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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

On the System Dependency of Satellite Sounding Impact-Comments on Recent Impact Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As shown by the Data Systems Test results, the impact of satellite temperature soundings on numerical weather prediction is highly dependent on the particular analysis and forecast system used to incorporate the data. The more amenable a system ...

M. S. Tracton; A. J. Desmaris; R. J. van Haaren; R. D. McPherson

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Review of Test Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GAC004 Revision 1 Effective June 2008 Review of Test Results Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date: Garrett...

3

Undulator Transportation Test Results  

SciTech Connect

A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

Wolf, Zachary

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

4

Impact of Sungate EP on PHEV Performance: Results of a Simulated Solar Reflective Glass PHEV Dynamometer Test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Composite fuel economy of a plug-in hybrid electric test vehicle increased 8% to 41.6 mpg because of the reduction in thermal loads from Sungate EP glazings installed in the windshield and backlite.

Rugh, J.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Environmental Impact | Browse Tree Results  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environmental Impact. From climate change to biodiversity loss - documenting man's impact. CAB International. Home. Abstracts Database. News Articles. ...

6

MITG test procedure and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Elements and modules for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator have been performance tested since the inception of the RTG program. These test articles seldom resembled flight hardware and often lacked adequate diagnostic instrumentation. Because of this, performance problems were not identified in the early stage of program development. The lack of test data in an unexpected area often hampered the development of a problem solution. A procedure for conducting the MITG Test was developed in an effort to obtain data in a systematic, unambiguous manner. This procedure required the development of extensive data acquisition software and test automation. The development of a facility to implement the test procedure, the facility hardware and software requirements, and the results of the MITG testing are the subject of this paper.

Eck, M.B.; Mukunda, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Light-weight radioisotope heater impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. Los Alamos National Laboratory designed, fabricated, and safety tested the LWRHU. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a fineweave-pierced fabric graphite aeroshell assembly. To compare the performance of the LWRHUs fabricated for the Cassini mission with the performance of those fabricated for the Galileo mission, and to determine a failure threshold, two types of impact tests were conducted. A post-reentry impact test was performed on one of 180 flight-quality units produced for the Cassini mission and a series of sequential impact tests using simulant-fueled LWRHU capsules were conducted respectively. The results showed that deformation and fuel containment of the impacted Cassini LWRHU was similar to that of a previously tested Galileo LWRHU. Both units sustained minimal deformation of the aeroshell and fueled capsule; the fuel was entirely contained by the platinum capsule. Sequential impacting, in both end-on and side-on orientations, resulted in increased damage with each subsequent impact. Sequential impacting of the LWRHU appears to result in slightly greater damage than a single impact at the final impact velocity of 50 m/s.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Rinehart, G.H.; Herrera, A. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Scale Model Turbine Missile Casing Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes three 1/5-scale-model turbine missile impact experiments performed to provide benchmark data for assessing turbine missiles effects in nuclear plant design. The development of an explosive launcher to accelerate the turbine missile models to the desired impact velocities is described. A comparison of the test results with those from full-scale experiments demonstrates scalability.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement device, did not operate effectively. Consequently, it is not suitable for application to the AWR process. (4) Initially, the spray ring (operated at approximately 2300 psi) and the nozzles provided by the pump vendor did not perform acceptably. The nozzles were replaced with a more robust model, and the performance was then acceptable. (5) The average solids concentration achieved in the slurry before Bentogrout addition was approximately 16% by weight. The solids concentration of the slurry after Bentogrout addition ranged from 26% to approximately 40%. The slurry pump and ITL system performed well at every concentration. No line plugging or other problems were noted. The results of the CTL runs and later ITL testing are summarized in an appendix to this report.

Abraham, TJ

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Experimental electrochemical capacitor test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various electrochemical capacitors (ultracapacitors) are being developed for hybrid vehicles as candidate power assist devices for the fast response engine. The primary functions of the ultracapacitor are to level the dynamic power loads on the primary propulsion device and recover available energy from regenerative breaking during off-peak power periods. Ultracapacitors show promise toward being able to accept high regenerative pulses while exhibiting very high cycle life. This paper will present test data from selected US Department of Energy (DOE) supported ultracapacitor projects designed to meet the fast response engine requirements. Devices containing carbon, conducting polymers, and metal oxide electrode materials in combination with aqueous or organic electrolytes are being supported by the DOE. This paper will present and discuss testing data obtained from recent prototype capacitors supplied by Maxwell Energy Products, Inc., SAFT America, Inc., Federal Fabrics-Fibers and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Constant-current, constant-power, leakage-current, and self-discharge testing of these various capacitors have been conducted. All devices were cycled between the rated charged voltage and zero volts for the constant-current tests and between the rated charged voltage and half that value for the constant-power tests.

Wright, R.B.; Murphy, T.C.; Kramer, W.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Satula, R.A.; Rogers, S.A. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Secure SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results Secure SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to evaluate the cryptographic implementation and performance impact of the Secure SCADA Communication Protocol (SSCP) upon supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) communications. This report presents performance test data derived from proof of concept implementations of the SSCP. Secure SCADA Communication Protocol Performance Test Results More Documents & Publications AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan Hallmark Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device

13

Preliminary results from Charpy impact testing of irradiated JPDR weld metal and commissioning of a facility for machining of irradiated materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forty two full-size Charpy specimens were machined from eight trepans that originated from the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). They were also successfully tested and the preliminary results are presented in this report. The trends appear to be reasonable with respect to the location of the specimens with regards to whether they originated from the beltline or the core regions of the vessel, and also whether they were from the inside or outside regions of the vessel wall. A short synopsis regarding commissioning of the facility to machine irradiated materials is also provided.

Iskander, S.K.; Hutton, J.T.; Creech, L.E.; Nanstad, R.K.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Rosseel, T.M.; Bishop, P.S.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Distribution Conductor Burndown Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On overhead distribution circuits, conductor burndown is a well-documented phenomenon. Two systems are especially vulnerable to burndown: covered conductors (also known as tree wires or coated conductors) and small bare wires. In a burndown scenario, a power-follow arc develops on the system, with at least one end of the arc attached to a conductor. The arc heats the conductor, which causes the strands to anneal and lose tensile strength. The burndown event results in the strands breaking and the conduct...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Distributed Utility Interconnection Tests -- Results and Next Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comprehensive suites of tests have been planned and performed to evaluate the impacts of distributed resources in a realistic test environment. This report describes the results of unintentional islanding and voltage regulation tests conducted at the Distributed Utility Integration Test (DUIT) facility, located at the Pacific Gas and Electric (PGE) test facility in San Ramon, California. The California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ha...

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Test results of early photovoltaic concentrating collectors  

SciTech Connect

Several passively and actively cooled photovoltaic concentrating collectors built during the period 1976 to 1979 have been tested. The tests provide information on the performance characteristics of these collectors. The results of the tests are summarized.

Gerwin, H.J.; Pritchard, D.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

COMPARISON OF RESPONSE OF 9977 TEST PACKAGES TO ANALYTICAL RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each of the hypothetical accident test cases for the 9977 prototypes was included in the battery of finite element structural analyses performed for the package. Comparison of the experimental and analytical results provides a means of confirming that the analytical model correctly represents the physical behavior of the package. The ability of the analytical model to correctly predict the performance of the foam overpack material for the crush test is of particular interest. The dissipation of energy in the crushing process determines the deceleration of the package upon impact and the duration of the impact. In addition, if the analytical model correctly models the foam behavior, the predicted deformation of the package will match that measured on the test articles. This study compares the deformations of the test packages with the analytical predictions. In addition, the impact acceleration and impact duration for the test articles are compared with those predicted by the analyses.

Smith, A; Tsu-Te Wu, T

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

18

Results of charpy V-notch impact testing of structural steel specimens irradiated at {approximately}30{degrees}C to 1 x 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} in a commercial reactor cavity  

SciTech Connect

A capsule containing Charpy V-notch (CVN) and mini-tensile specimens was irradiated at {approximately} 30{degrees}C ({approximately} 85{degrees}F) in the cavity of a commercial nuclear power plant to a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1MeV). The capsule included six CVN impact specimens of archival High Flux Isotope Reactor A212 grade B ferritic steel and five CVN impact specimens of a well-studied A36 structural steel. This irradiation was part of the ongoing study of neutron-induced damage effects at the low temperature and flux experienced by reactor supports. The plant operators shut down the plant before the planned exposure was reached. The exposure of these specimens produced no significant irradiation-induced embrittlement. Of interest were the data on unirradiated specimens in the L-T orientation machined from a single plate of A36 structural steel, which is the same specification for the structural steel used in some reactor supports. The average CVN energy of five unirradiated specimens obtained from one region of the plate and tested at room temperature was {approximately} 99 J, while the energy of 11 unirradiated specimens from other locations of the same plate was 45 J, a difference of {approximately} 220%. The CVN impact energies for all 18 specimens ranged from a low of 32 J to a high of 111 J. Moreover, it appears that the University of Kansas CVN impact energy data of the unirradiated specimens at the 100-J level are shifted toward higher temperatures by about 20 K. The results were an example of the extent of scatter possible in CVN impact testing. Generic values for the CVN impact energy of A36 should be used with caution in critical applications.

Iskander, S.K.; Stoller, R.E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab.

Harms, E; Chase, B; Cullerton, E; Hocker, A; Jensen, C; Joireman, P; Klebaner, A; Kubicki, T; Kucera, M; Legan, A; Leibfritz, J; Martinez, A; McGee, M; Nagaitsev, S; Nezhevenko, O; Nicklaus, D; Pfeffer, H; Pischalnikov, Y; Prieto, P; Reid, J; Schappert, W; Tupikov, V; Varghese, P; Branlard, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Economic Impacts of Carbon Taxes: Detailed Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the possibility that rising concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases might cause undesirable climate change, policies to restrict emissions of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, have been proposed. Such proposals frequently take the form of carbon taxes. This report presents the detailed results of an examination of the economic costs of carbon taxes, including where and how the U.S. economy would be impacted.

1995-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Single-Unit Unintentional Islanding Test Results at the DUIT Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of single-unit unintentional islanding tests performed at the DUIT Test Facility. These tests are the first tests to be performed in a comprehensive suite of tests to evaluate the impacts of distributed resources in a realistic test environment. The work described in this report has been sponsored by the California Energy Commission (CEC), and by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) through the U.S. Department of Energy.

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

22

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - PHEV Testing Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on cycles 7 Baseline Performance Testing Results 8 EnergyCS Prius - UDDS Fuel Use * 9 kWh Valence lithium pack - AC kWh EnergyCS PHEV Prius MPG & kWh - UDDS Testing 180 9 170...

23

Light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. Los Alamos National Laboratory designed, fabricated, and safety tested the LWRHU. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a fineweave-pierced fabric graphite aeroshell assembly. To compare the performance of the LWRHUs fabricated for the Cassini mission with the performance of those fabricated for the Galileo mission, and to determine a failure threshold, two types of impact tests were conducted. A post-reentry impact test was performed on one of 180 flight-quality units produced for the Cassini mission and a series of sequential impact tests using simulant-fueled LWRHU capsules were conducted respectively. The results showed that deformation and fuel containment of the impacted Cassini LWRHU was similar to that of a previously tested Galileo LWRHU. Both units sustained minimal deformation of the aeroshell and fueled capsule; the fuel was entirely contained by the platinum capsule. Sequential impacting, in both end-on and side-on orientations, resulted in increased damage with each subsequent impact. Sequential impacting of the LWRHU appears to result in slightly greater damage than a single impact at the final impact velocity of 50 m/s. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Reimus, M.A.; Rinehart, G.H.; Herrera, A.; Lopez, B.; Lynch, C.; Moniz, P. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. Los Alamos National Laboratory designed, fabricated, and safety tested the LWRHU. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a fineweave-pierced fabric graphite aeroshell assembly. To compare the performance of the LWRHUs fabricated for the Cassini mission with the performance of those fabricated for the Galileo mission, and to determine a failure threshold, two types of impact tests were conducted. A post-reentry impact test was performed on one of 180 flight-quality units produced for the Cassini mission and a series of sequential impact tests using simulant-fueled LWRHU capsules were conducted respectively. The results showed that deformation and fuel containment of the impacted Cassini LWRHU was similar to that of a previously tested Galileo LWRHU. Both units sustained minimal deformation of the aeroshell and fueled capsule; the fuel was entirely contained by the platinum capsule. Sequential impacting, in both end-on and side-on orientations, resulted in increased damage with each subsequent impact. Sequential impacting of the LWRHU appears to result in slightly greater damage than a single impact at the final impact velocity of 50 m/s.

Reimus, M. A. H.; Rinehart, G. H.; Herrera, A.; Lopez, B.; Lynch, C.; Moniz, P. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

IMPACTS Results Summary for CY 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Working in partnership with industry, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) is helping reduce industrial energy use, carbon emissions, and waste while boosting productivity and economic competitiveness. Operating within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), ITP conducts research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects and technology transfer activities that are producing substantial benefits to industry and helping the nation to address some of its biggest challenges in the areas of energy security and environmental performance. This document summarizes some of the impacts of ITP’s programs through 2010. The selection of 2010 as the timeframe for this report recognizes the fact that it takes at least two years to gain a full perspective on program performance and to assess the results of commercialization efforts for the technologies and practices at issue.

Weakley, Steven A.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER APRIL 4,1995 FC9510 / 95PT4 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer April 4, 1995 55103/9510:jb CONTENTS Page Introduction........................................................................................1 NPR-3 Map........................................................................................2 Benefits of D-JAX Pump-Off Controller.....................................................3 Test Results.......................................................................................3 Production Information..........................................................................4

27

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT AJUST A PUMP BEAM PUMPING UNIT FEBRUARY 19, 1997 FC9532 / 95EC1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER AJUST A PUMP TEST Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager February 19, 1997 650200/551107:9532 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Model-2000 Ajust A Pump system at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) manufactures compact beam-pumping units that incorporate energy-efficient gear boxes. The equipment is designed to reduce operating costs and minimize maintenance labor. This report documents the equipment performance and the results of the Ajust A Pump test. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate claims of energy efficiency and reduced labor requirements. The test showed

28

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PETRO-PLUG PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING JANUARY 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/97PT22 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: Michael R. Tyler RMOTC Project Manager January 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC/96ET4 CONTENTS Page Technical Description ...................................................................................................... 1 Problem ............................................................................................................................ 1 Solution ............................................................................................................................ 2 Operation..........................................................................................................................

29

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL PETROLEUM MAGNETICS INTERNATIONAL NOVEMBER 28, 1996 FC9520 / 95PT8 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETROLEUM MAGNETIC INTERNATIONAL DOWNHOLE MAGNETS FOR SCALE CONTROL Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9520:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Petroleum Magnetics International (PMI) downhole magnet, at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. PMI of Odessa, Texas, states that the magnets are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing

30

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE MARCH 15, 1998 FC9553/96PT16 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sperry-Sun Permanent Downhole Pressure Gauge PROJECT TEST RESULTS March 16, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract The Sperry-Sun Downhole Permanent Pressure Gauge (DPPG) is a pressure gauge that is designed to remain in the well for long periods of time providing real time surface data on borehole pressures. The DPPG was field tested at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center in well 63-TPX-10. The instrument was attached to the production string directly above a submersible pump. It was expected to monitor pressure draw-down and build-ups during normal production cycles. During the first two months of the test, the tool worked fine providing a pressure up survey that

31

Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) sequential impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. Los Alamos National Laboratory designed, fabricated, and safety tested the LWRHU. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a fineweave-pierced fabric graphite aeroshell assembly. A series of sequential impacts tests using simulant-fueled LWRHU capsules was recently conducted to determine a failure threshold. Sequential impacting, in both end-on and side-on orientations, resulted in increased damage with each subsequent impact. Although the tests were conducted until the aeroshells were sufficiently distorted to be out of dimensional specification, the simulant-fueled capsules used in these tests were not severely deformed. Sequential impacting of the LWRHU appears to result in slightly greater damage than a single impact at the final impact velocity of 50 m/s. Postimpact examination revealed that the sequentially impacted capsules were slightly more deformed and were outside of dimensional specifications.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Rinehart, G.H.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS APRIL 4,1995 FC9511 / 95PT5 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer November 28, 1995 650100/9511:jb ABSTRACT November 28, 1995 The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the Mag-Well Downhole Magnetic Fluid Conditioners (MFCs), at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR- 3) located 35 miles north of Casper in Natrona County, Wyoming. Mag-Well, Inc., manufactures the MFCs, that are designed to reduce scale and paraffin buildup on the rods, tubing and downhole pump of producing oil wells. The Mag-Well magnetic tools failed to

33

Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DYNAMOMETER DYNAMOMETER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9514 / 95PT6 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-

35

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DYNAMOTER DYNAMOTER Sandia National Laboratories FEBRUARY 10, 1998 FC9542 / 96PT11 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sandia Lab Downhole Dynamometer PROJECT TEST RESULTS February 10, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract This test involved the use of Downhole Dynamometer Tools (DDT) that were developed by Albert Engineering and the Sandia National Laboratory. The five (5) Downhole Dynamometers (DDT) were installed in the rod string of well 13-A-21 at predetermined intervals. The DDT tools are equipped with strain gauges and programmable clocks. The tools were place in the well and removed after the data had been gathered. The data gathering is pre-programmed to occur when pumped-off conditions are obtained in the well. This information then reflects the true conditions found downhole in a well in a pumped-off state.

36

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL PARAFFIN CONTROL PROJECT DECEMBER 17, 1997 FC9544 / 96PT12 RMOTC Test Report Paraffin Control Project BDM Oklahoma/NIPER 220 N. Virginia Bartlesville, OK 4003 918-336-2400, FAX 918-337-4365 Leo Giangiacomo, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17. 1997 Abstract This report summarizes the field performance results of a comparison of chemical and microbial paraffin control systems. The two systems were selected from laboratory screening work. Well selection was based on production rates, produced fluids, and prior paraffin treatments. The treatments were performed on similar groups of wells over the same period of time, using quantities and techniques recommended by the supplier specifically for the wells to be treated. The tests were conducted by the U. S. Department of

37

PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the range of 1 to 6 atm (15 to 90 psia). Temperatures could be controlled in the range from ambient to 80 C. Hydrogen generated at the cathode of the cell was collected for the purpose of flow measurement and composition analysis. The test facility proved to be easy to operate, versatile, and reliable.

Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

38

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Testing Data Summary - Summary Plots - - Comparison Plots - - Prototype Drawings - Prototype Summary prototype prototype description (test conditions: cold side -18C,...

40

Los Alamos test-room results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fourteen Los Alamos test rooms have been operated for several years; this paper covers operation during the winters of 1980-81 and 1981-82. Extensive data have been taken and computer analyzed to determine performance parameters such as efficiency, solar savings fraction, and comfort index. The rooms are directly comparable because each has the same net coefficient and solar collection area and thus the same load collector ratio. Configurations include direct gain, unvented Trombe walls, water walls, phase change walls, and two sunspace geometries. Strategies for reducing heat loss include selective surfaces, two brands of superglazing windows, a heat pipe system, and convection-suppression baffles. Significant differences in both backup heat and comfort are observed among the various rooms. The results are useful, not only for direct room-to-room comparisons, but also to provide data for validation of computer simulation programs.

McFarland, R.D.; Balcomb, J.D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 (specimen 22 data from Test 19) position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC...

42

Ice Ball Impact Testing of Roofing Materials - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Failure Analysis and Prevention. Presentation Title, Ice Ball Impact Testing of ...

43

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

44

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

45

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

46

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

47

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 position specimen specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18C, warm side 21C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line...

48

End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hhinckley, J.E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICROBIAL PRODUCTION STIMULATION MARCH 31, 1998 FC970010 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Microbial Production Stimulation for: D. Michael Dennis Geomicrobial Technologies,...

50

Full Scale Tornado Missile Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the time of this interim report, approximately half the tests scheduled in the EPRI/Sandia Tornado-Missile Program had been completed. This report was issued to disseminate the results of the initial tests as quickly as possible, in order to satisfy the needs of utilities and architect-engineers engaged in plant-licensing procedures. The findings are presented with a minimum of interpretation.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM JULY 25, 1996 FC9519 / 95PT7 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER TANK LEVEL GAUGING SYSTEM DOUBLE M ELECTRIC Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer July 25, 1996 551103/9519:jb ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a test of a Tank Level Gauging System at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3). Double M. Electric manufactures the equipment that incorporates an optical-encoder sending unit, cellular communications, and software interface. The system effectively displayed its capabilities for remote monitoring and recording of tank levels.

52

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is also possible. Well 83A4 at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 was selected as a test well. This well is rod pumped and had a stable production history. It produced enough...

53

Test results for robotic manipulator EMMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) headquarters in Gaithersburg, Maryland, where Grey Pilgrim has experimental space available under a Cooperative R & D Agreement (CRADA) with NIST. Under the CRADA, Grey Pilgrim is tasked with developing a version of EMMA suitable for deployment of a stereo camera on a NIST RoboCrane, a mobile platform with applications to several industrial environments (including hazardous materials) based on the concept of the Steward Platform, a structure with great strength and a minimum of material.

Ramsower, D.C.

1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport Gasifier test facility at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) has operated for almost 9,150 hours, gasifying bituminous and sub-bituminous coals and lignites using air and oxygen as the oxidant. During this time plant reliability and performance has improved progressively and the high degree of process understanding developed has been used to improve designs for key equipment items, such as coal feeding and coarse and fine ash removal. Using state-of-the-art data analysis and mode...

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

55

Thermally Induced Groundwater Flow Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The authors examine the transient residual thermal signal resulting from an underground nuclear test (buried below the water table) and its potential to affect local groundwater flow and radionuclide migration in a saturated, fractured, volcanic aquifer system. Thermal profiles measured in a drillback hole between 154 days and 6.5 years after the test have been used to calibrate a non-isothermal model of fluid flow. In this process, they have estimated the magnitude and relative changes in permeability, porosity and fracture density between different portions of the disturbed and undisturbed geologic medium surrounding the test location. The relative impacts of buoyancy forces (arising from the thermal residual of the test and the background geothermal gradient) and horizontal pressure gradients on the post-test flow system are better understood. A transient particle/streamline model of contaminant transport is used to visualize streamlines and streaklines of the flow field and to examine the migration of non-reactive radionuclides. Sensitivity analyses are performed to understand the effects of local and sub-regional geologic features, and the effects of fractured zones on the movement of groundwater and thermal energy. Conclusions regarding the overall effect of the thermal regime on the residence times and fluxes of radionuclides out of the system are drawn, and implications for more complicated, reactive contaminant transport are discussed.

Maxwell, R.M.; Tompson, A.F.B.; Rambo, J.T.; Carle, S.F.; Pawloski, G.A.

2000-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR IMPROVED ELASTOMER COMPOUND FOR PROGRESSIVE CAVITY PUMPS Cameron Elastomer Technology MARCH 23, 1998 FC9563/96PT17 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT17 Improved Elastomer Compound for Progressive Cavity Pumps Cameron Elastomer Technology 29501 Katy Fwy Katy, Texas 77494-7801 (281) 391-4615 (281) 391-4640 (fax) David H. Doyle, PE, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 23, 1998 Introduction The purpose of this project was to evaluate improved progressing cavity (PC) pump stator elastomer materials in NPR-3 crude under field conditions. The goal of the project was to test an elastomer material that can be used in high API-gravity (greater than 38' API) crude oils. Currently available materials used for the construction of pump stators swell and fail in contact with such crude oils. This limits the applicability of progressing cavity

57

Uncertainty in in-place filter test results  

SciTech Connect

Some benefits of accounting for uncertainty in in-place filter test results are explored. Information the test results provide relative to system performance acceptance limits is evaluated in terms of test result uncertainty. An expression for test result uncertainty is used to estimate uncertainty in in-place filter tests on an example air cleaning system. Modifications to the system test geometry are evaluated in terms of effects on test result uncertainty.

Scripsick, R.C.; Beckman, R.J.; Mokler, B.V.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/11/05 11:40 18.10 17.80 18.13 17.44 17.82 right 7 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer top angled toward cold side, Kr 17.80 13.74 16.90 14.44 15.77 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

59

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/15/05 13:40 18.08 17.75 17.91 16.84 17.43 right 8 triple/quad, 2 sputtered low-e layers, 2 layer teflon center insert clinging in center, Kr 18.26 17.58 18.05 17.23 17.67 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

60

Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the convertor housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/4/05 21:29 18.57 17.93 17.92 17.66 16.52 17.13 right 18 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated glass center layer in traditional broken spacer, Kr 18.54 18.38 17.67 17.81 16.85 17.37 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

62

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 23 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/16" acrylic with gap at top only, Kr 6/28/06 23:48 18.39 17.74 17.53 17.48 16.45 17.00 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.40 17.74 16.71 17.56 16.09 16.88 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

63

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 4/29/05 16:09 18.54 17.98 17.98 17.85 16.77 17.34 right 17 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer with 1/16" perimeter gap, Kr 18.88 16.14 16.08 17.71 14.41 16.15 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

64

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 4/14/05 17:22 18.51 17.42 17.76 17.67 16.61 17.18 right 15 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, dense sun screen center layer, Kr 19.33 17.07 13.77 18.00 14.20 16.26 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

65

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 1/31/06 16:22 17.15 15.06 16.46 15.32 13.91 14.68 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.53 17.87 16.90 17.71 16.41 17.11 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

66

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/24/05 12:40 17.51 17.52 17.63 16.30 17.03 right 9 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 72% open insect screen center layer, Kr 17.12 13.05 17.65 13.84 15.91 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average 1.12 0.00 0.39 4.47 21.36 20.68 21.02 20.8

67

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/25/05 16:15 18.47 17.37 17.87 17.40 16.11 16.82 right 20 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, folded Lexan center layer, Kr 18.63 17.24 16.06 17.51 15.64 16.67 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

68

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 23 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/16" acrylic with gap at bottom only, Kr 9/22/06 9:42 18.28 18.07 17.38 17.66 16.79 17.27 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.34 17.70 16.83 17.57 16.28 16.98 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

69

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/20/05 18:05 18.33 16.96 17.89 17.27 16.04 16.71 right 19 double, 1 sputtered low-e glass layer, 3/8" gap, Kr 15.73 15.53 14.97 14.51 13.65 14.13 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average 2.59 2.60 1.43 2.92 21.54 20.61 21.08 20.85

70

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LOW COST REFRACTURING LOW COST REFRACTURING JANUARY 23, 1998 FC9550/96PT14 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT14 Low Cost Refracturing Rock Creek Enterprises 980 Rock Creek Road Buffalo, Wyoming 82834 (307) 684-5243 (307) 684-0902 (fax) David H. Doyle, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center January 23, 1998 Introduction There are relatively few stimulation options available to owners of marginal or stripper wells. These wells are commonly restricted in their production rates because of formation or wellbore damage near the wellbore. Current services available to remove this damage are compared to the small gains possible from old, marginal wells. Over time, several things can occur that cause the flow of oil into the wellbore to be restricted. First, carbonate or sulfate scale can accumulate around the well or in the perforations. The accumulated scale will block oil from

71

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06/97DT15 06/97DT15 RMOTC Test Report Rotary Steerable Stabilizer Smith Drilling and Completions 16740 Hardy Street P. 0. Box 60068 Houston, Texas, 77205-0068 281-443-3370 Leo Giangiacorno, Acting Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center December 17, 1997 Introduction Directional drilling is more expensive than vertical drilling. This is due to the high maintenance cost of downhole motors and MWD systems required to control hole trajectory. In addition, directional holes have lower penetration rates due to the poor hole cleaning with a non-rotating string. Down time is often spent orienting tool face to obtain the desired trajectory after tile weight is placed on the bit and the reactive torque of the motor is absorbed by the drill string. Holes drilled in this manner often have a tortuous profile compared to holes drilled with a rotary system, increasing the torque

72

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR BEAM MOUNTED GAS COMPRESSOR (JACGAS COMPRESSOR) MARCH 3, 1998 FC970004/97PT23 RMOTC Test Report Number 97PT23 Jacgas Compressor Morrison International Iron Horse Compression Ltd. 9852-33 Avenue Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1C6 (403) 462-6847 David H. Doyle, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 3, 1998 Introduction Gas compressors that mount on the walking beam of an oil well pumping unit have been tried with mixed success for many years. Gas compression at the wellhead instead of further downstream can 'increase both oil and gas production by reducing the casinghead gas pressure. Excess pressure on the annulus of the well reduces fluid inflow and restricts production. In old, shallow wells, the small amount of pressure (50 psi) may be sufficient to prevent the well from producing economically. Other applications include the unloading of water

73

Property:Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance? Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Did The Test Results Demonstrate Projected Performance? Property Type Text...

