. Wilkins-crowder; David N. Summers; John W. Mitchell; Sanford A. Klein; William A. Beckman

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Technical and economic assessment of fluidized bed augmented compressed air energy-storage system. Volume II. Introduction and technology assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are described of a study subcontracted by PNL to the United Technologies Research Center on the engineering feasibility and economics of a CAES concept which uses a coal fired, fluidized bed combustor (FBC) to heat the air being returned from storage during the power production cycle. By burning coal instead of fuel oil, the CAES/FBC concept can completely eliminate the dependence of compressed air energy storage on petroleum fuels. The results of this assessment effort are presented in three volumes. Volume II presents a discussion of program background and an in-depth coverage of both fluid bed combustion and turbomachinery technology pertinent to their application in a CAES power plant system. The CAES/FBC concept appears technically feasible and economically competitive with conventional CAES. However, significant advancement is required in FBC technology before serious commercial commitment to CAES/FBC can be realized. At present, other elements of DOE, industrial groups, and other countries are performing the required R and D for advancement of FBC technology. The CAES/FBC will be reevaluated at a later date when FBC technology has matured and many of the concerns now plaguing FBC are resolved. (LCL)

Giramonti, A.J.; Lessard, R.D.; Merrick, D.; Hobson, M.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:42pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For employee commuting, it is important to account for any planned or expected changes in a Federal agency's size when estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential for different operating units or worksites. Considerations include: Are employment levels expected to change in the next decade at specific facilities or agency-wide? Are there any planned facility moves at major worksites? Employee commute coordinators may want to engage human resources and strategic planners in this effort to establish likely changes in employment numbers. Facility planners may be engaged to understand changes in commutes

380

The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments And Impact Statements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STYLE STYLE WRITING ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS AND IMPACT STATEMENTS R.P. Detwiler NNSA Office of General Counsel October 2005 In his introduction to William Strunk's classic on writing, The Elements of Style, E. B. White described the plight of those who read many of our NEPA documents: Will [Strunk] felt that the reader was in serious trouble most of the time, a man foundering in a swamp, and that it was the duty of anyone attempting to write English to drain this swamp quickly and get this man on dry ground, or at least throw him a rope. In revising text, I have tried to hold steadily in mind a belief of his, this concern for the bewildered reader. The Department and its contractors need to hold in their minds the women and men - decision makers, citizens, regulators and judges - who slog through our environmental

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381

Differing forms, differing purposes: A typology of health impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is currently considerable diversity in health impact assessment (HIA) practice internationally. Historically this diversity has been described as simple dichotomies, for example the differences between HIAs of projects and policies. However these distinctions have failed to adequately describe the differences that can be observed between different forms of HIAs. This paper describes the three historical and disciplinary fields from which HIA has emerged - environmental health, a social view of health, and health equity. It also puts forward a typology of four different forms of HIA that can be observed in current HIA practice: mandated, decision-support, advocacy, and community-led HIAs. This paper argues that these different forms of HIA serve different purposes and are not necessarily in competition; rather they allow HIA to be responsive to a range of population health concerns and purposes.

Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: b.harris-roxas@unsw.edu.au; Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.a

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Evaluation of environmental impact assessment system in Pakistan  

SciTech Connect

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) was first introduced in Pakistan based on the Environmental Protection Ordinance 1983. The EIA process was further strengthened under the Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997, which became operational under EIA Regulations 2000. Despite a sound legal basis and comprehensive guidelines, evidence suggests that EIA has not yet evolved satisfactorily in Pakistan. An evaluation of the EIA system against systematic evaluation criteria, based on interviews with EIA approval authorities, consulting firms and experts, reveals various shortcomings of the EIA system. These mainly include; inadequate capacity of EIA approval authorities, deficiencies in screening and scoping, poor EIA quality, inadequate public participation and weak monitoring. Overall, EIA is used presently as a project justification tool rather than as a project planning tool to contribute to achieving sustainable development. Whilst shortcomings are challenging, central government has recently shown a high degree of commitment to the environmental protection by making EIA compulsory for all the public sector projects likely to have adverse environmental impacts. The paper identifies opportunities for taking advantage of the current environment for strengthening the EIA process.

