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1

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels Models The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) biofuel models include JEDI Dry Mill Corn Ethanol, JEDI Lignocellulosic Ethanol, and JEDI Biopower. These JEDI...

2

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSP Model CSP Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from CSP projects. JEDI CSP has default information that can be utilized to run a generic impacts analysis assuming industry averages. Model users are encouraged to enter as much project-specific data as possible. Download the JEDI CSP Model Printable Version JEDI Home About JEDI Biofuels Models Coal Model CSP Model Geothermal Model Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model Natural Gas Model Photovoltaics Model Transmission Line Model Wind Model Download JEDI Methodology Interpreting Results Advanced Users Limitations of JEDI Models Publications Forum Webinars Contact Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback.

3

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transmission Line Model Transmission Line Model The Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts associated with transmission line projects. Applying a similar user interface as other JEDI models, Transmission Line JEDI requires a few additional user inputs such as: Transmission Line Type Line Length Terrain Type Right-of-Way Characteristics. Results are presented in the same manner as those in other JEDI models. This allows the transmission line JEDI model to be used by itself or in conjunction with electricity generation JEDI models. As with all JEDI models, reasonable default values are provided. Individual projects may vary and when possible project specific data should be used to obtain the best estimate of economic development impacts.

4

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Models Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version About JEDI Geothermal Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Geothermal model allows users...

5

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Photovoltaics (PV) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from PV projects. JEDI PV has default...

6

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three categories: Project Development and Onsite Labor Impacts Local Revenue and Supply Chain Impacts Induced Impacts JEDI model defaults are based on interviews with industry...

7

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Coal model allows the user to estimate economic development impacts from coal power generation projects. Applying a...

8

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from...

9

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

Tegen, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Limitations of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limitations of JEDI Models Limitations of JEDI Models Results are an estimate, not a precise forecast. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are input-output based models, also appropriately called calculators or screening tools. As such, they share important limitations with all models based on input-output calculation methodologies. For the interested user, the Environmental Protection Agency recently published EPA Assessing the Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy: A Resource for States1, which discusses and compares different types of models and screening tools for assessing economic impacts and jobs, including JEDI (see Chapter 5, pp. 136-142). The most important limitation to note is that JEDI results are estimates, not precise forecasts, for the following reasons.

11

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) Jump to: navigation, search Site head analysis jedi.jpg Overview Originally developed in 2002 for the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America project, the Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model was designed to be an easy-to-use, excel based calculator which uses IMPLAN's economic multipliers to estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. It comes as a separate model for wind, PV, natural gas, CSP, coal, and biofuels. Job's, earnings, and impact are outputs. Inputs are construction costs, equipment costs, O&M costs, financing parameters and any other costs associated with the project. With its success in

12

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpreting Results Interpreting Results Sample Results from JEDI. Download a text-version (MS Excel 44 KB) The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models estimate the number of jobs and economic impacts associated with power generation, fuel production, and other projects. Economic activity in input-output models is typically assessed in three categories. NREL's JEDI models classify the first category of results-on-site labor and professional services results-as dollars spent on labor from companies engaged in development and on-site construction and operation of power generation and transmission. These results include labor only-no materials. Companies or businesses that fall into this category of results include project developers, environmental and permitting consultants, road builders, concrete-pouring

13

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction

14

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aggregation Scheme - Base for most of the models, and the file JEDI Aggregation Scheme - PV for the solar photovoltaic model. In addition, the U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau...

15

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy jobs and impacts, JEDI has been expanded to biofuels, concentrating solar power, coal, and natural gas power plants. Based on project-specific and default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area (usually a state) that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. This fact sheet provides an overview of the JEDI model as it pertains to wind energy projects.

Not Available

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

JEDI Models | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » JEDI Models Jump to: navigation, search The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels.[1] Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm.[2] You can learn more about the JEDI model for wind and find reports based on

17

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Downloading...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Excel 3.4 MB) JEDI Biofuels Models Cellulosic Model rel. C1.10.02 (Excel 723 KB) Corn Ethanol Model rel. CE1.10.02 (Excel 679 KB) Biopower Model rel. B3.14.13. (Excel 386...

19

Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (DOE/NREL) has developed a spreadsheet-based wind model (Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI)) that incorporates economic multipliers for jobs, income, and output. Originally developed with state-specific parameters, it can also be used to conduct county and regional analyses. NREL has enlisted the Wind Powering America (WPA) State Wind Working Groups (SWWGs) to conduct county-specific economic impact analyses and has encouraged them to use JEDI if they do not have their own economic model. The objective of the analyses is to identify counties within WPA target states, and preferably counties with a significant agricultural sector, that could economically benefit from wind development. These counties could then explore opportunities to tap into the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Bill Section 9006 grants and loans to stimulate wind development. This paper describes the JEDI model and how i t can be used. We will also summarize a series of analyses that were completed to fulfill a General Accounting Office (GAO) request to provide estimates of the economic development benefits of wind power.

Sinclair, K.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

now: Project Development and On-site Labor (re-labeled from Direct) Turbine and Supply Chain Impacts (re-labeled from Indirect) Induced Impacts Impacts during the operating...

24

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the construction phase and for the ongoing operations phase. For the construction phase, the impacts are broken out by project development and on-site labor impacts,...

25

JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation and biofuel plants at the local (usually state) level. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering...

26

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The basic user interface for the natural gas model is the same as the wind and coal models. Results are provided in the same format as the coal and wind models allowing...

27

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Help  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

model, I receive a security alert message stating "the macros in the file have been disabled." How do I change the security setting, so I can run the model with the macros...

28

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning, and output (total economic activity) for a given power generation...

29

Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NRELs JEDI Model  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 M. Costanti Bozeman, Montana Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model Period of Performance: December 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 September 2004 * NREL/SR-500-36414 Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model Period of Performance: December 1, 2003 - May 31, 2004 M. Costanti

30

Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Job and Economic Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects Preprint March 2004 * NREL/CP-500-35953 M. Goldberg MRG & Associates K. Sinclair and M. Milligan (Consultant) National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at the 2004 Global WINDPOWER Conference Chicago, Illinois March 29-31, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US

31

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing how JEDI II calculates economic impacts from wind projects.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NREL's JEDI Model; Period of Performance: December 1, 2003--May 31, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic development potential that wind power offers is often an overlooked aspect of today's wind power projects. Much has been written about how wind can spur economic development, but few have attempted to quantify these impacts. Using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Jobs, Economic Development, and Impacts Model (JEDI), the author examined six counties in Montana to quantify these impacts. The overriding project goal was to illuminate economic development opportunities from wind project development for six Montana counties using an objective economic modeling tool. Interested stakeholders include the agriculture community, wind developers, renewable energy advocates, government officials, and other decision-makers. The Model was developed to enable spreadsheet users with limited or no economic modeling background to easily identify the statewide economic impacts associated with constructing and operating wind power plants. The Model's User Add-In feature allows users to conduct county-specific analyses using county IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for PLANning) multipliers, while state-level multipliers are contained within the Model as default values for all 50 states.

Costanti, M.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind Power (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using economic multipliers, JEDI II measures the potential employment (job and earnings) and economic development impacts (output) from new power plants by calculating the dollar flow from construction and annual operations. In its default form, JEDI II conducts state-specific analyses. County or regional analyses require additional multipliers.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power (Poster)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS JEDI II: JOBS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS FROM COAL, NATURAL GAS, AND WIND POWER Marshall Goldberg MRG & Associates Nevada City, California Suzanne Tegen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado The information contained in this poster is subject to a government license. * WINDPOWER 2006 * Pittsburgh, PA * June 4-7, 2006 * NREL/PO-500-39908 Michael Milligan, Consultant National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado How does JEDI II work? The user enters data specific to the new coal, gas, or wind plant: * Year of installation * Size of the project * Location * Cost ($/kW) * Any other site-specific information

37

Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Model Kcmil Thousand Circular Mils kV kilovolts MW Megawatt NESC National Electrical Safety Code NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory O&M Operations and Maintenance...

38

User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Coal, Natural Gas, and Wind: The Expanded Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI II); Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the impacts of building new coal, gas, or wind plants in three states: Colorado, Michigan, and Virginia. Our findings indicate that local/state economic impacts are directly related to the availability and utilization of local industries and services to build and operate the power plant. For gas and coal plants, the economic benefit depends significantly on whether the fuel is obtained from within the state, out of state, or some combination. We also find that the taxes generated by power plants can have a significant impact on local economies via increased expenditures on public goods.

Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M.; Milligan, M.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Development Impact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and biofuel plants at the local and state levels. First developed by NREL's Wind Powering America program to model wind energy impacts, JEDI has been expanded to analyze...

40

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Jobs and Economic Development Impact  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Resources & Tools Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model Fact Sheet Thumbnail of the JEDI fact sheet. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models are user-friendly tools that estimate the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a similar nameplate capacity (e.g., based on kilowatt-hours generated, rather than kilowatts installed). In either case, capacity factor and energy production should be...

42

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Publication...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Report No. TP-6A20-50400. August. Nelson, T.D.; Dumas, L.J. (2011). "Maximizing Job Creation: An Analysis of Alternatives for the Transformation of the Kansas City Plant."...

43

Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind...  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

default values representative of a "typical" offshore wind project constructed in water with an average depth of 25 meters and no farther than 100 nautical miles from a port....

44

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcards), Wind Powering America (WPA), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Development Impacts Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model is a user-friendly tool that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation at the local and state levels. Based on project-specific or default inputs (derived from industry norms), JEDI estimates the number of jobs and economic impacts to a local area that could reasonably be supported by a power generation project. For example, JEDI estimates the number of in-state construction jobs from a new wind farm. EERE Information Center

47

NRELs JEDI Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States government or any agency thereof. Available electronically at

M. Costanti; M. Costanti; Nrel Technical; Monitor K. Sinclair; Prepared Subcontract; No. Lee

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Joint Efficient Dark-energy Investigation (JEDI): Measuring the cosmic expansion history from type Ia supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JEDI (Joint Efficient Dark-energy Investigation) is a candidate implementation of the NASA-DOE Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM). JEDI will probe dark energy in three independent methods: (1) type Ia supernovae, (2) baryon acoustic oscillations, and (3) weak gravitational lensing. In an accompanying paper, an overall summary of the JEDI mission is given. In this paper, we present further details of the supernova component of JEDI. To derive model-independent constraints on dark energy, it is important to precisely measure the cosmic expansion history, H(z), in continuous redshift bins from z \\~ 0-2 (the redshift range in which dark energy is important). SNe Ia at z > 1 are not readily accessible from the ground because the bulk of their light has shifted into the near-infrared where the sky background is overwhelming; hence a space mission is required to probe dark energy using SNe. Because of its unique near-infrared wavelength coverage (0.8-4.2 microns), JEDI has the advantage of observing SNe Ia in the rest frame J band for the entire redshift range of 0 energy are discussed, with special emphasis on the improved precision afforded by the rest frame near-infrared data.

M. M. Phillips; Peter Garnavich; Yun Wang; David Branch; Edward Baron; Arlin Crotts; J. Craig Wheeler; Edward Cheng; Mario Hamuy; for the JEDI Team

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

49

NREL: Water Power Research - Economic and Power System Modeling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis Economic and Power System Modeling and Analysis NREL's Economic Analysis and power system modeling integrates data from device deployment and programmatic research into deployment and scenario models to quantify the economic and societal benefits of developing cost-competitive marine and hydrokinetic systems. It also identifies policy mechanisms, market designs, and supply chain needs to support various deployment scenarios, provide information and training to potential members of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry and effectively collaborate with all associated stakeholders. JEDI Modeling NREL worked with industry members to develop and provide public access to an easy-to-use input-output model that estimates the jobs and economic development impacts (JEDI) of MHK projects in the United States. The JEDI

50

NREL: Technology Deployment - Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

solar, among other topics. This webinar provides an overview of the Scenario Solar PV Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model work. The Scenario JEDI Model can...

51

How Many Jobs are there in the Domestic Small Wind Industry? (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This poster introduces the preliminary small wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model.

Tegen, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the U. S.: Locations and Local Impacts (Presentation)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

by by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Turbine Manufacturers in the U.S.: Locations and Local Impacts WINDPOWER 2010 Conference and Exhibition Dallas, Texas Suzanne Tegen May 26, 2010 NREL/PR-6A2-47913 Challenges to modeling Renewables Renewables represent new industries * Not isolated as an industry in conventional I/O codes Requires detailed knowledge of project costs and industry specific expenditures * Equipment, Engineering, Labor, Permitting, O&M, etc. The Wind JEDI Model * Provides a project basic project recipe for specific RE technologies * Applies Industry Specific Multipliers derived from IMPLAN National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future

55

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reductions in the short term. For the purpose of this assessment, it was assumed that no learning curve effects are present. Only effects of manufacturing multiple units for the...

56

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: REMI Agency/Company /Organization: Regional Economic Models Inc. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Determine Baseline, Develop Goals Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.remi.com/ Cost: Paid References: http://www.remi.com/index.php?page=overview&hl=en_US Related Tools Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) The Integrated Environmental Strategies Handbook: A Resource Guide for Air Quality Planning

57

JEDI Helping Fight for Clean Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that help determine jobs that might be created and other economic impacts of building power-generation systems that use wind, biomass or even solar energy. These estimates let...

58

PV Installation Labor Market Analysis and PV JEDI Tool Developments (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PV Installation Labor Market Analysis PV Installation Labor Market Analysis and PV JEDI Tool Developments Barry Friedman NREL Strategic Energy Analysis Center May 16, 2012 World Renewable Energy Forum Denver, Colorado NREL/PR-6A20-55130 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Disclaimer 2 DISCLAIMER AGREEMENT These information ("Data") are provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy LLC ("Alliance") for the U.S. Department of Energy (the "DOE"). It is recognized that disclosure of these Data is provided under the following conditions and warnings: (1) these Data have been prepared for reference purposes only; (2) these Data consist of forecasts, estimates or assumptions made on a best-

59

Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Southeast Region (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Southeast (defined here as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia).