74

AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to evaluate the performance of devices...

75

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to fulfill two major objectives. The first was to develop a gasifier able to process low-rank fuels more efficiently and cost-effectively than currently available designs. This work resulted in the Transport Gasifier for which two commercial projects have been announced. The second objective was to develop high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) filtration to facilitate high-temperature syngas cleanup and, thereb...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

76

Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) established the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) to fulfill two major objectives. The first was to develop a gasifier able to process low-rank fuels more efficiently and cost-effectively than currently available designs. This work resulted in the Transport Gasifier for which two commercial projects have been announced. The second objective was to develop high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) filtration to facilitate high-temperature syngas cleanup...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

RF Test Results from Cryomodule 1 at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Powered operation of Cryomodule 1 (CM-1) at the Fermilab SRF Beam Test Facility began in late 2010. Since then a series of tests first on the eight individual cavities and then the full cryomodule have been performed. We report on the results of these tests and lessons learned which will have an impact on future module testing at Fermilab. Since November 2010 Cryomodule 1 has been operating at 2 Kelvin. After evaluating each of the eight cavities while individually powered, the entire module has recently been powered and peak operation determined as shown in Figure 4. Several more weeks of measurements are planned before the module is warmed up, removed and replaced with Cryomodule 2 now under assembly at Fermilab.

Harms, E.; Carlson, K.; Chase, B.; Cullerton, E.; Hocker, A.; Jensen, C.; Joireman, P.; Klebaner, A.; Kubicki, T.; Kucera, M.; Legan, A.; /Fermilab /DESY

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

78

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IN-SITU H IN-SITU H 2 S BIOREMEDIATION JULY 11, 1994 FC9509 / 95PT3 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 North Poplar, Suite 100, Casper, WY 82601 (307) 261-5000, ext. 5060; FAX (307) 261-5997 IN-SITU H2S BIOREMEDIATION NATIONAL PARAKLEEN COMPANY PREPARED BY Fred Brown Michael R. Tyler 731 W.Wadley Field Engineer Building O July 11, 1994 Suite 130 Midland, Texas 79705 Phone (915)-683-3076 Fax (915)-683-3081 TEST PURPOSE: To treat producing oil wells that contain high concentrations of H2S with a product that will lower the levels of H2S in the well. METHOD OF TREATMENT: A bio-nutrient product (55 gallons) was mixed with 120 bbls of produced tensleep water and the mixture was pumped down the annulus of selected wells. The well was then shut-in for a 24 hour period and then was returned to production.

79

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. This report presents the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the small-scale test stand. It includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodologies, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012). The results of the aerosol measurements in the large-scale test stand are reported in Schonewill et al. (2012) along with an analysis of the combined results from both test scales.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. The round holes ranged in size from 0.2 to 4.46 mm. The slots ranged from (width × length) 0.3 × 5 to 2.74 × 76.2 mm. Most slots were oriented longitudinally along the pipe, but some were oriented circumferentially. In addition, a limited number of multi-hole test pieces were tested in an attempt to assess the impact of a more complex breach. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of this report is to present the experimental results and analyses for the aerosol measurements obtained in the large-scale test stand. The report includes a description of the simulants used and their properties, equipment and operations, data analysis methodology, and test results. The results of tests investigating the role of slurry particles in plugging of small breaches are reported in Mahoney et al. 2012a. The results of the aerosol measurements in the small-scale test stand are reported in Mahoney et al. (2012b).

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PHEV and Other Electric Drive Testing Results and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity PHEV and Other Electric Drive Testing Results and Resources Jim Francfort Electric Drive Session Alternative Fuels & Vehicles Las Vegas, Nevada -...

82

L1B test results Jos de Kloe,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADM-Aeolus L1B test results Jos de Kloe, L1B PM16 10-Mar-2009 #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 2 Test cases: Base Reference RMS (1) Academic Tests [with/without noise] (27) Sanity Tests (2) Realistic Tests [LITE data] (9) Mispointing Tests [CALIPSO data] (9) #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 3

Stoffelen, Ad

83

L2B test results Jos de Kloe,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADM-Aeolus L2B test results Jos de Kloe, L2B PM15 11-Mar-2009 #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 2 Test cases: Base Reference RMS (1) Academic Tests [with/without noise] (27) Sanity Tests (2) Realistic Tests [LITE data] (9) Mispointing Tests [CALIPSO data] (9) #12;L2B-PM15, J. de Kloe, 11-Mar-2009 3

Stoffelen, Ad

84

TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEST RESULT ANALYSIS WITH RESPECT TO FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS Gregor v. BOCHMANN and Omar B. BELLAL Université de Montréal Montréal, Canada Abstract: There are two aspects to testing: (1) the selection of appropriate test inputs and (2) the analysis of the observed interactions of the implementation under test

von Bochmann, Gregor

85

Charpy Impact Tests in Epoxy Matrix Composites Reinforced with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Wastes Generated during Stainless Steel Production · Charpy Impact Tests in Epoxy ... Differential Characterization of Ikperejere Iron shale and Iron Sandstone Deposit ... High Temperature Exposure of Oil Well Cements.

86

Full-Scale Tornado-Missile Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The testing described in this report provides data from full-scale simulated tornado-missile impacts on reinforced concrete walls. These data can be used directly for design and for the development of improved design and analysis techniques.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Building America Technical Review Meeting April 29-30, 2013 A Research Institute of the University of Central...

88

Initial Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses the Initial round robin results of the IEC 62804 system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon modules.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Ambrosi, H.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Ebert, M.; Mathiak, G.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of tests evaluating the electric switching portion of the EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter (ECPM) are presented. The ECPM is a modified parking meter that allows the purchase of 120 or 240 volt electric power. The ECPM is designed to make electricity available at any vehicle parking location. The test results indicate that the ECPM operated without failure thru a series of over current and ground fault tests at three different test temperatures. The magnitude of current required to trip the over current protection circuitry varied with temperature while the performance of the ground fault interruption circuitry did not change significantly with the test temperature.

Mersman, C.R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

2007 Nissan Altima-7982 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number 1N4CL21E27C177982). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Grey; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

2007 Toyota Camry-7129 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K773007129). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

2006 Toyota Highlander-6395 Hyrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A160006395). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

2006 Toyota Highlander-5681 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A860005681). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

2006 Toyota Highlander-5681 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A860005681). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

2006 Toyota Highlander-6395 Hyrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Highlander hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTEDW21A160006395). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

2007 Nissan Altima-7982 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number 1N4CL21E27C177982). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Grey; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

2007 Toyota Camry-7129 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K773007129). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Impact test characterization of carbon-carbon composites for the thermoelectric space power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thirty-eight unique carbon-carbon composite materials of cylindrical architecture were fabricated by commercial vendors for evaluation as alternative impact shell materials for the modular heat source of the thermoelectric space power system. Characterization of these materials included gas gun impact tests where cylindrical specimens containing a mass simulant were fired at 55 m/s to impact a target instrumented to measure force. The force versus time output was analyzed to determine: peak force, acceleration, velocity, and displacement. All impact tests exhibited an equivalence between preimpact momentum and measured impulse. In addition, energy was conserved based on a comparison of preimpact kinetic energy and measured work. Impact test results showed that the currently specified material provided impact energy absorption comparable to the best alternatives considered to date.

Romanoski, G.R.; Pih, Hui

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-3502E China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners Nan Zhou Round Robin Testing Results and Analysis by China National Institute of Standardization..................................................................................................................... 1 I.1.1 China's Energy Constraint Problem and the Need to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Energy

100

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral flow velocity, aquifer flow velocity, vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section) and in-well vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appliance & Equipment Standards » Implementation, Certification, & Appliance & Equipment Standards » Implementation, Certification, & Enforcement » Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards. Standardized DOE Testing Templates Residential Product Templates Automatic Commercial Ice Makers - September 17, 2012 Battery Chargers - June 13, 2011 Beverage Vending Machines - October 25, 2012 Central Air Conditioners and Central Air Conditioning Heat Pumps -

102

Three principal results from recent Fenton Hill flow testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability to the development of commercial-scale hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at other sites. These test results, obtained during the cumulative 11 months of reservoir flow testing between 1992 and 1995, show that there was no significant production temperature drawdown during this time and that the reservoir flow became more dispersed as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill and elsewhere, it is concluded that a three-well geometry, with one centrally located injection well and two production wells -- one at each end of the pressure-stimulated reservoir region -- would provide a much more productive system for future HDR development than the two-well system tested at Fenton Hill.

Brown, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DuTeaux, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Soil Desiccation Pilot Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of a pilot test of soil desiccation conducted as part of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test program. The report is written in CERCLA treatabilty test report format.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Johnson, Christian D.; Greenwood, William J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

2007 Nissan Altima-2351 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and the battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima HEV, number 2351 (VIN 1N4CL21E87C172351). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec). The Idaho National Laboratory and eTec conduct the AVTA for DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

2007 Toyota Camry-6330 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K673006330). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct AVTA for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

2007 Toyota Camry-6330 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Toyota Camry hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTNBB46K673006330). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct AVTA for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

2007 Nissan Altima-2351 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and the battery testing results for the 2007 Nissan Altima HEV, number 2351 (VIN 1N4CL21E87C172351). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec). The Idaho National Laboratory and eTec conduct the AVTA for DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Microsoft PowerPoint - Energy CS Prius Accel Testing Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 and the final results can be found in the table to the right. The Energy CS Prius averaged 66.1 mpg over the 5,596 miles of testing (5,440-mile goal). Based on an...

109

Microsoft PowerPoint - Hymotion Prius Accel Testing Results Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in May 2008 and the final results can be found in the table to the right. The Hymotion Prius averaged 79.5 mpg over the 5,591 miles of testing (5,440-mile goal). Based on an...

110

NREL: Wind Research - SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results The SWIFT wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing the SWIFT small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The competitive grant was awarded to Cascade Engineering. The SWIFT is a 1-kilowatt (kW), five-bladed with outer ring, horizontal-axis upwind small wind turbine. The turbine's rotor diameter is 2 meters, and its hub height is 13.72 meters. The SWIFT uses a single-phase permanent-magnet generator rated at 1 kW grid connected through an inverter at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary Supporting data and explanations for data provided in this table will be provided in the final reports. Data presented are preliminary and subject

111

Risk Impact Assessment of Extended Integrated Leak Rate Testing Intervals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a risk impact assessment for extending integrated leak rate test (ILRT) surveillance intervals to 15 years. The assessment demonstrates that on an industry-wide basis there is small risk associated with the extension, provided that the performance bases and defense-in-depth are maintained. There is an obvious benefit in not performing costly, critical-path, time-consuming tests that provide a limited benefit from a risk perspective.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Results of the PBF/LOFT Lead Rod Test Series  

SciTech Connect

The PBF/LOFT Lead Rod (PBF/LLR) Test Series consisted of four sequential, nuclear blowdown experiments (Test LLR-3, LLR-5, LLR-4, and LLR-4A). The primary objective of the test series was to evaluate the extent of mechanical deformation that would be expected to occur to low pressure (0.1 MPa) light water reactor design fuel rods subjected to a series of nuclear blowdown tests, and to determine if subjecting deformed fuel rods to subsequent testing would result in rod failure. The extent of mechanical deformation (buckling, collapse, or waisting of the cladding) was evaluated by comparison of cladding temperatue versus system pressure response with out-of-pile experimental data and by posttest visual examinations and cladding diametral measurements.

Varacalle, Jr, D J; Garner, R W; Hobbins, R R

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Wellbore inertial navigation system (WINS) software development and test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structure and operation of the real-time software developed for the Wellbore Inertial Navigation System (WINS) application are described. The procedure and results of a field test held in a 7000-ft well in the Nevada Test Site are discussed. Calibration and instrumentation error compensation are outlined, as are design improvement areas requiring further test and development. Notes on Kalman filtering and complete program listings of the real-time software are included in the Appendices. Reference is made to a companion document which describes the downhole instrumentation package.

Wardlaw, R. Jr.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cross-cooled dehumidifier model test results and computer simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on the development of a solar operated cross-cooled desiccant cooling system is described. A 15 cm x 15 cm x 15 cm (6'' x 6'' x 6'') cross-cooled silica gel desiccant dehumidifier model was designed, built and tested. The process of producing the silica gel sheets, the design and construction of the unit, the test setup and the test procedures are described in detail. A total of twenty tests were performed to determine the effect of inlet process stream dew point, process stream and cooling stream flowrates and regeneration stream temperature and dew point, on the performance of the unit. The test results show that the unit performance improves with increasing regeneration temperature, process stream flowrate and process air inlet dew point. The unit performance decreases with increase of the regeneration stream dew point. The results clearly show that the process stream inlet dew point is the dominating factor and that the concept of cross-cooling works very well. With moderate cross-cooling, the unit performance can increase over 50%. All tests were simulated by a computer program. The experimental and theoretical results are in very good agreement.

Mei, V.; Lavan, Z.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

NREL: Wind Research - Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT10 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing Ventera's VT10 small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The VT10 is a horizontal-axis downwind, three-bladed turbine rated at 10 kilowatts (kW). Its diameter is 6.7 meters, and it is mounted on a lattice tower with a hub height of 21.7 meters. The VT10 uses a single-phase, grid-connected, permanent-magnet generator that operates at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is listed below, along with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 3/22/2010: 0; 3/29/2010: 26; 3/31/2010: 74; 4/1/2010: 75; 4/2/2010: 174;

117

Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

GICHD mine dog testing project : soil sample results #5.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fifth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in June 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

First Test Results of the New LANSCE Wire Scanner  

SciTech Connect

The Beam Diagnostics and Instrumentation Team (BDIT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE facility is presently developing a new and improved wire scanner diagnostics system controlled by National Instrument's cRIO platform. This paper describes the current state of development of the control system along with the results gathered from the latest actuator motion performance and accelerator-beam data acquisition tests.

Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

SIMS prototype System 3 test results: engineering analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results obtained during testing of a closed hydronic drain down solar system designed for space and hot water heating are presented. Data analysis is included which documents the system performance and verifies the suitability of SIMS Prototype System 3 for field installation.

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Results of Sandia National Laboratories grid-tied inverter testing  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a definition for a Non-Islanding Inverter. This paper also presents methods that can be used to implement such an inverter, along with references to prior work on the subject. Justification for the definition is provided on both a theoretical basis and results from tests conducted at Sandia National Laboratories and Ascension Technology, Inc.

Kern, G.A. [Ascension Technology, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Bonn, R.H.; Ginn, J.; Gonzalez, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Commercial Nonintrusive Load Monitoring System Beta Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring many different individual loads on customer premises is a costly, complex, and trouble-prone operation. The availability of a single instrument that could plug into the meter socket and measure individual premise loads would greatly simplify and reduce the cost of customer load monitoring. This report provides the test results of such a prototype instrument.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Biomass Cofiring: Field Test Results: Summary of Results at the Bailly and Seward Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cofiring, the simultaneous combustion of two dissimilar fuels in a given boiler, is a technology being considered for low-cost, low-risk use of biomass by electricity generating companies. The process of commercializing cofiring has proceeded from engineering studies through parametric tests to longer-term demonstrations. This report summarizes the results of those demonstrations to date, placing them in the context of the previous test programs.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Switching surge test results ehv substation bus configurations  

SciTech Connect

The industry has been actively engaged in, and has presented many results of, ehv switching surge test programs associated with transmission line designs. It would seem equally important that similar efforts be staged relative to ehv switching surge capabilities of the terminal equipment as it would normally be found in its variety of configurations. Toward this end, a series of switching surge test programs on a number of substation bus configurations was conducted. Particular emphasis was placed on the determination of switching surge characteristics of the air gaps found in ehv substation bus designs. The test data are presented with pertinent data evaluations in an attempt to provide a more refined basis for the application of final judgments to bus designs for 345, 500, and 750 kV substations.

Hertig, G.E.; Kelly, W.B.

1966-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

TEST RESULTS FROM GAMMA IRRADIATION OF ALUMINUM OXYHYDROXIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrated metal oxides or oxyhydroxides boehmite and gibbsite that can form on spent aluminum-clad nuclear fuel assemblies during in-core and post-discharge wet storage were exposed as granular powders to gamma irradiation in a {sup 60}Co irradiator in closed laboratory test vessels with air and with argon as separate cover gases. The results show that boehmite readily evolves hydrogen with exposure up to a dose of 1.8 x 10{sup 8} rad, the maximum tested, in both a full-dried and moist condition of the powder, whereas only a very small measurable quantity of hydrogen was generated from the granular powder of gibbsite. Specific information on the test setup, sample characteristics, sample preparation, irradiation, and gas analysis are described.

Fisher, D.; Westbrook, M.; Sindelar, R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Orifice Plugging Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities, is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations published in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials present in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty introduced by extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches in which the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are largely absent. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine the aerosol release fractions and aerosol generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents (AFA) was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and rectangular slots. Much of the testing was conducted at pressures of 200 and 380 psi, but some tests were conducted at 100 psi. Testing the largest postulated breaches was deemed impractical because of the large size of some of the WTP equipment. The purpose of the study described in this report is to provide experimental data for the first key technical area, potential plugging of small breaches, by performing small-scale tests with a range of orifice sizes and orientations representative of the WTP conditions. The simulants used were chosen to represent the range of process stream properties in the WTP. Testing conducted after the plugging tests in the small- and large-scale test stands addresses the second key technical area, aerosol generation. The results of the small-scale aerosol generation tests are included in Mahoney et al. 2012. The area of spray generation from large breaches is covered by large-scale testing in Schonewill et al. 2012.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

D-0 South End Cap Calorimeter Cold Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The South endcap calorimeter vessel was moved into Lab A on Sept. 18, 1990. A cooldown of the pressure vessel with liquid nitrogen was performed on Sept. 26 to check the vessel's integrity. With the pressure vessel cold, the insulating vacuum was monitored for leaks. Through out the testing, the insulating vacuum remained good and the vessel passed the test. The cold test was carried out per the procedures of D-Zero engineering note 3740.220-EN-250. The test was very similar to the cold test performed on the Central Calorimeter in October of 1987. The test of the ECS was performed in the same manner using the same equipment as the ECN cold test. Reference D-Zero engineering notes 3740.210-EN-122, 3740.000-EN-I07, and 3740.210-EN-II0 for information about the CC cold test. Reference EN-260 for the results of the ECN cold test. The insulating vacuum space was pumped on while equipment was being connected to the pressure vessel. Two hours after starting to pump with the blower the vacuum space pressure was at about 40 microns. The pumping continued overnight (another 16 hours). In the morning the pressure was 11.5 microns. A rate of rise test was performed. With the pump valved off, the pressure rose to 14 microns within 5 minutes and then rose to 16 microns in 6 hours (0.33 microns/hour). After all connections were made to the pressure vessel, a vacuum pump with an estimated effective pumping speed of about 70 scfm was valved on. After 18 hours, the pressure vessel was down to 270 microns. An additional day of pumping took the pressure down to only 250 microns. A leak was then found and fixed around the seal of the rupture disc. The pump was put on line again. The pressure vessel with pump on line was 27 microns after 16.5 hours. A rate of rise was then conducted. The pressure was 90 microns after valving out the pump. After 30 minutes the pressure increased to 107 microns. (34 microns/hr).

Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

1990-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

131

Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results  

SciTech Connect

One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the relevant physical properties projected for actual WTP process streams.

Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10-MWe (megawatt electric), conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This report describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities, the operating experience of each major system, and overall plant performance. Tests were conducted to measure the power output (MW) of the each major system, the efficiencies of the heliostat, receiver, thermal storage, and electric power generation systems and the daily energy collected, daily thermal-to-electric conversion, and daily parasitic energy consumption. Also included are detailed test and evaluation reports.

BRADSHAW, ROBERT W.; DAWSON, DANIEL B.; DE LA ROSA, WILFREDO; GILBERT, ROCKWELL; GOODS, STEVEN H.; HALE, MARY JANE; JACOBS, PETER; JONES, SCOTT A.; KOLB, GREGORY J.; PACHECO, JAMES E.; PRAIRIE, MICHAEL R.; REILLY, HUGH E.; SHOWALTER, STEVEN K.; VANT-HULL, LORIN L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Results from Field Testing of Embedded Air Handling Unit and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tzone = zone temperature CSP = cooling set point HSP ... types, building uses, and weather conditions based on ... the faults and their impact on the ...

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Drop Test Results for the Combustion Engineering Model No. ABB-2901 Fuel Pellet Package  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) contracted with the Packaging Review Group (PRG) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct a single, 30-ft shallow-angle drop test on the Combustion Engineering ABB-2901 drum-type shipping package. The purpose of the test was to determine if bolted-ring drum closures could fail during shallow-angle drops. The PRG at LLNL planned the test, and Defense Technologies Engineering Division (DTED) personnel from LLNL's Site-300 Test Group executed the plan. The test was conducted in November 2001 using the drop-tower facility at LLNL's Site 300. Two representatives from Westinghouse Electric Company in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-SC); two USNRC staff members; and three PRG members from LLNL witnessed the preliminary test runs and the final test. The single test clearly demonstrated the vulnerability of the bolted-ring drum closure to shallow-angle drops-the test package's drum closure was easily and totally separated from the drum package. The results of the preliminary test runs and the 30-ft shallow-angle drop test offer valuable qualitative understandings of the shallow-angle impact.

Hafner, R S; Mok, G C; Hagler, L G

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

137

Exhaust emission testing of two ethanol variable fueled 1992 Chevrolet Luminas. Test results - 1993. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the exhaust emission testing results for two 1992 low-mileage Chevrolet Lumina ethanol variable fuel vehicles. The vehicles were tested on both Indolene and E85 fuel using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) for exhaust emissions. In the future, the EPA will retest the Luminas at future mileage accumulations of 20,000, 50,000 and possibly 100,000. At these future mileage accumulations, the vehicles will also be tested using intermediate fuel blends for both exhaust and evaporative emissions.

Samulski, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Hydrogen-burn survival: preliminary thermal model and test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents preliminary Hydrogen Burn Survival (HBS) Program experimental and analytical work conducted through February 1982. The effects of hydrogen deflagrations on safety-related equipment in nuclear power plant containment buildings are considered. Preliminary results from hydrogen deflagration experiments in the Sandia Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES) are presented and analytical predictions for these tests are compared and discussed. Analytical estimates of component thermal responses to hydrogen deflagrations in the upper and lower compartments of an ice condenser, pressurized water reactor are also presented.

McCulloch, W.H.; Ratzel, A.C.; Kempka, S.N.; Furgal, D.T.; Aragon, J.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Assessing Equivalent Viscous Damping Using Piping System test Results  

SciTech Connect

The specification of damping for nuclear piping systems subject to seismic-induced motions has been the subject of many studies and much controversy. Damping estimation based on test data can be influenced by numerous factors, consequently leading to considerable scatter in damping estimates in the literature. At present, nuclear industry recommendations and nuclear regulatory guidance are not consistent on the treatment of damping for analysis of nuclear piping systems. Therefore, there is still a need to develop a more complete and consistent technical basis for specification of appropriate damping values for use in design and analysis. This paper summarizes the results of recent damping studies conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Nie, J.; Morante, R.

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

140

Test results of the AGS Booster low frequency RF system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Band II RF system was originally built to support the Booster operations during the acceleration of heavy ions. Designed to sweep from 0.6 to 2.5 MHz, it was build and successfully tested over a much broader range reaching 4 MHz. Voltages up to more than 20 kV were reached over the design frequency range. The system consists of two stations, each of which is made of one single gap cavity directly driven by a grounded cathode push pull power amplifier. The low Q high permeability ferrites needed in the coaxial cavity in order to reach the lower end of the band make tuning extremely easy. Both systems were thoroughly tested both at single frequencies and on a sweep and are now installed in the ring, ready for operations. Static measurements showed no high-loss effects. The Band 11 system has been fully described in a previous paper; presented here are the results of the ``bench`` tests that lead to important performance improvements.

Sanders, R.T.; Cameron, P.; Damm, R.; Dunbar, A.; Goldman, M.; Kasha, D.; McNerney, A.; Meth, M.; Ratti, A.; Spitz, R.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. (Telephone: 412.776.4970; E-mail: publications@sae.org)

143

An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design  

SciTech Connect

Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

TMED-4 INTERIM REPORT PURE ZR EQUILIBRIUM TEST RESULTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to higher than expected permeation rates in the production of tritium in the TVA, a development and testing program was implemented to develop the understanding of why the higher rates were occurring. In addition, improved data are needed for both the design as well as the predictive models. One part of the program was to determine the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen and tritium over NPZ (1). During the course of this testing, some curious results were discovered (2) compared to the published literature data (3). Due to these apparently results, a follow-on task was undertaken to determine the equilibrium pressure of protium and deuterium over pure zirconium. A series of experiments were conducted to determine equilibrium pressures and isotherm data for the zirconium - protium and zirconium - deuterium systems. The data match the published literature data reasonably well with the plateau extending to loadings of about 1.4. There is a significant pressure rise for loadings greater than 1.7.