Nadeem, Obaidullah [Department of City and Regional Planning, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: obaidnadeem@yahoo.com; Hameed, Rizwan [Department of City and Regional Planning, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: d_rizwan@hotmail.com

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Economic and environmental impacts of the corn grain ethanol industry on the United States agricultural sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the impacts of increased ethanol production from corn starch on agricultural land use and the environment in the United States. The Policy Analysis System simulation model was used to simulate alternative ethanol production scenarios for 2007 through 2016. Results indicate that increased corn ethanol production had a positive effect on net farm income and economic wellbeing of the US agricultural sector. In addition, government payments to farmers were reduced because of higher commodity prices and enhanced net farm income. Results also indicate that if Conservation Reserve Program land was converted to crop production in response to higher demand for ethanol in the simulation, individual farmers planted more land in crops, including corn. With a larger total US land area in crops due to individual farmer cropping choices, total US crop output rose, which decreased crop prices and aggregate net farm income relative to the scenario where increased ethanol production happened without Conservation Reserve Program land. Substantial shifts in land use occurred with corn area expanding throughout the United States, especially in the traditional corn-growing area of the midcontinent region.

Larson, J.A.; English, B.C.; De La Torre Ugarte, D. G.; Menard, R.J.; Hellwinckel, C.M.; West, Tristram O.

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 ©2011 Penn State Extension and Penn College www.msetc.org 1 Economic Impacts of Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania: Employment and Income in 2009 August 2011 www.msetc.org The Marcellus Shale Education & Training Center (MSETC

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

386

Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of the project are to increase the base of scientific knowledge concerning (1) the fate and environmental effects of organics, trace metals, and NORM in water, sediment, and biota near several offshore oil and gas facilities; (2) the characteristics of produced water and produced sand discharges as they pertain to organics, trace metals, and NORM variably found in association with the discharges; (3) the recovery of three terminated produced water discharge sites located in wetland and high-energy open bay sites of coastal Louisiana; (4) the economic and energy supply impacts of existing and anticipated federal and state offshore and coastal discharge regulations; and (5) the catch, consumption and human use patterns of seafood species collected from coastal and offshore waters. The products of the effort will be a series of technical reports detailing the study procedures, results, and conclusions which contribute to the transfer of technology to the scientific community, petroleum industry, and state and federal agencies.

Gettleson, David A

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements, Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recommendations Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance printed on recycled paper Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements, Second Edition Preface This document provides recommendations for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) preparation of environmental assessments and environmental impact statements under the National Environmental

388

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006. “ Renewable Distributed Generation Assessment: San2005a. “Renewable Distributed Generation Assessment: City ofE3). 2005b. “Renewable Distributed Generation Assessment:

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E3). 2006. “Renewable Distributed Generation Assessment: San2005a. “Renewable Distributed Generation Assessment: City ofE3). 2005b. “Renewable Distributed Generation Assessment:

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E3). 2006. “Renewable Distributed Generation Assessment: San2005a. “Renewable Distributed Generation Assessment: City ofE3). 2005b. “Renewable Distributed Generation Assessment:

Mills, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Toward economic evaluation of climate change impacts : a review and evaluation of studies of the impact of climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efforts to access climate change have generally been unsuccessful in describing the economic damages (or benefits) associated with climate change or the functional relationship of damage (or benefits) to climate. Existing ...

Reilly, John M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Health impact assessment of air pollution using a dynamic exposure profile: Implications for exposure and health impact estimates  

SciTech Connect

In both ambient air pollution epidemiology and health impact assessment an accurate assessment of the population exposure is crucial. Although considerable advances have been made in assessing human exposure outdoors, the assessments often do not consider the impact of individual travel behavior on such exposures. Population-based exposures to NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} using only home addresses were compared with models that integrate all time-activity patterns-including time in commute-for Flanders and Brussels. The exposure estimates were used to estimate the air pollution impact on years of life lost due to respiratory mortality. Health impact of NO{sub 2} using an exposure that integrates time-activity information was on average 1.2% higher than when assuming that people are always at their home address. For ozone the overall estimated health impact was 0.8% lower. Local differences could be much larger, with estimates that differ up to 12% from the exposure using residential addresses only. Depending on age and gender, deviations from the population average were seen. Our results showed modest differences on a regional level. At the local level, however, time-activity patterns indicated larger differences in exposure and health impact estimates, mainly for people living in more rural areas. These results suggest that for local analyses the dynamic approach can contribute to an improved assessment of the health impact of various types of pollution and to the understanding of exposure differences between population groups. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure to ambient air pollution was assessed integrating population mobility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This dynamic exposure was integrated into a health impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differences between the dynamic and residential exposure were quantified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modest differences in health impact were found at a regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At municipal level larger differences were found, influenced by gender and age.