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Social impact models of opinion dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate models of opinion formation which are based on the social impact theory. The following approaches are discussed: (i) general mean field theory of social impact, (ii) a social impact model with learning, (iii) a model of a finite group with a strong leader, (iv) a social impact model with dynamically changing social temperature, (v) a model with individuals treated as active Brownian particles interacting via a communication field. 1

Janusz A. Ho?lyst; Krzysztof Kacperski; Frank Schweitzer; Janusz A. Ho?lyst; Krzysztof Kacperski; Frank Schweitzer

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Name Computable General Equilibrium Models for...

63

Scale Model Turbine Missile Casing Impact Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes three 1/5-scale-model turbine missile impact experiments performed to provide benchmark data for assessing turbine missiles effects in nuclear plant design. The development of an explosive launcher to accelerate the turbine missile models to the desired impact velocities is described. A comparison of the test results with those from full-scale experiments demonstrates scalability.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Title Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Publication Type Report...

65

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less...

66

Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Model Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, (510) 495-2404 LosAngelesSmogv1.jpg Smog over downtown Los Angeles. Aerosols are microscopic particles-like dust, pollen and soot-that ubiquitously float around in our atmosphere. Despite their tiny stature, these particles can have a huge impact on human health, climate and the environment. So scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Colorado State University and the California Air Resources Board have set out to characterize the roles of various particles as atmospheric change agents on a regional scale.

67

Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy  

SciTech Connect

NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Agency/Company /Organization: DG Joint Research Centre, European Commission, University of Heidelberg Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Other Website: iatools.jrc.ec.europa.eu/docs/ecol_econ_2006.pdf Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Screenshot References: Computable general equilibrium models[1] Abstract "Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) of economic, environmental, and

71

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Agency/Company /Organization: International Food Policy Research Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01018.pdf RelatedTo: Modeling International Relationships in Applied General Equilibrium (MIRAGE) Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies Screenshot

72

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency Webcast Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his is a PDF of PowerPoint slides presented during the 17 February 2009 webcast, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency. The webcast was based on work conducted for the report, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency (product number 1016085). The webcast and the slides include the following information: Modeling approaches and assumptions Summary of results for two approaches How model output can be applied by utilities Planned refinements to the model in 2009 and beyond, includin...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Partnership for Economic Policy Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.pep-net.org/programs/mpia/ Cost: Free Related Tools Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Poverty Social Impact Analysis ... further results A computable general equilibrium model that accounts for the interactions among sectors and institutions, and their links with the global economy. A

74

Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Model Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/documents/suca/evaluation_guide.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/model-energy-efficiency-program-impac Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This document provides guidance on model approaches for calculating energy, demand and emissions savings resulting from energy efficiency programs. It

75

The Impact of Snow Model Complexity at Three CLPX Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many studies have developed snow process understanding by exploring the impact of snow model complexity on simulation performance. This paper revisits this topic using several recently developed land surface models, including the Simplified ...

Xia Feng; Alok Sahoo; Kristi Arsenault; Paul Houser; Yan Luo; Tara J. Troy

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Modeling the Impact of Warming in Climate Change Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any economic analysis of climate change policy requires some model that describes the impact of warming on future GDP and consumption. Most integrated assessment models (IAMs) relate temperature to the level of real GDP ...

Pindyck, Robert S.

77

Modeling Impacts of Climate Change Mitigation Technologies on Power Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a modeling approach that simulate the impacts of different climate change mitigation technologies on power grids for power system planning purposes. Because the historical data is less credible when new technologies are being deployed to the system, it is then critical to model them to address their impacts. This paper illustrated how to integrate modeling results obtained from different modeling tools to give a reasonable forecast of the future. Building simulation tools, distribution power grid modeling tools, and power system planning tools are used to model and aggregate the impacts from the end-use to the system level. Electricity generation, production cost, emission, and transmission congestions are used to quantify the influence of different mitigation technologies. Modeling results have shown that the cross-discipline modeling approach provided the modeler with the necessary time resolution and input details to address the variables that influence the modeling results. Different modeling issues are also addressed in the paper.

Nguyen, Tony B.; Lu, Ning; Jin, Chunlian

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/39/39/42122112.pdf Modelling Agricultural Trade and Policy Impacts in Less Developed Countries Screenshot References: Modelling Ag Policy[1] Overview "The role of agricultural policies in addressing the development needs of poorer countries is high on the political agenda, for both structural reasons and as a result of recent market developments. In the first place,

79

Modeled Impact of Anthropogenic Land Cover Change on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equilibrium experiments with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratorys climate model are used to investigate the impact of anthropogenic land cover change on climate. Regions of altered land cover include large portions of Europe, India, ...

Kirsten L. Findell; Elena Shevliakova; P. C. D. Milly; Ronald J. Stouffer

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More November 20, 2013 - 11:54am Addthis EERE offers webinars to the public on a range of subjects, from adopting the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required. You can also watch archived webinars and browse previously aired videos, slides, and transcripts. Upcoming Webinars November 20: Live Webinar on Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Webinar Sponsor: EERE's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reducedpurposes. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts ofFigure 2: Comparison of capacity projections from AEO2011

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model (ENVISAGE) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model (ENVISAGE) Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: go.worldbank.org/ZC77UJYJ50 Related Tools TransportToolkit Prototype Threshold 21 Model General Equilibrium Modeling Package (GEMPACK) ... further results Designed to analyze a variety of issues related to the economics of climate

83

Neutrino Mass Models: Impact of non-zero reactor angle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk neutrino mass models are reviewed and the impact of a non-zero reactor angle and other deviations from tri-bimaximal mixing are discussed. We propose some benchmark models, where the only way to discriminate between them is by high precision neutrino oscillation experiments.

Stephen F. King

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

84

Magnetostatics and the electric impact model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The action of certain static magnetic fields on charged test particles is interpreted as a consequence of the interaction of the particles with electric dipole distributions emitted by other charged particles in relative motion. The dipole model of electric forces was initially conceived to emulate Coulomb's law, but is applied here to a wide class of phenomena, such as forces between parallel conductors, a relativistic correction of Biot--Savart's law, and the magnetic moment of a current loop.

Bhola N. Dwivedi; Horst Wilhelm; Klaus Wilhelm

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

An efficient load model for analyzing demand side management impacts  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of implementing Demand Side Management (DSM) in power systems is to change the utility's load shape--i.e. changes in the time pattern and magnitude of utility's load. Changing the load shape as a result of demand side activities could change the peak load, base load and/or energy demand. Those three variables have to be explicitly modeled into the load curve for properly representing the effects of demand side management. The impact of DSM will be manifested as higher or lower reliability levels. This paper presents an efficient technique to model the system load such that the impact of demand side management on the power system can be easily and accurately evaluated. The proposed technique to model the load duration curve will facilitate the representation of DSM impacts on loss-of-load probability, energy not served and energy consumption. This will provide an analytical method to study the impact of DSM on capacity requirements. So far iterative methods have been applied to study these impacts. The proposed analytical method results in a faster solution with higher accuracy. It takes only 18 seconds on an 80486 PC to solve each case study involving different peak and base loads, and energy use.

Rahman, S.; Rinaldy (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Max H. Sherman and Erin L. Hult Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 In Press as Sherman, M.H., Hult, E.L. 2013. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL-6114E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

87

Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development Max H. Sherman, Erin L. Hult * Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R3083, Berkeley, CA 94720-8133, USA h i g h l i g h t s < A lumped parameter model is applied to describe emission and storage buffering of contaminants. < Model is used to assess impact of ventilation on indoor formaldehyde exposure. < Observations of depletion of stored contaminants can be described by model. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 7 February 2013 Accepted 11 February 2013 Keywords: Buffering capacity Formaldehyde Moisture a b s t r a c t A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde

89

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Residential Air Quality Policies Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer People spend the majority of their time in residences and the health burden of indoor air is significant. However, the definitions of "acceptable" and "good" indoor air quality (IAQ), and the most effective, energy efficient methods for achieving various levels of IAQ are still matters of research and debate. Current ventilation standards focus on minimum requirements for overall and mechanically provided ventilation rates, and vented combustion equipment, and require only the installation of kitchen and bath exhaust fans for source control. These standards generally are

90

Modeling the onset of photosynthesis after the Chicxulub asteroid impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We do a preliminary modelling of the photosynthetic rates of phytoplankton at the very beginning of the Paleogene, just after the impact of the Chicxulub asteroid, which decisively contributed to the last known mass extinction of the Phanerozoic eon. We assume the worst possible scenario from the photobiological point of view: an already clear atmosphere with no ozone, as the timescale for soot and dust settling (years) is smaller than that of the full ozone regeneration (decades). Even in these conditions we show that most phytoplankton species would have had reasonable potential for photosynthesis in all the three main optical ocean water types. This modelling could help explain why the recovery of phytoplankton was relatively rapid after the huge environmental stress of that asteroid impact. In a more general scope, it also reminds us of the great resilience of the unicellular biosphere against huge environmental perturbations.

Perez, Noel; Martin, Osmel; Rojas, Reinaldo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands marginal CO2 intensities of energy eff...

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands the marginal CO2 intensities of en...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an effort to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study establishes a proof-of-concept for quantifying marginal CO2 intensi...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM): Technology share component  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The models described in this report are used to allocate total energy consumption in an energy end-use service area by fuel type (including electricity) within the Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM) framework. The primary objective of the DIAM is to provide energy consumption and expenditure forecasts for different population categories that are consistent with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) forecast, which is produced annually in the Annual Energy Outlook and periodically in support of DOE policy formulation and analysis. The models are multinominal logit models that have been estimated using EIA`s 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Three models were estimated: space heating share, water heating share, and cooking share. These models are used to allocate total end-use service consumption over different technologies defined by fuel type characteristics. For each of the end-use service categories, consumption shares are estimated for a subset of six fuel types: natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas, fuel oil/kerosene, wood, and other fuel.

Poyer, D.A.; Earl, E.; Bonner, B.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Climate, Land, Water Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fao.org/climatechange/mosaicc/66705/en/ FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC) Screenshot References: FAO-Modelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change (MOSAICC)[1] "FAO-MOSAICC (for MOdelling System for Agricultural Impacts of Climate Change) is a system of models designed to carry out each step of the impact

96

Modeling the dynamic crush of impact mitigating materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crushable materials are commonly utilized in the design of structural components to absorb energy and mitigate shock during the dynamic impact of a complex structure, such as an automobile chassis or drum-type shipping container. The development and application of several finite-element material models which have been developed at various times at LLNL for DYNA3D will be discussed. Between the models, they are able to account for several of the predominant mechanisms which typically influence the dynamic mechanical behavior of crushable materials. One issue we addressed was that no single existing model would account for the entire gambit of constitutive features which are important for crushable materials. Thus, we describe the implementation and use of an additional material model which attempts to provide a more comprehensive model of the mechanics of crushable material behavior. This model combines features of the pre-existing DYNA models and incorporates some new features as well in an invariant large-strain formulation. In addition to examining the behavior of a unit cell in uniaxial compression, two cases were chosen to evaluate the capabilities and accuracy of the various material models in DYNA. In the first case, a model for foam filled box beams was developed and compared to test data from a 4-point bend test. The model was subsequently used to study its effectiveness in energy absorption in an aluminum extrusion, spaceframe, vehicle chassis. The second case examined the response of the AT-400A shipping container and the performance of the overpack material during accident environments selected from 10CFR71 and IAEA regulations.

Logan, R.W.; McMichael, L.D.

1995-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Optimal Execution Under Jump Models For Uncertain Price Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comes from price impacts of both the investor's own trades and other concurrent ... Indeed price impact of large trades have been considered as one of the main...

98

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present a model to estimate the nationalenergy and economic impacts of the Department of Energy Building Americaprogram. The program goal is to improve energy performance in newresidential construction, by working with builders to design andconstruct energy-efficient homes at minimal cost. The model is anadaptation of the method used to calculate the national energy savingsfor appliance energy efficiency standards. The main difference is thatthe key decision here is not the consumer decision to buy anefficienthouse, but rather the builder decision to offer such a house inthe market. The builder decision is treated by developing a number ofscenarios in which the relative importance of first costs vs. energysavings is varied.

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor, Journal of Nuclear Materials (2010), doi models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor Valeryi Sizyuk

Harilal, S. S.

100

Modelling the environmental impact of an aluminium pressure die casting plant and options for control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes a model (MIKADO) to analyse options to reduce the environmental impact of aluminium die casting. This model will take a company perspective, so that it can be used as a decision-support tool for the environmental management of a ... Keywords: Aluminium die casting plant, Environmental decision-support tool, Environmental impact assessment, Integrated Assessment Model, Modelling

Belmira Neto; Carolien Kroeze; Leen Hordijk; Carlos Costa

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use regional air quality modeling to evaluate the impact of model resolution on uncertainty associated with the human health benefits resulting from proposed air quality regulations. Using a regional photochemical model ...

Thompson, Tammy M.

102

Modeling High-Impact Weather and Climate: Lessons From a Tropical Cyclone Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Although the societal impact of a weather event increases with the rarity of the event, our current ability to assess extreme events and their impacts is limited by not only rarity but also by current model fidelity and a lack of understanding of the underlying physical processes. This challenge is driving fresh approaches to assess high-impact weather and climate. Recent lessons learned in modeling high-impact weather and climate are presented using the case of tropical cyclones as an illustrative example. Through examples using the Nested Regional Climate Model to dynamically downscale large-scale climate data the need to treat bias in the driving data is illustrated. Domain size, location, and resolution are also shown to be critical and should be guided by the need to: include relevant regional climate physical processes; resolve key impact parameters; and to accurately simulate the response to changes in external forcing. The notion of sufficient model resolution is introduced together with the added value in combining dynamical and statistical assessments to fill out the parent distribution of high-impact parameters. Finally, through the example of a tropical cyclone damage index, direct impact assessments are presented as powerful tools that distill complex datasets into concise statements on likely impact, and as highly effective communication devices. Capsule: "Combining dynamical modeling of high-impact weather using traditional regional climate models with statistical techniques allows for comprehensive sampling of the full distribution, uncertainty estimation, direct assessment of impacts, and increased confidence in future changes."

Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Suzuki-Parker, Asuka

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future Agency/Company /Organization: MetroBike Focus Area: Non-Motorized Transport, Transportation Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: www.metrobike.net/index.php?s=file_download&id=26 Cost: Free Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future Screenshot References: Bike-Sharing:History, Impacts, Models of Provision, and Future[1] This paper discusses the history of bike-sharing from the early 1st generation program to present day 3rd generation programs. Included are a detailed examination of models of provision, with benefits and detriments

104

Models for managing the impact of an epidemic Daniel Bienstock ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

However, even a much milder epidemic would have vast social impact as services such as health care, police and utilities became severely hampered by staff.

105

Optimal Execution Under Jump Models For Uncertain Price Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 13, 2012 ... A major source of the execution cost comes from price impacts of both the investor's own trades and other concurrent institutional trades.

106

Impacts of Modeled Recommendations of the National Commission on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

the new CAFE standards, which forces an increase in the sale of hybrid vehicles. The NCEP and the CAFE cases have similar impacts on petroleum consumption and imports,

107

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy (EERE) is supporting the development ofgoals. For the most part EERE program impacts are estimatedcase, which removes any EERE program activities that are

Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The Impact of Spectral Nudging on Cloud Simulation with a Regional Atmospheric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of spectral nudging on cloud simulation with a regional atmospheric model was examined. Simulated cloudiness of the Regional Model (REMO) and the Spectrally Nudged REMO (SN-REMO) were intercompared and evaluated with satellite-derived ...

Insa Meinke; Beate Geyer; Frauke Feser; Hans von Storch

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the ULBNL-63728 Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non .............................................................................................................. 9 4. Baseline Profile (BLP) Models

111

Impacts of Land Surface Model Complexity on a Regional Simulation of a Tropical Synoptic Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multimode Chameleon Surface Model (CHASM) with different levels of complexity in parameterizing surface energy balance is coupled to a limited-area model (DARLAM) to investigate the impacts of complexity in land surface representations on the ...

H. Zhang; J. L. McGregor; A. Henderson-Sellers; J. J. Katzfey

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A simple model of impact dynamics in many dimensional systems, with applications to heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple model of impact dynamics in many dimensional systems, with applications to heat exchangers present a simple hybrid model of impact dynamics in heat exchangers. The method, based on graph theory and experimental evidence. 1 Introduction A heat exchanger typically consists of a large number of thin pipes

Bristol, University of

113

Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks Committee Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks) Departmental Member Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) represent a promising future direction

Victoria, University of

114

Modeling environmental impact of unfired bricks in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brick manufacturing requires a considerable amount of energy and land, but these numbers have been difficult to quantify in rural parts of the developing world. The environmental impact of unfired bricks in India is ...

Zachau Walker, Miriam E. (Miriam Elizabeth)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Global Modeling of the Contrail and Contrail Cirrus Climate Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite considerable technological advances, aviation impacts on global climate are significant and may constitute a future constraint on the continued growth of air travel. The most important but least understood component in aviation climate ...

Ulrike Burkhardt; Bernd Krcher; Ulrich Schumann

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Impact of Transport Schemes on Modeled Dust Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sensitivity study is performed with the CHIMERE-DUST chemistry transport model in order to evaluate the modeled mineral dust spread due to the horizontal transport scheme accuracy. Three different schemes are implemented in the model: the ...

Maria Raffaella Vuolo; Laurent Menut; Hlne Chepfer

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact Ionization Model Using Average Energy and Average Square Energy of Distribution Function Ken relaxation length, v sat ø h''i (¸ 0:05¯m), the energy distribution function is not well described calculation of impact ionization coefficient requires the use of a high energy distribution function because

Dunham, Scott

118

Using Random Effects to Build Impact Models When the Available Historical Record Is Short  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of the affect of weather and climate on human activities requires the construction of impact models that are able to describe the complex links between weather and socioeconomic data. In practice, one of the biggest challenges is the ...

Filipe Aires

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Impact of Satellite Sounding Data on the Systematic Error of a Numerical Weather Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of satellite sounding data on the systematic errors of the numerical weather prediction model of the Israel Meteorological Service has been investigated. In general, satellite data have been shown to reduce systematic error, and in ...

Noah Wolfson; Albert Thomasell; Arnold Gruber; George Ohring

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Impact of a Spectral Gravity Wave Parameterization on the Stratosphere in the Met Office Unified Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a parameterized spectrum of gravity waves on the simulation of the stratosphere in the Met Office Unified Model (UM) is investigated. In the extratropical mesosphere, the gravity wave forcing acts against the mean zonal wind and it ...

A. A. Scaife; N. Butchart; C. D. Warner; R. Swinbank

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling the BiosphereAtmosphere System: The Impact of the Subgrid Variability in Rainfall Interception  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subgrid variability in rainfall distribution has been widely recognized as an important factor to include in the representation of land surface hydrology within climate models. In this paper, using West Africa as a case study, the impact of the ...

Guiling Wang; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Impact of Domain Size on Modeled Ozone Forecast for the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the impact of model domain extent and the specification of lateral boundary conditions on the forecast quality of air pollution constituents in a specific region of interest. A developmental version of the national Air ...

Pius Lee; Daiwen Kang; Jeff McQueen; Marina Tsidulko; Mary Hart; Geoff DiMego; Nelson Seaman; Paula Davidson

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

On the Impact of WRF Model Vertical Grid Resolution on Midwest Summer Rainfall Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model exploratory sensitivity simulations were performed to determine the impact of vertical grid resolution (VGR) on the forecast skill of Midwest summer rainfall. Varying the VGR indicated that a refined VGR, ...

Eric A. Aligo; William A. Gallus Jr.; Moti Segal

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Impact of aerothermal modeling on the estimation of turbine blade life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of aerothermal modeling on estimates of turbine blade heat transfer and life was assessed for three high pressure turbine blades. The work was conducted as part of a project aimed at the evaluation of the effect ...

Collin, Jean E., 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Impact of Tropical Forcing on Extratropical Predictability in a Simple Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of tropical forcing on the predictability of the extratropical atmosphere is studied. Using a two-layer spectral model, numerical experiments and diagnostic analyses have been carried out to examine the enhancement of predictability ...

Jianchun Qin; Walter A. Robinson

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Modeling the Impact of Land Surface Degradation on the Climate of Tropical North Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degradation of the land surface has been suggested as a cause of persistent drought in tropical north Africa. A general circulation model is used to assess the impact of degradation of five regions within tropical north Africa. Idealized ...

Douglas B. Clark; Yongkang Xue; Richard J. Harding; Paul J. Valdes

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen R.

128

11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

Polenske, Karen R.

129

The econometric submodels of the Energy Policy Socioeconomic Impact Model (EPSIM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Socioeconomic Impact Model (EPSIM) is an econometric simulation model that runs on IBM-compatible personal computers. It can be used to assess the economic impact of energy policies and programs, such as utility rate designs and demand-side management programs, on various population groups, such as minority and low-income households. The econometric submodels that constitute the internal structure of EPSIM are described in detail.

Butler, J.G.; Poyer, D.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ENSO Prediction with Markov Models: The Impact of Sea Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of seasonally varying linear Markov models are constructed in a reduced multivariate empirical orthogonal function (MEOF) space of observed sea surface temperature, surface wind stress, and sea level analysis. The Markov models are ...

Yan Xue; Ants Leetmaa; Ming Ji

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Modified SDOF Models for Improved Representation of the Impact Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requires electrolytics #12;Reliability predictor models · MIL-HDBK 217F ­ Last updated in 1995 ­ Does

Feraboli, Paolo

132

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development of a practical modeling framework for estimating the impact of wind technology on bird populations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the most pressing environmental concerns related to wind project development is the potential for avian fatalities caused by the turbines. The goal of this project is to develop a useful, practical modeling framework for evaluating potential wind power plant impacts that can be generalized to most bird species. This modeling framework could be used to get a preliminary understanding of the likelihood of significant impacts to birds, in a cost-effective way. The authors accomplish this by (1) reviewing the major factors that can influence the persistence of a wild population; (2) briefly reviewing various models that can aid in estimating population status and trend, including methods of evaluating model structure and performance; (3) reviewing survivorship and population projections; and (4) developing a framework for using models to evaluate the potential impacts of wind development on birds.

Morrison, M.L. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States); Pollock, K.H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Technology Models and Software Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Models and Software Tools Technology Models and Software Tools Here you'll find information about models and software tools used to analyze parabolic trough power plant technology. They include: Annual Simulation Solar Advisor Model TRNSYS Other Analysis SolTRACE Receiver Model DView JEDI Annual Simulation Software Because solar power plants rely on an intermittent fuel supply-the sun-it is necessary to model the plant's performance on an hourly (or finer resolution) basis to understand and predict its annual performance. A number of performance and economics models are available for evaluating parabolic trough solar technologies. Industry also has developed a number of proprietary models for evaluating parabolic trough plants. Solar Advisor Model NREL, partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy

135

Climatic Impact of Amazon DeforestationA Mechanistic Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent general circulation model (GCM) experiments suggest a drastic change in the regional climate, especially the hydrological cycle, after hypothesized Amazon basinwide deforestation. To facilitate the theoretical understanding of such a ...

Ning Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson; Xubin Zeng

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Modeling the Impact of Summer Temperatures on National Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National population-weighted weekly degree day totals, which have been used to model and assess temperature-related natural gas consumption, are compared with summertime electricity consumption. A very close relationship between national cooling ...

Douglas M. Le Comte; Henry E. Warren

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Market Model Simulation: The Impact of Increased Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to reduce energy consumption of gasoline, the U.S. Congress passed the ... from information in a Solomon Smith Barney report on Australian Magnesium, United States .... The market model was used to analyze three scenarios. First...

138

The Role of Convective Model Choice in Calculating the Climate Impact of Doubling CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of the parameterization of vertical convection in calculating the climate impact of doubling CO2 is assessed using both one-dimensional radiative-convective vertical models and in the latitude-dependent Hadley-baroclinic model of Lindzen ...

R. S. Lindzen; A. Y. Hou; B. F. Farrell

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fault-Impact models based on delay and packet loss for IEEE 802.11g  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we derive fault-impact models for wireless network traffic as it could be used in the control traffic for smart grid nodes. We set up experiments using a testbed with 116 nodes which uses the protocol IEEE 802.11g. We develop models for ...

Daniel Happ, Philipp Reinecke, Katinka Wolter

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Assessing impacts of climate change on forests: The state of biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rauscher, H.M. [Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MI (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

The impact of pollution on stellar evolution models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An approach is introduced for incorporating the concept of stellar pollution into stellar evolution models. The approach involves enhancing the metal content of the surface layers of stellar models. In addition, the surface layers of stars in the mass range of 0.5-2.0 Solar masses are mixed to an artificial depth motivated by observations of lithium abundance. The behavior of polluted stellar evolution models is explored assuming the pollution occurs after the star has left the fully convective pre main sequence phase. Stellar models polluted with a few Earth masses of iron are significantly hotter than stars of the same mass with an equivalent bulk metallicity. Polluted stellar evolution models can successfully reproduce the metal-rich, parent star tau Bootis and suggest a slightly lower mass than standard evolution models. Finally, the possibility that stars in the Hyades open cluster have accreted an average of 0.5 Earth masses of iron is explored. The results indicate that it is not possible to rule out stellar pollution on this scale from the scatter of Hyades stars on a color-magnitude diagram. The small amount of scatter in the observational data set does rule out pollution on the order of 1.5 Earth masses of iron. Pollution effects at the low level of 0.5 Earth masses of iron do not produce substantial changes in a star's evolution.

Aaron Dotter; Brian Chaboyer

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Impact of ASCAT Scatterometer Wind Observations on the High-Resolution Limited-Area Model (HIRLAM) within an Operational Context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Denial experiments, also denoted observing system experiments (OSEs), are used to determine the impact of an observing system on the forecast quality of a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model. When the impact is neutral or positive, new ...

Siebren de Haan; Gert-Jan Marseille; Paul de Valk; John de Vries

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Modeling the Impact of Convective Entrainment on the Tropical Tropopause  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) cloud-resolving model of deep moist convective events reveal net cooling near the tropopause (1518 km above ground), caused by a combination of large-scale ascent and small-scale ...

F. J. Robinson; S. C. Sherwood

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Modeling the impact of lifestyle on health at scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research in computational epidemiology to date has concentrated on estimating summary statistics of populations and simulated scenarios of disease outbreaks. Detailed studies have been limited to small domains, as scaling the methods involved poses considerable ... Keywords: computational epidemiology, geo-temporal modeling, machine learning, online social networks, ubiquitous computing

Adam Sadilek; Henry Kautz

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Developments in computation, modeling and experimentation: Impacts on R D  

SciTech Connect

The original objective was to document the feasibility of the coordinated research program sponsored by ECUT called Materials-by-Design (MBD).'' The MBD program funds research to develop hierarchical models to predict materials' performance based on microstructural information. This paper was specifically prepared for this meeting to help technical staff and their managers justify and plan for an advanced computer infrastructure within their companies. In order to do this, several additional objectives for this paper are (1) to foster an appreciation of the dramatic increase in computational power that have occurred over the last forty years, (2) to encourage better utilization of supercomputing in current scientific research by identifying current issues and opportunities, and (3) to promote anticipation and enthusiasm for the dramatic changes supercomputers currently being developed will offer scientists in the near future.