Korinko, P.; Morgan, G.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

145

PROTEC TM TEAR-OFFS: RESULTS OF LONG TERM TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed a series of tests (Phases 1 and 2) to assess the potential use of a Mylar{reg_sign} tear-off system as a primary or secondary protective barrier to minimize acid etching ('frosting'), accidental scratching, and/or radiation damage for shielded cells, glovebox, and/or chemical hood windows. Conceptually, thin, multi-layered sheets of Mylar (referred to throughout this report as the ProTec{trademark} tear-off system) can be directly applied to the shielded cell, glovebox, or hood sash window to serve as a secondary (or primary) barrier. Upon degradation of visual clarity due to accidental scratching, spills/splatters, and/or radiation damage, the outer layer (or sheet) of Mylar could be removed refreshing or restoring the view. Due to the multilayer aspect, the remaining Mylar layers would provide continued protection for the window from potential reoccurrences. Although the concept of using a tear-off system as a protective barrier is conceptually enticing, potential technical issues were identified and addressed as part of this phased study to support implementation of this type of system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specific test conditions of interest to the DWPF included the performance of the tear-off system exposed to or under the following conditions: (1) acid(s) (concentrated (28.9 M) HF, concentrated (15.9M) HNO{sub 3}, 6M HCl, and 0.6M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}); (2) base (based on handling of radioactive sludges with pH of {approx}12-13); (3) gamma radiation (due to radioactive sources or materials being used in the analytical cells); (4) scratch resistance (simulating accidental scratching with the manipulators); and (5) in-situ testing (sample coupons exposed to actual field conditions in DWPF). The results of the Phase 1 study indicated that the ProTec tear-off concept (as a primary or secondary protective barrier) is a potential technical solution to prevent or retard excessive damage that would result from acid etching, base damage (as a result of a sludge spill or splatter), gamma radiation damage, and/or accidental scratching (due to manipulator/tool contact). Although identified as a potential solution, the Phase 1 testing was relatively short-term with exposure times up to 1-2 months for the acid and gamma radiation tests. Phase 2 testing included longer exposure times for the acid resistance (up to 456 days) and gamma radiation exposure (700 days with a cumulative gamma dose of {approx}3.1 x 10{sup 5} rad) assessments. The tear-off system continued to perform well in these longer-term acid resistance testing and gamma exposure conditions. Complete removal of the tear-offs after these long-term exposure times indicate that not only could visual clarity be restored but the mechanical integrity could be retained. The results also provided insight into the ability of the ProTec tear-off system to withstand the chemical and physical abuses expected in off-normal shielded cells operations. The conceptual erasing of scratches or marks by excessive manipulator abuse was demonstrated in the SRNL Shielded Cells mock-up facility through the removal of the outer layer tear-off with manipulators. In addition, the Phase 2 testing included an in-situ assessment of a prototype tear-off system in the DWPF Sampling Cells where the system was exposed to actual field conditions including radioactive sources, acidic and basic environments, dusting, and chemical cleaning solutions over a 5-6 month period. DWPF personnel were extremely satisfied with the performance (including the successful removal of 3 layers with manipulators) of the ProTec tear-off system under actual field conditions. The successful removal of the outer layer tear-offs with the manipulator, using tabs not specifically designed for remote operations, demonstrates that the system is 'manipulator-friendly' and could be implemented in a remote environment. The ability to remove the outer layer tear-off not only regains visual clarity but also reduces waste disposal volumes (i.e., dispo

Peeler, D

2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

First Measurements and Results With a Stretched Wire Test Setup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LINAC Coherent Light Source [LCLS] is a free electron laser, designed to produce high brilliant X-ray beams using Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission [SASE]. Due to the physics of SASE, the electron beam has to be held very precisely on the same trajectory as the X-ray light beam generated by the undulator magnets. To optimize the SASE output, trajectory deviations between both beams have to be minimized to a few micrometers along the entire undulator section and held stable over the time period between beam-based-alignment processes. Consequently, extremely high position stability of all magnets in the undulator section is required to operate the LCLS successfully. The knowledge of any magnet movement exceeding few micrometers during periods of several weeks is essential for efficient X-ray generation. A well known principle of monitoring transverse component positions along beam lines is the application of stretched wires, associated with suitable wire position sensors and electronics. The particular challenge at LCLS is the required wire system performance in conjunction with the length of the undulator section and the large number of monitors. Verification of system stability and resolution under real conditions is the primary goal of this test setup. A stretched wire test setup has been implemented to gain experience for the final design of a wire system, which will meet the position monitoring requirements in the LCLS undulator section. The report briefly introduces the system's architecture and describes first measurements and results.

Peters, Franz

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

147

Enhancing Building Operations Through Automated Diagnostics: Field Test Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) is a modular diagnostic software system that provides detection and diagnosis of problems with the operation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems and major energy end-uses. It has been extensively field tested and demonstrated in buildings over the past several years. WBD found problems with many air-handling units at all sites. The problems ranged from a simple set point deviation to improper implementation of controls. The results from these demonstrations, along with the feedback from building operators and managers on the use of diagnostic tools, are presented in the paper. Experience from field tests indicates that providing diagnostic tools to building operators can increase their awareness of equipment faults, but it will not by itself solve the problems of inefficient operations. Changes in operation and maintenance practices and behavior are needed. We discuss how these new technologies might be delivered and used more effectively to better manage facilities, improving their condition and increasing their energy efficiency.

Katipamula, S.; Brambley, M. R.; Bauman, N.; Pratt, R. G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Computing, Networking and Services (2010)" POSTER Preliminary Results in Virtual Testing for Smart Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Smart buildings promise to revolutionize the way we live. Applications ranging from climate control to fire management can have significant impact on the quality and cost of these services. However, a smart building and any technology with direct effect on the safety of its occupants must undergo extensive testing. Virtual testing by means of computer simulation can significantly reduce the cost of testing and, as a result, accelerate the development of novel applications. Unfortunately, building physically-accurate simulation codes can be labor intensive. To address this problem, we propose a framework for rapid, physicallyaccurate virtual testing of smart building systems. The proposed framework supports analytical modeling and simulation of both a discrete distributed system as well as the physical environment that hosts it.

Julien Bruneau; Charles Consel; Walid Taha; Wail Masry Hannourah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the resluts of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within eleven Hanford Site wells during fiscal year 2000. Detailed characterization tests performed included groundwater-flow characterization; barometric response evaluation; slug tests; single-well tracer tests; constant-rate pumping tests; and in-well, vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include transmissivity; hydraulic conductivity; specific yield; effective porosity; in-well, lateral flow velocity; aquifer-flow velocity; vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section); and in-well, verticla flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater-flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Results of the 1000 Hour Rotary Microfilter Endurance Test  

Stellite on Nitronic 60. 8 SRNL-L3100-2010-00229 Rotary Microfilter 1000 Hour Test Flux Data for 1000 Hour Test 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 100 200 300 400 500 ...

152

Process Testing Results and Scaling for the Hanford Waste ...  

PEP Testing Objectives • Qualitatively demonstrate leaching and ultrafiltration processes, equipment design and process control strategies • Obtain data to ...

153

Results of IEC 62804 Draft Round Robin Testing (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three crystalline silicon module designs were distributed in five replicas each to five laboratories for testing according to the IEC 62804 (Committee Draft) system voltage durability qualification test for crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules. The stress tests were performed in environmental chambers at 60 degrees C, 85% relative humidity, 96 h, and with module nameplate system voltage applied.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Koch, S.; Weber, T.; Berghold, J.; Hoffmann, S.; Koehl, M.; Dietrich, S.; Mathiak, G.; Ebert, M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS  

SciTech Connect

The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

Hay, M.; King, W.

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

155

2011 Hyundai Sonata 4932 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid HEV (VIN KMHEC4A43BA004932). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Results and conclusions test capabilities task group summary report  

SciTech Connect

This annotated briefing documents an economic analysis of Sandia`s system-level test facilities maintained and operated by the Design, Evaluation, and Test Technology Center 9700. The study was divided into four primary sub-tasks: (1) Estimation of the future system-level test workload, (2) Development of a consistent economic model to estimate the cost of maintaining and operating the test facilities, (3) Determination of the availability of viable alternative test sites, and (4) Assessment of the potential savings through reduction of excess capacity under various facility-closure scenarios. The analysis indicated that potential savings from closing all facilities could approach $6 million per year. However, large uncertainties in these savings remove any sound economic arguments for such closure: it is possible that testing at alternative sites could cost more than maintaining the current set of system-level test facilities. Finally, a number of programmatic risks incurred by facility closure were identified. Consideration of facility closure requires a careful weighing of any projected economic benefit against these programmatic risks. This summary report covers the briefing given to upper management. A more detailed discussion of the data and analyses is given in the full report, available for internal use from the technical library.

Bomber, T.; Pierce, K.; Easterling, R.; Rogers, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Room and Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, three previous papers [1, 2, 3] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens that began the investigation of these characteristics. The goal of the work presented herein is to add the results of additional tensile impact testing for 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, additional tests achieved target strain rates of 5, 10, and 22 per second at room temperature, 300, and 600 degrees Fahrenheit. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at each designated strain rate and temperature are presented herein.

Dana K. Morton; Spencer D. Snow; Tom E. Rahl; Robert K. Blandford

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Results of Repeat Tracer Tests at Ohaaki, NZ  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 20 years of tracer testing at Ohaaki a number of wells have been used more than once as tracer injection sites. In studying the various responses obtained it has been necessary to consider variations in the experimental test conditions before making comparisons which relate to field conditions. Some very significant changes have occurred in the field hydrology in recent years and water flow speeds as high as those encountered at Wairakei have been demonstrated.

McCabe, W.J.; Clotworthy, A.W.; Morris, C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel and control rod behavior, aerosol and hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (36,000 MWd/MtU) pressurized water-reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 silver-indium-cadmium control rods, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1.3-h transient at a coolant pressure of 6.95 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy and control rod absorber alloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 2100-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on-line instrumentation, analysis of fission product and aerosol data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 40 refs., 160 figs., 31 tabs.

Petti, D.A.; Martinson, Z.R.; Hobbins, R.R.; Allison, C.M.; Carlson, E.R.; Hagrman, D.L.; Cheng, T.C.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Seifken, L.J.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

PBF (Power Burst Facility) severe fuel damage test 1--3 test results report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1--3 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1--3 was the third test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel rod behavior, hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (38,000 MWd/tU) pressurized water reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 empty zircaloy guide tubes, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1-h transient at a nominal coolant pressure of 6.85 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 1340-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of online instrumentation, analysis of fission product data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 34 refs., 241 figs., 51 tabs.

Martinson, Z.R.; Gasparini, M.; Hobbins, R.R.; Petti, D.A.; Allison, C.M.; Hohorst, J.K.; Hagrman, D.L.; Vinjamuri, K. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Recent results from the Spacecraft Fabrication and Test MODIL  

SciTech Connect

The Spacecraft Fabrication and Test Manufacturing Operations Development and Integration Laboratory (SF&T MODIL) is working with SDIO program offices and contractors to reduce schedule and budget risks for SDIO systems as they go into production. The concurrent engineering thrust has identified potential high payoff areas. A materials and structures demonstration project has been successfully completed in partial automated closing of matched metal molds for a continuous fiber composite. In addition to excellent accuracy, the parts demonstrated excellent predictability and repeatability of physical properties. The cryocooler thrust successfully demonstrated and inserted precision technologies into a generic cryocooler part. The precision technologies thrust outlined two potentially high payoff areas in precision alignment and miniature rocket thrust measurement. The Producible Technology Working Group (PTWG) efforts identified the need for a test and assembly thrust. Due to funding limitations, continuing efforts are limited to the cryocooler thrust.

Saito, T.T.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Test Procedure for 170.302.h Incorporate Laboratory Test Results APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Procedure for §170.302.h Incorporate Laboratory Test Results APPROVED Version 1.1 September 24, 2010 1 Test Procedure for §170.302 (h) Incorporate Laboratory Test Results This document describes the test procedure for evaluating conformance of complete EHRs or EHR modules1

163

The Power Systems Development Facility: Test Results 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transport Gasifier test facility at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) has operated for over 7,750 hours, gasifying bituminous and sub-bituminous coals and lignites using air and oxygen as the oxidant. During this time plant reliability and performance has improved progressively and the high degree of process understanding developed has been used to improve designs for key equipment items, such as coal feeding and ash removal. Using state-of-the-art data analysis and modeling software, the...

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results obtained from detailed hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer system conducted at the Hanford Site.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

165

Procedures for evaluating health impacts resulting from development of energy resources. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This manual is a compilation of formats, protocols, and procedures that may be used by communities and state agencies to evaluate health impacts resulting from the development of energy resources. The manual also considers ways of using these evaluations to develop plans for coping with health impacts. It is an outgrowth of a study of health problems experienced by impacted communities in Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS: TEST METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presenting Test Results Heat Exchanger Descriptions and Testof Residential Heat Exchangers Conclusions . . . . . . . .ventilation testing heat exchangers. system, a heat

Fisk, William J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Test Results for HINS Focusing Solenoids at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

A focusing lens R&D program is close to completion and industrial production of magnets has begun. Two types of magnets are being built for use in the room temperature RF section at the front end of a superconducting H-minus linac of a High Intensity Neutrino Source. All of the magnets are designed as a solenoid with bucking coils to cancel the field in the vicinity of adjacent RF cavities, and one type incorporates steering dipole corrector coils. We present a summary of the predicted and measured quench and magnetic properties for both R&D and production device samples that have been tested at Fermilab.

Tartaglia, M.A.; Orris, D.F.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Test results of lithium pool-air reaction suppression systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered reaction suppression systems were demonstrated to be effective in suppressing lithium pool-air reactions for lithium quantities up to 100 kg. Lithium pool-air reaction suppression system tests were conducted to evaluate suppression system effectiveness for potential use in fusion facilities in mitigating consequences of postulated lithium spills. Small-scale perforated and sacrificial cover plate suppression systems with delayed inert gas purging proved effective in controlling the lithium-air interaction for lithium quantities near 15 kg at initial temperatures up to 450/sup 0/C. A large-scale suppression system with a sacrificial cover, a diverter plate, an inert gas atmosphere, and remotely retrievable catch pans proved effective in controlling lithium pool-air interaction for a 100-kg lithium discharge at an initial temperature of 550/sup 0/C. This suppression system limited the maximum pool temperature to about 600/sup 0/C less than that expected for a similar lithium pool-air reaction without a suppression system. Lithium aerosol release from this large-scale suppression system was a factor of about 10,000 less than that expected for a lithium pool-air reaction with no suppression system. Remote retrieval techniques for lithium cleanup, such as (1) in-place lithium siphoning and overhead crane dismantling, and (2) lithium catch pan removal by use of an overhead crane, were demonstrated as part of this large-scale test.

Jeppson, D.W.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Short-Term Test Results: Multifamily Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Multifamily deep energy retrofits (DERs) represent great potential for energy savings, while also providing valuable insights on research-generated efficiency measures, cost-effectiveness metrics, and risk factor strategies for the multifamily housing industry. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a base scope retrofit with a goal of achieving 30% savings (relative to pre-retrofit), and a DER scope with a goal of 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit). The base scope has been applied to the entire complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. Findings from the implementation, commissioning, and short-term testing at Bay Ridge include air infiltration reductions of greater than 60% in the DER building; a hybrid heat pump system with a Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) > 1 (relative to a high efficiency furnace) which also provides the resident with added incentive for energy savings; and duct leakage reductions of > 60% using an aerosolized duct sealing approach. Despite being a moderate rehab instead of a gut rehab, the Bay Ridge DER is currently projected to achieve energy savings ? 50% compared to pre-retrofit, and the short-term testing supports this estimate.

Lyons, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the process of amending an aquifer with a substrate that induces growth and/or activity of indigenous bacteria for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction. For application at the 100-D Area, the purpose of biostimulation is to induce reduction of chromate, nitrate, and oxygen to remove these compounds from the groundwater. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier previously installed in the Hanford 100-D Area and thereby increase the longevity of the ISRM barrier. Substrates for the treatability test were selected to provide information about two general approaches for establishing and maintaining an in situ permeable reactive barrier based on biological reactions, i.e., a biobarrier. These approaches included 1) use of a soluble (miscible) substrate that is relatively easy to distribute over a large areal extent, is inexpensive, and is expected to have moderate longevity; and 2) use of an immiscible substrate that can be distributed over a reasonable areal extent at a moderate cost and is expected to have increased longevity.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Johnson, Christian D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gasperikova, E.; Ajo-Franklin, J.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Results from the NREL Variable-Speed Test bed  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NREL Variable-Speed Test bed turbine has been used to examine the performance and controllability of a variable-speed, variable-pitch turbine. Control strategies that eliminate drive-train torque fluctuations in high winds have been published before and example data are given here. The energy capture of a variable-speed wind turbine depends in part on its ability to successfully operate at the peak of the C{sub p}-{lambda} curve. The losses associated with the inability of the rotor to stay exactly on top of the curve at all have been found and quantified. New control strategies for improving energy capture in moderate winds are also proposed. The potential exists to improve overall energy capture by 5% or more.

Fingersh, L.J.; Carlin, P.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). National Wind Technology Center

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Test results, Industrial Solar Technology parabolic trough solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Industrial Solar Technology are cost-sharing development of advanced parabolic trough technology. As part of this effort, several configurations of an IST solar collector were tested to determine the collector efficiency and thermal losses with black chrome and black nickel receiver selective coatings, combined with aluminized film and silver film reflectors, using standard Pyrex{reg_sign} and anti-reflective coated Pyrex{reg_sign} glass receiver envelopes. The development effort has been successful, producing an advanced collector with 77% optical efficiency, using silver-film reflectors, a black nickel receiver coating, and a solgel anti-reflective glass receiver envelope. For each receiver configuration, performance equations were empirically derived relating collector efficiency and thermal losses to the operating temperature. Finally, equations were derived showing collector performance as a function of input insolation value, incident angle, and operating temperature.

Dudley, V.E. [EG and G MSI, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R.; Matthews, C.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Izod Impact Tests in Polyester Matrix Composites Reinforced with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A natural fiber presents interfacial characteristics with polymeric matrices that favor a high impact energy absorption by the composite structure. The objective of ...

175

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Plug-in 2011: Initial PEV and Charging Infrastructure Test Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plug in 2011: Initial PEV and Charging in 2011: Initial PEV and Charging Infrastructure Test Results Infrastructure Test Results Jim Francfort Jim Francfort Jim Francfort Jim...

177

MICRO PIN ARRAY DETECTOR (MIPA): FIRST TEST RESULTS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel gas proportional detector, consisting of an array of pins immersed into a cathode made out of closely packed hexagonals has been developed. The resulting geometry of the detector is 3 dimensional. Electron multiplication is limited to a region in close proximity to the tip of each pin, where the electric field decreases with distance from the pin at a rate faster than l/r, the rate that exists in a traditional wire chamber. The multiplication region is limited to a small part of the detector volume leading to stability of operation up to high charge gas gains. The amplification region is located far enough from any dielectric surface that the gas gain is insensitive to the charge state of the surface, a significant benefit compared with many other micro-pattern detectors. The microscopic dimensions of the individual pins of the array result in signals whose total duration is about a microsecond. Two identical, but opposite polarity signals are detected, one on the pin and one on the cathode. Both signals can be used by two independent, charge division, read-out systems to obtain unambiguous x-y position information of the primary ionization.

REHAK,P.; SMITH,G.C.; WARREN,J.B.; YU,B.

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

178

MICRO PIN ARRAY DETECTOR (MIPA): FIRST TEST RESULTS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel gas proportional detector, consisting of an array of pins immersed into a cathode made out of closely packed hexagonals has been developed. The resulting geometry of the detector is 3 dimensional. Electron multiplication is limited to a region in close proximity to the tip of each pin, where the electric field decreases with distance from the pin at a rate faster than 1/r, the rate that exists in a traditional wire chamber. The multiplication region is limited to a small part of the detector volume leading to stability of operation up to high charge gas gains. The amplification region is located far enough from any dielectric surface that the gas gain is insensitive to the charge state of the surface, a significant benefit compared with many other micro-pattern detectors. The microscopic dimensions of the individual pins of the array result in signals whose total duration is about a microsecond. Two identical, but opposite polarity signals are detected, one on the pin and one on the cathode. Both signals can be used by two independent, charge division, read-out systems to obtain unambiguous x-y position information of the primary ionization.

REHAK,P.; SMITH,G.C.; WARREN,J.B.; YU,B.

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Pressurization test results: Bonneville Power Administration Energy Conservation Study  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of air leakage measurements in 18 single-family detached houses at the Midway substation, Hanford, Washington, performed as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's Energy Conservation Study. The change in energy consumption following various retrofit strategies is compared. Air leakage was measured in each house with the fan pressurization technique, before and after the retrofits were installed. No significant change was found in infiltration rates in those houses receiving either no retrofits or insulation only; and average reduction of 17% in leakage area was found in the houses retrofitted with storm doors and windows. There appears to be great potential for further savings in energy use from reduced infiltration, and the study is being extended to investigate this.

Krinkel, D.L.; Dickeroff, D.J.; Casey, J.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular testing in order to more specifically document potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas development

Manning, Sturt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Round Robin Testing of Commercial Hydrogen Sensor Performance--Observations and Results: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presented observations and results from round robin testing of commercial hydrogen sensor performance.

Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.; Rivkin, C.; Post, M.; Boon-Bret, L.; Black, G.; Harskamp, F.; Moretto, P.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Final Test Results on 80% Service Test and Implementation Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current practice within the nuclear power industry is to use performance discharge tests for condition monitoring to determine when a battery has reached 80% of its rated capacity, which is considered the end of its service life. A service test is now used every refueling outage to verify that a battery can satisfy its design basis function as defined by the battery duty cycle. A modified performance test is used at ...

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

183

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF HEAT EXCHANGER TEST STAND WITH INITIAL TEST RESULTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Continual development of internal combustion engines requires greater performance from liquid coolants and heat exchangers to maintain optimal temperature. For the purpose of experimental testing… (more)

Albrecht, Daniel David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Test result analysis and validation of test verdicts G. v. Bochmann, D. Desbiens, M. Dubuc, D. Ouimet and F. Saba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test result analysis and validation of test verdicts G. v. Bochmann, D. Desbiens, M. Dubuc, D's) are useful in the protocol development cycle, particulary in the conformance testing area. In this paper, we present TETRA, a test and trace analysis tool based on the LOTOS FDT which can be used to automatically

von Bochmann, Gregor

185

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPACTS IMPACTS Industrial Technologies Program: Summary of Program Results for CY 2009 Boosting the Productivity and Competitiveness of U.S. Industry Foreword Foreword A robust U.S. industrial sector relies on a secure and affordable energy supply. While all Americans are feeling the pinch of volatile energy prices, project financial-constriction impacts on industry are especially acute. Uncertainty over energy prices, emission regulations, and sources of financing not only hurt industrial competitiveness - together they have the potential to push U.S. manufacturing operations offshore, eliminate jobs that are the lifeline for many American

186

High-silicon {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment- impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

Reimus, M.A.H.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Test results of a steam injected gas turbine to increase power and thermal efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The desire to increase both power and thermal efficiency of the gas turbine (Brayton cycle) engine has been pursued for a number of years and has involved many approaches. The use of steam in the cycle to improve performance has been proposed by various investigators. This was most recently proposed by International Power Technology, Inc. (IPT) and has been tested by Detroit Diesel Allison (DDA), Division of General Motors. This approach, identified as the Cheng dual-fluid cycle (Cheng/DFC), includes the generation of steam using heat from the exhaust, and injecting this steam into the engine combustion chamber. Test results on an Allison 501-KB engine have demonstrated that use of this concept will increase the thermal efficiency of the engine by 30% and the output power by 60% with no increase in turbine inlet temperature. These results will be discussed, as will the impact of steam rate, location of steam injection, turbine temperature, and engine operational characteristics on the performance of the Cheng/DFC.

Messerlie, R.L.; Tischler, A.O.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Results of OpenDSS CIM Interoperability Testing: Paris Interoperability Test, March 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) participated in the 2011 interoperability testing of the Common Information Model (CIM) for distribution, which was conducted at the Electricit de France facilities in Clamard, France, from March 28 through April 1, 2011. The testing covered the following parts of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard 61970, Energy Management System Application Program Interface (EMS-API), and standard 61968, Application Integration at Electric Utilities, Sy...

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

On the modeling of the Taylor cylinder impact test for orthotropic textured materials: Calculations and experiments  

SciTech Connect

Taylor impact tests using specimens cut from a rolled plate of Ta were conducted. The Ta was well-characterized in terms of flow stress and crystallographic texture. A piece-wise yield surface was interrogated from this orthotropic texture, and used in EPIC-95 3D simulations of the Taylor test. Good agreement was realized between the calculations and the post-test geometries in terms of major and minor side profiles and impact-interface footprints.

Maudlin, P.J.; Bingert, J.F.; House, J.W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

GOVERNOR PERFORMANCE TESTS. CORE I, SEED 2. Test Results. Section 4  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was conducted to determine the load at which each of the governor valves open when the primary average temperature is at 500 deg F. Data compilations for the test are presented along with comparisons with past performances. (J.R.D.)

1961-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

192

Qualification test procedures and results for Honeywell solar collector subsystem, single-family residence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test procedures and results are described in qualifying the Honeywell solar collector subsystem. Testing began in mid-August 1976, and was concluded in late February 1977. Testing was done in the following areas: pressure, service loads, hail, solar degradation, pollutants, thermal degradation, and outgassing. Results from these tests are summarized.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Information Resources: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues This April 9, 2009 webcast provided an overview of CALiPER's Round 7 testing results, and an update on the emerging understanding of...

194

Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Round 7 Testing Results and SSL Product Life Issues on Facebook Tweet about...

195

Impact of residential photovoltaics on electric utilities: some evidence from field test and simulation  

SciTech Connect

The adoption of residential photovoltaics will affect the load profile of electric utilities, the adequacy and reliability of their capacity, and their consumption of fuels. Impacts are examined by a comparison of the actual load profile facing a Texas utility with solar outputs from both TRNSYS simulations and a test array in Fort Worth. Array output is scaled up parametrically to represent different levels of solar penetration. The reductions in peak load and loss-of-load probability indicate that the adoption of 5 kW arrays by 50% of the residences reduces capacity requirements by only 4%. The value of utility savings will exceed the cost of the PV systems before 1990. The field test results are more favorable than the simulation.

Katzman, M.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Assessing the Impact of Differential Genotyping Errors on Rare Variant Tests of Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genotyping errors are well-known to impact the power and type I error rate in single marker tests of association. Genotyping errors that happen according to the same process in cases and controls are known as non-differential ...

Fast, Shannon Marie

197

Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions: Results from bellows tested in corroded conditions. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of nineteen bellows have been tested. Thirteen bellows were tested in ``like-new`` condition (results reported in Volume 1), and six were tested in a corroded condition. The tests showed that bellows in ``like-new`` condition are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage, while those in a corroded condition did not perform as well, depending on the amount of corrosion. The corroded bellows test program and results are presented in this report.

Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009, Introduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPACTS IMPACTS Industrial Technologies Program: Summary of Program Results for CY 2009 Boosting the Productivity and Competitiveness of U.S. Industry Foreword Foreword A robust U.S. industrial sector relies on a secure and affordable energy supply. While all Americans are feeling the pinch of volatile energy prices, project financial-constriction impacts on industry are especially acute. Uncertainty over energy prices, emission regulations, and sources of financing not only hurt industrial competitiveness - together they have the potential to push U.S. manufacturing operations offshore, eliminate jobs that are the lifeline for many American families, and weaken a sector of the economy that serves as the backbone of U.S. gross domestic product. The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is actively

200

PHYSICS RESULTS OF THE NSLS-II LINAC FRONT END TEST STAND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Front End Test Stand (LFETS) was installed at the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) in the fall of 2011 in order to test the Linac Front End. The goal of these tests was to test the electron source against the specifications of the linac. In this report, we discuss the results of these measurements and the effect on linac performance.