Dhondt, Stijn, E-mail: stijn.dhondt@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Beckx, Carolien, E-mail: Carolien.Beckx@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Degraeuwe, Bart, E-mail: Bart.Degraeuwe@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Lefebvre, Wouter, E-mail: Wouter.Lefebvre@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Kochan, Bruno, E-mail: Bruno.Kochan@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Bellemans, Tom, E-mail: Tom.Bellemans@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Int Panis, Luc, E-mail: Luc.intpanis@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Macharis, Cathy, E-mail: cjmachar@vub.ac.be [Department MOSI-Transport and Logistics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050, Brussels (Belgium); Putman, Koen, E-mail: kputman@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Interuniversity Centre for Health Economics Research (I-CHER), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Economic, Energy, and Environmental Benefits of Concentrating Solar Power in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides a summary assessment of concentrating solar power and its potential economic return, energy supply impact, and environmental benefits for the State of California.

Stoddard, L.; Abiecunas, J.; O'Connell, R.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Economic Assessment of a Conceptual Biomass to Liquids Bio-Syntrolysis Plant  

SciTech Connect

A series of assessments evaluated the economic efficiency of integrating a nuclear electric power plant with a biomass to SynFuel plant under three market scenarios. Results strongly suggest that a nuclear assisted-BioSyntrolysis Process would be as cost competitive as other carbon feedstock to liquid fuels concepts while having significant advantages regarding CO2 greenhouse gas production. This concept may also be competitive for those energy markets where energy dense, fossil fuels are scarce while wind, hydroelectric, or other renewable energy sources can be produced at a relatively low cost. At this time, a realistic vision of this technology’s deployment of a biomass to synfuel plants powered by a nuclear 1100 MWe reactor. Accompanying an area of 25 miles by 25 miles, this integrated Enterprise could produce 24,000 BBLs of SynFuel daily; or 0.2% of the U.S.’s imported oil.

M. M. Plum; G. L. Hawkes

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As power generation from variable distributed energy resources (DER) grows, energy flows in the network are changing, increasing the requirements for ancillary services, including voltage support. With the appropriate power converter, DER can provide ancillary services such as frequency control and voltage support. This paper outlines the economic potential of DERs coordinated in a microgrid to provide reactive power and voltage support at its point of common coupling. The DER Customer Adoption Model assesses the costs of providing reactive power, given local utility rules. Depending on the installed DER, the cost minimizing solution for supplying reactive power locally is chosen. Costs include the variable cost of the additional losses and the investment cost of appropriately over-sizing converters or purchasing capacitors. A case study of a large health care building in San Francisco is used to evaluate different revenue possibilities of creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive power.

Appen, Jan von; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Momber, Ilan; Klapp, David; Scheven, Alexander von

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate.

Alexander, D.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

SciTech Connect

To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV, requiring the use of these tariffs would disadvantage some commercial PV installations. In particular, for PV systems that serve less than 25-50% of annual customer load, the characteristics of the customer's underlying load profile often determine the most favorable rate structure, and energy-focused rate structures may not be ideal for many commercial-customer load shapes. Regulators that wish to establish rates that are beneficial to a range of PV applications should therefore consider allowing customers to choose from among a number of different rate structures. {sm_bullet} Eliminating net metering can significantly degrade the economics of PV systems that serve a large percentage of building load. Under the assumptions stipulated in this report, we find that an elimination of net metering could, in some circumstances, result in more than a 25% loss in the rate-reduction value of commercial PV. As long as annual solar output is less than roughly 25% of customer load and excess PV production can be sold to the local utility at a rate above $0.05/kWh, however, elimination of net metering is found to rarely result in a financial loss of greater than 5% of the rate-reduction value of PV. More detailed conclusions on the rate-reduction value of commercial PV include: {sm_bullet} Commercial PV systems can sometimes greatly reduce demand charges. Though energy-focused retail rates often offer the greatest rate reduction value, commercial PV installations can generate significant reductions in demand charges, in some cases constituting 10-50% of the total rate savings derived from PV installations. These savings, however, depend highly on the size of the PV system relative to building load, on the customer's load shape, and on the design of the demand charge itself. {sm_bullet} The value of demand charge reductions declines with PV system size. At high levels of PV penetration, the value of PV-induced demand charge savings on a $/kWh basis can drop substantially. As a result, the rate-reduction value of PV can decline by up to one-half when a PV system m