Young, J.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Impact of Spatial Resolution on Model-Derived Radiative Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Spatial Resolution Impact of Spatial Resolution on Model-Derived Radiative Heating W. O'Hirok and C. Gautier Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California C. Gautier Department of Geography University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction At the typical spatial resolution of climate and weather forecasting models, clouds are portrayed as uniform plane-parallel entities with three-dimensional (3D) radiative effects generally considered not important. However, as the resolution of these models increase, and with the development of "super parameterizations" (embedded cloud resolving models), there is a need to assess the spatial resolution where 3D effects should not be neglected (Khairoutdinov and Randall 2001). In this study, we perform

148

Energy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Telecom Paristech, LTCI Paris, France Abstract--In this paper we present a new analysis of energy.5% of world-wide electrical energy is responsible to cellular network and 80% of this is consumed at baseEnergy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility Thanh Tung Vu Telecom

149

A model for simulating impacts of seismic events on large power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the capabilities and calculation logic of EPfast, a new simulation and impact analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory. The tool represents an emerging set of simulation models focusing on evaluating the vulnerability ... Keywords: multi-component disruptions, power network seismic performance, seismic system vulnerability, system collapse, uncontrolled islanding

Edgar C. Portante; Brian A. Craig; Leah E. Talaber Malone; James A. Kavicky; Stephen F. Folga; Stewart Cedres

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Modeling of CO2 Reduction Impacts on Energy Prices with Modelica Philip Machanick1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price mean reversion rate" ; Real relEnergyPrice (start = 1); Real energyCostTrend (start = 1); Real[i,j,k]; end nextStep; equation energyCostTrend = relEnergyPrice * energyUse / baseEnergyUse; // usefulModeling of CO2 Reduction Impacts on Energy Prices with Modelica Philip Machanick1 , Ariel Liebman1

Machanick, Philip

151

Evolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Analysis and Management of the Visual Resource, Incline Village, Nevada, April 23-25, 1979. 2 / AssociatesEvolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1 2/ Brian A/ The method can be used to train evaluators to use explicit criteria (vividness, intactness and unity

Standiford, Richard B.

152

Modeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar proton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar charged particles of solar and cosmic origin. Therefore variations of the geomagnetic field occurring to the atmosphere under the consideration of different shielding properties of the geomagnetic field. The present

Wehrli, Bernhard

153

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Title Impacts of Contaminan t Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6114E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Erin L. Hult Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 72 Start Page 41 Pagination 41-49 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords Buffering capacity, formaldehyde, moisture Abstract A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

154

International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT): Model description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MODEL.................................................................................................................................7 I. Basic Methodology on Food............................................................................................. 7

Mark W. Rosegrant; Claudia Ringler; Siwa Msangi; Timothy B. Sulser; Tingju Zhu; Sarah A. Cline

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind November 20, 2013 3:00PM EST Online Starting more than a year ago, NREL initiated work to expand the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model to include fixed-bottom offshore wind technology. Following the completion of the model (and in partnership with the DOE Wind Program, Illinois State University, and James Madison University), NREL supported the analysis of the regional jobs and economic impacts of offshore wind for the Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, and Gulf Coast regions. The November Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach webinar will provide an overview of the new offshore wind JEDI model and

156

Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies to Predict the Impact Response of Explosives and Propellants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Understanding and predicting the impact response of explosives and propellants remains a challenging area in the energetic materials field. Efforts are underway at LLNL (and other laboratories) to apply modern diagnostic tools and computational analysis to move beyond the current level of imprecise approximations towards a predictive approach more closely based on fundamental understanding of the relevant mechanisms. In this paper we will discuss a set of underlying mechanisms that govern the impact response of explosives and propellants: (a) mechanical insult (impact) leading to material damage and/or direct ignition; (b) ignition leading to flame spreading; (c) combustion being driven by flame spreading, perhaps in damaged materials; (d) combustion causing further material damage; (e) combustion leading to pressure build-up or relief; (f) pressure changes driving the rates of combustion and flame spread; (g) pressure buildup leading to structural response and damage, which causes many of the physical hazards. We will briefly discuss our approach to modeling up these mechanistic steps using ALE 3D, the LLNL hydrodynamic code with fully coupled chemistry, heat flow, mass transfer, and slow mechanical motion as well as hydrodynamic processes. We will identify the necessary material properties needed for our models, and will discuss our experimental efforts to characterize these properties and the overall mechanistic steps, in order to develop and parameterize the models in ALE 3D and to develop a qualitative understanding of impact response.

Maienschein, J L; Nichols III, A L; Reaugh, J E; McClelland, M E; Hsu, P C

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

Impact of Climate Drift on Twenty-First-Century Projection in a Coupled AtmosphericOcean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing climate drift in coupled atmosphereocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) usually requires 10002000 years of spinup, which has not been practical for every modeling group to do. For the purpose of evaluating the impact of climate ...

Mao-Chang Liang; Li-Ching Lin; Ka-Kit Tung; Yuk L. Yung; Shan Sun

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Methods for modeling impact-induced reactivity changes in small reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes techniques for determining impact deformation and the subsequent reactivity change for a space reactor impacting the ground following a potential launch accident or for large fuel bundles in a shipping container following an accident. This technique could be used to determine the margin of subcriticality for such potential accidents. Specifically, the approach couples a finite element continuum mechanics model (Pronto3D or Presto) with a neutronics code (MCNP). DAGMC, developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is used to enable MCNP geometric queries to be performed using Pronto3D output. This paper summarizes what has been done historically for reactor launch analysis, describes the impact criticality analysis methodology, and presents preliminary results using representative reactor designs.

Tallman, Tyler N.; Radel, Tracy E.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Villa, Daniel L.; Smith, Brandon M. (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Radel, Ross F.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wilson, Paul Philip Hood (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Analysis of the environmental impact of China based on STIRPAT model  

SciTech Connect

Assuming that energy consumption is the main source of GHG emissions in China, this paper analyses the effect of population, urbanisation level, GDP per capita, industrialisation level and energy intensity on the country's environmental impact using the STIRPAT model with data for 1978-2006. The analysis shows that population has the largest potential effect on environmental impact, followed by urbanisation level, industrialisation level, GDP per capita and energy intensity. Hence, China's One Child Policy, which restrains rapid population growth, has been an effective way of reducing the country's environmental impact. However, due to the difference in growth rates, GDP per capita had a higher effect on the environmental impact, contributing to 38% of its increase (while population's contribution was at 32%). The rapid decrease in energy intensity was the main factor restraining the increase in China's environmental impact but recently it has also been rising. Against this background, the future of the country looks bleak unless a change in human behaviour towards more ecologically sensitive economic choices occurs.

Lin Shoufu, E-mail: linshf2003@126.co [School of Economics, FuJian Normal University, Fuzhou City, 350007, Fujian Province (China) and School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China) and Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Zhao Dingtao, E-mail: box@ustc.edu.c [School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China); Marinova, Dora, E-mail: D.Marinova@curtin.edu.a [Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Impact of relative permeability models on fluid flow behavior for gas condensate reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate assessments of reserves and evaluation of productivity trends for gas condensate systems depend on a basic understanding of phase and fluid flow behavior. In gas condensate reservoirs, the gas flow depends on liquid drop out at pressures below the dewpoint pressure. The liquid initially accumulates as a continuous film along the porous media because of the low interfacial tension. Then, as the volume of condensate increases, the interfacial tension increases and capillary forces become more important. Modeling fluid flow in these systems must consider the dependence of relative permeability on both viscous and capillary forces. This research focuses on the evaluation of several recently proposed relative permeability models and on the quantification of their impact on reservoir fluid flow and well performance. We selected three relative permeability models to compare the results obtained in the modeling of relative permeabilities for a published North Sea gas condensate reservoir. The models employ weighting factors to account for the interpolation between miscible and immiscible flow behavior. The Pusch model evaluated using Fevang's weighting factor gave the best estimation of relative permeability when compared to the published data. Using a sector model, we evaluated the effects at the field scale of the selected gas condensate relative permeability models on well performance under different geological heterogeneity and permeability anisotropy scenarios. The Bette and Pusch models as well as the Danesh model, as implemented in a commercial reservoir simulator, were used to quantify the impact of the relative permeability models on fluid-flow and well performance. The results showed that, if the transition between miscible and immiscible behavior is not considered, the condensate saturation could be overestimated and the condensate production could be underestimated. After twenty years of production, the heterogeneous model using the selected relative permeability models predicted between 7.5 - 13% more condensate recovery than was estimated using an immiscible relative permeability model. Using the same relative permeability models, the anisotropic model forecast between 3 - 10% more condensate recovery than predicted using an immiscible relative permeability model. Results using the anisotropic model showed that vertical communication could affect the liquid distribution in the reservoir.

Zapata Arango, Jose? Francisco

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Summary Impacts of Modeled Provisions of the 2003 Conference Energy Bill  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This service report was undertaken at the February 2, 2004, request of Senator John Sununu to perform an assessment of the Conference Energy Bill of 2003. This report summarizes the CEB provisions that can be analyzed using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and have the potential to affect energy consumption, supply, and prices. The impacts are estimated by comparing the projections with the CEB provisions to the AEO2004 Reference Case.

Andy Kydes

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Users guide: simulation model for ammunition plants; prediction of wastewater characteristics and impact of reuse/recycle. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the algorithm and details the operating instructions required for an ammunition plant process model developed for DARCOM environmental personnel. The model was created to define the impact of increased ammunition production on the quantity and quality of the effluents discharged from the plants. It also allows assessment of the impact of recycle/reuse of wastewaters on final effluent quality. This model may be accessed through the Environmental Technical Information System.

Railsback, S.; Messenger, M.; Webster, R.D.; Bandy, J.T.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect

This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic impacts of the development of energy-efficient technologies.

Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters Radiation Impacts on Global Climate Models F. Baer, N. Arsky, and K. Rocque University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Climate Prediction and Radiative Heating Climate models are driven by forcing, and these forces are seen primarily by the thermal field in general circulation models (GCMs). The major forces that affect the thermal field are longwave radiative (LWR) heating, shortwave radiative (SWR) heating, and convection (cumulus, etc.). These forcing effects are cycled through the thermal field to the motion field by nonlinear transfer. The dependent variables-in particular, temperature (T), moisture (Q) and especially clouds-evolve in time in a model and determine the subsequent forcing. If the dependent variables are not accurately calculated in space and time, the forcing

165

TWP-ICE Global Atmospheric Model Intercomparison: Convection Responsiveness and Resolution Impact  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of global atmospheric model (GAM) simulations of tropical convection during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE). The distinct cloud properties, precipitation, radiation, and vertical diabatic heating profiles associated with three different monsoon regimes (wet, dry, and break) from available observations are used to evaluate 9 GAM forecasts initialized daily from realistic global analyses. All models well captured the evolution of large-scale circulation and the thermodynamic fields, but cloud properties differed substantially among models. For example, liquid water path and ice water path differed by up to two orders of magnitude. Compared with the relatively well simulated top-heavy heating structures during the wet and break period, most models had difficulty in depicting the bottom-heavy heating profiles associated with cumulus congestus. The best performing models during this period were the ones whose convection scheme was most responsive to the free tropospheric humidity. Compared with the large impact of cloud and convective parameterizations on model cloud and precipitation characteristics, resolution has relatively minor impact on simulated cloud properties. However, one feature that was influence by the resolution study in several models was the diurnal cycle of precipitation. Peaking at a different time from convective precipitation, large-scale precipitation generally increases in high resolution forecasts and modulates the total precipitation diurnal cycle. Overall, the study emphasizes the importance of more environmental responsive convective parameterizations to capture various types of convection and the substantial diversity among large-scale cloud and precipitation schemes in current GAMs. This experiment has also demonstrated itself to be a very useful testbed for those developing cloud and convection schemes in these models.

Lin, Yanluan; Donner, Leo J.; Petch, Jon C.; Bechtold, P.; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Komori, T.; Wapler, K.; Willett, M.; Xie, X.; Zhao, M.; Xie, Shaocheng; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Wind stress measurements from the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission and the impact on an ocean model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind stress measurements from the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission and the impact by the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission (April­October 2003) and their impact on ocean model simulation. The diurnal variability captured by twice-daily scatterometer wind from the tandem mission

Talley, Lynne D.

167

Modeling the Vulnerability of an Urban Groundwater System due to the Combined Impacts of Climate Change and Management Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change impact on a groundwater-dependent small urban town has been investigated in the semiarid hard rock aquifer in southern India. A distributed groundwater model was used to simulate the groundwater levels in the study region for the ...

M. Sekhar; M. Shindekar; Sat K. Tomer; P. Goswami

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Indian Summer Monsoon Precipitation Climatology in a High-Resolution Regional Climate Model: Impacts of Convective Parameterization on Systematic Biases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an attempt to develop a better simulation of the climatology of monsoon precipitation in climate models, this paper investigates the impacts of different convective closures on systematic biases of an Indian monsoon precipitation climatology ...

P. Mukhopadhyay; S. Taraphdar; B. N. Goswami; K. Krishnakumar

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Estimation of Climate Change Impact on Mean Annual Runoff across Continental Australia Using Budyko and Fu Equations and Hydrological Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the climate change impact on mean annual runoff across continental Australia estimated using the Budyko and Fu equations informed by projections from 15 global climate models and compares the estimates with those from extensive ...

J. Teng; F. H. S. Chiew; J. Vaze; S. Marvanek; D. G. C. Kirono

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Impact of Isopycnal Diffusion on Heat Fluxes and the Transient Response of a Two-Dimensional Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional (latitudedepth) oceanclimate model is used to assess the impact of calculating diffusive heat and salinity fluxes along and across isopycnal surfaces rather than in a verticalhorizontal coordinate system. Differences between ...

L. D. Danny Harvey

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements makes an accurate quantification of solar contributions to recent climate change difficult. Whereas earlier SSI observations and models provided a qualitatively consistent picture of the SSI variability, recent measurements by the SORCE satellite suggest a significantly stronger variability in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range and changes in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands in anti-phase with the solar cycle. A number of recent chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations have shown that this might have significant implications on the Earth's atmosphere. Motivated by these results, we summarize here our current knowledge of SSI variability and its impact on Earth's climate. We present a detailed overview of existing SSI measurements and provide thorough comparison of models available to date. SSI changes influence the Earth's atmosphere, both directly, through changes in shortwave (SW) heating and therefore, temp...

Ermolli, I; de Wit, T Dudok; Krivova, N A; Tourpali, K; Weber, M; Unruh, Y C; Gray, L; Langematz, U; Pilewskie, P; Rozanov, E; Schmutz, W; Shapiro, A; Solanki, S K; Woods, T N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias  

SciTech Connect

The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

Summary Impacts of Modeled Provisions of the 2003 Conference Energy Bill  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Summary Impacts of Modeled Provisions of the 2003 Conference Energy Bill February 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor.