Fliller R. P.; Gao, F.; Yang, X.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Piel, C

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Initial results of the California Testing and Inspection Program for solar equipment (TIPSE)  

SciTech Connect

The California Energy Commission has accredited seven independent test laboratories to test solar collectors. Data for 65 collector models are tabulated. Terms used in the table are defined and ways to interpret the results are discussed. (MHR)

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Test Results for HD1, a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design and Fabrication ofa 16 Tesla Nb 3 Sn Dipole Magnet",Test Results for HD 1, a 16 Tesla Nb 3 Sn Dipole Magnet A.F.and bore fields above 16 Tesla. II. MAGNET FEATURES AND TEST

Lietzke, A.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Mode-Stirred Method Implementation for HIRF Susceptibility Testing and Results Comparison with Anechoic Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the implementation of mode-stirred method for susceptibility testing according to the current DO-160D standard. Test results on an Engine Data Processor using the implemented procedure and the comparisons with the standard anechoic ...

Nguyen Truong X.; Ely Jay J.; Koppen Sandra V.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Small Wind Turbine Testing Results from the National Renewable Energy Lab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The independent testing project was established at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion. Among these barriers is a lack of independent testing results for small turbines.

Bowen, A.; Huskey, A.; Link, H.; Sinclair, K.; Forsyth, T.; Jager, D.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Simulations Some results for probabilistic CSP 3/29 Background Testing theory pCSP Simulations Some results Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goal: Specification and proof methodologies for probabilistic concurrent systems Nondeterminism + Probability – why necessary? ? “Nondeterminism ” intrinsic to specification development à la CSP ? underspecified components expressed using “nondeterminism” COMP ? OPTION ? underspecified COMP more specified ? Analysis of concurrent systems requires “nondeterminism” ?- internal choice of CSP 4/29 Background Testing theory pCSP Simulations Some results Background

Matthew Hennessy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Foster Wheeler Solar Development Corporation modular industrial solar retrofit qualification test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under the Department of Energy's Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit project, industrial process steam systems incorporating line-focus solar thermal collectors were designed and hardware was installed and tested. This report describes the test results for the system designed by Foster Wheeler Solar Development Corporation. The test series included function and safety tests to determine that the system operated as specified, an unattended operations test to demonstrate automatic operation, performance tests to provide a database for predicting system performance, and life cycle tests to evaluate component and maintenance requirements. Component-level modifications to improve system performance and reliability were also evaluated.

Cameron, C.P.; Dudley, V.E.; Lewandoski, A.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Results of crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). Evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation-induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered) did not seem to have been altered by irradiation compared to those of the ASME K{sub Ia} curve. 9 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstead, R.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests: RTG-1 and RTG-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.; George, T.G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Identification and estimation of socioeconomic impacts resulting from perceived risks and changing images; An annotated bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1982, the US Congress passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to initiate the process of choosing a location to permanently store high-level nuclear waste from the designated Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as the only location to be studied as a candidate site for such a repository. The original acts and its amendments had established the grant mechanism by which the state of Nevada could finance an investigation of the potential socioeconomic impacts that could result from the installation and operation of this facility. Over the past three years, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM or RW) in the US Department of Energy (DOE) has approved grant requests by Nevada to perform this investigation. This report is intended to update and enhance a literature review conducted by the Human Affairs Research Center (HARC) for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project that dealt with the psychological and sociological processes underlying risk perception. It provides addition information on the HARC work, covers a subsequent step in the impact-estimation process, and translates risk perception into decisions and behaviors with economic consequences. It also covers recently developed techniques for assessing the nature and magnitude of impacts caused by environmental changes focusing on those impacts caused by changes in perceived risks.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.; Hemphill, R.C.; Mohiudden, S.; Corso, J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INNOVATION INNOVATION IMPACT Breakthrough Research Results NREL's campus in Golden, Colorado, is a model of sustainable energy and energy efficiency. INNOVATION IMPACT NREL has a rich history of scientific innovation and partnering with industry in research and development to bring new products and technologies into manufacturing production. In these pages we have captured key breakthrough results across our primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies. It is our hope that these examples convey the breadth of research at NREL. Under the stewardship of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL is focused

211

Logic Design for On-Chip Test Clock Generation - Implementation Details and Impact on Delay Test Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses delay test for SOC devices with high frequency clock domains. A logic design for on-chip high-speed clock generation, implemented to avoid expensive test equipment, is described in detail. Techniques for on-chip clock generation, meant to reduce test vector count and to increase test quality, are discussed. ATPG results for the proposed techniques are given.

Beck, Matthias; Kaibel, Martin; Poehl, Frank; Lin, Xijiang; Press, Ron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Multipacting simulation and test results of BNL 704 MHz SRF gun  

SciTech Connect

The BNL 704MHz SRF gun has a grooved choke joint to support the photo-cathode. Due to the distortion of grooves at the choke joint during the BCP for the choke joint, several multipacting barriers showed up when it was tested with Nb cathode stalk at JLab. We built a setup to use the spare large grain SRF cavity to test and condition the multipacting at BNL with various power sources up to 50kW. The test is carried out in three stages: testing the cavity performance without cathode, testing the cavity with the Nb cathode stalk that was used at Jlab, and testing the cavity with a copper cathode stalk that is based on the design for the SRF gun. This paper summarizes the results of multipacting simulation, and presents the large grain cavity test setup and the test results.

Xu W.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Cullen, C. et al

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

213

2006 Lexus RX400h-4807 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Lexus RX900h hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTJHW31U660004807). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

2006 Lexus RX400h-2575 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Lexus RX900h hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTJHW31U660002575). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

2006 Lexus RX400h-2575 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Lexus RX900h hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTJHW31U660002575). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

2006 Lexus RX400h-4807 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity conducts several different types of tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicles batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new, and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of accelerated testing. This report documents the battery testing performed and battery testing results for the 2007 Lexus RX900h hybrid electric vehicle (Vin Number JTJHW31U660004807). Testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation conduct Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Chester Motloch; James Francfort

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 3 full-scale additive tests, conducted at IPL's Petersburg Station Unit 2. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2007.

Gary Blythe

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reducedpurposes. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts ofFigure 2: Comparison of capacity projections from AEO2011

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Abstract N/A Authors James Kauahikaua and Douglas Klein Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Citation James Kauahikaua,Douglas Klein. 1978. Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A. Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS. 2:363-366. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Results_of_Electric_Survey_in_the_Area_of_Hawaii_Geothermal_Test_Well_HGP-A&oldid=682499

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Finding of No Significant Impact Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex, Nevada Test Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL/NUCLEAR COUNTERMEASURES TEST AND EVALUATION COMPLEX, NEVADA TEST SITE The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is the Federal organization charged with defending the borders of the United States under the authority the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-296). The DHS requested the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to develop at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) a complex for testing and evaluating countermeasures for interdicting potential terrorist attacks using radiological and/or nuclear weapons of mass destruction. In response to that request, NNSA proposes to construct, operate, and maintain the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC). NNSA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1499) (EA) which analyzes the potential

222

SIMULATED WASTE TESTING OF GLYCOLATE IMPACTS ON THE 2H-EVAPORATOR SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Glycolic acid is being studied as a total or partial replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste tank farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the tank farm were addressed via a literature review, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the non-radioactive simulant tests impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The testing for which non-radioactive simulants could be used involved the following: the partitioning of glycolate into the evaporator condensate, the impacts of glycolate on metal solubility, and the impacts of glycolate on the formation and dissolution of sodium aluminosilicate scale within the evaporator. The following are among the conclusions from this work: ? Evaporator condensate did not contain appreciable amounts of glycolate anion. Of all tests, the highest glycolate concentration in the evaporator condensate was 0.38 mg/L. A significant portion of the tests had glycolate concentration in the condensate at less than the limit of quantification (0.1 mg/L). ? At ambient conditions, evaporator testing did not show significant effects of glycolate on the soluble components in the evaporator concentrates. ? Testing with sodalite solids and silicon containing solutions did not show significant effects of glycolate on sodium aluminosilicate formation or dissolution.

Martino, C. J.

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

223

Results from baseline tests of the SPRE I and comparison with code model predictions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine with linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) as a candidate for high capacity space power. This paper presents results of base-line engine tests at design and off-design operating conditions. The test results are compared with code model predictions.

Cairelli, J.E.; Geng, S.M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Skupinski, R.C. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States). NASA Lewis Research Center Group

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

EPRI/C-E PWR Safety Valve Test Report Volume 3: Test Results for Dresser Safety Valve Model 31739A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI at the request of the PWR utilities developed an overall program for the testing of PWR primary system safety and relief valves. This program was in response to NUREG 0578 Item 2.1.2 and NUREG 0737 Item II.D.1.A requirements. This report documents the results of safety valve testing performed as part of the overall program at the EPRI/C-E Valve Test Facility located at Combustion Engineering's Kreisinger Development Laboratory, Windsor, Connecticut. Seven safety valves representative of those utiliz...

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program, radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test  

SciTech Connect

The general-purpose heat source provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system. The results of this test indicated that impact by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hydraulic impact end effector final test report. Automation and robotics section, ER/WM-AT Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One tool being developed for dislodging and fragmenting the hard salt cake waste in the single-shell nuclear waste tanks at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is the hydraulic impact end effector (HIEE). This total operates by discharging 11-in. slugs of water at ultrahigh pressures. The HIEE was designed, built, and initially tested in 1992. Work in 1993 included advanced developments of the HIEE to further investigate its fragmentation abilities and to determine more effective operating procedures. These tests showed that more fragmentation can be achieved by increasing the charge pressure of 40 kpsi to 55 kpsi and by the use of different operating procedures. The size of the material and the impact energy of the water slug fired from the HIEE are believed to be major factors in material fragmentation. The material`s ability to fracture also appears to depend on the distance a fracture or crack line must travel to a free surface. Thus, larger material is more difficult to fracture than smaller material. Discharge pressures of 40 kpsi resulted in little penetration or fracturing of the material. At 55 kpsi, however, the size and depth of the fractures increased. Nozzle geometry had a significant effect on fragment size and quantity. Fragmentation was about an order of magnitude greater when the HIEE was discharged into drilled holes rather than onto the material surface. Since surface shots tend to create craters, a multi-shot procedure, coupled with an advanced nozzle design, was used to drill (crater) deep holes into large material. With this procedure, a 600-lb block was reduced to smaller pieces without the use of any additional equipment. Through this advanced development program, the HIEE has demonstrated that it can quickly fragment salt cake material into small, easily removable fragments. The HIEE`s material fragmentation ability can be substantially increased through the use of different nozzle geometries and operating procedures.

Couture, S.

1994-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

227

Correlating Dynamometer Testing to In-Use Fleet Results of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Standard dynamometer test procedures are currently being developed to determine fuel and electrical energy consumption of plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEV). To define a repeatable test procedure, assumptions were made about how PHEVs will be driven and charged. This study evaluates these assumptions by comparing results of PHEV dynamometer testing following proposed procedures to actual performance of PHEVs operating in the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) North American PHEV Demonstration fleet. Results show PHEVs in the fleet exhibit a wide range of energy consumption, which is not demonstrated in dynamometer testing. Sources of variation in performance are identified and examined.

John G. Smart; Sera White; Michael Duoba

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

DEWATERING TREATMENT SCALE-UP TESTING RESULTS OF HANFORD TANK WASTES  

SciTech Connect

This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low-activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

229

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 2: Results from the Controlled Cooking Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five charcoal cookstoves were tested using a Controlled Cooking Test (CCT) developed from cooking practices in Haiti. Cookstoves were tested for total burn time, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and the ratio of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO/CO{sub 2}). These results are presented in this report along with LBNL testers’ observations regarding the usability of the stoves.

Lask, Kathleen; Jones, Jennifer; Booker, Kayje; Ceballos, Cristina; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Light-Duty Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Federal Test Procedure Emissions Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's development and deployment of alternative fuels for environmental and national security reasons, NREL has managed a series of light-duty vehicle emissions tests on alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). The purpose of this report is to give a detailed evaluation of the final emissions test results on vehicles tested on methanol, ethanol, and compressed natural gas.

Kelly, K.; Eudy, L.; Coburn, T.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

231

An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal were completed in 2005 and 2006 and have been previously reported. This topical report presents the results from the Task 5 full-scale additive tests, conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1. Both additives were tested there.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand changes impact the electric power sector. Figure 2:for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. Thedemand changes impact the electric power sector. We refer to

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Interim results from UO/sub 2/ fuel oxidation tests in air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to extend the characterization of spent fuel oxidation in air. To characterize oxidation behavior of irradiated UO/sub 2/, fuel oxidation tests were performed on declad light-water reactor spent fuel and nonirradited UO/sub 2/ pellets in the temperature range of 135 to 250/sup 0/C. These tests were designed to determine the important independent variables that might affect spent fuel oxidation behavior. The data from this program, when combined with the test results from other programs, will be used to develop recommended spent fuel dry-storage temperature limits in air. This report describes interim test results. The initial PNL investigations of nonirradiated and spent fuels identified the important testing variables as temperature, fuel burnup, radiolysis of the air, fuel microstructure, and moisture in the air. Based on these initial results, a more extensive statistically designed test matrix was developed to study the effects of temperature, burnup, and moisture on the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Oxidation tests were initiated using both boiling-water reactor and pressurized-water reactor fuels from several different reactors with burnups from 8 to 34 GWd/MTU. A 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field was applied to the test ovens to simulate dry storage cask conditions. Nonirradiated fuel was included as a control. This report describes experimental results from the initial tests on both the spent and nonirradiated fuels and results to date on the tests in a 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field. 33 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

Campbell, T.K.; Gilbert, E.R.; Thornhill, C.K.; White, G.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Griffin, C.W.j

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Inlet Air Spray Cooler for Gas Turbine Power Augmentation: Plans, Specifications and Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field tests on a commercial combustion turbine generator show that novel cooling technology economically augments power output. This report details the results and presents key spray cooler design parameters.

1997-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

Deriving In-Use PHEV Fuel Economy Predictions from Standardized Test Cycle Results: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Explores the issue of how to apply an adjustment method to raw plug-in hybrid vehicle dynamometer test results to better estimate PHEVs' in-use fuel and electricity consumption.

Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Carlson, R.; Smart, J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A...

239

Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Preliminary results of the US pool-boiling coils from the IFSMTF full-array tests  

SciTech Connect

The Large Coil Task to develop superconducting magnets for fusion reactors, is now in the midst of full-array tests in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Included in the test array are two pool-boiling coils designed and fabricated by US manufacturers, General Dynamics/Convair Division and General Electric/Union Carbide Corporation. So far, both coils have been energized to full design currents in the single-coil tests, and the General Dynamics coil has reached the design point in the first Standard-I full-array test. Both coils performed well in the charging experiments. Extensive heating tests and the heavy instrumentation of these coils have, however, revealed some generic limitations of large pool-boiling superconducting coils. Details of these results and their analyses are reported.

Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Variability in energy factor test results for residential electric water heaters  

SciTech Connect

Recent modifications to the minimum energy efficiency requirements for residential water heaters have spurred an investigation into the variability in testing high-efficiency electric water heaters. While initial inter-laboratory comparisons showed excellent agreement between test results from different labs, subsequent inter-laboratory comparisons show differences between measured energy factors of up to 0.040. To determine the source of these differences, analyses of various parts of the test procedure are performed. For one case studied, the uncertainty in test results can be as high as +-0.028 if instrument accuracies reach the minimum level allowed in the test procedure. Other areas of the test procedure where variability is introduced are the optional use of pre-draws, the location of the lower tank temperature-measuring device, the use of insulation on tank fittings, and the use of a warm-up period before the simulated-use test commences. The implications of these issues on test results are provided.

Healy, William; Lutz, James D.; Lekov, Alex

2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

242

NREL: Wind Research - Viryd Technologies' CS8 Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Viryd Technologies' CS8 Turbine Testing and Results Viryd Technologies' CS8 Turbine Testing and Results Viryd Technologies CS8 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing Viryd Technologies' CS8 small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The CS8 is an upwind, horizontal-axis, three-bladed, stall controlled turbine rated at 8 kilowatts (kW). It has an 8.5-meter rotor diameter and is mounted on a guyed tilt-up lattice tower with a hub height of 24.9 meters. The CS8 uses a single-phase, grid-connected, induction generator that operates at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary Supporting data and explanations for data included in this table are provided in the final reports.

243

Subject: Results of Test 5 on Bonded Jacket Electric Cables Dear Satish:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As you know, we have recently completed the fifth test in our research program on low-voltage electric cables (JCN W-6465). The objective of this test was to determine if bonded jacket cables have any unique failure mechanisms that are not present in unbondedjacket cables. To achieve this objective, EPR insulated cables with both a bonded and unbonded CSPE jacket were preaged and accident tested. The cables were manufactured by Okonite, Samuel Moore, and Anaconda. As a result of this test, one of the two Okonite cables preaged to simulate 20 years of qualified life, and three of the three Okonite cables preaged to simulate 40 years of qualified life failed catastrophically by splitting open. These results call into question the qualification basis for these cables. The Samuel Moore and Anaconda cables performed acceptably. The enclosed letter report documents the findings of this test. If you have any questions on this, please contact me. Sincerely,

Mr. Satish; K. Aggarwal; Robert J. Lofaro; S. Carfagno; E. Grove

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Small Wind Turbine Testing Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) began testing small wind turbines (SWTs) through the Independent Testing project. Using competitive solicitation, five SWTs were selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's NWTC is accredited by the American Association of Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) to conduct duration, power performance, safety and function, power quality, and noise tests to International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards. Results of the tests conducted on each of the SWTs are or will be available to the public on the NREL website. The results could be used by their manufacturers in the certification of the turbines or state agencies to decide which turbines are eligible for state incentives.

Bowen, A.; Huskey, A.; Link, H.; Sinclair, K.; Forsyth, T.; Jager, D.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Forecast of thermal-hydrological conditions and air injection test results of the single heater test at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ESF Single Heater Test, Sandia National Laboratories Letterthe Single Heater Test by Sandia (Sobolik et al. , 1996).the Single Heater Test by Sandia (Sobolik etal. , 1996). cap

Birkholzer, J.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Selected test results from the neosonic polymer Li-ion battery.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery was measured using a number of tests including capacity, capacity as a function of temperature, ohmic resistance, spectral impedance, hybrid pulsed power test, utility partial state of charge (PSOC) pulsed cycle test, and an over-charge/voltage abuse test. The goal of this work was to evaluate the performance of the polymer Li-ion battery technology for utility applications requiring frequent charges and discharges, such as voltage support, frequency regulation, wind farm energy smoothing, and solar photovoltaic energy smoothing. Test results have indicated that the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery technology can provide power levels up to the 10C{sub 1} discharge rate with minimal energy loss compared to the 1 h (1C) discharge rate. Two of the three cells used in the utility PSOC pulsed cycle test completed about 12,000 cycles with only a gradual loss in capacity of 10 and 13%. The third cell experienced a 40% loss in capacity at about 11,000 cycles. The DC ohmic resistance and AC spectral impedance measurements also indicate that there were increases in impedance after cycling, especially for the third cell. Cell No.3 impedance Rs increased significantly along with extensive ballooning of the foil pouch. Finally, at a 1C (10 A) charge rate, the over charge/voltage abuse test with cell confinement similar to a multi cell string resulted in the cell venting hot gases at about 45 C 45 minutes into the test. At 104 minutes into the test the cell voltage spiked to the 12 volt limit and continued out to the end of the test at 151 minutes. In summary, the Neosonic cells performed as expected with good cycle-life and safety.

Ingersoll, David T.; Hund, Thomas D.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid for Energy Recovery Linac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND TEST RESULTS OF A HTS SOLENOID DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND TEST RESULTS OF A HTS SOLENOID FOR ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC* R. Gupta # , M. Anerella, I. Ben-Zvi, G. Ganetis, D. Kayran, G. McIntyre, J. Muratore, S. Plate and W. Sampson, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 USA and M. Cole and D. Holmes, Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medord, NY, 11763 USA Abstract An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at ~77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the

250

Structure test results from SLAC (NLCTA) show breakdown and damage at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test results from SLAC (NLCTA) show breakdown and damage at test results from SLAC (NLCTA) show breakdown and damage at gradients well below expectations from single cavity tests. The papers and presentations listed here illustrate some recent work on the topic. SLAC meeting notes are found here. Overview - Basic understanding of the role of particulate contaminants (Hasan Padamsee, PAC97) Literature study - Field emission and high voltage breakdown - (presentation by D. Burke 1996) References listed in D. Burke summary: SLAC Breakdown in S-band structures (Loew and Wang 1988) High Gradient studies in structures (Loew and Wang 1990) High Gradient tests (Wang et.al. 1994) Properties of Periodic Accelerating Structures for Linear Colliders (Wang 1989) Field emission in high gradient structures - (Loew and Wang -School 1997)

251

Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 1 and 2: Testing and Modeling Results; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) investigates root causes of wind turbine gearbox premature failures and validates design assumptions that affect gearbox reliability using a combined testing and modeling approach. Knowledge gained from the testing and modeling of the GRC gearboxes builds an understanding of how the selected loads and events translate into internal responses of three-point mounted gearboxes. This paper presents some testing and modeling results of the GRC research during Phase 1 and 2. Non-torque loads from the rotor including shaft bending and thrust, traditionally assumed to be uncoupled with gearbox, affect gear and bearing loads and resulting gearbox responses. Bearing clearance increases bearing loads and causes cyclic loading, which could contribute to a reduced bearing life. Including flexibilities of key drivetrain subcomponents is important in order to reproduce the measured gearbox response during the tests using modeling approaches.

Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; LaCava, W.; Link, H.; McNiff, B.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Simulation Test for Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, and Marcus Bianchi National Renewable Energy Laboratory Joel Neymark J. Neymark & Associates Mike Kennedy Mike D. Kennedy, Inc. Link to Accompanying Zipped Data Files (3.9 MB) This document is intended for use with the following documents: Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), NREL/TP-550-47427 Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX, NREL/TP-550-47502 Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-52414 August 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy

253

Dynamic performance of packed-bed dehumidifiers: experimental results from the SERI desiccant test loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussed are the design and construction of a desiccant test loop and results of tests with a silica-gel-packed bed. The test loop consists of two centrifugal fans, two duct heaters, a steam humidifier, 24.4m (80 ft) of 30-cm (12-in.) circular duct, instrumentation, and a test section. The loop is capable of testing adsorption and desorption modes at flow rates up to 0.340 kg/s (600 scfm) and at regeneration temperatures up to 120/sup 0/C (248/sup 0/F). Tests of a 74-cm(29-in.)-diameter, 3.2-cm(1.25-in.)-thick silica gel bed indicated that mass transfer occurs more readily in the adsorption direction than in the desorption direction. Pressure drop data indicated that the resistance of each of the two screens that hold the silica gel in place was equivalent to 2.5-cm(1-in.) of silica gel due to plugging. Results of the tests were also used to validate a SERI desiccant computer model, DESSIM.

Kutscher, C F; Barlow, R S

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

EPRI/C-E PWR Safety Valve Test Report, Volume 10: Piping Structural Response Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI at the request of the PWR Utilities developed an overall program for the testing of PWR primary system safety and relief valves. This program was in response to NUREG 0578 Item 2.1.2 and NUREG 0737 Item II.D.l.A requirements.This report documents the results of safety valve testing performed as part of the overall program at the EPRI/C-E Valve Test Facility located at Combustion Engineering's Kreisinger Development Laboratory, Windsor, Connecticut. Seven safety valves ...

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

High-g shock test results of Tadiran TLM-1530MP cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In April of 2009, testing was done of a high-g instrumentation device that utilized Tadiran TLM-1530MP cells as a power source. As a result of that testing, it was determined that those cells exhibit failure more often when shocked in the axial direction. No failures over many tests where found when the cells were shocked laterally. Moreover, when shocked laterally, the cells exhibited no observable degradation in performance. We looked at the failed cells via non-destructive x-ray analysis to determine what internal structures failed.

O'Malley, Patrick D.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Beam test results of the irradiated Silicon Drift Detector for ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Silicon Drift Detectors will equip two of the six cylindrical layers of high precision position sensitive detectors in the ITS of the ALICE experiment at LHC. In this paper we report the beam test results of a SDD irradiated with 1 GeV electrons. The aim of this test was to verify the radiation tolerance of the device under an electron fluence equivalent to twice particle fluence expected during 10 years of ALICE operation.

Kushpil, S; Giubellino, P; Idzik, M; Kolozhvari, A; Kushpil, V; Martínez, M I; Mazza, G; Mazzoni, A; Meddi, F; Nouais, D; Petracek, V; Piemonte, C; Rashevsky, A; Riccati, L; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A; Wheadon, R; PH-TH

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Test results of heat-exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These tests evaluated flow-driven brushes, recirculating sponge rubber balls, chlorination, and mechanical system/chlorination combinations for in-situ cleaning of two potential heat exchanger materials: titanium and aluminum alloy 5052. Tests were successful when fouling resistance was <3.0 x 10/sup -4/ ft/sup 2/ hr-/sup 0/F/Btu. Results indicated systems and cleaning techniques using brushes, soft sponge balls, and various concentrations of chlorine had some potential for maintaining heat transfer efficiency.

Lott, D F

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine sensitivity test results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NASA Lewis Research Center has been testing a 1 kW (1.33 hp) free-piston Stirling engine at the NASA Lewis test facilities. The tests performed over the past several years have been on a single cylinder machine known as the RE-1000. The data recorded were to aid in the investigation of the dynamics and thermodynamics of the free-piston Stirling engine. The data are intended to be used primarily for computer code validation. NASA reports TM-82999, TM-83407, and TM-87126 give initial results of the engine tests. The tests were designed to investigate the sensitivity of the engine performance to variations on the mean pressure of the working space, the working fluid used, heater and cooler temperatures, regenerator porosity, power piston mass and displacer dynamics. These tests have now been completed at NASA Lewis. This report presents some of the detailed data collected in the sensitivity tests. In all, 781 data points were recorded. A complete description of the engine and test facility is given. Many of the data can be found in tabular form, while a microfiche containing all of the data points can be requested from NASA Lewis.

Schreiber, J.G.; Geng, S.M.; Lorenz, G.V.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Results of recent reactor-material tests on dispersal of oxide fuel from a disrupted core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of experimental investigations and related analyses are reported addressing the dispersal of molten oxide fuel from a disrupted core via various available pathways for the CRBR system. These investigations included the GAPFLOW tests in which pressure-driven and gravity drainage tests were performed using dispersal pathways mocking up the intersubassembly gaps, the CAMEL C6 and C7 tests in which molten fuel entered sodium-filled control assembly ducts under prototypic thermal-hydraulic conditions, and the Lower Internals Drainage (LID) tests in which molten fuel drained downward through simulated below-core structure (orifice plate stacks) as the bottom of control assembly ducts. The results of SHOTGUN tests addressing basic freezing of molten UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2//metal mixtures flowing through circular tubes are also reported. Test results have invariably shown the existance of stable UO/sub 2/ crusts on the inside surfaces of the flow paths. Appreciable removal of fuel was indicated prior to freezing-induced immobilization. Application of heat transfer models based upon the presence of stable, insulating fuel crusts tends to overpredict the removal process.