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

SciTech Connect

To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV, requiring the use of these tariffs would disadvantage some commercial PV installations. In particular, for PV systems that serve less than 25-50% of annual customer load, the characteristics of the customer's underlying load profile often determine the most favorable rate structure, and energy-focused rate structures may not be ideal for many commercial-customer load shapes. Regulators that wish to establish rates that are beneficial to a range of PV applications should therefore consider allowing customers to choose from among a number of different rate structures. {sm_bullet} Eliminating net metering can significantly degrade the economics of PV systems that serve a large percentage of building load. Under the assumptions stipulated in this report, we find that an elimination of net metering could, in some circumstances, result in more than a 25% loss in the rate-reduction value of commercial PV. As long as annual solar output is less than roughly 25% of customer load and excess PV production can be sold to the local utility at a rate above $0.05/kWh, however, elimination of net metering is found to rarely result in a financial loss of greater than 5% of the rate-reduction value of PV. More detailed conclusions on the rate-reduction value of commercial PV include: {sm_bullet} Commercial PV systems can sometimes greatly reduce demand charges. Though energy-focused retail rates often offer the greatest rate reduction value, commercial PV installations can generate significant reductions in demand charges, in some cases constituting 10-50% of the total rate savings derived from PV installations. These savings, however, depend highly on the size of the PV system relative to building load, on the customer's load shape, and on the design of the demand charge itself. {sm_bullet} The value of demand charge reductions declines with PV system size. At high levels of PV penetration, the value of PV-induced demand charge savings on a $/kWh basis can drop substantially. As a result, the rate-reduction value of PV can decline by up to one-half when a PV system meets 75% rather

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Agency/Company /Organization: Forest Trends, The Climate, Community and Biodiversity (CCB) Alliance, The Rainforest Alliance, Flora and Fauna International Partner: United Nations Development Programme, U.S. Agency for International Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.forest-trends.org/documents/files/doc_2436.pdf Cost: Free Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Screenshot References: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects[1]

400

Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NRELs JEDI Model  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 M. Costanti Bozeman, Montana Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model Period of Performance: December 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model Period of Performance: December 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004 M. Costanti

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102009-2918 October 2009 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on an earlier draft of

402

Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development An Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah David J. Ratliff, Captain United States Air Force Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Center for the Market Diffusion of Renewable Energy and Clean Technology Jon M. Huntsman School of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 DOE/GO-102010-3005 March 2010 The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. The authors thank Marshall Goldberg and Elise Brown for assistance with data collection and analysis and Sandra Reategui, Suzanne Tegen, and Sara Baldwin for the helpful comments on

403

Colorado economic impact study on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1993. To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are: Direct employment was estimated at 894 workers; An estimated 89 percent of all direct employment was local; Secondary employment resulting from remedial action at the active Colorado UMTRA Project sites and the Grand Junction vicinity property program is estimated at 546 workers. Total employment (direct and secondary) is estimated at 1440 workers for the period of study (July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993). An estimated $24.1 million was paid in wages to UMTRA workers in Colorado during FY1993; Direct and secondary wage earnings were estimated at $39.9 million; Income tax payments to the state of Colorado were estimated at $843,400 during FY1993; The gross economic impact of UMTRA Project activities in the state of Colorado is estimated at $70 million during the 1-year study period; and the net economic benefit to the state of Colorado was estimated at $57.5 million, or $5.90 per dollar of funding provided by Colorado. This figure includes both direct and secondary benefits but does not include the impact of alternative uses of the state funding.