174

Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city  

SciTech Connect

An atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. Reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate. Urban air quality, and particularly airborne particles, is a major concern in terms of human health impacts. Sea-spray is known to be a major component of the particle ensemble at coastal sites yet relatively few air quality models include the interaction of gases with sea-spray and the fate of the particles produced. Sea-spray is not an inert addition to the particle ensemble because heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray droplets changes the droplets composition and the particle size distribution, which impacts deposition and the ion balance in different particle size fractions. It is shown that the ISOPART model is capable of simulating gas and particle concentrations in the coastal metropolis of Vancouver and the surrounding valley. It is also demonstrated that to accurately simulate ambient concentrations of particles and reactive/soluble gases in a coastal valley it is absolutely critical to include heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray. Partitioning of total particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} between sea-spray and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is highly sensitive to the amount of sea-spray present, and hence the initial vertical profile, sea-spray source functions [48] and the wind speed. When a fixed wind speed is used to initialize the sea-spray vertical profiles, as expected, the sea-spray concentration decays with distance inland, but the particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration decays more slowly because it is also a function of the uptake rate for HNO{sub 3}. The simulation results imply model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield highly misleading results in terms of emission sensitivities of the PM size distribution. The sensitivity of the model results to the initial sea spray profile further suggests there would be great benefit in better definition of the vertical profile of size resolved sea-spray for use in such model studies.

Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Monache, L D; Stull, R B

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Estimating catchment-scale impacts of wildfire on sediment and nutrient loads using the E2 catchment modelling framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 1.3 million ha of forested and agricultural land in south-eastern Australia was burnt by wildfires in early 2003. This paper describes a modelling process to assess the impacts of the fires on the quality of receiving waters and river systems ... Keywords: Catchment modelling, E2, Nutrient loads, Sediment loads, Water quality, Wildfire

Paul M. Feikema; Gary J. Sheridan; Robert M. Argent; Patrick N. J. Lane; Rodger B. Grayson

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A new approach for modeling the peak utility impacts from a proposed CUAC standard  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new Berkeley Lab approach for modeling the likely peak electricity load reductions from proposed energy efficiency programs in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This method is presented in the context of the commercial unitary air conditioning (CUAC) energy efficiency standards. A previous report investigating the residential central air conditioning (RCAC) load shapes in NEMS revealed that the peak reduction results were lower than expected. This effect was believed to be due in part to the presence of the squelch, a program algorithm designed to ensure changes in the system load over time are consistent with the input historic trend. The squelch applies a system load-scaling factor that scales any differences between the end-use bottom-up and system loads to maintain consistency with historic trends. To obtain more accurate peak reduction estimates, a new approach for modeling the impact of peaky end uses in NEMS-BT has been developed. The new approach decrements the system load directly, reducing the impact of the squelch on the final results. This report also discusses a number of additional factors, in particular non-coincidence between end-use loads and system loads as represented within NEMS, and their impacts on the peak reductions calculated by NEMS. Using Berkeley Lab's new double-decrement approach reduces the conservation load factor (CLF) on an input load decrement from 25% down to 19% for a SEER 13 CUAC trial standard level, as seen in NEMS-BT output. About 4 GW more in peak capacity reduction results from this new approach as compared to Berkeley Lab's traditional end-use decrement approach, which relied solely on lowering end use energy consumption. The new method has been fully implemented and tested in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 (AEO2003) version of NEMS and will routinely be applied to future versions. This capability is now available for use in future end-use efficiency or other policy analysis that requires accurate representation of time varying load reductions.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris; Chan, Peter; Coughlin, Katie

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Impact of Rotor Surface Velocity, Leakage Models and Real Gas Properties on Rotordynamic Force Predictions of Gas Labyrinth Seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rotordynamic coefficients of a gas labyrinth seal are assumed to be frequency independent. However, this assumption loses its validity as rotor surface velocity approaches Mach 1. The solution procedure of 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer which assumes frequency independent force coefficients is modified to allow for calculating frequency dependent force coefficients. A comparative study of the impact of using frequency-dependent model and the original frequency-independent model on stability analysis is made. The results indicate that frequency dependency of force coefficients should be accounted for in stability analysis as rotor surface velocity approaches a significant fraction of Mach number. The bulk flow rotordynamic analysis model by Childs and Scharrer is modified to investigate the impact of leakage-flow models on predictions. A number of leakage models are incorporated in the one-control volume model, and a comparative study is made. Kinetic energy carryover factor of a leakage equation is one of the dominant factors in seal cross-force generation. A leakage equation based on a model proposed by Gamal which uses Hodkinson?s kinetic energy carryover factor is found to improve predictions of direct damping and cross-coupled stiffness. A test case is implemented to study the impact of variation of seal axial radial clearance on stability characteristics. The 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer and subsequent bulk flow models are based on the assumption of isothermal flow across the labyrinth seal. The 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer is modified to include energy equation, and the flow process is assumed to be adiabatic. However, predicted cross-coupled stiffness and direct damping coefficients using the new model do not compare well with the experimental results by Picardo as compared to the isothermal model. The impact of using real gas properties on static and rotordynamic characteristics of the seal is studied.

Thorat, Manish R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Financial Impact of Good Condenser Vacuum in Industrial Steam Turbines: Computer Modeling Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial turbine throttle conditions are fixed by plant designs - materials of construction, steam requirements, etc. Condensing turbine exhaust conditions are limited by the atmosphere to which residual heat is rejected; and are fixed by installed condenser surface area and the steam space characteristics. Since the steam rate and shaft power costs are dependent on the available enthalpy drop across the machine, the steam must condense at the lowest practical thermal state. Thus, air presence and cooling rate must be controlled. The condensing turbine is not an isolated system. It directly affects the use of boiler fuel and the purchase of power. Its condensate requires reheating to feedwater temperature: steam is used, backpressure power is made, for example. Its performance affects the entire steam system and must be monitored persistently. Because of the complexities (and advantages) of systems analyses, computer modeling is demonstrated in this paper to fully evaluated the network effects and the financial impact of good condenser vacuum.

Viar, W. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Tropical Cyclone Data Impact Studies: Influence of Model Bias and Synthetic Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of assimilating dropwindsonde data and enhanced atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) on tropical cyclone track forecasts are examined using the Navy global data assimilation and forecasting systems. Enhanced AMVs have the largest impact ...

Carolyn A. Reynolds; Rolf Langland; Patricia M. Pauley; Christopher Velden

182

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand changes impact the electric power sector. Figure 2:for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. Thedemand changes impact the electric power sector. We refer to

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Tropical Cyclone Data Impact Studies: Influence of Model Bias and Synthetic Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of assimilating dropwindsonde data and enhanced atmospheric motion vectors (AMVs) on tropical cyclone track forecasts are examined using the Navy global data assimilation and forecasting systems. Enhanced AMVs have the largest impact ...

Carolyn A. Reynolds; Rolf Langland; Patricia M. Pauley; Christopher Velden

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earths albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Modeling study of ventilation, IAQ and energy impacts of residential mechanical ventilation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a simulation study of indoor air quality, ventilation and energy impacts of several mechanical ventilation approaches in a single-family residential building. The study focused on a fictitious two-story house in Spokane, Washington and employed the multizone airflow and contaminant dispersal model CONTAM. The model of the house included a number of factors related to airflow including exhaust fan and forced-air system operation, duct leakage and weather effects, as well as factors related to contaminant dispersal including adsorption/desorption of water vapor and volatile organic compounds, surface losses of particles and nitrogen dioxide, outdoor contaminant concentrations, and occupant activities. The contaminants studied include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor, fine and coarse particles, and volatile organic compounds. One-year simulations were performed for four different ventilation approaches: a base case of envelope infiltration only, passive inlet vents in combination with exhaust fan operation, an outdoor intake duct connected to the forced-air system return balanced by exhaust fan operation, and a continuously-operated exhaust fan. Results discussed include whole building air change rates, air distribution within the house, heating and cooling loads, contaminants concentrations, and occupant exposure to contaminants.

Persily, A.K.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

Not Available

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

John Collins

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Look at the U.S. Energy System A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economical in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gases. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This paper discusses the systematic approach used to develop the 2050 Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), which allows the user to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand. It also provides an overall systems understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This paper also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rational for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing 2050 SIM.

Layne Pincock; John W. Collins

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Modeling the vulnerability of an urban groundwater system due to the combined impacts of climate change and management scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change impact on a groundwater dependent small urban town has been investigated in the semi-arid hard rock aquifer in South India. A distributed groundwater model was used to simulate the groundwater levels in the study region for the ...

M. Sekhar; M. Shindekar; Sat K. Tomer; P. Goswami

192

Evaluation of Water Stress Impact on the Parameter Values in Stomatal Conductance Models Using Tower Flux Measurement of a Boreal Aspen Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of water stress on plant stomatal conductance (g) has been widely studied but with little consensus as to the processes governing its responses. The photosynthesis-driven stomatal conductance models usually employ constant model ...

Shusen Wang

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A georeferenced Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to analyze the climate change impacts on the ski industry in Andorra and the effect of snowmaking as future adaptation strategy. The present study is the first attempt to analyze the ski industry in the Pyrenees region and will contribute to a better understanding of the vulnerability of Andorran ski resorts and the suitability of snowmaking as potential adaptation strategy to climate change. The resulting model can be used as a planning support tool to help local stakeholders understand the vulnerability and potential impacts of climate change. This model can be used in the decision-making process of designing and developing appropriate sustainable adaptation strategies to future climate variability.

Pons-Pons, M; Rosas-Casals, M; Sureda, B; Jover, E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Population, affluence, and environmental impact across development: Evidence from panel cointegration modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes urban population's and affluence's (GDP per capita's) influence on environmental impact in developed and developing countries by taking as its starting point the STIRPAT framework. In addition to considering environmental impacts ... Keywords: Environment and development, Environmental/Carbon Kuznets Curve, FMOLS panel cointegration, GHG emissions, IPAT, Population and environment, STIRPAT

Brantley Liddle

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Impacts of Trades in an Error-Correction Model of Quote Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Short-Selling and Asset Price Adjustment to PrivateF. , 2000, Time and the Price Impact of a Trade, Journal ofand OHara, Maureen, 1987, Price, Trade Size and Information

Engle, Robert F; Patton, Andrew J

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Modeling the determinants of the social impacts of agricultural development projects  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to help policy-makers improve the social sustainability of development projects, this study identifies the key determinants of farmers' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the floodwater spreading project (FWSP) on the Gareh-Bygone plain in Iran. In order to analyze the links between the various factors that affect the experience of social impact, a theoretical framework was developed. Stratified random sampling was used to survey 138 farm households from the four villages in the region. One male and one female from each house were interviewed face-to-face using a questionnaire, resulting in a total of 276 interviews. Structural factors were found to be the largest contribution to stakeholders' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the project. Results from a cluster analysis suggested that the level of floodwater information, level of participation, water access, ownership change, and environmental worldview were the most important factors explaining attitude towards social impact of the FWSP.

Ahmadvand, Mostafa, E-mail: Ahmadvand_2000@yahoo.co [Department of Rural Development Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Yasouj University, Yasouj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karami, Ezatollah, E-mail: ekarami@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Iman, Mohammad Taghi, E-mail: Iman@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Sociology, School of Social Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Modeling of Regional Hydroclimate Change over the Indian Subcontinent: Impact of the Expanding Thar Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thar Desert between northwestern India and Pakistan is the most densely populated desert region in the world, and the vast surrounding areas are affected by rapid soil degradation and vegetation loss. The impact of an expanded desert (...

Massimo Bollasina; Sumant Nigam

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Model-based spectroscopic analysis of the oral cavity: impact of anatomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the impact of anatomy on the spectral properties of oral tissue, we used reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize nine different anatomic sites. All spectra were collected in vivo ...

McGee, Sasha

199

Modeling the impacts of biomass burning on air quality in and around Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The local and regional impacts of open fires and trash burning on ground-level ozone (O[subscript 3]) and fine carbonaceous aerosols in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and surrounding region during two high fire ...

Lei, W.

200

Impact of Two Microphysical Schemes upon Gas Scavenging and Deposition in a Mesoscale Meteorological Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two widely used microphysical schemes are compared to evaluate their possible impact on wet deposition mechanisms. They are based upon different spectral distributions for raindrops (Marshall-Palmer and lognormal distributions) and use different ...

Nadine Chaumerliac; Evelyne Richard; Robert Rosset; Everett C. Nickerson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Potential Impacts of the Saharan Air Layer on Numerical Model Forecasts of North Atlantic Tropical Cyclogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical cyclones have devastating impacts on countries across large parts of the globe, including the Atlantic basin. Thus, forecasting of the genesis of Atlantic tropical cyclones is important, but this problem remains a challenge for ...

Aaron S. Pratt; Jenni L. Evans

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

On the modeling of the Taylor cylinder impact test for orthotropic textured materials: Calculations and experiments  

SciTech Connect

Taylor impact tests using specimens cut from a rolled plate of Ta were conducted. The Ta was well-characterized in terms of flow stress and crystallographic texture. A piece-wise yield surface was interrogated from this orthotropic texture, and used in EPIC-95 3D simulations of the Taylor test. Good agreement was realized between the calculations and the post-test geometries in terms of major and minor side profiles and impact-interface footprints.