Spencer, B.W.; Wilson, R.J.; Vetter, D.L.; Erickson, E.G.; Dewey, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results  

SciTech Connect

On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the economizer outlet, upstream of the SCR reactor, and CAE measured flue gas NO{sub x} and CO concentrations at the sampling grids located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor. During the June 20-21 sampling period, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet. All ammonia measurements were performed using a modified version of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conditional Test Method (CTM) 027. The NO{sub x} and CO measurements were performed using U.S. EPA Methods 7E and 10, respectively.

Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-6 test data report : thermal hydraulic results, Rev. 0.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure? (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx} {phi} 30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength is being addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus measures the fracture strength of the crust while it is either at room temperature or above, the latter state being achieved with a heating element placed below the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the sixth water ingression test, designated SSWICS-6. This test investigated the quenching behavior of a fully oxidized PWR corium melt containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete at a system pressure of 1 bar absolute. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D.; Aeschlimann, B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

C Stoots; J O' Brien; T Cable

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Pilot plant test results and demonstration of the Ahlstrom Pyroflow pressurized CFB technology  

SciTech Connect

Ahlstrom Pyropower initiated development of PCFB technology in 1086 after a detailed analysis of competing advanced coal utilization technologies. A 10 MWth pilot plant was started up in 1989 and has produced very promising test results which are highly competitive with coal gasification. This led to a successful application for demonstration of the technology under round III of the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. The resulting project is Iowa Power's DMEC-1 PCFB Repowering Project. The project is currently in the preliminary engineering phase with supporting pilot plant testing being performed in parallel. Successful demonstration of PCFB technology will provide utilities with a cost effective option for repowering older power stations to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment in the near term and a clean and high efficiency new plant option in the longer term. This paper will present recent pilot plant test results and review the major technical features of the DMEC-1 project.

Provol, S.J.; Dryden, R.J. (Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Pilot plant test results and demonstration of the Ahlstrom Pyroflow pressurized CFB technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ahlstrom Pyropower initiated development of PCFB technology in 1086 after a detailed analysis of competing advanced coal utilization technologies. A 10 MWth pilot plant was started up in 1989 and has produced very promising test results which are highly competitive with coal gasification. This led to a successful application for demonstration of the technology under round III of the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program. The resulting project is Iowa Power`s DMEC-1 PCFB Repowering Project. The project is currently in the preliminary engineering phase with supporting pilot plant testing being performed in parallel. Successful demonstration of PCFB technology will provide utilities with a cost effective option for repowering older power stations to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment in the near term and a clean and high efficiency new plant option in the longer term. This paper will present recent pilot plant test results and review the major technical features of the DMEC-1 project.

Provol, S.J.; Dryden, R.J. [Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

C Stoots; J O'Brien; T Cable

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Closed-loop flow test Miravalles Geothermal Field well log results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE) conducted a closed-loop flow test in the Miravalles Geothermal Field. The closed-loop test was started in May and ran through August of 1990. The effluent from the production well PG-11 was carried by a pipeline through a monitor station to the injection well PG-2. Before starting the long-term flow test in May, cold-water injection experiments were performed in each well to determine the pressure and temperature response. A series of downhole measurements were made in each well to obtain background information. The downhole measurements were repeated in August just before terminating the flow test to evaluate the results.

Dennis, B.; Eden, G.; Lawton, R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Thermal and optical performance test results for compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs)  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the performance characteristics (thermal and optical) of a properly truncated CPC that could be used in two-stage solar thermal power generation systems. The CPCs selected for testing were the 5:1 cones with a 25{degree} acceptance angle and an untruncated concentration ratio of 5.6X. Experiments were carried out at the Advanced Components Test Facility of the Georgia Tech Research Institute. Several cones of the same dimensions but with different shell materials, reflector surfaces, and employing various heat removal methods were tested. It has been demonstrated experimentally for the first time that the CPCs with high reflectivity surfaces can have optical efficiencies in the range of 90% and above. In order to verify those results, a computer ray-trace analysis was also performed. These tests have shown that passive cooling alone is adequate for small-scale, low-power systems.

Suresh, D.; O'Gallagher, J.; Winston, R. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems; Results of IEA Collaboration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

Ela, E.; Parsons, B.; Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B. C.; Tande, J. O.; Estanqueiro, A.; Gomez, E.; Smith, J. C.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Spent Fuel Drying System Test Results (Dry-Run in Preparation for Run 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a)on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of a test ''dry-run'' conducted prior to the eighth and last of those tests, which was conducted on an N-Reactor outer fuel element removed from K-West canister6513U. The system used for the dry-run test was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodologies are given in Section 3.0. The experimental results are provided in Section 4.0 and discussed Section 5.0.

BM Oliver; GS Klinger; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; PJ MacFarlan; GA Ritter

1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc.

275

Testing Protocols and Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI-Resnet Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testing Protocols & Results: Testing Protocols & Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI/RESNET Development Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting: Combustion Safety in Tight Houses Jim Fitzgerald Center for Energy and Environment Building Performance Institute Page 2  Weatherization, custom windows & central air conditioning  Attic insulation, wall insulation, and attic air sealing - borrowed specs from energy programs and used weatherization contractors  Average house leakage: 7.8 ACH50 before 5.4 ACH50 after MSP secret: this Airport Sound Program does weatherization work to reduce sound All Tightening of Existing Homes Can Affect Combustion Appliance Safety Tightening work was done on 3000 homes with no testing, what could possibly go wrong?

276

Results of a Field Test Using R-407C in Split System Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the results of a field test to determine implications of an R-407C replacement of R-22. A change of refrigerants precipitates other changes in materials, component selection, and processing. In addition, thermodynamic properties are different. Consequently, the effects on durability, thermal performance, humidity control, servicing, and manufacturability were questioned. The field test addressed many of these questions. Anticipated changes in manufacturing processes were implemented on the production line. Contractors were educated on the differences in the refrigerant. Data were obtained by refrigerant, lubricant, and component tear down analysis. Experiential information was derived from feed back of contractors and home owners, as well as multiple site visits. Generally, the field test has demonstrated that by following a few basic rules, the industry can anticipate use of R-407C with satisfactory results. However, the surprising appearance of a contaminate precipitant indicates the need for more investigation into long term effects.

Boyd, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Results from evaporation tests to support the MWTF heat removal system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental tests program was conducted to measure the evaporative heat removal from the surface of a tank of simulated waste. The results contained in this report constitute definition design data for the latest heat removal function of the MWTF primary ventilation system.

Crea, B.A.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

Results of the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment investigated the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered reactor accident. This experiment, which was carried out in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories, was performed under the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program. The DF-4 test is described herein and results from the experiment are presented. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B{sub 4}C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. Hydrogen generation was found to continue throughout the experiment, diminishing slightly following the relocation of molten oxidizing zircaloy to the lower extreme of the test bundle. A large blockage which was formed from this material continued to oxidize while steam was being fed into the the test bundle. The results of this test have provided information on the initial stages of core melt progression in BWR geometry involving the heatup and cladding oxidation stages of a severe accident and terminating at the point of melting and relocation of the metallic core components. The information is useful in modeling melt progression in BWR core geometry, and provides engineering insight into the key phenomena controlling these processes. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description, Capabilities, and Analytical Results  

SciTech Connect

During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Activity. DRI has operated these stations since that time. A third station was deployed in the period May to September 2011. The TTR is located within the northwest corner of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (280 mi2). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from Soils Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

Hartwell William T.,Daniels Jeffrey,Nikolich George,Shadel Craig,Giles Ken,Karr Lynn,Kluesner Tammy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Final test results for the Schott HCE on a LS-2 collector.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed thermal performance testing on the Schott parabolic trough receiver using the LS-2 collector on the Sandia rotating platform at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. This testing was funded as part of the US DOE Sun-Lab USA-Trough program. The receiver tested was a new Schott receiver, known as Heat Collector Elements (HCEs). Schott is a new manufacturer of trough HCEs. The Schott HCEs are 4m long; therefore, two were joined and mounted on the LS-2 collector module for the test. The Schott HCE design consists of a 70mm diameter high solar absorptance coated stainless steel (SS) tube encapsulated within a 125mm diameter Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tube with vacuum in the annulus formed between the SS and glass tube to minimize convection heat losses. The Schott HCE design is unique in two regards. First, the bellows used to compensate for the difference in thermal expansion between the metal and glass tube are inside the glass envelope rather than outside. Second, the composition of materials at the glass-to-metal seal has very similar thermal expansion coefficients making the joint less prone to breakage from thermal shock. Sandia National Laboratories provided both the azimuth and elevation collector module tracking systems used during the tests. The test results showed the efficiency of the Schott HCE to be very similar to current HCEs being manufactured by Solel. This testing provided performance verification for the use of Schott tubes with Solargenix trough collector assemblies at currently planned trough power plant projects in Arizona and Nevada.

Moss, Timothy A.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Test results for a Bi-2223 HTS racetrack coil for generator applications  

SciTech Connect

Testing, results and analysis of a Bi-2223 model superconducting generator coil produced under the DOE Superconductivity Partnership Initiative are presented. The test arrangement enables coil energization with dc and transient currents over a range of operating temperatures to explore coil performance under conditions analogous to those that would be experienced by a superconducting generator field coil. Analytical calculations of coil ac and ohmic losses and temperature rise compare well with experimental measurements. Good performance is predicted for a typical 3-phase fault condition. Coil steady state and transient performance can be predicted with confidence for full scale superconductor application.

Salasoo, L.; Herd, K.G.; Laskaris, E.T.; Hart, H.R. Jr.; Chari, M.V.K. [GE Corporate Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Deriving In-Use PHEV Fuel Economy Predictions from Standardized Test Cycle Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have potential to reduce or eliminate the U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Quantifying the amount of petroleum each uses, however, is challenging. To estimate in-use fuel economy for conventional vehicles the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducts chassis dynamometer tests on standard historic drive cycles and then adjusts the resulting “raw” fuel economy measurements downward. Various publications, such as the forthcoming update to the SAE J1711 recommended practice for PHEV fuel economy testing, address the challenges of applying standard test procedures to PHEVs. This paper explores the issue of how to apply an adjustment method to such “raw” PHEV dynamometer test results in order to more closely estimate the in-use fuel and electricity consumption characteristics of these vehicles. The paper discusses two possible adjustment methods, and evaluates one method by applying it to dynamometer data and comparing the result to in-use fleet data (on an aftermarket conversion PHEV). The paper will also present the methodologies used to collect the data needed for this comparison.

John Smart; Richard "Barney" Carlson; Jeff Gonder; Aaron Brooker

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Test results from the 500 kW direct contact pilot plant at East Mesa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500 kW power plant utilizing direct contact heat exchange (DCHX) between the geothermal brine and the isobutane (IC/sub 4/) working fluid is being operated at the East Mesa test facility. The power plant incorporates a 40-inch-diameter direct-contactor approximately 35 feet tall. The purpose of the pilot plant is to determine the feasibility of large-scale direct-contact heat exchange and power plant operation with the DCHX. The binary cycle offers higher conversion factors (heat energy transformed to electrical energy) than the flashed steam approach for geothermal brines in the 300 to 400/sup 0/F range and preliminary results indicate the DCHX system may have higher performance than the conventional tube-and-shell binary approach. This performance advantage results from the absence of any fouling and the very close pinch temperatures achieved in the DCHX itself. The baseline performance tests for the plant were completed in January 1980. The results of these tests and follow-on testing are covered.

Nichols, K.E.; Olander, R.G.; Lobach, J.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

3D Radiative Hydrodynamics for Disk Stability Simulations: A Proposed Testing Standard and New Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics simulations of protoplanetary disks report disparate disk behaviors, and these differences involve the importance of convection to disk cooling, the dependence of disk cooling on metallicity, and the stability of disks against fragmentation and clump formation. To guarantee trustworthy results, a radiative physics algorithm must demonstrate the capability to handle both the high and low optical depth regimes. We develop a test suite that can be used to demonstrate an algorithm's ability to relax to known analytic flux and temperature distributions, to follow a contracting slab, and to inhibit or permit convection appropriately. We then show that the radiative algorithm employed by Meji\\'a (2004) and Boley et al. (2006) and the algorithm employed by Cai et al. (2006) and Cai et al. (2007, in prep.) pass these tests with reasonable accuracy. In addition, we discuss a new algorithm that couples flux-limited diffusion with vertical rays, we apply the test suite, an...

Boley, Aaron C; Nordlund, Aake; Lord, Jesse

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—Cast Stone and Alkali Alumino-Silicate Geopolymer  

SciTech Connect

PNNL is conducting screening tests on the candidate waste forms to provide a basis for comparison and to resolve the formulation and data needs identified in the literature review. This report documents the screening test results on the Cast Stone cementitious waste form and the Geopolymer waste form. Test results suggest that both the Cast Stone and Geopolymer appear to be viable waste forms for the solidification of the secondary liquid wastes to be treated in the ETF. The diffusivity for technetium from the Cast Stone monoliths was in the range of 1.2 × 10-11 to 2.3 × 10-13 cm2/s during the 63 days of testing. The diffusivity for technetium from the Geopolymer was in the range of 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s through the 63 days of the test. These values compare with a target of 1 × 10-9 cm2/s or less. The Geopolymer continues to show some fabrication issues with the diffusivities ranging from 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s for the better-performing batch to from 1.2 × 10-9 to 1.8 × 10-11 cm2/s for the poorer-performing batch. In the future more comprehensive and longer term performance testing will be conducted, to further evaluate whether or not these waste forms will meet the regulation and performance criteria needed to cost-effectively dispose of secondary wastes.

Pierce, Eric M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Parker, Kent E.; Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

An Experimental Evaluation of HVAC-Grade Carbon-Dioxide Sensors: Part 2, Performance Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second paper in a four-part series reporting on the test and evaluation of typical carbon-dioxide sensors used in building HVAC applications. Fifteen models of NDIR HVAC-grade CO2 sensors were tested and evaluated to determine the accuracy, linearity, repeatability, and hysteresis of each sensor. This paper describes the performance of the sensors and provides a comparison with the manufacturers specifications. The sensors were tested at 40% relative humidity, 73oF (22.8oC) temperature, 14.70 psia (101.35 kPa) pressure, and at five different CO2 concentrations (400 ppm, 750 ppm, 1100 ppm, 1450 ppm, and 1800 ppm). The test results showed a wide variation in sensor performance among the various manufacturers and in some cases a wide variation among sensors of the same model. In all, 45 sensors were evaluated: three from each of the 15 models. Among the 15 models tested, eight models have a single-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, four models have a dual-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, and three models have a single-lamp, dual-wavelength configuration.

Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory [Iowa State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Results and code prediction comparisons of lithium-air reaction and aerosol behavior tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) Fusion Safety Support Studies include evaluation of potential safety and environmental concerns associated with the use of liquid lithium as a breeder and coolant for fusion reactors. Potential mechanisms for volatilization and transport of radioactive metallic species associated with breeder materials are of particular interest. Liquid lithium pool-air reaction and aerosol behavior tests were conducted with lithium masses up to 100 kg within the 850-m/sup 3/ containment vessel in the Containment Systems Test Facility. Lithium-air reaction rates, aerosol generation rates, aerosol behavior and characterization, as well as containment atmosphere temperature and pressure responses were determined. Pool-air reaction and aerosol behavior test results were compared with computer code calculations for reaction rates, containment atmosphere response, and aerosol behavior. The volatility of potentially radioactive metallic species from a lithium pool-air reaction was measured. The response of various aerosol detectors to the aerosol generated was determined. Liquid lithium spray tests in air and in nitrogen atmospheres were conducted with lithium temperatures of about 427/sup 0/ and 650/sup 0/C. Lithium reaction rates, containment atmosphere response, and aerosol generation and characterization were determined for these spray tests.

Jeppson, D.W.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mitigation of tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of full-scale testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Full-Scale Mixer Pump Test Program was performed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 from February 4 to April 13, 1994, to confirm the long-term operational strategy for flammable gas mitigation and to demonstrate that mixing can control the gas release and waste level. Since its installation on July 3, 1993, the current pump, operating only a few hours per week, has proved capable of mixing the waste sufficiently to release gas continuously instead of in large episodic events. The results of Full-Scale Testing demonstrated that the pump can control gas release and waste level for long-term mitigation, and the four test sequences formed the basis for the long-term operating schedule. The last test sequence, jet penetration tests, showed that the current pump jet creates flow near the tank wall and that it can excavate portions of the bottom sludge layer if run at maximum power. Pump mixing has altered the {open_quote}normal{close_quote} configuration of the waste; most of the original nonconvective sludge has been mixed with the supernatant liquid into a mobile convective slurry that has since been maintained by gentle pump operation and does not readily return to sludge.

Stewart, C.W.; Hudson, J.D.; Friley, J.R.; Panisko, F.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Irwin, J.J.; Fadeff, J.G.; Efferding, L.F.; Michener, T.E.; Kirch, N.W. [and others

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Enhancements in Glovebox Design Resulting from Laboratory-Conducted FIre Tests  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project was to disassemble nuclear weapons pits and convert the resulting special nuclear materials to a form suitable for further disposition. Because of the nature of materials involved, the fundamental system which allowed PDCF to perform its mission was a series of integrated and interconnected gloveboxes which provided confinement and containment of the radioactive materials being processed. The high throughput planned for PDCF and the relatively high neutron and gamma radiation levels of the pits required that gloveboxes be shielded to meet worker dose limits. The glovebox shielding material was required to contain high hydrogen concentrations which typically result in these materials being combustible. High combustible loadings created design challenges for the facility fire suppression and ventilation system design. Combustible loading estimates for the PDCF Plutonium (Pu) Processing Building increased significantly due to these shielding requirements. As a result, the estimates of combustible loading substantially exceeded values used to support fire and facility safety analyses. To ensure a valid basis for combustible loading contributed by the glovebox system, the PDCF Project funded a series of fire tests conducted by the Southwest Research Institute on door panels and a representative glovebox containing Water Extended Polyester (WEP) radiological shielding to observe their behavior during a fire event. Improvements to PDCF glovebox designs were implemented based on lessons learned during the fire test. In particular, methods were developed to provide high levels of neutron shielding while maintaining combustible loading in the glovebox shells at low levels. Additionally, the fire test results led to design modifications to mitigate pressure increases observed during the fire test in order to maintain the integrity of the WEP cladding. These changes resulted in significantly reducing the credited combustible loading of the facility. These advances in glovebox design should be considered for application in nuclear facilities within the Department of Energy complex in the future.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Wunderlich, Gregory M.; Mcentire, James R.; Richmond, William G.

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

290

OFF-GAS MERCURY CONTROL USING SULFUR-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON – TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Several laboratory and pilot-scale tests since the year 2000 have included demonstrations of off-gas mercury control using fixed bed, sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. These demonstrations have included operation of carbon beds with gas streams containing a wide range of mercury and other gas species concentrations representing off-gas from several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste treatment processes including electrical resistance heated (joule-heated) glass melters, fluidized bed calciners, and fluidized bed steam reformers. Surrogates of various DOE mixed waste streams (or surrogates of offgas from DOE mixed waste streams) including INL “sodium bearing waste” (SBW), liquid “low activity waste” (LAW) from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and liquid waste from Savannah River National Laboratory (“Tank 48H waste”) have been tested. Test results demonstrate mercury control efficiencies up to 99.999%, high enough to comply with the Hazardous Waste (HWC) Combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards even when the uncontrolled off-gas mercury concentrations exceed 400,000 ug/dscm (at 7% O2), and confirm carbon bed design parameters for such high efficiencies. Results of several different pilot-scale and engineering-scale test programs performed over several years are presented and compared.

Nick Soelberg

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid For Energy Recovery Linac  

SciTech Connect

An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at {approx}77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the design, construction and test results of this HTS solenoid. The HTS solenoid in the proposed ERL will be situated in the transition region between the superconducting cavity at {approx}4 K and the cryostat at the room temperature. Solenoid inside the cryogenic structure provides an early focusing and hence low emittance beam. The temperature in the transition region will be too high for a conventional low temperature superconductor and resistive heat load from copper coils will be too high on cryogenic system. HTS coils also allow much higher current density and significant reduction in size as compared to copper coils. Hence HTS solenoid provide a unique and technically superior solution. The use of a HTS solenoid with superconducting cavity offers a unique option as it can be placed in a cold to warm transition region to provide early focussing without using additional space. Construction and test results so far are very encouraging for its use in the ERL project.

Anerella, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Kayran, D; McIntyre, G; Muratore, J; Plate, S; Sampson, W; Cole, M

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

292

Comparison of constant-rate pumping test and slug interference test results at the Hanford Site B pond multilevel test facility  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, is responsible for monitoring the movement and fate of contamination within the unconfined aquifer to ensure that public health and the environment are protected. To support the monitoring and assessment of contamination migration on the Hanford Site, a sitewide 3-dimensional groundwater flow model is being developed. Providing quantitative hydrologic property data is instrumental in development of the 3-dimensional model. Multilevel monitoring facilities have been installed to provide detailed, vertically distributed hydrologic characterization information for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer. In previous reports, vertically distributed water-level and hydrochemical data obtained over time from these multi-level monitoring facilities have been evaluated and reported. This report describes the B pond facility in Section 2.0. It also provides analysis results for a constant-rate pumping test (Section 3.0) and slug interference test (Section 4.0) that were conducted at a multilevel test facility located near B Pond (see Figure 1. 1) in the central part of the Hanford Site. A hydraulic test summary (Section 5.0) that focuses on the comparison of hydraulic property estimates obtained using the two test methods is also presented. Reference materials are listed in Section 6.0.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Thorne, P.D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts WW Casing Connection on 7" Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his ''WW'' threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This work was a continuation of testing performed by SES as reported in August of 1999. The connection design tested was identified as ''WW''. The samples were all integral (no coupled connections) and contained a wedge thread form with 90{sup o} flank angles relative to the pipe centerline. The wedge thread form is a variable width thread that primarily engages on the flanks. This thread form provides very high torque capacity and good stabbing ability and makeup. The test procedure selected for one of the samples was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections, which is currently going through the ISO acceptance process. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test procedure was performed with one sample. Four samples were tested to failure. Table 1 contains a summary of the tasks performed by SES. The project started with the delivery of test samples by Mr. Watts. Pipe from the previous round of tests was used for the new samples. Figure 1 shows the structural and sealing results relative to the pipe body. Sample 1 was used to determine the torque capacity of the connection. Torque was applied to the capacity of SES's equipment which was 28,424 ft-lbs. From this, an initial recommended torque range of 7,200 to 8,800 ft-lbs. was selected. The sample was disassembled and while there was no galling observed in the threads, the end of the pin had collapsed inward. Sample 2 received three makeups. Breakouts 1 and 2 also had collapsing of the pin end, with no thread galling. From these make/breaks, it was decided to reduce the amount of lubricant applied to the connection by applying it to the box or pin only and reducing the amount applied. Samples 3 and 4 received one makeup only. Sample 5 initially received two make/breaks to test for galling resistance before final makeup, No galling was observed. Later, three additional make/breaks were performed with no pin end collapse and galling over 1/2 a thread occurring on one of the breakouts. During the make/break tests, the stabbing and hand tight makeup of the WW connection was found to be very easy and trouble free. There was no tendency to crossthread, even when stabbed at an angle, and it screwed together very smoothly up to hand tight. During power tight makeup, there was no heat generated in the box (as checked by hand contact) and no jerkiness associated with any of the makeups or breakouts. Sample 2 was tested in pure compression. The maximum load obtained was 1,051 kips and the connection was beginning to significantly deform as the sample buckled. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 3 was capped-end pressure tested to failure. The capped-end yield pressure of the pipe was 16,572 psi and the sample began to leak at 12,000 psi. Sample 4 was tested in pure tension. The maximum load obtained was 978 kips and the connection failed by fracture at the pin critical section. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 5 was tested in combined tension/compression and internal gas pressure. The sample was assembled, setup and tested four times. The first time was with a torque of 7,298 ft-lbs and the connection leaked halfway to ISO Load Point 2 with loads of 693 kips and 4,312 psi. The second time the torque was increased to 14,488 ft-lbs and a leak occurred at 849 kips and 9,400 psi, which was ISO Load Point 2. The third time the makeup torque was again increased, to 20,456 ft-lbs, and a leak occurred at 716 kips and 11,342 psi, ISO Load Point 4. The fourth test was with the same torque as before, 20,617 ft-lbs, and the connection successfully tested up to load step 56, ISO Load Point 6 (second round) before leaking at 354 kips and 11,876 psi. At this point,

John D. Watts

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

PDM performance Test Results and Preliminary Analysis: Incompressible and Compressible Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three, small diameter, Moineau, positive displacement (drilling) motors (PDMs) were dynamometer tested using water, air-water mist, air-water foam, and aerated water. The motors included (1) a 1.5-inch OD, single-lobe mud motor; (2) a 1.69-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe mud motor; and (3) a 1.75-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe air motor. This paper describes the test apparatus, procedures, data analysis, and results. Incompressible and compressible fluid performance are compared; linear performance, predicted by a positive displacement motor model, is identified where it occurs. Preliminary results and conclusions are (1) the performance of all three motors is accurately modeled using a two-variable, linear model for incompressible fluid and (2) the model was not successfully adapted to model compressible fluid performance.

Dreesen, D.S.; Gruenhagan, E.; Cohen, J.C.; Moran, D.W.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Results of the 1988 geothermal gradient test drilling project for the State of Washington  

SciTech Connect

During late summer and early fall of 1988, the Washington Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) completed drilling eight shallow geothermal gradient test wells in the southern Washington Cascade Range. This report describes the preliminary results of the 1988 drilling and gradient measuring, and summarizes our current perspectives on distribution and magnitude of the geothermal resource potential in the southern Washington Cascades. 18 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Barnett, D.B.; Korosec, M.A.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Results from a Test Fixture for button BPM Trapped Mode Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of measures have been suggested to mitigate the problem of button BPM trapped mode heating. A test fixture, using a combination of commercial-off-the-shelf and custom machined components, was assembled to validate the simulations. We present details of the fixture design, measurement results, and a comparison of the results with the simulations. A brief history of the trapped mode button heating problem and a set of design rules for BPM button optimization are presented elsewhere in these proceedings. Here we present measurements on a test fixture that was assembled to confirm, if possible, a subset of those rules: (1) Minimize the trapped mode impedance and the resulting power deposited in this mode by the beam. (2) Maximize the power re-radiated back into the beampipe. (3) Maximize electrical conductivity of the outer circumference of the button and minimize conductivity of the inner circumference of the shell, to shift power deposition from the button to the shell. The problem is then how to extract useful and relevant information from S-parameter measurements of the test fixture.