Not Available

1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California Prepared for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado and

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Impacts of the Kyoto Protocol on U.S. Energy Markets and Economic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Activity October 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was...

406

The Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM): Technology share component  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The models described in this report are used to allocate total energy consumption in an energy end-use service area by fuel type (including electricity) within the Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM) framework. The primary objective of the DIAM is to provide energy consumption and expenditure forecasts for different population categories that are consistent with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) forecast, which is produced annually in the Annual Energy Outlook and periodically in support of DOE policy formulation and analysis. The models are multinominal logit models that have been estimated using EIA`s 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Three models were estimated: space heating share, water heating share, and cooking share. These models are used to allocate total end-use service consumption over different technologies defined by fuel type characteristics. For each of the end-use service categories, consumption shares are estimated for a subset of six fuel types: natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas, fuel oil/kerosene, wood, and other fuel.

Poyer, D.A.; Earl, E.; Bonner, B.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Assessment of impact of degree of automation on human roles: the experts' analysis using gaming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the two assessments performed to evaluate the impact of increasing levels of automation (LoA) on Human Factors aspects and the impact on their responsibilities and interactions. This activity has been developed within ... Keywords: ATM, assessment, automation, gaming, human factors

R. Casar, A. Arranz, B. Escribano, A. Grosskreutz, R. Garcia, R. Suikat, M. Jipp, G. D. R. Zon, M. Joosse

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Assessing Climate Information Use in Agribusiness. Part II: Decision Experiments to Estimate Economic Value  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Difficulty in evaluating the economic effectiveness of climate information is a significant impediment to expanding the use of that information. An innovative approach, combining a decision experiment and an empirical economic analysis was ...

Steven T. Sonka; Stanley A. Changnon; Steven Hofing

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Walking the sustainability assessment talk - Progressing the practice of environmental impact assessment (EIA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internationally there is a growing demand for environmental impact assessment (EIA) to move away from its traditional focus towards delivering more sustainable outcomes. South Africa is an example of a country where the EIA system seems to have embraced the concept of sustainability. In this paper we test the existing objectives for EIA in South Africa against sustainability principles and then critique the effectiveness of EIA practice in delivering these objectives. The outcome of the research suggests that notwithstanding a strong and explicit sustainability mandate through policy and legislation, the effectiveness of EIA practice falls far short of what is mandated. This shows that further legislative reform is not required to improve effectiveness but rather a focus on changing the behaviour of individual professionals. We conclude by inviting further debate on what exactly practitioners can do to give effect to sustainability in EIA practice.

Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North West University (South Africa); School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University (Australia); Retief, Francois [School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North West University (South Africa)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Growth strategy for hybrid organizations : balancing economic, environmental, and social impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid organizations combine the structure and culture of for-profit companies with the commitment to social good of non-profit organizations. This structure enables them to address social problems in an economically ...

Mamao, Gustavo Moreira

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Technical-economic assessment of the production of methanol from biomass. Conversion process analysis. Final research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive engineering system study was conducted to assess various thermochemical processes suitable for converting biomass to methanol. A summary of the conversion process study results is presented here, delineating the technical and economic feasibilities of producing methanol fuel from biomass utilizing the currently available technologies. (MHR)

Wan, E.I.; Simmons, J.A.; Price, J.D.; Nguyen, T.D.

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 23, 2009 September 23, 2009 EIS-0407: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas September 21, 2009 EIS-0435: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct a Scoping Meeting Modification of the Groton Generation Station Interconnection Agreement, Brown County, South Dakota September 15, 2009 EIS-0434: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and to Conduct Scoping Meetings Hualapai Valley Solar Interconnection Project in Mohave County, Arizona July 30, 2009 EIS-0425: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Project, Chelan and Okanogan Counties, WA

414

Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H. Wiser Pagination 17 Date Published 062010 Institution LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department...

415

Technology assessment of solar energy systems. Socioeconomic impacts of solar deployment and conventional energy use. Volume III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study presents an analysis of socio-economic impacts of conventional energy prices and solar technology use in the residential sector. Patterns of household energy use are explored as a function of income class. Impacts on household disposable income of use of conventional fuels and technologies as compared to solar alternatives are then assessed. This analysis is conducted for 1978 and 1990 by income class and region. Profiles of residential-solar-system purchases are presented and trends in the adoption of solar systems in this sector are discussed. Because income levels and certain demographic characteristics tend to be correlated, insights regarding the distribution of impacts among population groups can be obtained by examining the demographic composition of US households. Accordingly, socio-economic profiles of the US population are developed to help identify the demographic characteristics of households most severely affected by high energy prices, as well as of those households best able to reduce energy costs through the purchase of solar energy and conservation.