Maudlin, P.J.; Bingert, J.F.; House, J.W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Impacts of Future Climate Change on California Perennial Crop Yields: Model Projections with Climate and Crop Uncertainties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most research on the agricultural impacts of climate change has focused on the major annual crops, yet perennial cropping systems are less adaptable and thus potentially more susceptible to damage. Improved assessments of yield responses to future climate are needed to prioritize adaptation strategies in the many regions where perennial crops are economically and culturally important. These impact assessments, in turn, must rely on climate and crop models that contain often poorly defined uncertainties. We evaluated the impact of climate change on six major perennial crops in California: wine grapes, almonds, table grapes, oranges, walnuts, and avocados. Outputs from multiple climate models were used to evaluate climate uncertainty, while multiple statistical crop models, derived by resampling historical databases, were used to address crop response uncertainties. We find that, despite these uncertainties, climate change in California is very likely to put downward pressure on yields of almonds, walnuts, avocados, and table grapes by 2050. Without CO{sub 2} fertilization or adaptation measures, projected losses range from 0 to >40% depending on the crop and the trajectory of climate change. Climate change uncertainty generally had a larger impact on projections than crop model uncertainty, although the latter was substantial for several crops. Opportunities for expansion into cooler regions are identified, but this adaptation would require substantial investments and may be limited by non-climatic constraints. Given the long time scales for growth and production of orchards and vineyards ({approx}30 years), climate change should be an important factor in selecting perennial varieties and deciding whether and where perennials should be planted.

Lobell, D; Field, C; Cahill, K; Bonfils, C

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

Examination of Housing Price Impacts on Residential Properties Before and After Superfund Remediation Using Spatial Hedonic Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although recent brownfields redevelopment research using theories of real estate valuation and neighborhood change have indicated negative effects on surrounding residential housing, little evidence exists to show price impacts and sociodemographic change after remediation. This study examines the extent and size of the economic impact of Superfund sites on surrounding single-family residential properties before and after remediation in Miami-Dade County and examines trends for contemporaneous sociodemographic changes. The study combines the economic impact from changes in environmental quality with contemporaneous sociodemographic changes within the purview of environmental and social justice. This study uses spatial hedonic price modeling on a comprehensive dataset of property-level data, with corresponding sales prices of housing transactions while controlling for other structural, neighborhood, and submarkets characteristics for assessing economic impact. Findings revealed that housing sales prices for single-family residential properties significantly increases as distance to the nearest contaminated Superfund increases. Following remediation, this negative impact declined and housing values increased significantly in neighborhoods with remedied Superfund sites albeit more so in low housing submarkets than premium submarkets. Spatial hedonic models outperformed traditional OLS models in presenting unbiased efficient parameter estimates, correcting for spatial dependence. Although no evidence for gentrification was observed, there existed significant differences between certain sociodemographic characteristics of neighborhoods around contaminated Superfund sites and those of properties located elsewhere leading to concerns of environmental and social justice. Findings suggest that low-income minority populations are more likely to be living in neighborhoods around contaminated Superfund sites and experience a greater negative effect on housing sales prices; these sites are also less likely to be remedied as compared to sites located elsewhere. The findings highlight not only the revealed preferences of homeowners with respect to environmental disamenities, but also help inform policymakers and researchers of the impact of brownfields redevelopment on economic and sociodemographic characteristics of a growing urban region with evolving cultural and social diversity. Incorporating influences of housing submarkets, neighborhood amenities, and spatial dependence help provide a holistic and comprehensive model for examining environmental disamenities and provide a better understanding for neighborhood change.

Mhatre, Pratik Chandrashekhar

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development and application of an integrated ecological modelling framework to analyze the impact of wastewater discharges on the ecological water quality of rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling is an effective tool to investigate the ecological state of water resources. In developing countries, the impact of sanitation infrastructures (e.g. wastewater treatment plants) is typically assessed considering the achievement of legal physicochemical ... Keywords: Habitat suitability models, Information-theoretic approach, Integrated ecological modelling, MIKE 11, Multi-model inference

Javier E. Holguin-Gonzalez, Gert Everaert, Pieter Boets, Alberto Galvis, Peter L. M. Goethals

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Systematic Model Error: The Impact of Increased Horizontal Resolution versus Improved Stochastic and Deterministic Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-standing systematic model errors in both tropics and extratropics of the ECMWF model run at a horizontal resolution typical for climate models are investigated. Based on the hypothesis that the misrepresentation of unresolved scales ...

J. Berner; T. Jung; T. N. Palmer

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Climate Change Impacts on Jordan River Flow: Downscaling Application from a Regional Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integration of climate change projections into hydrological and other response models used for water resource planning and management is challenging given the varying spatial resolutions of the different models. In general, climate models are ...

Rana Samuels; Alon Rimmer; Andreas Hartmann; Simon Krichak; Pinhas Alpert

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Impact of a Two-Way Coupling between an Atmospheric and an Ocean-Ice Model over the Gulf of St. Lawrence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to present the impacts of a fully interactive coupling between an atmospheric and a sea ice model over the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. The impacts are assessed in terms of the atmospheric and sea ice forecasts ...

Pierre Pellerin; Harold Ritchie; Franois J. Saucier; Franois Roy; Serge Desjardins; Michel Valin; Vivian Lee

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Modeling of Future-Year Emissions Control Scenarios for the Lower Fraser Valley: Impacts of Natural Gas and Propane Vehicle Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MC2CALGRID photochemical modeling system is used to simulate the impact of two fuel substitution scenarios on ozone levels for a future year in the Lower Fraser Valley of British Columbia, Canada. The relative impacts of selected natural gas ...

M. Hedley; W. Jiang; R. McLaren; D. L. Singleton

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Impact of Sea Spray Evaporation in a Numerical Weather Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong winds above the sea lead to large amounts of spray in the lowest part of the boundary layer. Through their evaporation, spray droplets influence the exchange of sensible and latent heat between sea and air. In this study, the impact of ...

Jan F. Meirink; Vladimir K. Makin

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Rigorous evaluation of a soil heat transfer model for mesoscale climate change impact studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of Climate Change on plant development as well as on carbon and nitrogen cycling in soils is an important research topic for Global Change impact assessment at the regional scale. These changes affect the availability and quality of ground ... Keywords: Energy balance, GLOWA-Danube, Land surface, Mesoscale, Soil temperature

Markus Muerth; Wolfram Mauser

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modeling the Economic Impact of Pandemic Influenza: A Case Study in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influenza pandemics have occurred intermittently throughout the 20th century and killed millions of people worldwide. It is expected that influenza pandemics will continue to occur in the near future. Huge number of deaths and cases is the most troublesome ... Keywords: Cost analysis, Economic impact, Pandemic influenza, Turkey

Elcin Yoldascan; Behice Kurtaran; Melik Koyuncu; Esra Koyuncu

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The impact of a realistic packet traffic model on the performance of surveillance wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is quite common to see that classical periodic or Poisson packet traffic models are used for evaluating the performance of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). However, these models may not be appropriate for modeling the data traffic resulting from a ... Keywords: Intrusion detection applications, Packet traffic model, Surveillance sensor networks, Wireless sensor networks

Ilker Demirkol; Cem Ersoy; Fatih Alagz; Hakan Deli

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Impact of Upper OceanTopographical Coupling and Isopycnal Outcropping in Japan/East Sea Models with 1/8 to 1/64 Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional primitive equation ocean model is used to investigate the impact of grid resolution, baroclinic instability, bottom topography, and isopycnal outcropping on the dynamics of the wind and throughflow-forced surface circulation in the ...

Patrick J. Hogan; Harley E. Hurlburt

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Impact of Enthalpy-Based Ensemble Filtering Sea Ice Data Assimilation on Decadal Predictions: Simulation with a Conceptual Pycnocline Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The non-Gaussian probability distribution of sea ice concentration makes it difficult to directly assimilate sea ice observations into a climate model. Because of the strong impact of the atmospheric and oceanic forcing on the sea ice state, any ...

S. Zhang; M. Winton; A. Rosati; T. Delworth; B. Huang

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Impact of Initial Soil Moisture Anomalies on Subsequent Precipitation over North America in the Coupled LandAtmosphere Model CAM3CLM3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To investigate the impact of anomalous soil moisture conditions on subsequent precipitation over North America, a series of numerical experiments is performed using a modified version of the Community Atmosphere Model version 3 and the Community ...

Yeonjoo Kim; Guiling Wang

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Introduction to the OR Forum Article: Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions by Ramteen Sioshansi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comment on Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions by Ramteen Sieshansi. Keywords: energy, environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Edieal J. Pinker

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The Impact of Horizontal Grid Spacing on the Microphysical and Kinematic Structures of Strong Tropical Cyclones Simulated with the WRF-ARW Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Advanced Weather Research and Forecasting numerical model, the impact of horizontal grid spacing on the microphysical and kinematic structure of a numerically simulated tropical cyclone (TC), and their relationship to storm intensity ...

Alexandre O. Fierro; Robert F. Rogers; Frank D. Marks; David S. Nolan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Essays on Modeling the Economic Impacts of a Foreign Animal Disease on the United States Agricultural Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign animal disease can cause serious damage to the United States (US) agricultural sector and foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), in particular, poses a serious threat. FMD causes death and reduced fecundity in infected animals, as well as significant economic consequences. FMD damages can likely be reduced through implementing pre-planned response strategies. Empirical studies have evaluated the economic consequences of alternative strategies, but typically employ simplified models. This dissertation seeks to improve US preparedness for avoiding and/or responding to an animal disease outbreak by addressing three issues related to strategy assessment in the context of FMD: integrated multi region economic and epidemic evaluation, inclusion of risk, and information uncertainty. An integrated economic/epidemic evaluation is done to examine the impact of various control strategies. This is done by combining a stochastic, spatial FMD simulation model with a national level, regionally disaggregated agricultural sector mathematical programming economic model. In the analysis, strategies are examined in the context of California's dairy industry. Alternative vaccination, disease detection and movement restriction strategies are considered as are trade restrictions. The results reported include epidemic impacts, national economic impacts, prices, regional producer impacts, and disease control costs under the alternative strategies. Results suggest that, including trade restrictions, the median national loss from the disease outbreak is as much as $17 billion when feed can enter the movement restriction zone. Early detection reduces the median loss and the standard deviation of losses. Vaccination does not reduce the median disease loss, but does have a smaller standard deviation of loss which would indicate it is a risk reducing strategy. Risk in foreign animal disease outbreaks is present from several sources; however, studies comparing alternative control strategies assume risk neutrality. In reality, there will be a desire to minimize the national loss as well as minimize the chance of an extreme outcome from the disease (i.e. risk aversion). We perform analysis on FMD control strategies using breakeven risk aversion coefficients in the context of an outbreak in the Texas High Plains. Results suggest that vaccination while not reducing average losses is a risk reducing strategy. Another issue related to risk and uncertainty is the response of consumers and domestic markets to the presence of FMD. Using a highly publicized possible FMD outbreak in Kansas that did not turn out to be true, we examine the role of information uncertainty in futures market response. Results suggest that livestock futures markets respond to adverse information even when that information is untrue. Furthermore, the existence of herding behavior and potential for momentum trading exaggerate the impact of information uncertainty related to animal disease.

Hagerman, Amy Deann

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Diagnosing the Impact of Stratospheric Planetary Wave Breaking in a Linear Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past, linear quasigeostrophic theory has proven successful in modeling the vertical and meridional propagation of stationary planetary waves in the stratosphere. Since in such models the wave solution does not sensitively depend on the ...

Christian Hauck; Volkmar Wirth

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Impact of the Reduced Drag Coefficient on Ocean Wave Modeling under Hurricane Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of new drag coefficient (Cd) parameterizations on WAVEWATCH III (WW3) model surface wave simulations are investigated. The new parameterizations are based on a coupled windwave model (CWW) and a wave tank experiment, and yields reduced C...

Il-Ju Moon; Isaac Ginis; Tetsu Hara

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Spatial Resolution Impacts on National Meteorological Center Nested Grid Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasts from different resolution versions of the National Meteorological Center Nested Grid Model (NGM) are compared for two case studies to assess an optimal ratio of model vertical and horizontal resolutions. Four combinations are considered:...

David D. Houghton; Ralph A. Petersen; Richard L. Wobus

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Estimating Potential Evaporation from Vegetated Surfaces for Water Management Impact Assessments Using Climate Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin managers concerned with maintaining water supplies and mitigating flood risk in the face of climate change are taking outputs from climate models and using them in hydrological models for assessment purposes. While precipitation is the ...

Victoria A. Bell; Nicola Gedney; Alison L. Kay; Roderick N. B. Smith; Richard G. Jones; Robert J. Moore

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Impact of Horizontal Resolution on the Tropical Heat Budget in an Atlantic Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ocean general circulation model (OGCM) of the tropical Atlantic is coupled to an advective atmospheric boundary layer model. This configuration is used to investigate the hypothesis that resolving tropical instability waves (TIWs) in OGCMs ...

Markus Jochum; Raghu Murtugudde; Raffaele Ferrari; Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

WRF Model Simulation of Two Alberta Flooding Events and the Impact of Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines simulations of two flooding events in Alberta, Canada, during June 2005, made using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). The model was used in a manner readily accessible to nonmeteorologists (e.g., accepting ...

Thomas K. Flesch; Gerhard W. Reuter

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A Parameterization of Heterogeneous Land Surfaces for Atmospheric Numerical Models and Its Impact on Regional Meteorology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural land surfaces are usually heterogeneous over the resolvable scales considered in atmospheric numerical models. Therefore, model surface parameterizations that assume surface homogeneity may fail to represent the surface forcing ...

R. Avissar; R. A. Pielke

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Local and Mesoscale Impacts of Wind Farms as Parameterized in a Mesoscale NWP Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new wind farm parameterization has been developed for the mesoscale numerical weather prediction model, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF). The effects of wind turbines are represented by imposing a momentum sink on the mean flow; ...

Anna C. Fitch; Joseph B. Olson; Julie K. Lundquist; Jimy Dudhia; Alok K. Gupta; John Michalakes; Idar Barstad

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Impacts of a Parameterization Deficiency on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface water and energy balance plays an important role in land surface models, especially in coupled land surfaceatmospheric models due to the complicated interactions between land surfaces and the overlying atmosphere. The primary purpose of ...

Yuqiong Liu; Luis A. Bastidas; Hoshin V. Gupta; Soroosh Sorooshian

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Impacts of the Lowest Model Level Height on the Performance of Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lowest model level height z1 is important in atmospheric numerical models, since surface layer similarity is applied to the height in most of the models. This indicates an implicit assumption that z1 is within the surface layer. In this study, ...