Cameron,P.; Bacha, B.; Blednykh, A.; Pinayev, I.; Singh, O.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

297

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission. Axially-grooved heat pipe: accelerated life test results  

SciTech Connect

The results through SIG/Galileo contract close-out of accelerated life testing performed from June 1978 to June 1979 on axially-grooved, copper/water heat pipes are presented. The primary objective of the test was to determine the expected lifetime of axially-grooved copper/water heat pipes. The heat pipe failure rate, due to either a leak or a build-up of non-condensible gas, was determined. The secondary objective of the test was to determine the effects of time and temperature on the thermal performance parameters relevant to long-term (> 50,000 h) operation on a space power generator. The results showed that the gas generation rate appears to be constant with time after an initial sharp rise although there are indications that it drops to approximately zero beyond approx. 2000 h. During the life test, the following pipe-hours were accumulated: 159,000 at 125/sup 0/C, 54,000 at 165/sup 0/C, 48,000 at 185/sup 0/C, and 8500 at 225/sup 0/C. Heated hours per pipe ranged from 1000 to 7500 with an average of 4720. Applying calculated acceleration factors yields the equivalent of 930,000 pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C. Including the accelerated hours on vendor tested pipes raises this number to 1,430,000 pipe-hours at 125/sup 0/C. It was concluded that, for a heat pipe temperature of 125/sup 0/C and a mission time of 50,000 h, the demonstrated heat pipe reliability is between 80% (based on 159,000 actual pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C) and 98% (based on 1,430,000 accelerated pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C). Measurements indicate some degradation of heat transfer with time, but no detectable degradation of heat transport. (LCL)

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Selected test results from the LiFeBatt iron phosphate Li-ion battery.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the performance of the LiFeBatt Li-ion cell was measured using a number of tests including capacity measurements, capacity as a function of temperature, ohmic resistance, spectral impedance, high power partial state of charge (PSOC) pulsed cycling, pulse power measurements, and an over-charge/voltage abuse test. The goal of this work was to evaluate the performance of the iron phosphate Li-ion battery technology for utility applications requiring frequent charges and discharges, such as voltage support, frequency regulation, and wind farm energy smoothing. Test results have indicated that the LiFeBatt battery technology can function up to a 10C{sub 1} discharge rate with minimal energy loss compared to the 1 h discharge rate (1C). The utility PSOC cycle test at up to the 4C{sub 1} pulse rate completed 8,394 PSOC pulsed cycles with a gradual loss in capacity of 10 to 15% depending on how the capacity loss is calculated. The majority of the capacity loss occurred during the initial 2,000 cycles, so it is projected that the LiFeBatt should PSOC cycle well beyond 8,394 cycles with less than 20% capacity loss. The DC ohmic resistance and AC spectral impedance measurements also indicate that there were only very small changes after cycling. Finally, at a 1C charge rate, the over charge/voltage abuse test resulted in the cell venting electrolyte at 110 C after 30 minutes and then open-circuiting at 120 C with no sparks, fire, or voltage across the cell.

Ingersoll, David T.; Hund, Thomas D.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Results of drip tests on sludge-based and actinide-doped glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reaction of three differs simulated nuclear waste glasses is being evaluated using a test method that slowly drips water onto a glass/metal assembly. The tests have been in progress for up to eight years and are being performed with as-cast and glass aged by reaction with water vapor. Results are presented for the cumulative release of Np, Pu, and Am as a function of time; also reported are the particulate species that have been detected suspended in solution. A significant difference is noted in the suspended species depending on the glass composition, and on whether the glass is aged. With as-cast glass, the radioactivity is associated with the suspended particles, while with the aged glass, the solution has a high initial anion content, and the transuranic elements appear to be dissolved in solution, since they pass through filters with small pore sizes. Examples are given of possible tests to evaluate the interaction between these test solutions and potential engineered barrier components.

Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Materials Degradation: Preliminary Results of Corrosion Tests on Ceramatec Electrolysis Cell Components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion tests were performed on stainless steel and nickel alloy coupons in H2O/H2 mixtures and dry air to simulate conditions experienced in high temperature steam electrolysis systems. The stainless steel coupons were tested bare and with one of three different proprietary coatings applied. Specimens were corroded at 850°C for 500 h with weight gain data recorded at periodic intervals. Post-test characterization of the samples included surface and cross-section scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and area-specific resistance measurements. The uncoated nickel alloy outperformed the ferritic stainless steel under all test conditions based on weight gain data. Parabolic rate constants for corrosion of these two uncoated alloys were consistent with values presented in the literature under similar conditions. The steel coatings reduced corrosion rates in H2O/H2 mixtures by as much as 50% compared to the untreated steel, but in most cases showed negligible corrosion improvement in air. The use of a rare-earth-based coating on stainless steel did not result in a significantly different area specific resistance values after corrosion compared to the untreated alloy. Characterization of the samples is still in progress and the findings will be revised when the complete data set is available.

Paul Demkowicz; Prateek Sachdev; Kevin DeWall; Pavel Medvedev

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Techniques for Demand Response, LBNL-59975, May 2007 [Protocol Development for Demand Response Calculation – Findsand S. Kiliccote, Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts:

Han, Junqiao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Simulation and testing of a lateral, microfabricated electron-impact ion source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation and experimental testing of a miniaturized, lateral, electron-impact ionization source are reported. Modeling and subsequent optimization of the device design led to a tenfold improvement in the performance of the device in comparison with earlier designs. Increased electron current contributing to ionization and increased ion collection efficiency are believed to be the main factors responsible for this improvement. SIMION software was used to model the behavior of the devices and understand the improvement in performance. The ion source can operate in a wide pressure range from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and generate ion currents in excess of 1 {mu}A.

Natarajan, Srividya; Parker, Charles B.; Glass, Jeffrey T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Gilchrist, Kristin H.; Piascik, Jeffrey R.; Stoner, Brian R. [Center for Materials and Electronic Technologies, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States)

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 107: Low Impact Soil Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 107 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Low Impact Soil Sites' and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 01-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site - High Alt; CAS 02-23-02, Contaminated Areas (2); CAS 02-23-03, Contaminated Berm; CAS 02-23-10, Gourd-Amber Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-11, Sappho Contamination Area; CAS 02-23-12, Scuttle Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-24, Seaweed B Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-27, Adze Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-28, Manzanas Contamination Area; CAS 03-23-29, Truchas-Chamisal Contamination Area; CAS 04-23-02, Atmospheric Test Site T4-a; CAS 05-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site; CAS 09-23-06, Mound of Contaminated Soil; CAS 10-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site M-10; and CAS 18-23-02, U-18d Crater (Sulky). Closure activities were conducted from February through April 2009 according to the FFACO (1996; as amended February 2008) and Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 107 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2009). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities are summarized.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

High Temperature Solid-Oxide Electrolyzer 2500 Hour Test Results At The Idaho National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing the concept of using solid oxide fuel cells as electrolyzers for large-scale, high-temperature (efficient), hydrogen production. This program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Utilizing a fuel cell as an electrolyzer introduces some inherent differences in cell operating conditions. In particular, the performance of fuel cells operated as electrolyzers degrades with time faster. This issue of electrolyzer cell and stack performance degradation over time has been identified as a major barrier to technology development. Consequently, the INL has been working together with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah) to improve the long-term performance of high temperature electrolyzers. As part of this research partnership, the INL conducted a 2500 hour test of a Ceramatec designed and produced stack operated in the electrolysis mode. This paper will provide a summary of experimental results to date for this ongoing test.

Carl Stoots; James O'Brien; Stephen Herring; Keith Condie; Lisa Moore-McAteer; Joseph J. Hartvigsen; Dennis Larsen

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Byggmeister Test Home: Analysis and Initial Results of Cold Climate Wood-Framed Home Retrofit  

SciTech Connect

BSC seeks to further the energy efficiency market for New England area retrofit projects by supporting projects that are based on solid building science fundamentals and verified implementation. With the high exposure of energy efficiency and retrofit terminology being used in the general media at this time, it is important to have evidence that measures being proposed will in fact benefit the homeowner through a combination of energy savings, improved durability, and occupant comfort. There are several basic areas of research to which the technical report for these test homes can be expected to contribute. These include the combination of measures that is feasible, affordable and acceptable to homeowners as well as expectations versus results. Two Byggmeister multi-family test homes in Massachusetts are examined with the goal of providing case studies that could be applied to other similar New England homes.

Gates, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Side-by-Side Testing of Water Heating Systems: Results from the 2010 - 2011 Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) continues the testing and evaluation of seven water heating systems operating side-by-side at the HWS laboratory in Cocoa, Florida, and documents results in this report. All systems are submitted to alternating hot water draw schedules (ASHRAE 90.1 and NREL/BA). The most significant system change under the latest testing rotation comes from the evaluation of a new state-of-the-art electric heat pump water heater (HPWH) system. The HPWH water heater has demonstrated that under favorable ambient conditions it can perform very well against the best system evaluated in Phase I (2009-2010) ? the differentially controlled solar flat plate solar system.

Colon, C.; Parker, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Results of the PDF{trademark} test burn at Clifty Creek Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process Derived Fuel (PDF{sup TM}) from the ENCOAL process is different from other coals used to generate steam for the power industry. Although PDF{sup TM} is currently produced from Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal, the coal structure changes during processing. Compared to the parent coal, PDF{sup TM} contains much less moisture and slightly lower volatile matter resulting in a higher heating value and higher ash per million Btu. These coal properties can potentially benefit utility boiler performance. Combining the high combustion reactivity typical of PRB coals with significantly reduced moisture should produce higher flame zone temperatures and shorter flames. As a result, some boilers may experience increased steam production, better burnout, or lower excess air. The objective of the work contracted to Quinapoxet Engineering was to quantify the impacts of burning PDF{sup TM} on boiler performance at Clifty Creek Unit 3. A unique optical temperature monitor called SpectraTemp was used to measure changes in furnace exit gas temperature (FEGT) with time and boiler operating parameters for both PDF{sup TM} blends as well as a baseline coal blend consisting of 60% PRB coal, 20% Ohio coal, and 20% low-volatile eastern bituminous coal from Virginia. FEGT was then related to net plant heat rate, NO{sub x} emissions, and electrostatic precipitator performance.

Johnson, S.A.; Knottnerus, B.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Gas Gun Impact Testing of PZT 95/5, Part 1: Unpoled State  

SciTech Connect

In the present study, 10 impact tests were conducted on unpoled PZT 95/5, with 9% porosity and 2 at% Nb doping. These tests were instrumented to obtain time-resolved loading, unloading and span signatures. As well, PVDF gauges allowed shock timing to be established explicitly. The ferroelectric/antiferroelectric phases transition was manifested as a ramp to 0.4 GPa. The onset of crushup produced the most visible signature: a clear wave separation at 2.2 GPa followed by a highly dispersive wave. The end states also reflected crushup, and are consistent with earlier data and with related poled experiments. A span strength value of 0.17 GPa was measured for a shock stress of 0.5 GPa, this decreased to a very small value (no visible pullback signature) for a shock strength of 1.85 GPa.

FURNISH,MICHAEL D.; SETCHELL,ROBERT E.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; MONTGOMERY,STEPHEN T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Program Description and Results APPENDICES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Program Description and Results APPENDICES Mary Ann Piette David Watson Naoya Motegi Sila Kiliccote Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS90R3111 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 August 30, 2007 This work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, under Work for Others Contract No. 150-99-003, Am #1 and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL Report Number 62218 2 Table of Contents List of Tables ......................................................................................................................................3

311

Overview of Recent Results of the Solar Two Test and Evaluations Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Two project is a collaborative, cost-shared project between eleven US industry and utility partners and the U.S. Department of Energy to validate the molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprises 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system and a steam generator system that use molten nitrate salt as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powers a 10 MWe, conventional Rankine cycle turbine. This paper describes the test plan and evaluations currently in progress at Solar Two and provides some recent results.

Gilbert, R.; Pacheco, J.E.

1999-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

IEEE 802.15.4 Communication Protocol Field Test Results and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.15.4 standard defines the 2.4 GHz frequency band with 16 channels (channels 11-26), the 915 MHz band with 10 channels (channels (1-10), and the 836 MHz band with one channel (channel 0). This report introduces IEEE 802.15.4 evaluation tools that are currently under development, open range test results, and a radio-frequency (RF) survey of a suburban ranch style home with a metal roof located in Pleasanton, California. The report presents th...

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

High Temperature Superconducting Matrix Fault Current Limiter: Proof-of-Concept Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the design and proof-of-concept test results of a pre-prototype superconducting fault current limiter (FCL). The device employs SuperPower's Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) technology and BSCCO-2212 bulk material manufactured by Nexans SuperConductors' melt cast processing (MCP) technique. The MFCL technology is targeted to address fault current over-duty problems at the transmission voltage level of 138kV and higher. In addition to EPRI sponsorship, this $12M development progra...

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Results from Alloy 600 And Alloy 690 Caustic SCC Model Boiler Tests  

SciTech Connect

A versatile model boiler test methodology was developed and used to compare caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of mill annealed Alloy 600 and thermally treated Alloy 690. The model boiler included simulated crevice devices that efficiently and consistently concentrated Na2CO3, resulting in volatilization of CO2 with the steam and concentration of NaOH at the tube surfaces. The test methodology also included variation in tube stress, either produced by the primary to secondary side pressure differential, or by a novel method that reproducibly yields a higher stress condition on the tube. The significant effect of residual stress on tube SCC was also considered. SCC of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 were evaluated as a function of temperature and stress. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) evaluations of the cracks and the grain boundaries ahead of the cracks were performed, providing insight into the SCC mechanism. This model boiler test methodology may be applicable to a range of bulkwater secondary chemistries that concentrate to produce aggressive crevice environments.

Miller, Frederick D.; Thomas, Larry E.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Test Beam Results of 3D Silicon Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS upgrade  

SciTech Connect

Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable-B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS Inner Detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance. Full and partial 3D pixel detectors have been tested, with and without a 1.6T magnetic field, in high energy pion beams at the CERN SPS North Area in 2009. Sensors characteristics have been measured as a function of the beam incident angle and compared to a regular planar pixel device. Overall full and partial 3D devices have similar behavior. Magnetic field has no sizeable effect on 3D performances. Due to electrode inefficiency 3D devices exhibit some loss of tracking efficiency for normal incident tracks but recover full efficiency with tilted tracks. As expected due to the electric field configuration 3D sensors have little charge sharing between cells.

Grenier, P.; /SLAC; Alimonti, G.; /INFN, Milan; Barbero, M.; /Bonn U.; Bates, R.; /Glasgow U.; Bolle, E.; /Oslo U.; Borri, M.; /Manchester U.; Boscardin, M.; /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo; Buttar, C.; /Glasgow U.; Capua, M.; /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Cobal, M.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine; Cristofoli, A.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine; Dalla Betta, G.F.; /Trento U. /INFN, Trento; Darbo, G.; /INFN, Genoa; Da Via, C.; /Manchester U.; Devetak, E.; /SUNY, Stony Brook; DeWilde, B.; /SUNY, Stony Brook; Di Girolamo, B.; /CERN; Dobos, D.; /CERN; Einsweiler, K.; /LBL, Berkeley; Esseni, D.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Manchester U. /CERN /LBL, Berkeley /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Oslo U. /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SLAC /SLAC /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /SLAC /SINTEF, Oslo /Manchester U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Bonn U. /Bonn U. /CERN /Manchester U. /SINTEF, Oslo /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Manchester U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Glasgow U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Hawaii U. /Freiburg U. /Manchester U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /CERN /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /Prague, Tech. U. /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /CERN /Oslo U. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /SLAC /Oslo U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Oslo U. /Bergen U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /SLAC /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Standard Test Method for Determining Resistance of Photovoltaic Modules to Hail by Impact with Propelled Ice Balls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method provides a procedure for determining the ability of photovoltaic modules to withstand impact forces of falling hail. Propelled ice balls are used to simulate falling hailstones. 1.2 This test method defines test specimens and methods for mounting specimens, specifies impact locations on each test specimen, provides an equation for determining the velocity of any size ice ball, provides a method for impacting the test specimens with ice balls, provides a method for determining changes in electrical performance, and specifies parameters that must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable levels of ice ball impact resistance is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.4 The size of the ice ball to be used in conducting this test is not specified. This test method can be used with various sizes of ice balls. 1.5 This test method may be applied to concentrator and nonconcentrator modules. 1.6 The v...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Test results from the GA technologies engineering-scale off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect

One method for reducing the volume of HTGR fuel prior to reprocessing or spent fuel storage is to crush and burn the graphite fuel elements. The burner off-gas (BOG) contains radioactive components, principally H-3, C-14, Kr-85, I-129, and Rn-220, as well as chemical forms such as CO/sub 2/, CO, O/sub 2/, and SO/sub 2/. The BOG system employs components designed to remove these constitutents. Test results are reported for the iodine and SO/sub 2/ adsorbers and the CO/HT oxidizer. Silver-based iodine adsorbents were found to catalyze the premature conversion of CO to CO/sub 2/. Subsequent tests showed that iodine removal could not be performed downstream of the CO/HT oxidizer since iodine in the BOG system rapidly deactivated the Pt-coated alumina CO catalyst. Lead-exchanged zeolite (PbX) was found to be an acceptable alternative for removing iodine from BOG without CO conversion. Intermittent and steady-state tests of the pilot-plant SO/sub 2/ removal unit containing sodium-exchanged zeolite (NaX) demonstrated that decontamination factors greater than or equal to 100 could be maintained for up to 50 h. In a reprocessing flowsheet, the solid product from the burners is dissolved in nitric or Thorex acid. The dissolver off-gas (DOG) contains radioactive components H-3, Kr-85, I-129, Rn-220 plus chemical forms such as nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/). In the pilot-scale system at GA, iodine is removed from the DOG by adsorption. Tests of iodine removal have been conducted using either silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) or AgNO/sub 3/-impregnated silica gel (AC-6120). Although each sorbent performed well in the presence of NO/sub x/, the silica gel adsorbent proved more efficient in silver utilization and, thus, more cost effective.

Jensen, D.D.; Olguin, L.J.; Wilbourn, R.G.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Computer-assisted comparison of analysis and test results in transportation experiments  

SciTech Connect

As a part of its ongoing research efforts, Sandia National Laboratories` Transportation Surety Center investigates the integrity of various containment methods for hazardous materials transport, subject to anomalous structural and thermal events such as free-fall impacts, collisions, and fires in both open and confined areas. Since it is not possible to conduct field experiments for every set of possible conditions under which an actual transportation accident might occur, accurate modeling methods must be developed which will yield reliable simulations of the effects of accident events under various scenarios. This requires computer software which is capable of assimilating and processing data from experiments performed as benchmarks, as well as data obtained from numerical models that simulate the experiment. Software tools which can present all of these results in a meaningful and useful way to the analyst are a critical aspect of this process. The purpose of this work is to provide software resources on a long term basis, and to ensure that the data visualization capabilities of the Center keep pace with advancing technology. This will provide leverage for its modeling and analysis abilities in a rapidly evolving hardware/software environment.

Knight, R.D. [Gram, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, D.J.; Koski, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

319

Results of Research Engine and Vehicle Drive Cycle Testing during Blended Hydrogen/Methane Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results of Research Engine and Results of Research Engine and Vehicle Drive Cycle Testing during Blended Hydrogen/Methane Operation Thomas Wallner, Henning Lohse-Busch, Henry Ng Argonne National Laboratory Robert Peters University of Alabama at Birmingham NHA Annual Hydrogen Conference 2007 San Antonio/Texas March 19 th - 22 nd 2007 DOE-Sponsors: Lee Slezak, Gurpreet Singh Government license The submitted manuscript was developed by the UChicago Argonne LLC as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. DE-AC-02-06CH11357 with DOE. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up, nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display publicly, by or on

320

The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector of the AMS experiment: test beam results with a prototype  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) will be equipped with a proximity Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for measuring the velocity and electric charge of the charged cosmic particles. This detector will contribute to the high level of redundancy required for AMS as well as to the rejection of albedo particles. Charge separation up to iron and a velocity resolution of the order of 0.1% for singly charged particles are expected. A RICH protoptype consisting of a detection matrix with 96 photomultiplier units, a segment of a conical mirror and samples of the radiator materials was built and its performance was evaluated. Results from the last test beam performed with ion fragments resulting from the collision of a 158 GeV/c/nucleon primary beam of indium ions (CERN SPS) on a lead target are reported. The large amount of collected data allowed to test and characterize different aerogel samples and the sodium fluoride radiator. In addition, the reflectivity of the mirror was evaluated. The data analysis confirms the design goals.

Luísa Arruda; Fernando Barão; Patrícia Goncalves; Rui Pereira

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Economic Impact of the Florida Clam Culture Industry: 2007 Results From small beginnings in the early 1990s,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Impact of the Florida Clam Culture Industry: 2007 Results From small beginnings of the diverse mix of food items produced by the Florida aquaculture industry. The culture pro- cess the industry resides. And aside from the revenue generated by the sale and distribution of market ready clams

Florida, University of

322

Results of bench-scale plasma system testing in support of the Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) is a high-temperature process that destroys hazardous organic components and stabilizes the radioactive components and hazardous metals in a leach-resistant vitreous slag waste form. The PHP technology development program is targeted at mixed waste that cannot be easily treated by conventional means. For example, heterogeneous debris, which may contain hazardous organics, toxic metals, and radionuclides, is difficult to characterize and cannot be treated with conventional thermal, chemical, or physical treatment methods. A major advantage of the PHP over other plasma processes is its ability to separate nonradioactive, non-hazardous metals from the non-metallic and radioactive components which are contained in the vitreous slag. The overall PHP program involves the design, fabrication, and operation of test hardware to demonstrate and certify that the PHP concept is viable for DOE waste treatment. The program involves bench-scale testing of PHP equipment in radioactive service, as well as pilot-scale demonstration of the PHP concept using nonradioactive, surrogate test materials. The fate of secondary waste streams is an important consideration for any technology considered for processing mixed waste. The main secondary waste stream generated by the PHP is flyash captured by the fabric- filter baghouse. The PHP concept is that flyash generated by the process can, to a large extent, be treated by processing this secondary waste stream in the PHP. Prior to the work presented in the paper, however, the PHP project has not quantitatively demonstrated the ability to treat PHP generated flyash. A major consideration is the quantity of radionuclides and RCRA-regulated metals in the flyash that can be retained the resultant waste form.

Leatherman, G.L.; Cornelison, C. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frank, S. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Field test results of the physical solvent N-Formyl morpholine for gas treating applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is developing gas processing technology that will reduce gas processing costs for current production and allow subquality gas to be economically produced that would have been otherwise, not produced. The experimental program has primarily focused on the evaluation of N-Formyl Morpholine (NFM) as a physical solvent for the cost-effective upgrading of subquality natural gas to pipeline quality. The selection of NFM for this program was based on previous work conducted by IGT in the selective removal of hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide from coal gasifier effluents. That work showed that the use of NFM resulted in a significant cost advantage over 107 other solvents for that application. The project approach for the development of NFM process has been divided into following main categories: obtain vapor-liquid equilibrium, physical properties and additional published literature data; obtain mass-transfer coefficients using 2 inch absorber/stripper apparatus and calculate equation of state parameters and binary interaction parameters using VLE data; develop a gas processing model using Aspen Plus simulation program and evaluate economic advantages of the NFM process compared to commercial physical solvent; and design a pilot plant skid mounted field test unit and conduct field test experiments.

Palla, N.; Lee, A.L.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

3D-FBK Pixel Sensors: Recent Beam Tests Results with Irradiated Devices  

SciTech Connect

The Pixel Detector is the innermost part of the ATLAS experiment tracking device at the Large Hadron Collider, and plays a key role in the reconstruction of the primary vertices from the collisions and secondary vertices produced by short-lived particles. To cope with the high level of radiation produced during the collider operation, it is planned to add to the present three layers of silicon pixel sensors which constitute the Pixel Detector, an additional layer (Insertable B-Layer, or IBL) of sensors. 3D silicon sensors are one of the technologies which are under study for the IBL. 3D silicon technology is an innovative combination of very-large-scale integration and Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems where electrodes are fabricated inside the silicon bulk instead of being implanted on the wafer surfaces. 3D sensors, with electrodes fully or partially penetrating the silicon substrate, are currently fabricated at different processing facilities in Europe and USA. This paper reports on the 2010 June beam test results for irradiated 3D devices produced at FBK (Trento, Italy). The performance of these devices, all bump-bonded with the ATLAS pixel FE-I3 read-out chip, is compared to that observed before irradiation in a previous beam test.

Micelli, A.; /INFN, Trieste /Udine U.; Helle, K.; /Bergen U.; Sandaker, H.; /Bergen U.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Barbero, M.; /Bonn U.; Hugging, F.; /Bonn U.; Karagounis, M.; /Bonn U.; Kostyukhin, V.; /Bonn U.; Kruger, H.; /Bonn U.; Tsung, J.W.; /Bonn U.; Wermes, N.; /Bonn U.; Capua, M.; /Calabria U.; Fazio, S.; /Calabria U.; Mastroberardino, A.; /Calabria U.; Susinno, G.; /Calabria U.; Gallrapp, C.; /CERN; Di Girolamo, B.; /CERN; Dobos, D.; /CERN; La Rosa, A.; /CERN; Pernegger, H.; /CERN; Roe, S.; /CERN /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /Freiburg U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Glasgow U. /Hawaii U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /Barcelona, IFAE /LBL, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /Manchester U. /New Mexico U. /New Mexico U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /Oslo U. /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /SUNY, Stony Brook /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /Trento U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Udine U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Trento /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /VTT Electronics, Espoo /VTT Electronics, Espoo

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Mitigation of Tank 241-SY-101 by pump mixing: Results of testing phases A and B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spare mixing pump from the Hanford Grout Program was installed in Hanford double-shell waste Tank 241-SY-101 on July 3, 1993, after being modified to take advantage of waste stratification. It was anticipated that pump mixing would prevent large episodic flammable gas releases that had been occurring about every 100-150 days. A cautious initial test plan, called Phase A, was run to find how the pump and tank would behave in response to very brief and gentle pump operation. No large gas releases were triggered, and the pump performed well except for two incidents of nozzle plugging. On October 21, 1993, the next test series, Phase B, began, and the pump was applied more aggressively to mix the tank contents and mitigate uncontrolled gas releases. Orienting the pump in new directions released large volumes of gas and reduced the waste level to a near-record low. Results of the entire period from pump installation to the end of Phase B on December 17, 1993, are presented in detail in this document. Though long-term effects require further evaluation, we conclude from these data that the jet mixer pump is an effective means of controlling flammable gas release and that it has met the success criteria for mitigation in this tank.

Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Chvala, W.D.; Friley, J.R.; Gregory, W.B.; Hudson, J.D.; Michener, T.E.; Panisko, F.E.; Stewart, C.W.; Wise, B.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Efferding, L.E.; Fadeff, J.G.; Irwin, J.J.; Kirch, N.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A simulation study using EFA and CFA programs based the impact of missing data on test dimensionality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the impact of missing rates and data imputation methods on test dimensionality. We consider how missing rate levels (10%, 20%, 30%, and 50%) and the six missed data imputation methods (Listwise, Serial Mean, Linear Interpolation, ... Keywords: Confirmatory factor analysis, Data imputation, Exploratory factor analysis, Statistics package for social science, Test dimensionality

Shin-Feng Chen; Shuyi Wang; Chen-Yuan Chen

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results Mary Ann Piette David Watson Naoya Motegi Sila Kiliccote Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS90R3111 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 June 19, 2007 LBNL Report Number 62218 ii Acknowledgements The work described in this report was funded by the Emerging Technologies Program at Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Additional funding was provided by the Demand Response Research Center which is funded by the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission), Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program, under Work for Others Contract No.500-03-026, Am #1 and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are grateful for the extensive

328

Results from betatron phase measurements in RHIC during the sextant test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was an important step towards its completion. One sixth of the two RHIC accelerators was fully commissioned. gold ion beam was injected and transported through one sextant of one of the two rings. The betatron phase advance per cell was measured by recording differences in the horizontal and vertical positions of the beam at the end of the sextant due to a sequence of correction dipole kicks along the beam line. Measurement results show excellent agreement with predicted values, confirming that production measurements of the integral functions of the quadrupoles were very accurate, and that the polarity of all elements (correction dipoles, quadrupoles, dipoles etc.) was correct.