Gordon, J.J.; Tahami, J.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Analyze qualitatively development and climate impacts from pursuing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

impacts that could be qualitatively assessed include: Economic: employment, job creation, income, food production, rural electrification and stability in supply, terms of...

417

Analyze qualitatively development and climate impacts of LEDS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

impacts that could be qualitatively assessed include: Economic: employment, job creation, income, food production, rural electrification and stability in supply, terms of...

418

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century MarketsChapter 1 Impact of Research on the Economic Outlook for Soybeans and Soybean Products in Global Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing Soybeans for the 21st Century Markets Chapter 1 Impact of Research on the Economic Outlook for Soybeans and Soybean Products in Global Markets Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry P

419

Conceptual design and techno-economic assessment of integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology  

SciTech Connect

Direct steam generation (DSG) in parabolic trough collectors causes an increase to competitiveness of solar thermal power plants (STPP) by substitution of oil with direct steam generation that results in lower investment and operating costs. In this study the integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology is introduced and techno-economic assessment of this plant is reported compared with two conventional cases. Three considered cases are: an integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology (ISCCS-DSG), a solar electric generating system (SEGS), and an integrated solar combined cycle system with HTF (heat transfer fluid) technology (ISCCS-HTF). This study shows that levelized energy cost (LEC) for the ISCCS-DSG is lower than the two other cases due to reducing O and M costs and also due to increasing the heat to electricity net efficiency of the power plant. Among the three STPPs, SEGS has the lowest CO{sub 2} emissions, but it will operate during daytime only. (author)

Nezammahalleh, H.; Farhadi, F.; Tanhaemami, M. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, No 593 Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, photovoltaics, renewable energy, tariff design Abstract To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design of retail electricity tariffs and want to understandof commercial electricity tariffs, elucidates the principlesand design of retail electricity tariffs can impact the

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economiccustomer retail electricity rates currently offered in thethe design of retail electricity rates, particularly for

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economiccustomer retail electricity rates currently offered in thethe design of retail electricity rates, particularly for

Mills, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 8, 2007 November 8, 2007 EIS-0382: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Mesaba Energy Project, Itasca, Minnesota October 17, 2007 EIS-0402: Advance Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory August 10, 2007 EIS-0400: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard-Windy Gap Substation Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Grand County, CO July 23, 2007 EIS-0375: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste August 31, 2006 EIS-0380: Notice to Extend Comment Period on the Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New

425

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 3, 2011 June 3, 2011 EIS-0435: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Groton Generation Station Interconnection Agreement, Brown County, South Dakota May 23, 2011 EIS-0460: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement FutureGen 2.0 Project, Morgan County, Illinois May 20, 2011 EIS-0471: Final Environmental Impact Statement Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho May 20, 2011 EIS-0471: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho May 20, 2011 EIS-0468: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement American Centrifuge Plant, Piketon, OH April 29, 2011 EIS-0350-S1: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental

426

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 12, 2011 January 12, 2011 EIS-0407: Record of Decision Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas January 4, 2011 EIS-0450: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission Project in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada December 17, 2010 EIS-0455: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA December 17, 2010 EIS-0403: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States December 14, 2010 EIS-0459: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Hawai'i Interisland Renewable Energy Program December 10, 2010 EIS-0421: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

427

Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model; Period of Performance: December 1, 2003--May 31, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic development potential that wind power offers is often an overlooked aspect of today's wind power projects. Much has been written about how wind can spur economic development, but few have attempted to quantify these impacts. Using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Jobs, Economic Development, and Impacts Model (JEDI), the author examined six counties in Montana to quantify these impacts. The overriding project goal was to illuminate economic development opportunities from wind project development for six Montana counties using an objective economic modeling tool. Interested stakeholders include the agriculture community, wind developers, renewable energy advocates, government officials, and other decision-makers. The Model was developed to enable spreadsheet users with limited or no economic modeling background to easily identify the statewide economic impacts associated with constructing and operating wind power plants. The Model's User Add-In feature allows users to conduct county-specific analyses using county IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for PLANning) multipliers, while state-level multipliers are contained within the Model as default values for all 50 states.