Hyeyum Hailey Shin; Song-You Hong; Jimy Dudhia

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Impacts of a gas cartel on the European gas market selected results from the supply model EUGAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

b, * This article introduces the simulation model EUGAS which allows a quantitative analysis of the long-term natural gas supply of Europe. Based on chosen parameter specifications, the simulation shows that no discernible physical gas scarcity at least for the next 20-30 years will occur in Europe. Significant investments in new production and transport facilities will be necessary during the next decades. Diversification of supplies and political considerations will have a significant impact on the development of new natural gas resources. Possibly, a new built gas cartel similar to the OPEC may modify the gas supply pattern of Europe.

J. Perner A; A. Seeliger

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Impact of the U.S. National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS) on Building Energy Performance Simulation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. National Institute for Building Sciences (NIBS) started the development of the National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS). Its goal is to define standard sets of data required to describe any given building in necessary detail so that any given AECO industry discipline application can find needed data at any point in the building lifecycle. This will include all data that are used in or are pertinent to building energy performance simulation and analysis. This paper describes the background that lead to the development of NBIMS, its goals and development methodology, its Part 1 (Version 1.0), and its probable impact on building energy performance simulation and analysis.

Bazjanac, Vladimir

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

VISION Model : description of model used to estimate the impact of highway vehicle technologies and fuels on energy use and carbon emissions to 2050.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The VISION model has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide estimates of the potential energy use, oil use, and carbon emission impacts to 2050 of advanced light- and heavy-duty highway vehicle technologies and alternative fuels. DOE supports research of advanced transportation technologies (including fuels) and is frequently asked to provide estimates of the potential impacts of successful market penetration of these technologies, sometimes on a relatively quick-turnaround basis. VISION is a spreadsheet model in Microsoft Excel that can be used to respond rapidly to quick-turnaround requests, as well as for longer-term analyses. It uses vehicle survival and age-dependent usage characteristics to project total light and heavy vehicle stock, total vehicle miles of travel (VMT), and total energy use by technology and fuel type by year, given market penetration and vehicle energy efficiency assumptions developed exogenously. Total carbon emissions for on-highway vehicles by year are also estimated because life-cycle carbon coefficients for various fuels are included in VISION. VISION is not a substitute for the transportation component of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS incorporates a consumer choice model to project market penetration of advanced vehicles and alternative fuels. The projections are made within the context of the entire U.S. economy. However, the NEMS model is difficult to use on a quick-turnaround basis and only makes projections to 2025. VISION complements NEMS with its relative ''user-friendliness'' and by extending the time frame of potential analysis. VISION has been used for a wide variety of purposes. For illustration, we have listed some of its most recent and current uses in Table 1.1. Figures 1.1-1.3 illustrate the results of some of those runs. These graphs are not actual model output, but they are based on model results. The main body of this report describes VISION's methodology and data sources. The methodology and data sources used in the light- and heavy-vehicle portions of the model are discussed separately. Some suggestions for future improvements to the model are made. Appendix A provides instructions on how to run the VISION model. Appendix B describes the procedure for updating the model with the latest EIA Annual Energy Outlook (AEO).

Singh, M.; Vyas, A.; Steiner, E.

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

GROW1: a crop growth model for assessing impacts of gaseous pollutants from geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary model of photosynthesis and growth of field crops was developed to assess the effects of gaseous pollutants, particularly airborne sulfur compounds, resulting from energy production from geothermal resources. The model simulates photosynthesis as a function of such variables as irradiance, CO/sub 2/ diffusion resistances, and internal biochemical processes. The model allocates the products of photosynthesis to structural (leaf, stem, root, and fruit) and storage compartments of the plant. The simulations encompass the entire growing season from germination to senescence. The model is described conceptually and mathematically and examples of model output are provided for various levels of pollutant stress. Also, future developments that would improve this preliminary model are outlined and its applications are discussed.

Kercher, J.R.

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

The Performance of a Medium-Range Forecast Model in WinterImpact of Physical Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of a series of forecasts on seven weather situations from February 1976 using two models which differ only in their physical parameterizations.

A. Hollingsworth; K. Arpe; M. Tiedtke; M. Capaldo; H. Savijrvi

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of BaselineLoad Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California  

SciTech Connect

Both Federal and California state policymakers areincreasingly interested in developing more standardized and consistentapproaches to estimate and verify the load impacts of demand responseprograms and dynamic pricing tariffs. This study describes a statisticalanalysis of the performance of different models used to calculate thebaseline electric load for commercial buildings participating in ademand-response (DR) program, with emphasis onthe importance of weathereffects. During a DR event, a variety of adjustments may be made tobuilding operation, with the goal of reducing the building peak electricload. In order to determine the actual peak load reduction, an estimateof what the load would have been on the day of the event without any DRactions is needed. This baseline load profile (BLP) is key to accuratelyassessing the load impacts from event-based DR programs and may alsoimpact payment settlements for certain types of DR programs. We testedseven baseline models on a sample of 33 buildings located in California.These models can be loosely categorized into two groups: (1) averagingmethods, which use some linear combination of hourly load values fromprevious days to predict the load on the event, and (2) explicit weathermodels, which use a formula based on local hourly temperature to predictthe load. The models were tested both with and without morningadjustments, which use data from the day of the event to adjust theestimated BLP up or down.Key findings from this study are: - The accuracyof the BLP model currently used by California utilities to estimate loadreductions in several DR programs (i.e., hourly usage in highest 3 out of10 previous days) could be improved substantially if a morning adjustmentfactor were applied for weather-sensitive commercial and institutionalbuildings. - Applying a morning adjustment factor significantly reducesthe bias and improves the accuracy of all BLP models examined in oursample of buildings. - For buildings with low load variability, all BLPmodels perform reasonably well in accuracy. - For customer accounts withhighly variable loads, we found that no BLP model produced satisfactoryresults, although averaging methods perform best in accuracy (but notbias). These types of customers are difficult to characterize withstandard BLP models that rely on historic loads and weather data.Implications of these results for DR program administrators andpolicymakersare: - Most DR programs apply similar DR BLP methods tocommercial and industrial sector customers. The results of our study whencombined with other recent studies (Quantum 2004 and 2006, Buege et al.,2006) suggests that DR program administrators should have flexibility andmultiple options for suggesting the most appropriate BLP method forspecific types of customers.

Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote,Sila

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model  

SciTech Connect

Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPPs scientific objective of improving climate models. We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Nio in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling the subsurface thermal impact of Arctic thaw lakes in a warming climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warming air temperatures in the Arctic are modifying the rates of thermokarst processes along Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain. The Arctic Coastal Plain is dominated by thaw lakes. These kilometer-scale lakes are the most visible surface features in the ... Keywords: MATLAB, Numerical model, Permafrost, Thaw lakes, Thermal model

N. Matell; R. S. Anderson; I. Overeem; C. Wobus; F. E. Urban; G. D. Clow

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Impact of Model Resolution on the Prediction of Summer Precipitation over the United States and Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer seasonal simulations for selected years were performed using the NCEP Global Forecast System (GFS) at high (T126L28) and low (T62L28) resolutions, and the NCEP 80-km regional spectral model (RSM) nested in the T62 model outputs (RSM80/T62)...

Kingtse C. Mo; Jae-Kyung Schemm; H. M. H. Juang; R. Wayne Higgins; Yucheng Song

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Assessment of Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Hydrodynamic Model Domain Expansion and Refinement, and Online Dissemination of Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report we describe the 1) the expansion of the PNNL hydrodynamic model domain to include the continental shelf along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Vancouver Island; and 2) the approach and progress in developing the online/Internet disseminations of model results and outreach efforts in support of the Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OPF). Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics, for fiscal year 2010 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

VISION Model: Description of Model Used to Estimate the Impact of Highway Vehicle Technologies and Fuels on Energy Use and Carbon Emissions to 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ESD/04-1 ESD/04-1 VISION Model: Description of Model Used to Estimate the Impact of Highway Vehicle Technologies and Fuels on Energy Use and Carbon Emissions to 2050 Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Operated by The University of Chicago, under Contract W-31-109-Eng-38, for the United States Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The University of Chicago, nor any of their employees or officers, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Impact of Nighttime Shut Down on the Prediction Accuracy of Monthly Regression Models for Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regression models of measured energy use in buildings are widely used as baseline models to determine retrofit savings from measured energy consumption. It is less expensive to determine savings from monthly utility bills when they are available than to install hourly metering equipment. However, little is known about the impact of nighttime shut off on the accuracy of savings determined from monthly data. This paper reports a preliminary investigation of this question by comparing the heating and cooling energy use predicted by regression models based on monthly data against the predictions of calibrated hourly simulation models when applied to a medium-sized university building in Texas with (i) DDCAV system operating 24 hours per day, (ii) DDCAV system with nighttime shut down, (iii) DDVAV system operating 24 hours per day, and (iv) DDVAV system with nighttime shut down. The results of the four cases studied indicate : 1) when the AHUs are operated 24 hours/day, the annual prediction error of the cooling regression models is less than 0.5% of the annual cooling energy consumption; however, 2) when the AHUs are operated with nighttime shut down, the annual prediction error of the cooling models becomes as high as 6% of annual energy consumption. It should be noted that the cases considered here include only single end-uses of energy and have not investigated energy-use data which includes multiple end-uses. Modified regression models are therefore recommended when AHUs are not operated 24 hours per day and the temperature pattern is significantly different between pre and post retrofit years.

Wang, J.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microsoft Word - Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation_Final2.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 1 Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Jennifer M. Logue, William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 LBNL-5796E LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor

243

Impact of Ingesting Satellite-Derived Cloud Cover into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the extent to which assimilating high-resolution remotely sensed cloud cover into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) provides an improved regional diagnosis of downward short- and longwave surface radiation ...

Ismail Yucel; W. James Shuttleworth; R. T. Pinker; L. Lu; S. Sorooshian

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Modeling the Impact of State and Federal Incentives on Concentrating Solar Power Market Penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents methodology and results from the Regional Energy Deployment System Model (ReEDS) examining the ability of concentrating solar power (CSP), other renewables, and electricity storage to contribute to the U.S. electric sector.

Blair, N.; Short, W.; Mehos, M.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Model Experiments on the Impact of Pacific Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies on Blocking Frequency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensitivity experiments with a perpetual January version of a low-resolution general circulation model are conducted to investigate the influence of Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies on blocking in the Northern Hemisphere. Six 1200-...

Steven L. Mullen

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Impacts of Soil Heating Condition on Precipitation Simulations in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil temperature is a major variable in land surface models, representing soil energy status, storage, and transfer. It serves as an important factor indicating the underlying surface heating condition for weather and climate forecasts. This ...

Xingang Fan

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Climate Studies with a Multilayer Energy Balance Model. Part III: Climatic Impact of Stratospheric Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and climatic effects of stratospheric volcanic aerosols are studied with a multilayer energy balance model. The results show that the latitudinal distribution of aerosols has a significant effect on climate sensitivity. When ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Li Peng; Albert Arking

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Forcing and Sampling of Ocean General Circulation Models: Impact of High-Frequency Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant inertial oscillations are present in all primitive equation ocean general circulation models when they are forced with high-frequency (period order of days) wind stress fields. At specific latitudes the energy of the wind stress ...

Steven R. Jayne; Robin Tokmakian

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Impact of an Updated Carbon Bond Mechanism on Predictions from the CMAQ Modeling System: Preliminary Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An updated and expanded version of the Carbon Bond mechanism (CB05) has been incorporated into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to more accurately simulate wintertime, pristine, and high-altitude situations. The CB05 ...

Golam Sarwar; Deborah Luecken; Greg Yarwood; Gary Z. Whitten; William P. L. Carter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Higher Order Turbulence Closure and Its Impact on Climate Simulations in the Community Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes climate simulations of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) coupled with a higher-order turbulence closure, known as Cloud Layers Unified by Binormals (CLUBB). CLUBB is a unified parameterization of the planetary ...

Peter A. Bogenschutz; Andrew Gettelman; Hugh Morrison; Vincent E. Larson; Cheryl Craig; David P. Schanen

251

Higher-Order Turbulence Closure and Its Impact on Climate Simulations in the Community Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes climate simulations of the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5), coupled with a higher-order turbulence closure known as Cloud Layers Unified by Binormals (CLUBB). CLUBB is a unified parameterization of the planetary ...

Peter A. Bogenschutz; Andrew Gettelman; Hugh Morrison; Vincent E. Larson; Cheryl Craig; David P. Schanen

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Analysis of the Impact of Model Nonlinearities in Inverse Problem Solving  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the relationship between nonlinear model properties and inverse problem solutions is analyzed using a numerical technique based on the inverse problem theory formulated by Mosegaard and Tarantola. According to this theory, the ...

T. Vukicevic; D. Posselt

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Evolving Multisensor Precipitation Estimation Methods: Their Impacts on Flow Prediction Using a Distributed Hydrologic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates evolving methodologies for radar and merged gaugeradar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) to determine their influence on the flow predictions of a distributed hydrologic model. These methods include the National ...

David Kitzmiller; Suzanne Van Cooten; Feng Ding; Kenneth Howard; Carrie Langston; Jian Zhang; Heather Moser; Yu Zhang; Jonathan J. Gourley; Dongsoo Kim; David Riley

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Impact of Changes to the Radiation Transfer Parameterizations Plus Cloud Optical. Properties in the ECMWF Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new radiation package, shown to correct most of the systematic errors of the operational ECMWF radiation scheme, has been extensively tested in the ECMWF forecast model. Improvements in the clear-sky fluxes and radiative heating/cooling rate ...

Jean-Jacques Morcrette

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Assessing the impact of hierarchy on model understandability --- a cognitive perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modularity is a widely advocated strategy for handling complexity in conceptual models. Nevertheless, a systematic literature review revealed that it is not yet entirely clear under which circumstances modularity is most beneficial. Quite the contrary, ...

Stefan Zugal; Jakob Pinggera; Barbara Weber; Jan Mendling; Hajo A. Reijers

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Uncertainty Propagation of Regional Climate Model Precipitation Forecasts to Hydrologic Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo framework is adopted for propagating uncertainty in dynamically downscaled seasonal forecasts of area-averaged daily precipitation to associated streamflow response calculations. Daily precipitation is modeled as a mixture of two ...