Trbojevic, D.; Connolly, R.; Fischer, W. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory`s & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R & D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R & D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory's Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Prototype Test Results of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are currently no experiments, either satellite or ground-based, that are sensitive to astrophysical gamma-rays at energies between 20 and 250 GeV. We are developing the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) to explore this energy range. STACEE will use heliostat mirrors at a solar research facility to collect Cherenkov light from extensive air showers produced by high energy gamma-rays. Here we report on the results of prototype test work at the solar facility of Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM). The work demonstrates that the facility is suitable for use as an astrophysical observatory. In addition, using a full scale prototype of part of STACEE, we detected atmospheric Cherenkov radiation at energies lower than any other ground-based experiment to date.

STACEE Collaboration

1997-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

332

Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory's Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

PERIODIC WASTE DISPOSAL SYSTEM MATERIAL BALANCE TEST. CORE I, SEED 2. Section 2. Test Results T-641317  

SciTech Connect

ABS>A test was made on the Radioactive Waste Disposal (RWD) system to determine the acceptability of procedures used in containing, processing, and disposing the wastes received from the plant during a steady-state operation. The RWD system was found to be adequate and to have 60,000 gallons available at all times in the Surge and Decay tanks for safety injection. (D.L.C.)

1961-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

2010 Ford Fusion VIN 4757 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Ford Fusion HEV (VIN: 3FADP0L34AR144757). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

2010 Honda Insight VIN 0141 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H78AS010141). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 0462 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN: JTDKN3DU2A5010462). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

2010 Toyota Prius VIN 6063 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Toyota Prius HEV (VIN JTDKN3DU5A0006063). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

2010 Honda Insight VIN 1748 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Insight HEV (VIN: JHMZE2H59AS011748). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, First-Year Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers are conducting field tests to evaluate the ability of a variety of materials to oxidize vapor-phase elemental mercury. Testing will be conducted at two sites for 14 months at each site. This report summarizes the first year of work on the project, including installation, and four months of testing of the pilot at the first site.

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Comparison of analysis and vibration test results for a multiple supported piping system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of a nuclear power plant piping system subjected to high level vibrational excitation is investigated experimentally and analytically. The objective is to evaluate the piping analysis method employed in the SMACS computer code. Experimental data are obtained from the Large Shaker Experiments (SHAG) conducted at the HDR Test Facility in Kahl/Main, FRG, in which the dynamic behavior of an in-plant piping system with various support configurations was investigated. Comparisons of calculational results with measured data indicate that the adequacy of the prediction depends primarily on the modeling of boundary conditions and dynamic supports. Treating the latter as rigid and using building motion as input, in general, results in under prediction of piping response. On the other hand when accelerations on the pipe side of the dynamic support attachment are used as input, piping response is highly overpredicted. Also modeling wall/floor component attachments as fixed usually leads to underprediction of amplitude as well as differences in the frequency content of response. 9 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Hsieh, B.J.; Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Results of short-term corrosion evaluation tests at Raft River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four categories of short-term materials evaluation tests were conducted in geothermal fluid from Raft River Geothermal Experiment, Well No. 1, to obtain corrosion data relevant to the design of the Raft River Thermal Loop Facility. Test programs are described and the testing philosophies are discussed. All materials and configurations which were tested are identified and details of posttest visual examinations are presented. The materials are then assigned to appropriate performance categories on the basis of test behavior, and the possible service limitations are appraised.

Miller, R.L.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Test results for the 201.25 MHZ tetrode power amplifier at LANSCE  

SciTech Connect

A new RF amplifier has been constructed for use as the intermediate power amplifier stage for the 201.25 MHz Alvarez DTL at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). It is part of a larger upgrade to replace the entire RF plant with a new generation of components. The new RF power system under development will enable increased peak power with higher duty factor. The first tank requires over 400 kW of RF power. This can be satisfied using the TH781 tetrode in a THALES cavity amplifier. The same stage will be also used to drive a TH628 Diacrode(reg. sign) final power amplifier for each of the three remaining DTL tanks. In this application, it will only be required to deliver approximately 150 kW of peak power. Details of the system design, layout for DTL 1, and test results will be presented. The Thales cavity amplifier and TH78I tetrode have been tested for two upcoming requirements at LANSCE. As an IPA to drive a future TH628 Diacrode(reg. sign) FPA with 120-150 kW, the amplifier provided over 16 dB power gain with 50% efficiency or better. As a stand-alone FPA to drive a 5 MeV Alvarez DTI, tank, the amplifier provided 13.5 dB power gain with 50% efficiency or better. It can also be used to drive a 200 MHz RFQ in the future. Power supplies, driver amplifier and coaxial circulators are being specified for the complete installation.

Lyles, J. T. (John T.); Archuletta, S. (Steven); Davis, J. L. (Jerry L.); Lopez, L. J. (Luis J.); Roybal, G. (Gabriel)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN 0815 Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), including testing the PHEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 12,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Chevrolet Volt PHEV (VIN 1G1RD6E48BU100815). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec) dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

2010 Honda Civic Hybrid UltraBattery Conversion 5577 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing the HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Honda Civic HEV UltraBattery Conversion (VIN JHMFA3F24AS005577). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-110 Heel Solids  

SciTech Connect

Nine samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-110 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, the sample solids were primarily white to light-brown with minor dark-colored inclusions. The maximum dimension of the majority of the solids was <2 mm; however, numerous pieces of aggregate, microcrystalline, and crystalline solids with maximum dimensions ranging from 5-70 mm were observed. In general, the larger pieces of aggregate solids were strongly cemented. Natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O] was the dominant solid phase identified in the heel solids. Results of chemical analyses suggested that 85-87 wt% of the heel solids were the fluoridephosphate double salt. The average bulk density measured for the heel solids was 1.689 g/mL; the reference density of natrophosphate is 1.71 g/mL. Dissolution tests on composite samples indicate that 94 to 97 wt% of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids can be retrieved by dissolution in water. Dissolution and recovery of the soluble components in 1 kg (0.59 L) of the heel solids required the addition of ≈9.5 kg (9.5 L) of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.4 kg (4.45 L) of water at 45 ?C. Calculations performed using the Environmental Simulation Program indicate that dissolution of the ≈0.86 kg of natrophosphate in each kilogram of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids would require ≈9.45 kg of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.25 kg of water at 45 ?C. The slightly larger quantities of water determined to be required to retrieve the soluble components in 1 kg of the heel solids are consistent with that required for the dissolution of solids composed mainly of natrophosphate with a major portion of the balance consisting of highly soluble sodium salts. At least 98% of the structural water, soluble phosphate, sodium, fluoride, nitrate, carbonate, nitrite, sulfate, oxalate, and chloride in the test composites was dissolved and recovered in the dissolution tests. Most of the {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs present in the initial heel solids composites was removed in the water dissolution tests. The estimated activities/weights of {sup 129}I, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U in the dry residual solids were <25% of the weights/activities in the initial composite solids. Gibbsite and nordstrandite [both Al(OH){sub 3}] were the major solid phases identified in the solids remaining after completion of the dissolution tests. Chemical analysis indicated that the residual solids may have contained up to 62 wt% Al(OH){sub 3}. Significant quantities of unidentified phosphate-, iron-, bismuth-, silicon-, and strontium- bearing species were also present in the residual solids. The reference density of gibbsite (and nordstrandite) is 2.42 g/mL. The measured density of the residual solids, 2.65 g/mL, would be a reasonable value for solids containing gibbsite as the major component with minor quantities of other, higher density solids. Sieve analysis indicated that 22.2 wt% of the residual solids were discrete particles >710 μm in size, and 77.8 wt% were particulates <710 μm in size. Light-scattering measurements suggested that nearly all of the <710-μm particulates with diameters >12 μm were weakly bound aggregates of particles with diameters <2 μm. The <710-μm residual solids settled very slowly when dispersed in reagent water. The physical appearance of a suspension containing ≈0.4 vol% of the solids in pure water changed very little over a period of 46.5 hours. It should be noted that the distribution of particle sizes in the residual solids and the observed settling behavior were both strongly influenced by the procedures followed in the dissolution tests.

Callaway, William S.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems, Results of IEA Collaboration  

SciTech Connect

There are a multitude of studies completed and ongoing related to the cost of wind integration. However, the results are not easy to compare. An international forum for exchange of knowledge of power system impacts of wind power has been formed under the IEA Implementing Agreement on Wind Energy. IEA WIND R and D Task 25 on 'Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power' produced a state-of-the-art report in October 2007, where the most relevant wind-power grid integration studies were analyzed, especially regarding methodologies and input data. This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B. C.; Tande, J. O.; Estanqueiro, A.; Gomez, E.; Smith, J. C.; Ela, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cadmium Depletion Impacts on Hardening Neutron6 Spectrum for Advanced Fuel Testing in ATR  

SciTech Connect

For transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products effectively is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast spectrum test reactor in the United States of America (USA), initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. A test region is achieved with a Cadmium (Cd) filter which can harden the neutron spectrum to a spectrum similar (although still somewhat softer) to that of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). A fuel test loop with a Cd-filter has been installed within the East Flux Trap (EFT) of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A detailed comparison analyses between the cadmium (Cd) filter hardened neutron spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum have been performed using MCWO. MCWO is a set of scripting tools that are used to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2.2. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the Cd-filter can effectively flatten the Rim-Effect and reduce the linear heat rate (LHGR) to meet the advanced fuel testing project requirements at the beginning of irradiation (BOI). However, the filtering characteristics of Cd as a strong absorber quickly depletes over time, and the Cd-filter must be replaced for every two typical operating cycles within the EFT of the ATR. The designed Cd-filter can effectively depress the LHGR in experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum enough to adequately flatten the Rim Effect in the test region.

Gray S. Chang

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Results from Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Series 3 spent fuel dissolution tests  

SciTech Connect

The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), formerly the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Specimens prepared from pressurized water reactor fuel rod segments were tested in sealed stainless steel vessels in Nevada Test Site J-13 well water at 85{degree}C and 25{degree}C. The test matrix included three specimens of bare-fuel particles plus cladding hulls, two fuel rod segments with artificially defected cladding and water-tight end fittings, and an undefected fuel rod section with watertight end fittings. Periodic solution samples were taken during test cycles with the sample volumes replenished with fresh J-13 water. Test cycles were periodically terminated and the specimens restarted in fresh J-13 water. The specimens were run for three cycles for a total test duration of 15 months. 22 refs., 32 figs., 26 tabs.

Wilson, C.N.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

BP-5 Remedial Investigation Slug-Test Characterization Results for Well 699-52-55A  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted slug-test characterization at the final, completed BP-5 Remedial Investigation well 699-52-55A near the 200-East Area at the Hanford Site on April 22, 2008. The slug-test characterization was in support of the BP-5 Remedial Investigation. The portion of the unconfined aquifer tested is composed of sediments of the lower Ringold Formation and the underlying Elephant Mountain basalt flowtop. The basalt flowtop unit was included as part of the effective test-interval length for the slug-test analysis because the flowtop unit is hydraulically communicative with the unconfined aquifer. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity for the effective test-interval length represent composite values for the lower Ringold Formation and the underlying Elephant Mountain basalt flow top.

Newcomer, Darrell R.

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L ABORATORY China Energy Efficiency Round Robin TestingNeed to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Energy Consumingfor Implementing the China Energy Efficiency Label System (

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Preliminary operational results of the low-temperature solar industrial process heat field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six solar industrial process heat field tests have been in operation for a year or more - three are hot water systems and three are hot air systems. All are low-temperature projects (process heat at temperatures below 212/sup 0/F). Performance results gathered by each contractor's data acquisition system are presented and project costs and problems encountered are summarized. Flat-plate, evacuated-tube, and line-focus collectors are all represented in the program, with collector array areas ranging from 2500 to 21,000 ft/sup 2/. Collector array efficiencies ranged from 12% to 36% with net system efficiencies from 8% to 33%. Low efficiencies are attributable in some cases to high thermal losses and, for the two projects using air collectors, are due in part to high parasitic power consumption. Problems have included industrial effluents on collectors, glazing and absorber surface failures, excessive thermal losses, freezing and overheating, control problems, and data acquisition system failure. With design and data acquisition costs excluded costs of the projects ranged from $25/ft/sup 2/ to $87/ft/sup 2/ and $499/(MBtu/yr) to $1537/(MBtu/yr).

Kutscher, C.F.; Davenport, R.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

NO{sub x} Abatement Pilot Plant 90-day test results report  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced during nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant are calcined in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to provide both volume reduction and a more stable waste form. Because a large component of the HLW is nitric acid, high levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) are produced in the process and discharged to the environment via the calciner off-gas. The NO{sub x} abatement program is required by the new Fuel Processing Restoration (FPR) project permit to construct to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from the NWCF. Extensive research and development has indicated that the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process is the most promising technology for treating the NWCF off-gas. Pilot plant tests were performed to determine the compatibility of the SCR process with actual NWCF off-gas. Test results indicate that the SCR process is a viable method for abating the NO{sub x} from the NWCF off-gas. Reduction efficiencies over 95% can be obtained, with minimal amounts of ammonia slip, provided favorable operating conditions exist. Two reactors operated with series flow will provide optimum reduction capabilities. Typical operation should be performed with a first reactor stage gas space velocity of 20,000 hr{sup {minus}1} and an inlet temperature of 320{degrees}C. The first stage exhaust NO{sub x} concentration will then dictate the parameter settings for the second stage. Operation should always strive for a peak reactor temperature of 520{degrees}C in both reactors, with minimal NH{sub 3} slip from the second reactor. Frequent fluctuations in the NWCF off-gas NO{sub x} concentration will require a full-scale reduction facility that is versatile and quick-responding. Sudden changes in NWCF off-gas NO{sub x} concentrations will require quick detection and immediate response to avoid reactor bed over-heating and/or excessive ammonia slip.

McCray, J.A.; Boardman, R.D. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation`s irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western`s wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western`s power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage.

Edwards, B.K.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, S.C. [Western Area Power Administration, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Test Generation for Crosstalk-Induced Faults: Framework and Computational Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to technology scaling and increasing clock frequency, problems due to noise effects lead to an increase in design/debugging efforts and a decrease in circuit performance. This paper addresses the problem of efficiently and accurately generating two-vector ... Keywords: crosstalk, fault modeling, mixed-signal test, time-based test generation

Wei-Yu Chen; Sandeep K. Gupta; Melvin A. Breuer

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Design and Testing of a Landfill Gas Cleanup System for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Plants: Volume 1: Field Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an effort to develop a low-cost cleanup system that would enable landfill gas to be used in carbonate fuel cells or other power generation devices. The EPRI-developed system is now available for license to commercial applications.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

357

Test-Wiseness Training: An Investigation of the Impact of Test-Wiseness in an Employment Setting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The current study examined ethnic group differences in test-wiseness and the extent to which test-wiseness training may eliminate these differences in a sample of 87… (more)

Houston, Susan Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Analysis of the energy impacts of the DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Small Grants Program: methods and results  

SciTech Connect

The study outlines methods for assessing the energy savings of projects funded by DOE in the Appropriate Technology Program (AT) and the way to apply these methods to obtain estimates of energy impacts. The energy savings potential was assessed for 57 projects from a national population of 584. Program energy savings were estimated from project savings using statistical inference. Details of the approach are discussed. Chapter 2 presents and discusses estimates of direct energy savings and Chapter 3 discusses methods and results of the economic analysis. Chapter 4 examines the indirect energy savings. Chapter 5 presents estimates of program energy savings and the methods used to obtain them. The report concludes with a discussion of how improved project selection can increase program energy savings and presents two approaches for conducting future energy impact studies. (MCW)

Lucarelli, B.; Kessel, J.; Kay, J.; Linse, J.; Tompson, S.; Homer, M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

AN ANALYSIS OF THE ENERGY IMPACTS OF THE DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM: METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ENERGY IMPACTS OF THE DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGYmanufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constituteTHE ENERGY IMPACTS of the DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

Lucarelli, Bart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Design, Construction, and Test Results for Three Different Fiber Optic Tow Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, manufacture, and testing of three armored fiber optic tow cables is discussed. The motivation for these developments was the technical need to have low-loss high-bandwidth transmission lines, that function with negligible crosstalk and absence ...

E. Althouse

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Spatially Variable Advection Correction of Radar Data. Part II: Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatially variable advection-correction/analysis procedure introduced in Part I is tested using analytical reflectivity blobs embedded in a solid-body vortex, and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 ...

Alan Shapiro; Katherine M. Willingham; Corey K. Potvin

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Screening Analysis : Volume 2, Impact Results (Columbia River System Operation Review).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed results from all of the work groups are presented in this chapter. Ninety alternatives were analyzed during the screening process. Three of the alternative represent various base cases and are used for comparison purposes. The other 87 alternatives represent a wide variety of operational possibilities ranging from current operations to emphasizing a single river use to compromise operations that attempt to accommodate the multiple uses. Every possible alternative suggested during the screening phase was considered. Each alternative was given an abbreviated name, a number and assigned by ROSE to either the Corps (C) or BPA (B) for hydroregulation modeling. A list of the alternatives with its number and hydroregulation assignment is given below. The results in this chapter are presented in numerical order. The first 3 letters in the name identify which work group suggested the alternative. The format for the results includes a brief description of each alternative, a tabulation of the screening calculations organized by work group, and observations/comments on the alternative by the work groups. The description summarizes the key operational requirements for the alternative and was taken directly from the instructions given to the hydroregulation modelers.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Gas Permeation Testing Results from the Mixed Waste Focus Area Improved Hydrogen Getter Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas permeabilities of more than 20 polymers were measured using pure and mixed gas techniques. The motivation was to determine potential materials that could be used to protect hydrogen getter particles from poisons while permitting sufficient hydrogen rates to enable the getters use in TRUPACT types of containers. A rate of five barrers or larger is needed. Of the materials screened in the pure gas tests, more than 15 qualified. Nine materials qualified in the mixed gas tests, but of the nine only three had high CCl4 rejection rates and four others would greatly reduce the transport of the CCl4.

Mark Stone; Christopher Orme; Eric Peterson; Michael Benson; John Kaszuba; Eugene Mroz; Marc Haga

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. High-siliocon fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because any space mission could experience a launch abort or return from orbit, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment-impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Evaluation of Emerging Line Inspection Technologies: Results of 2012 Outdoor Laboratory Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes outdoor laboratory testing performed in 2012 to evaluate different approaches to establish conductor temperature during a helicopter-based Lidar field survey of an existing overhead transmission line. Establishing conductor temperature during Lidar surveys is necessary to assemble a line model to determine line sags, and thus clearances, under full rating and specified environmental conditions. ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

370

Test Results Using a Bell Jar to Measure Containment Vessel Pressurization  

SciTech Connect

A bell jar is used to determine containment vessel pressurization due to outgassing of plutonium materials. Fifteen food cans containing plutonium bearing materials, including plutonium packaged in direct contact with plastic and plutonium contaminated enriched oxide have been tested to date.

Hensel, S.J.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

Elastic-plastic-creep analysis of thermal ratchetting in straight pipe and comparisons with test results  

SciTech Connect

From winter meeting of American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Detroit, Michigan, USA (11 Nov 1973). An experimental and analytical study of ratchetting in a simple structural component is described. A straight pipe from a wellcharacterized heat of Type 304 stainless steel was subjected to a series of thermal downshocks followed by sustained periods of high-temperature operation under internal pressure. The test was performed in a special sodium test facility built for the purpose. The inelastic analysis predictions were obtained using a one-dimensional finite-element procedure, and they were based on interim constitutive equations that have been recommended for use in design analyses of liquid-metal fast-breeder reactor components. The agreement between the measured and predicted ratchetting behavior is good. (8 references) (auth)

Corum, J.M.; Sartory, W.K.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Utility Test Results of a 2-Megawatt, 10-Second Reserve-Power System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the 1996 evaluation by Pacific Gas and Electric Company of an advanced reserve-power system capable of supporting 2 MW of load for 10 seconds. The system, developed under a DOE Cooperative Agreement with AC Battery Corporation of East Troy, Wisconsin, contains battery storage that enables industrial facilities to ''ride through'' momentary outages. The evaluation consisted of tests of system performance using a wide variety of load types and operating conditions. The tests, which included simulated utility outages and voltage sags, demonstrated that the system could provide continuous power during utility outages and other disturbances and that it was compatible with a variety of load types found at industrial customer sites.

BALL,GREG J.; NORRIS,BENJAMIN L.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Results of a one-way experiment to test the isotropy of the speed of light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the outcome of an experiment based on an improved version of Fizeau's coupled-slotted-discs that tests the fundamental postulates of Special Relativity for the one-way speed of light propagation. According to our methodology, important phenomena - a limit on and the diurnal regularity of the variation of the speed of light due to the movements of the Earth (assuming that the speed of light follows a Galilean transformation) - can be tested by the present experiment. However, these measurements do not indicate any significant diurnal variation. Consequently, the limit of the present outcome on the variation of the speed of light is insignificant. Assuming that the speed of light is not invariant and performing a rigorous statistical analysis, the limit established is approximately 1/50 of the previous Fizeau-type experiment with 95% confidence level. These outcomes are consistent with the assumptions of Einstein's Special Relativity.

Md. Farid Ahmed; Brendan M. Quine; Spiros Pagiatakis; A. D. Stauffer

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

374

Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-110 Heel Solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nine samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-110 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, the sample solids were primarily white to light-brown with minor dark-colored inclusions. The maximum dimension of the majority of the solids was 710 ?m in size, and 77.8 wt% were particulates 12 ?m were weakly bound aggregates of particles with diameters <2 ?m. The <710-?m residual solids settled very slowly when dispersed in reagent water. The physical appearance of a suspension containing ?0.4 vol% of the solids in pure water changed very little over a period of 46.5 hours. It should be noted that the distribution of particle sizes in the residual solids and the observed settling behavior were both strongly influenced by the procedures followed in the dissolution tests.

Callaway, William S.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Test results of a Stirling engine utilizing heat exchanger modules with an integral heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Pipe Stirling Engine (HP-1000), a free-piston Stirling engine incorporating three heat exchanger modules, each having a sodium filled heat pipe, has been tested at the NASA-Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The heat exchanger modules were designed to reduce the number of potential flow leak paths in the heat exchanger assembly and incorporate a heat pipe as the link between the heat source and the engine. An existing RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine was modified to operate using the heat exchanger modules. This paper describes heat exchanger module and engine performance during baseline testing. Condenser temperature profiles, brake power, and efficiency are presented and discussed.

Skupinski, R.C.; Tower, L.K.; Madi, F.J.; Brusk, K.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Significant test results, energy potential, and geology of some Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal sandstone reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geopressured-geothermal reservoir found in the northern Gulf of Mexico basin represent a large potential future energy resource. Three reservoirs in various stages of developmental testing are of current interest. Over a four-year testing period the Gladys McCall 1 (Cameron Parish, Louisiana) produced 27.3 million bbl of brine and 676 million scf of gas at an average rate of 20,000 bbl/day from perforations between 15,158 and 15,490 ft. This lower Miocene sandstone section forms part of a genetic unit of interconnected channel and point-bar sandstones deposited in a lower shelf environment. Pleasant Bayou 2 well (Brazoria County, Texas) is currently being flow-tested at 20,000 bbl/day and has a gas/brine ratio of approximately 23 scf/stb and a temperature of 291/degrees/F. An electric energy conversion system being set up here will test potential for electric generation from geopressured-geothermal energy. Superior Hulin 1 (Vermilion Parish, Louisiana) is a deep (21,549 ft) former gas well proposed to be completed as a geopressured-geothermal well. Initial log analysis indicates that a 570-ft thick sandstone, of probable submarine fan origin, may contain free gas in addition to solution gas and may thus represent an economically feasible geopressured-geothermal well. Gas-separated brine is disposed by subsurface injection into disposal wells. However, in areas where hydrocarbon fields with wells penetrating geopressured sands are present, hot brines could be injected into depleted hydrocarbon zones to aid secondary recovery.

John, C.J.; Stevenson, D.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

THE RESULTS OF TESTING TO EVALUATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND SETTLING IN THE COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER  

SciTech Connect

The Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology offers the potential to increase waste loading for High Level Waste (HLW) glasses leading to significant improvements in waste throughput rates compared to the reference Joule Heated Melter (JHM). Prior to implementation of a CCIM in a production facility it is necessary to better understand processing constraints associated with the CCIM. The glass liquidus temperature requirement for processing in the CCIM is an open issue. Testing was conducted to evaluate crystal formation and crystal settling during processing in the CCIM to gain insight into the effects on processing. A high aluminum/high iron content glass composition with known crystal formation tendencies was selected for testing. A continuous melter test was conducted for approximately 51 hours. To evaluate crystal formation, glass samples were obtained from pours and from glass receipt canisters where the glass melt had varying residence time in the melter. Additionally, upon conclusion of the testing, glass samples from the bottom of the melter were obtained to assess the degree of crystal settling. Glass samples were characterized in an attempt to determine quantitative fractions of crystals in the glass matrix. Crystal identity and relative composition were determined using a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Select samples were also analyzed by digesting the glass and determining the composition using inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). There was evidence of crystal formation (primarily spinels) in the melt and during cooling of the collected glass. There was evidence of crystal settling in the melt over the duration of the melter campaign.

Marra, J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Results of emissions testing while burning densified refuse derived fuel, Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Environmental Services, Inc. provided engineering and source testing services to the Council of Great Lake Governors to support their efforts in promoting the development and utilization of densified refuse derived fuels (d-RDF) and pelletized wastepaper fuels in small steam generating facilities. The emissions monitoring program was designed to provide a complete air emissions profile while burning various refuse derived fuels. The specific goal of this test program was to conduct air emissions tests at Dordt College located in Sioux Center, Iowa and to identify a relationship between fuel types and emission characteristics. The sampling protocol was carried out June 12 through June 20, 1989 on boiler {number sign}4. This unit had been previously modified to burn d-RDF. The boiler was not equipped with any type of air pollution control device so the emissions samples were collected from the boiler exhaust stack on the roof of the boilerhouse. The emissions that were sampled included: particulates; PM{sub 10} particulates; hydrochloric acid; dioxins; furans; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB); metals and continuous monitors for CO, CO{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub x}NO{sub x} and total hydrocarbons. Grab samples of the fuels were collected, composited and analyzed for heating value, moisture content, proximate and ultimate analysis, ash fusion temperature, bulk density and elemental ash analysis. Grab samples of the boiler ash were also collected and analyzed for total hydrocarbons total dioxins, total furans, total PCBs and heavy metals. 77 figs., 20 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Segregation of Uranium Metal from K Basin Sludge: Results from Vendor Testing  

SciTech Connect

Under contract to Fluor Hanford, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory directed laboratory, bench-scale, and pilot-scale vendor testing to evaluate the use of commercial gravity mineral concentration technology to remove and concentrate uranium metal from Hanford K Basin sludge. Uranium metal in the sludge corrodes by reacting with water to generate heat and hydrogen gas, and may constrain shipment and disposal of the sludge to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as remote-handled transuranic waste. Separating uranium metal from the K Basin sludge is expected to be similar to some gold recovery operations. Consequently, the capabilities of commercial gravity mineral concentration technologies were assessed for their applicability to K Basin sludge streams. Overall, the vendor testing demonstrated the technical feasibility of using gravity concentration equipment to separate the K Basin sludge into a high-volume uranium metal-depleted stream and a low-volume uranium metal-rich stream. I n test systems, more than 96% of the uranium metal surrogate was concentrated into 10 to 30% of the sludge mass (7 to 24% of the sludge volume). With more prototypical equipment and stream recycle, higher recoveries may be achieved.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Elmore, Monte R.; Delegard, Calvin H.