Costanti, M.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

New Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New Zealand Agency/Company /Organization New Zealand Ministry of the Environment Sector Energy, Climate Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publica Country New Zealand Australia and New Zealand References Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New Zealand [1] "This Guidance Manual: provides projections of future climate change around New Zealand compares these projections with present climate extremes and variations identifies potential effects on local government functions and

429

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Tooele County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Tooele County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants Nikhil Mongha, MBA, MS Carollo Engineers Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Renewable Energy for Rural Economic Development College of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 August 2006 DOE/GO-102006-2353 Contract No. DE-FG48-05R810736 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

430

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Utah County, Utah from the Development of Wind Power Plants  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Utah County, Utah from the Development of Wind Power Plants Nikhil Mongha, MBA, MS Carollo Engineers Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Renewable Energy for Rural Economic Development College of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 May 2006 DOE/GO-102006-2316 DE-FG48-05R810736 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Special thanks to Marshall Goldberg for his assistance with the analysis and Sarah Wright and Christine Watson Mikell for their review of this report. ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

431

Analysis of the Economic Impact on Box Elder County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Box Elder County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants Nikhil Mongha, MBA, MS Carollo Engineers Cathy L. Hartman, Ph.D. Edwin R. Stafford, Ph.D. Renewable Energy for Rural Economic Development College of Business Utah State University 3560 Old Main Hill Logan, Utah 84322-3560 August 2006 DOE/GO-102006-2350 Contract No. DE-FG48-05R810736 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

432

Environmental impact assessment of abnormal events: a follow-up study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Impact analyses included in environmental assessments for a selected nuclear power plant, petroleum storage facility, crude oil pipeline, and geopressure well that have experienced operational, abnormal events are compared with the data quantifying the environmental impacts of the events. Comparisons of predicted vs actual impacts suggests that prediction of the types of events and associated impacts could be improved; in some instances, impacts have been underestimated. Analysis of abnormal events is especially important in environmental assessment documents addressing a technology that is novel or unique to a particular area. Incorporation of abnormal event impact analysis into project environmental monitoring and emergency response plans can help improve these plans and can help reduce the magnitude of environmental impacts resulting from said events.

Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Lee, D.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 2: Assessment of health impacts; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The task 2 report compares the relative health and hazard impacts of EV battery recycling technologies. Task 2 compared the relative impact of recycling EV batteries in terms of cancer, toxicity, and ecotoxicological potential, as well as leachability, flammability, and corrosivity/reactivity hazards. Impacts were evaluated for lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron sulfide and disulfide, lithium-polymer, lithium-ion, and zinc-air batteries. Health/hazard impacts were evaluated for recycling methods including smelting, electrowinning, and other appropriate techniques that apply to different battery technologies.

Unnasch, S.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Assessment of the Economic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions onEconomic Potential of Microgrids for Reactive Power Supplyof creating an incentive for microgrids to provide reactive

Appen, Jan von

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity rates in California and across the United States (STATES ABSTRACT This study examines the relative economics of electric vehicle operation in the context of current electricity rates

Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S.2191, the Lieberman-Warner climate Security Act of 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Energy Market and Economic Impacts of S. 2191, the Lieberman-Warner Climate Security Act of 2007 April 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by

437

Energy and Economic Impacts of H.R.5049, the Keep America Competitive Global Warming Policy Act  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Energy and Economic Impacts of H.R.5049, the Keep America Competitive Global Warming Policy Act August 2006 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester.

438

Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the availability of hydro power has the greatest impact oncontribute to a redesigned hydro power supply system in thein 2050 (like all non-hydro power plants in this analysis,

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Life cycle assessment of concrete pavements : impacts and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concrete pavement network in the United States plays a crucial role in the economy by enabling the transport of people and goods, but it also leads to resource consumption and environmental impacts. This thesis is ...