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reactive Power Laboratory: Synchronous Condenser Testing&Modeling Results - Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject report documents the work carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during months 5-7 (May-July 2005) of a multi-year research project. The project has the overall goal of developing methods of incorporating distributed energy (DE) that can produce reactive power locally and for injecting into the distribution system. The objective for this new type of DE is to be able to provide voltage regulation and dynamic reactive power reserves without the use of extensive communication and control systems. The work performed over this three-month period focused on four aspects of the overall objective: (1) characterization of a 250HP (about 300KVAr) synchronous condenser (SC) via test runs at the ORNL Reactive Power Laboratory; (2) development of a data acquisition scheme for collecting the necessary voltage, current and power readings at the synchronous condenser and on the distribution system; (3) development of algorithms for analyzing raw test data from the various test runs; and (4) validation of a steady-state model for the synchronous condenser via the use of a commercial software package to study its effects on the ORNL 13.8/2.4kV distribution network.

Henry, SD

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

of true positive plus false negative test results; ? see also specific ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

result of a training or learning process e.g. of the observer; (esp. important in surgical trials); time-treatment interaction: if different results occur in one treatment ...

382

300-Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of Well 399-3-21  

SciTech Connect

This report presents brief test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within well 399-3-21 as part of the 300-Area volatile organic compound characterization program. The test intervals were characterized as the borehole was advanced to its final drill depth (45.7 m) and before its completion as a monitor-well facility. The primary objective of the slug tests was to provide information pertaining to the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at this location and to select the final screen-depth interval for the monitor well. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor-well strategies within this area.

Spane, Frank A.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Results of Aging Tests of Vendor-Produced Blended Feed Simulant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is procuring through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) a minimum of five 3,500 gallon batches of waste simulant for Phase 1 testing in the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). To make sure that the quality of the simulant is acceptable, the production method was scaled up starting from laboratory-prepared simulant through 15-gallon vendor prepared simulant and 250-gallon vendor prepared simulant before embarking on the production of the 3500-gallon simulant batch by the vendor. The 3500-gallon PEP simulant batches were packaged in 250-gallon high molecular weight polyethylene totes at NOAH Technologies. The simulant was stored in an environmentally controlled environment at NOAH Technologies within their warehouse before blending or shipping. For the 15-gallon, 250-gallon, and 3500-gallon batch 0, the simulant was shipped in ambient temperature trucks with shipment requiring nominally 3 days. The 3500-gallon batch 1 traveled in a 70-75°F temperature controlled truck. Typically the simulant was uploaded in a PEP receiving tank within 24-hours of receipt. The first uploading required longer with it stored outside. Physical and chemical characterization of the 250-gallon batch was necessary to determine the effect of aging on the simulant in transit from the vendor and in storage before its use in the PEP. Therefore, aging tests were conducted on the 250-gallon batch of the vendor-produced PEP blended feed simulant to identify and determine any changes to the physical characteristics of the simulant when in storage. The supernate was also chemically characterized. Four aging scenarios for the vendor-produced blended simulant were studied: 1) stored outside in a 250-gallon tote, 2) stored inside in a gallon plastic bottle, 3) stored inside in a well mixed 5-L tank, and 4) subject to extended temperature cycling under summer temperature conditions in a gallon plastic bottle. The following series of aging tests were conducted to accomplish these objectives.

Russell, Renee L.; Buchmiller, William C.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

385

D0 Silicon Upgrade: Commissioning Test Results for D-Zero's Helium Refrigerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The test objectives are: (1) Make liquid helium and measure refrigerator capacity; (2) Measure liquid helium dewar heat leak, transfer line heat leak, and liquid nitrogen consumption rates; (3) Operate all cryogenic transfer lines; (4) Get some running time on all components; (5) Debug mechanical components, instrumentation, DMACs user interface, tune loops, and otherwise shake out any problems; (6) Get some operating time in to get familiar with system behavior; (7) Revise and/or improve operating procedures to actual practice; and (8) Identify areas for future improvement. D-Zero's stand alone helium refrigerator (STAR) liquified helium at a rate of 114 L/hr. This is consistent with other STAR installations. Refrigeration capacity was not measured due to lack of a calibrated heat load. Measured heat leaks were within design values. The helium dewar loss was measured at 2 to 4 watts or 9% per day, the solenoid and VLPC helium transfer lines had a heat leak of about 20 watts each. The liquid nitrogen consumption rates of the mobile purifier, STAR, and LN2 subcooler were measured at 20 gph, 20 to 64 gph, and 3 gph respectively. All cryogenic transfer lines including the solenoid and visible light photon counter (VLPC) transfer lines were cooled to their cryogenic operating temperatures. This included independent cooling of nitrogen shields and liquid helium components. No major problems were observed. The system ran quite well. Many problems were identified and corrected as they came up. Areas for improvement were noted and will be implemented in the future. The instrumentation and control system operated commendably during the test. The commissioning test run was a worthwhile and successful venture.

Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste: test program results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air classified municipal solid waste (MSW) was fired in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor at low excess air to simulate boiler conditions. The 7 ft/sup 2/ combustor at Combustion Power Company's energy laboratory in Menlo Park, CA, incorporates water tubes for heat extraction and recycles elutriated particles to the bed. System operation was stable while firing processed MSW for the duration of a 300-h test. Low excess air, low exhaust gas emissions, and constant bed temperature demonstrated feasibility of steam generation from fluidized bed combustion of MSW. During the 300-h test, combustion efficiency averaged 99%. Excess air was typically 44% while an average bed temperature of 1400/sup 0/F and an average superficial gas velocity of 4.6 fps were maintained. Typical exhaust emission levels were 30 ppM SO/sub 2/, 160 ppM NO/sub x/, 200 ppM CO, and 25 ppM hydrocarbons. No agglomeration of bed material or detrimental change in fluidization properties was experienced. A conceptual design study of a full scale plant to be located at Stanford University was based on process conditions from the 300-h test. The plant would produce 250,000 lb/hr steam at the maximum firing rate of 1000 tons per day (TPD) processed MSW. The average 800 TPD firing rate would utilize approximately 1200 TPD raw MSW from surrounding communities. The Stanford Solid Waste energy Program was aimed at development of a MSW-fired fluidized bed boiler and cogeneration plant to supply most of the energy needs of Stanford University.

Preuit, L C; Wilson, K B

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, Second-Year Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the second year of technical progress on the project entitled "Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems." The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. ...

2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and health impacts are presented for activities associated with transient testing of nuclear fuel and material using two candidate test reactors. Transient testing involves irradiation of nuclear fuel or materials for short time-periods under high neutron flux rates. The transient testing process includes transportation of nuclear fuel or materials inside a robust shipping cask to a hot cell, removal from the shipping cask, pre-irradiation examination of the nuclear materials, assembly of an experiment assembly, transportation of the experiment assembly to the test reactor, irradiation in the test reactor, transport back to the hot cell, and post-irradiation examination of the nuclear fuel or material. The potential for environmental or health consequences during the transportation, examination, and irradiation actions are assessed for normal operations, off-normal (accident) scenarios, and transportation. Impacts to the environment (air, soil, and groundwater), are assessed during each phase of the transient testing process. This report documents the evaluation of potential consequences to the general public. This document supports the Environmental Assessment (EA) required by the U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 USC Subsection 4321 et seq.).

Annette L. Schafer; Lloyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will result in rising sales prices. VRF Air Conditioner Themain users of VRF air conditioners are commercial usersand large-scale households, and VRF air conditioners usually

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Run - Beyond - Cladding - Breach (RBCB) test results for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuels program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1984 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began an aggressive program of research and development based on the concept of a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, exclusively designed around the use of metallic fuel. This is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Although the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel since its creation 25 yeas ago, in 1985 ANL began a study of the characteristics and behavior of an advanced-design metallic fuel based on uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) and uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloys. During the past five years several areas were addressed concerning the performance of this fuel system. In all instances of testing the metallic fuel has demonstrated its ability to perform reliably to high burnups under varying design conditions. This paper will present one area of testing which concerns the fuel system's performance under breach conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to document the observed post-breach behavior of this advanced-design metallic fuel. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Batte, G.L. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Hoffman, G.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Some preliminary results from the NWTC direct-drive, variable-speed test bed  

SciTech Connect

With the remarkable rise in interest in variable-speed operation of larger wind turbines, it has become important for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) to have access to a variable-speed test bed that can be specially instrumented for research. Accordingly, a three-bladed, 10-meter, downwind, Grumman Windstream machine has been equipped with a set of composite blades and a direct-coupled, permanent-magnet, 20 kilowatt generator. This machine and its associated control system and data collection system are discussed. Several variations of a maximum power control algorithm have been installed on the control computer. To provide a baseline for comparison, several constant speed algorithms have also been installed. The present major effort is devoted to daytime, semi-autonomous data collection.

Carlin, P.W.; Fingersh, L.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 2: Results from the Controlled Cooking Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and thecarbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO/CO 2 ). These results14 3.2.2 Total Carbon Dioxide (CO

Lask, Kathleen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Test beam results on the Proton Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proton Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZP) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator protons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator protons have the same energy, the calorimeter's response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. The ZP is a spaghetti calorimeter, which collects and measures the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a brass absorber. The details of its construction will be shown. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter and its energy resolution have been studied as a function of the beam energy. Also, the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are presented. Moreover, the differences between the calorimeter's responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams.

Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Scomparin, E.; Stocco, D.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F. [Universita di Torino, Turin (Italy); INFN, Turin (Italy); Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A. [Universita di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN, Cagliari (Italy)] (and others)

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

394

Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Mult-Pollutant Control Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-megawatt (MW) Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/induct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. Testing was conducted through ports located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor to evaluate the performance of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system, as well as through ports located at the air heater outlet and baghouse outlet or stack to determine pollutant removal efficiencies across the Turbosorp{reg_sign} scrubber and baghouse. Data from the unit's stack continuous emission monitor (CEM) were also used for determining attainment of the performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions and SO{sub 2} removal efficiency.

Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Initial Laboratory-Scale Melter Test Results for Combined Fission Product Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methods and results used to vitrify a baseline glass, CSLNTM-C-2.5 in support of the AFCI (Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative) using a Quartz Crucible Scale Melter at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Document number AFCI-WAST-PMO-MI-DV-2009-000184.

Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rieck, Bennett T.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Vienna, John D.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

RESULTS OF CHARACTERIZATION TESTS OF THE SURFACES OF A COMMERCIALLY CARBURIZED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A commercial surface carburization treatment that shows promise for hardening the surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source against cavitation erosion and pitting caused by the action of pulsed pressure waves in the liquid mercury target has been investigated. To verify promotional claims for the treatment and to uncover any factors that might be of concern for the integrity of a carburized target vessel, some characterization tests of the nature of the surface layers of carburized austenitic 316LN stainless steel were conducted. The findings support most of the claims. The carburized layer is about 35 {micro}m thick. Its indentation hardness is about five times larger than that of the substrate steel and declines rapidly with depth into the layer. The surface is distorted by the treatment, and the austenite lattice is enlarged. The corrosion resistance of the carburized layer in an acid medium is greater than that for untreated austenite. The layer is not brittle; it is plastically deformable and is quite resistant to cracking during straining. Contrary to the provider's assertations, the maximum carbon content of the layer is much less than 6-7 wt% carbon, and the carbon is not simply contained in supersaturated solid solution; some of it is present in a previously unreported iron carbide phase located at the very surface. Large variations were found in the thickness of the layer, and they signify that controls may be needed to ensure a uniform thickness for treatment of the SNS target vessel. Inclusion stringers and {delta}-ferrite phase embraced in the treated layer are less resistant to chemical attack than the treated austenite. From a cavitation pitting perspective under SNS bombardment, such non-austenitic phases may provide preferential sites for pitting. The shallow depth of the hardened layer will require use of protection measures to avoid mishandling damage to the layer during assembly and installation of a target vessel.

Farrell, K

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

MHD seawater thruster performance: A comparison of predictions with experimental results from a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate a design oriented MHD thruster performance computer code. The thruster performance code consists of a one-dimensional MHD hydrodynamic model coupled to a two-dimensional electrical model. The code includes major loss mechanisms affecting the performance of the thruster. Among these losses are the joule dissipation losses, frictional losses, electrical end losses, and single electrode potential losses. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

Picologlou, B.F.; Doss, E.D.; Geyer, H.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C.; Ranellone, R.F. (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

650V DC Ride-Through System Ultra Capacitor Version: System Description and Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, the need for effective short-term energy storage has become evident as a result of the sensitivity of modern equipment to power system disturbances. Adjustable Speed Drives (ASD) are some of the more sensitive electronic systems used in modern manufacturing facilities. The interruption of continuous processes due to the inability of the ASD to ride through voltage sags or momentary outages may lead to significant financial losses. This report describes an ultracapacitor version of a...

1998-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Kellogg brown & Root Transport Reactor: PSDR Test Results and Economic Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To be competitive, new coal-based power plants must have low capital costs and use coal in a highly efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally superior manner. One of the most cost-competitive, coal-based power plant technologies is believed to be an air-blown, combined cycle incorporating a partial gasifier and a pressurized char combustor. This report presents preliminary results from the evaluation of one such technology, Kellogg Brown and Root's (KBR) gasification combined cycle (GCC). The report...

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

Jaffe, L.D.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact test results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge `92: Exhaust emissions testing and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge `92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the US Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine. out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Zammit, M.G. [Johnson Matthey, Wayne, PA (United States); Davies, J.G.; Salmon, G.S. [General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Bruetsch, R.I. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge '92: Exhaust emissions testing and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge '92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the US Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine. out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Zammit, M.G. (Johnson Matthey, Wayne, PA (United States)); Davies, J.G.; Salmon, G.S. (General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)); Bruetsch, R.I. (US Environmental Protection Agency (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Preliminary results from field testing an improved refractory material for slagging coal gasifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Slag attack of refractory materials used to line the hot face of slagging gasifiers limits their service life to between 3 and 24 months. These gasifiers use coal, petroleum coke, or combinations of them as raw materials to produce chemicals, liquid fuel, and/or electricity; with future consideration being given to the use of other abundant, low cost feedstock such as biomass. The ash from these materials generate liquid slags during gasification at temperature between 1300 - 1575 C and pressures up to 1000 psi, leading to severe slag attack of a vessel lining and causing unacceptable gasifier reliability and on-line availability. To maximize refractory life and provide protection of the gasifier metal shell, the best liners have contained a minimum of 60-70 pct chromia in combination with alumina, alumina/zirconia, or magnesia. The Albany Research Center of DOE has developed a phosphate containing high chrome oxide refractory liner that indicates potential for increased service life over currently used materials. This new liner has been produced commercially by a refractory company and installed in a gasifier for performance evaluation. Refractory issues in slagging gasifiers, the development and properties of the phosphate containing high chrome oxide material, and the preliminary results from the plant trial of this material will be presented.

Bennett, James P.; Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Powell, Cynthia A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Field Test Report: Preliminary Aquifer Test Characterization Results for Well 299-W15-225: Supporting Phase I of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Design  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the hydrologic test results for both local vertical profile characterization and large-scale hydrologic tests associated with a new extraction well (well 299-W15-225) that was constructed during FY2009 for inclusion within the future 200-West Area Groundwater Treatment System that is scheduled to go on-line at the end of FY2011. To facilitate the analysis of the large-scale hydrologic test performed at newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225 (C7017; also referred to as EW-1 in some planning documents), the existing 200-ZP-1 interim pump-and-treat system was completely shut-down ~1 month before the performance of the large-scale hydrologic test. Specifically, this report 1) applies recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of hydrologic test and pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses for a preliminary determination of large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) provides an assessment of the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225. The hydrologic characterization approach presented in this report is expected to have universal application for meeting the characterization needs at other remedial action sites located within unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

405

Analysis of the energy impacts of the DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Small Grants Program: methods and results  

SciTech Connect

In 1977, Congress directed DOE to create an energy grants program with the object of funding individuals, small businesses, and nonprofit organizations to develop technologies that use renewable energy resources. The Small Grants Program was created and this report assesses the energy savings potential of the program. The first step in the analysis was to assess the energy-savings potential of 57 projects. Program energy savings were then estimated from project savings using statistical inference. Chapter 2 presents estimates of direct energy savings for the 57 projects and discusses direct energy savings. Chapter 3 discusses the methods and results of the economic analysis. Chapter 4 examines the indirect savings. Because of the large size of the sample, neither project descriptions nor specific details of each project analysis are included. Instead, two examples from the analysis are presented in Chapters 2, 3, and 4 to illustrate the methods. The results of the analysis and key project data are summarized. Chapter 5 presents estimates of program energy savings and the methods used to obtain them. The report concludes with a discussion of how improved project selection can increase program energy savings and present two approaches for conducting future energy-impact studies.

Lucarelli, B.; Kessel, J.; Kay, J.; Linse, J.; Tompson, S.; Homer, M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

TEST RESULTS FOR A STIRLING-ENGINE-DRIVEN HEAT-ACTUATED HEAT PUMP BREADBOARD SYSTEM T.M. Moynihan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

849044 TEST RESULTS FOR A STIRLING-ENGINE-DRIVEN HEAT-ACTUATED HEAT PUMP BREADBOARD SYSTEM T- of the diaphragms, and corresponding displace- resonant -refrigerant compressor through a ment of oil, is a heat-actuated heat pump '_ ~*,^ (HAHP) that was developed for residential appli- -, / Combustor cations

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

407

OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

408

OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

410

Comparison of calculated results from two analytical models with measured data from a heat-exchanger flow test  

SciTech Connect

Predicted results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model were compared with measured results from an air flow test on a half-scale model of the auxiliary heat exchanger for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Measurements of both velocity and pressure were made within the heat exchanger shell side flow field. These measurements were compared with calculated results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model. Both analytical models predicted early identical results which, except for some minor anomalies, compared favorably with the measured data.

Carosella, D.P.; Pavlics, P.N.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An Experimental Evaluation of HVAC-Grade Carbon-Dioxide Sensors: Part 3, Humidity, Temperature, and Pressure Sensitivity Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the third paper in a four-part series reporting on the test and evaluation of typical carbon-dioxide sensors used in building HVAC applications. Fifteen models of NDIR HVAC-grade CO2 sensors were tested and evaluated to determine the humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of the sensors. This paper reports the performance of the sensors at various relative humidity, temperature, and pressure levels common to building HVAC applications and provides a comparison with manufacturer specifications. Among the 15 models tested, eight models have a single-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, four models have a dual-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, and three models have a single-lamp, dual-wavelength configuration. The sensors were tested in a chamber specifically fabricated for this research. A description of the apparatus and the method of test are described in Part 1 (Shrestha and Maxwell 2009). The test result showed a wide variation in humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of CO2 sensors among manufacturers. In some cases, significant variations in sensor performance exist between sensors of the same model. Even the natural variation in relative humidity could significantly vary readings of some CO2 sensor readings. The effects of temperature and pressure variation on NDIR CO2 sensors are unavoidable without an algorithm to compensate for the changes. For the range of temperature and pressure variation in an air-conditioned space, the effect of pressure variation is more significant compared to the effect of temperature variation.

Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory [Iowa State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

High Power Testing Results of the X-band Mixed-mode RF Windows for Linear Colliders  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we summarize the high power testing results of the X-band mixed-mode RF windows at KEK and SLAC for linear colliders. The main feature of these windows is that the combination of modes on the surface of the ceramic significantly decreases the electric and magnetic fields in the junction between the ceramic and the metal. So far two types of high power windows (with the diameter of 53 mm and 64 mm) have been fabricated. A high power model of the smaller type window was fabricated and tested in a resonant ring at KEK. A maximum circulating power of 81 MW with 300 ns duration or 66 MW with 700 ns duration was achieved. Light emission was observed for a power level of over 10 MW. Later, both windows were shipped to SLAC for even higher power testing using combined power from two klystrons. The first window (53 mm diameter) achieved a transmitted power of 80 MW with 1.5 microsec duration at 30 Hz repetition. It was not destroyed during the testing. The testing of the second window was carried out next to the small type and achieved 62 MW with 1.5 microsec duration with 10 Hz repetition. The final results of both windows are presented in this report.

Loewen, Roderick J

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

413

Influence of the deuteron energy on the testing volume of IFMIF and its impact on other parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The influence of the energy of the deuteron beam on irradiation parameters of IFMIF is analyzed. The main purpose of this paper is to identify possible positive and negative impacts on irradiation parameters that an increase in the deuteron energy of the beam can cause. Several parameters of the facility, such as neutron generation rate, number of neutrons with energy above 20 MeV at the source and in the test assembly, volume with dpa rate above a threshold value, gas production, and gradient of the atomic displacement rate, are analyzed and conclusions are drawn based on the calculated values. It is shown that an increase in the deuteron energy to 40 MeV does not produce a significant negative impact for the elements analyzed, but instead is beneficial in producing nuclear responses more similar to a fusion environment than the lower deuteron energies.

Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Multi-Year Analysis of Renewable Energy Impacts in California: Results from the Renewable Portfolio Standards Integration Cost Analysis; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS, Senate Bill 1078) requires the state's investor-owned utilities to obtain 20% of their energy mix from renewable generation sources. To facilitate the imminent increase in the penetration of renewables, the California Energy Commission (CEC), in support of the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC), initiated a study of integration costs in the context of RPS implementation. This effort estimated the impact of renewable generation in the regulation and load-following time scales and calculated the capacity value of renewable energy sources using a reliability model. The analysis team, consisting of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the California Wind Energy Collaborative (CWEC), performed the study in cooperation with the California Independent System Operator (CaISO), the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE). The study was conducted over three phases and was followed by an analysis of a multi-year period. This paper presents results from the multi-year analysis and the Phase III recommendations.

Milligan, M.; Shiu, H.; Kirby, B.; Jackson, K.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

On-sun test results from second-generation and advanced-concepts alkali-metal pool-boiler receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two 75-kW{sub t} alkali-metal pool-boiler solar receivers have been successfully tested at Sandia National Laboratories` National Solar Thermal Test Facility. The first one, Sandia`s `` second-generation pool-boiler receiver,`` was designed to address commercialization issues identified during post-test assessment of Sandia`s first-generation pool-boiler receiver. It was constructed from Haynes alloy 230 and contained the alkali-metal alloy NaK-78. The absorber`s wetted side had a brazed-on powder-metal coating to stabilize boiling. This receiver was evaluated for boiling stability, hot- and warm-restart behavior, and thermal efficiency. Boiling was stable under all conditions. All of the hot restarts were successful. Mild transient hot spots observed during some hot restarts were eliminated by the addition of 1/3 torr of xenon to the vapor space. All of the warm restarts were also successful. The heat-transfer crisis that damaged the first receiver did not recur. Thermal efficiency was 92.3% at 750{degrees}C with 69.6 kW{sub t} solar input. The second receiver tested, Sandia`s ``advanced-concepts receiver,`` was a replica of the first-generation receiver except that the cavities, which were electric-discharge-machined in the absorber for boiling stability, were eliminated. This step was motivated by bench-scale test results that showed that boiling stability improved with increased heated-surface area, tilt of the heated surface from vertical, and added xenon. The bench-scale results suggested that stable boiling might be possible without heated-surface modification in a 75-kW{sub t} receiver. Boiling in the advanced-concepts receiver with 1/3 torr of xenon added has been stable under all conditions, confirming the bench-scale tests.

Moreno, J.B.; Andraka, C.E.; Moss, T.A.; Cordeiro, P.G.; Dudley, V.E.; Rawlinson, K.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds. Phase 2: Results of duplex-type experiments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Sixth Irradiation Series is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest toughness data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degrees}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). This is the second report giving the results of the tests on irradiated duplex-type crack-arrest specimens. A previous report gave results of tests on irradiated weld-embrittled-type specimens. Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens irradiated in the same capsules as the crack-arrest specimens were also tested, and a 41-J transition temperature shift was determined from these specimens. {open_quotes}Mean{close_quote} curves of the same form as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) K{sub la} curve were fit to the data with only the {open_quotes}reference temperature{close_quotes} as a parameter. The shift between the mean curves agrees well with the 41-J transition temperature shift obtained from the CVN specimen tests. Moreover, the four data points resulting from tests on the duplex crack-arrest specimens of the present study did not make a significant change to mean curve fits to either the previously obtained data or all the data combined.

Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Results of scoping tests for open-cycle OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion) components operating with seawater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents comprehensive documentation of the experimental research conducted on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components operating with seawater as a working fluid. The results of this research are presented in the context of previous analysis and fresh-water testing; they provide a basis for understanding and predicting with confidence the performance of all components of an OC-OTEC system except the turbine. Seawater tests have confirmed the results that were obtained in fresh-water tests and predicted by the analytical models of the components. A sound technical basis has been established for the design of larger systems in which net power will be produced for the first time from OC-OTEC technology. Design and operation of a complete OC-OTEC system that produces power will provide sufficient confidence to warrant complete transfer of OC-OTEC technology to the private sector. Each components performance is described in a separate chapter written by the principal investigator responsible for technical aspects of the specific tests. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Zangrando, F; Bharathan, D; Green, H J; Link, H F; Parsons, B K; Parsons, J M; Pesaran, A A [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA); Panchal, C B [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix  

SciTech Connect

Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.

N /A

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Results for the Independent Sampling and Analysis of Used Oil Drums at the Impact Services Facility in Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), via the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, perform independent sampling and analysis of used oils contained within eight 55 gallon drums stored at the former IMPACT Services facility, located at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These drums were originally delivered by LATA Sharp Remediation Services (LSRS) to IMPACT Services on January 11, 2011 as part of the Bldg. K-33 demolition project, and the drums plus contents should have been processed as non-hazardous non-radiological waste by IMPACT Services. LSRS received a certificate of destruction on August 29, 2012 (LSRS 2012a). However, IMPACT Services declared bankruptcy and abandoned the site later in 2012, and eight of the original eleven K-33 drums are currently stored at the facility. The content of these drums is the subject of this investigation. The original drum contents were sampled by LSRS in 2010 and analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), using both compositing and grab sampling techniques. The objective of this 2013 sample and analysis effort was to duplicate, to the extent possible, the 2010 sampling and analysis event to support final disposition decisions. Part of that decision process includes either verifying or refuting the assertion that oils that are currently stored in drums at the IMPACT Services facility originated from Bldg. K-33 equipment.

none,

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z