Loijos, Alex (Alexander Nikos)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalAnalysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2,of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Impacts of PSC Elements on Contract Economics under Oil Price Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production sharing contract (PSC) is one of the most common types of cooperation modes in international petroleum contracts. The elements that affect PSC economics mainly include royalty, cost oil, profit oil as well as income tax. Assuming that oil ... Keywords: Production Sharing, Oil Price, Oil Contract, International Petroleum Cooperation

Wang Zhen; Zhao Lin; Liu Mingming

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Economic Impacts of Climate Variability in South Africa and Development of Resource Prediction Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of food and water supplies and economic growth in South Africa leads to the realization that climate variability plays a major role. Summer rainfall in the period of 1980–99 is closely associated (variance = 48%) with year-to-year ...

Mark R. Jury

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of an exhaustive literature search and evaluation concerning the properties and economics of commercially available nonmetallic well casing and screens. These materials were studied in terms of their use in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

RIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: SPRO Business Operations General Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http:www.directives.doe.govpdfsdoedoetextlneword20602061.pdf MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS...

446

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: SPRO Physical Security Major Application  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessments, for requirements and additional gUidance for conducting a PIA: http:www.directives.doe.govpdfsdoedoetexUneword206o2061.pdf MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS...

447

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Baseload wind energy: modeling the competition betweenSystems Integrated with Wind Energy Resources in California,Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems, Environmental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and sublittoral zones. The results include: (a) the exposure dose rates assessed by a car-borne scintillation spectrometry system; (b) laboratory measurements of the activity...

449

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customer’s underlying load profile often determine the mostwith flat or inverted load profiles will often not earn muchThe shape of a customer’s load profile can impact the rate-

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The Economic Impact of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Vermont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2008). A copy of a Vermont marriage license costs $10.00. Vermont Department of Health. http://Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex Couples

Ramos, Christopher; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The Economic Impact of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in the District of Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex Couples102,639). See Cindy Chooley, Vermont Department of Health.for same-sex couples in Vermont, 2,435). Gates, Gary J. ,

Ramos, Christopher; Badgett, M V Lee; Sears, Brad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Economic Impact of Extending Marriage to Same-Sex Couples in Maine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact on the State of Vermont of Allowing Same-Sex Couplesfor same-sex couples in Vermont, 2,435). Gates, Gary J. ,Council. 2002. Report of the Vermont Domestic partnership

Ramos, Christopher; Badgett, M.V. Lee; Sears, Brad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Elevated Natural Radioactivity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Elevated Natural Radioactivity Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In the present study, the radiological impact assessment in three selected areas of elevated natural radioactivity in Greece is attempted, based on measurements, theoretical relations, and simple model application. These areas are Milos - an island of volcanic origin in Cyclades Archipelago, Ikaria - an island in the Eastern Aegean Sea and Loutraki - a coastal area in mainland Greece. These areas are characterized by their

454

Development of techniques for rapidly assessing the local air quality impacts of airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combustion of fossil fuels for aviation activity harms air quality and human health near airports through the production of PM2.5. Currently, dispersion models can assess these local-scale (distances ~10 km) impacts, ...

Lee, Gideon (Gideon Luther)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

On the Development of Regional Climatic Scenarios for Policy-Oriented Climatic-Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review on the development of climatic scenarios related to policy-oriented assessment of the impact of climatic variations is presented. It seeks to provide background information needed to evaluate the extent to which existing regional ...

Peter J. Lamb

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Comparison of life cycle impact assessment tools in the case of biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) tools exist, each with different methodologies. These tools often provide different results, thus making it difficult for the LCA practitioner to determine which results yield the best or most likely estimate ...

Amy E. Landis; Thomas L. Theis

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Assessment of Photovoltaic Energy Availability DuringPhotovoltaic Generation in South Australia. ” Energy Policy,Solar Photovoltaic Cells. ” Center for the Study of Energy

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Assessment of Photovoltaic Energy Availability DuringPhotovoltaic Generation in South Australia. ” Energy Policy,Solar Photovoltaic Cells. ” Center for the Study of Energy

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Assessment of Photovoltaic Energy Availability DuringPhotovoltaic Generation in South Australia. ” Energy Policy,Solar Photovoltaic Cells. ” Center for the Study of Energy

Mills, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impacts economic assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.