Phaedon C. Kyriakidis; Norman L. Miller; Jinwon Kim

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Parameterization and Impact of Ice initiation Processes Relevant to Numerical Model Simulations of Cirrus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effort to improve descriptions of ice initiation processes of relevance to cirrus clouds for use in regional-scale numerical cloud models with bulk microphysical schemes is described. This is approached by deriving practical parameterizations ...

Paul J. DeMott; Michael P. Meyers; William R. Cotton

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Complexity of Snow Schemes in a Climate Model and Its Impact on Surface Energy and Hydrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three different complexity snow schemes implemented in the ECMWF land surface scheme Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme of Surface Exchanges over Land (HTESSEL) are evaluated within the EC-EARTH climate model. The snow schemes are (i) the original ...

Emanuel Dutra; Pedro Viterbo; Pedro M. A. Miranda; Gianpaolo Balsamo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A modeling study on the climate impacts of black carbon aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The role of black carbon (BC) aerosols in climate change is important because of its strong capability in causing extinction of solar radiation. A three-dimensional interactive aerosol-climate model has been used to study ...

Wang, Chien.

260

Simulating the Biogeochemical and Biogeophysical Impacts of Transient Land Cover Change and Wood Harvest in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) from 1850 to 2100  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the climate impacts of historical and projected land cover change in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4), new time series of transient Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4) plant functional type (PFT) and wood harvest ...

Peter J. Lawrence; Johannes J. Feddema; Gordon B. Bonan; Gerald A. Meehl; Brian C. ONeill; Keith W. Oleson; Samuel Levis; David M. Lawrence; Erik Kluzek; Keith Lindsay; Peter E. Thornton

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Evaluation of PV performance models and their impact on project risk.  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic systems are often priced in $/W{sub p}, where Wp refers to the DC power rating of the modules at Standard Test Conditions (1000 W/m{sup 2}, 25 C cell temperature) and $ refers to the installed cost of the system. However, the true value of the system is in the energy it will produce in kWhs, not the power rating. System energy production is a function of the system design and location, the mounting configuration, the power conversion system, and the module technology, as well as the solar resource. Even if all other variables are held constant, the annual energy yield (kWh/kW{sup p}) will vary among module technologies because of differences in response to low-light levels and temperature. Understanding energy yield is a key part of understanding system value. System performance models are used during project development to estimate the expected output of PV systems for a given design and location. Performance modeling is normally done by the system designer/system integrator. Often, an independent engineer will also model system output during a due diligence review of a project. A variety of system performance models are available. The most commonly used modeling tool for project development and due diligence in the United States is probably PVsyst, while those seeking a quick answer to expected energy production may use PVWatts. In this paper, we examine the variation in predicted energy output among modeling tools and users and compare that to measured output.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Cameron, Christopher P.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Environmental Impacts of Biofuels and Climate Change in Kansas: Stage 1 Model Setup and Inputs Lindsey Witthaus*, Sumathy Sinnathamby+, Lorinda Bejot+, Belinda S.M. Sturm*, Kyle Douglas-Mankin+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Impacts of Biofuels and Climate Change in Kansas: Stage 1 ­ Model Setup and Inputs to assess agricultural and environmental impacts of biofuels and climate change in Kansas. The first stage

Peterson, Blake R.

263

Impact of Proposed Disturbed Rock Zone Conceptual Model Modifications to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have recently proposed a set of updates that integrate data from recent site characterization studies to two conceptual models for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Performance Assessment (WIPP PA) program. This paper discusses the changes to the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ) model, which describes the macroscopic manifestation of grain-scale microcracks and larger macro-cracks that are created by induced stresses in the salt surrounding excavations. The DRZ, as modeled in WIPP PA, is an important component of the repository system because its properties affect the quantity of available brine and its ability to enter the waste areas as well as the connectivity of panels after closure. The DOE and SNL have proposed decreasing the region that represents the DRZ in WIPP PA. Additionally, it has been proposed to make the permeability of DRZ a time-dependent quantity to reflect the long-term behavior. In this paper, the implementation of the proposed DRZ model changes is outlined, and the impact of the DRZ modifications on the long-term performance of the WIPP is discussed. The DRZ modifications generally reduced the amount of brine that entered into the repository, as well as reduced the pressure in the repository, except for scenarios in which a pressurized brine pocket was encountered. Overall, the saturation and pressure changes affected the frequency and magnitude of the direct brine and spalling volumes. (authors)

Clayton, D.J.; Ismail, A.E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A Preliminary Synthesis of Modeled Climate Change Impacts on U.S. Regional Ozone Concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a synthesis of results that have emerged from recent modeling studies of the potential sensitivity of U.S. regional ozone (O3) concentrations to global climate change (ca. 2050). This research has been carried out under the ...

C. P. Weaver; E. Cooter; R. Gilliam; A. Gilliland; A. Grambsch; D. Grano; B. Hemming; S. W. Hunt; C. Nolte; D. A. Winner; X-Z. Liang; J. Zhu; M. Caughey; K. Kunkel; J-T. Lin; Z. Tao; A. Williams; D. J. Wuebbles; P. J. Adams; J. P. Dawson; P. Amar; S. He; J. Avise; J. Chen; R. C. Cohen; A. H. Goldstein; R. A. Harley; A. L. Steiner; S. Tonse; A. Guenther; J-F. Lamarque; C. Wiedinmyer; W. I. Gustafson; L. R. Leung; C. Hogrefe; H-C. Huang; D. J. Jacob; L. J. Mickley; S. Wu; P. L. Kinney; B. Lamb; N. K. Larkin; D. McKenzie; K-J. Liao; K. Manomaiphiboon; A. G. Russell; E. Tagaris; B. H. Lynn; C. Mass; E. Salath; S. M. O'neill; S. N. Pandis; P. N. Racherla; C. Rosenzweig; J-H. Woo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Review of uncertainty estimates associated with models for assessing the impact of breeder reactor radioactivity releases  

SciTech Connect

The purpose is to summarize estimates based on currently available data of the uncertainty associated with radiological assessment models. The models being examined herein are those recommended previously for use in breeder reactor assessments. Uncertainty estimates are presented for models of atmospheric and hydrologic transport, terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and internal and external dosimetry. Both long-term and short-term release conditions are discussed. The uncertainty estimates presented in this report indicate that, for many sites, generic models and representative parameter values may be used to calculate doses from annual average radionuclide releases when these calculated doses are on the order of one-tenth or less of a relevant dose limit. For short-term, accidental releases, especially those from breeder reactors located in sites dominated by complex terrain and/or coastal meteorology, the uncertainty in the dose calculations may be much larger than an order of magnitude. As a result, it may be necessary to incorporate site-specific information into the dose calculation under these circumstances to reduce this uncertainty. However, even using site-specific information, natural variability and the uncertainties in the dose conversion factor will likely result in an overall uncertainty of greater than an order of magnitude for predictions of dose or concentration in environmental media following shortterm releases.

Miller, C.; Little, C.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A Numerical Model for Evaluating the Impact of Noble Metal Chemical Addition in Boiling Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The technique of noble metal chemical addition (NMCA), accompanied by a low-level hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), is being employed by several U.S. nuclear power plants for mitigating intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the vessel internals of their boiling water reactors (BWRs). An improved computer model by the name of DEMACE was employed to evaluate the performance of NMCA throughout the primary coolant circuit (PCC) of a commercial BWR. The molar ratios of hydrogen to oxidizing species in the PCC under normal water chemistry and HWC are analyzed. The effectiveness of NMCA is justified by calculated electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) around the PCC and in a local power range monitoring (LPRM) housing tube, in which practical in-vessel ECP measurements are normally taken.Prior to the modeling work for the BWR, the Mixed Potential Model, which is embedded in DEMACE and responsible for ECP calculation, was calibrated against both laboratory and plant ECP data. After modeling for various HWC conditions, it is found that the effectiveness of NMCA in the PCC of the selected BWR varies from region to region. In particular, the predicted ECP in the LPRM housing tube is notably different from that in the nearby bulk environment under NMCA, indicating that cautions must be given to a possible, undesirable outcome due to a distinct ECP difference between a locally confined area and the actual bulk environment.

Yeh, T.-K. [National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan (China)

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Evaluation of the Atmospheric Transport Model in the MACCS2 Code and its Impact on Decision Making at DOE Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Atmospheric the Atmospheric Transport Model in the MACCS2 Code and its Impact on Decision Making at Department of Energy Sites John E. Till and Arthur S. Rood June 5, 2012 RAC Historical Dose Reconstruction Projects Environmental Risk Assessment "Understanding and communicating the movement of radionuclides and chemicals released to the environment, resulting exposure to humans, and the subsequent dose or risk from exposure." Types of Dose/Risk  Medical  Occupational  Public Dose/Risk Can Be Estimated for  Real people  Hypothetical people Purpose of Assessments  Compliance  Decision making  Epidemiology  Emergency response Approaches to Estimating Risk  In certain situations, and depending upon the decisions to be made, if the results of relatively

268

Network flow model analysis of the impact of chlorofluorocarbon phaseout on acid-grade fluorspar. Information circular/1994  

SciTech Connect

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC`s) are being phased out and eventually banned under extensive international agreements because the chlorine in CFC`s is thought to deplete the Earth`s ozone layer. As a result, the fluorspar mining industry, which is the source of fluorine in fluorocarbons through intermediate hydrofluoric acid, is being affected. Concern for this impact has led the U.S. Bureau of Mines to employ its capabilities to analyze various scenarios in the evolution of CFC replacements and substitutes to determine their effect on fluorspar mining. This report utilizes a network flow model to examine the effects of proposed replacements for CFC`s, in terms of fluorine content, on fluorspar operations worldwide and on hydrofluoric acid plants in North America and Europe.

Slatnick, J.A.; Fulton, R.B.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a larger study of liquefied natural gas impacts on device performance and pollutant emissions for existing equipment in California, this report describes a cmoputer modeling study of a partially premixed flame issueing from a single cooktop burner port. The model consisted of a reactive computational fluid dynamics three-dimensional spatial grid and a 71-species chemical mechanism with propane combustion capability. Simulations were conducted with a simplified fuel mixture containing methane, ethane, and propane in proportions that yield properties similar to fuels distributed throughout much of California now and in recent years (baseline fuel), as well as with two variations of simulated liquefied natural gas blends. A variety of simulations were conducted with baseline fuel to explore the effect of several key parameters on pollutant formation and other flame characteristics. Simulations started with fuel and air issuing through the burner port, igniting, and continuing until the flame was steady with time. Conditions at this point were analyzed to understand fuel, secondary air and reaction product flows, regions of pollutant formation, and exhaust concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and formaldehyde. A sensitivity study was conducted, varying the inflow parameters of this baseline gs about real-world operating conditions. Flame properties responded as expected from reactive flow theory. In the simulation, carbon monoxide levels were influenced more by the mixture's inflow velocity than by the gas-to-air ratio in the mixture issuing from the inflow port. Additional simulations were executed at two inflow conditions - high heat release and medium heat release - to examine the impact of replacing the baseline gas with two mixtures representative of liquefied natural gas. Flame properties and pollutant generation rates were very similar among the three fuel mixtures.

Tonse, S. R.; Singer, B. C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Data collection handbook to support modeling the impacts of radioactive material in soil  

SciTech Connect

A pathway analysis computer code called RESRAD has been developed for implementing US Department of Energy Residual Radioactive Material Guidelines. Hydrogeological, meteorological, geochemical, geometrical (size, area, depth), and material-related (soil, concrete) parameters are used in the RESRAD code. This handbook discusses parameter definitions, typical ranges, variations, measurement methodologies, and input screen locations. Although this handbook was developed primarily to support the application of RESRAD, the discussions and values are valid for other model applications.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.J.; Jones, L.G.; Wang, Y.Y.; Faillace, E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Loureiro, C. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Chia, Y.P. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Geology

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

TAO: Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Impact Home Download Documentation Publications Referencing TAO Impact Who We Are Acknowledgements License Contact Us Research and Publications that make use of TAO Dressed TDDFT study of low-lying electronic excited states in selected linear polyenes and diphenylopolyenes, Mazur, G., Makowski, M., Włodarczyk, R., and Aoki, Y., International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 111, 4, 819--825, 2011. BibTeX Secondary thermal cracks in EGS: a variational approach, Bourdin, B., Knepley, M., and Maurini, C., Proceedings of the 34th annual meeting of the Geothermal resources council, 2010. BibTeX Adaptive Real-Time Bioheat Transfer Models for Computer Driven MR-guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy, Fuentes, D., Feng, Y., Elliott, A., Shetty, A., McNichols, R. J., Oden, J. T., and Stafford, R. J., IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., 5, 1024--1030, 2010. BibTeX

272

ON THE IMPACT OF SUPER RESOLUTION WSR-88D DOPPLER RADAR DATA ASSIMILATION ON HIGH RESOLUTION NUMERICAL MODEL FORECASTS  

SciTech Connect

Assimilation of radar velocity and precipitation fields into high-resolution model simulations can improve precipitation forecasts with decreased 'spin-up' time and improve short-term simulation of boundary layer winds (Benjamin, 2004 & 2007; Xiao, 2008) which is critical to improving plume transport forecasts. Accurate description of wind and turbulence fields is essential to useful atmospheric transport and dispersion results, and any improvement in the accuracy of these fields will make consequence assessment more valuable during both routine operation as well as potential emergency situations. During 2008, the United States National Weather Service (NWS) radars implemented a significant upgrade which increased the real-time level II data resolution to 8 times their previous 'legacy' resolution, from 1 km range gate and 1.0 degree azimuthal resolution to 'super resolution' 250 m range gate and 0.5 degree azimuthal resolution (Fig 1). These radar observations provide reflectivity, velocity and returned power spectra measurements at a range of up to 300 km (460 km for reflectivity) at a frequency of 4-5 minutes and yield up to 13.5 million point observations per level in super-resolution mode. The migration of National Weather Service (NWS) WSR-88D radars to super resolution is expected to improve warning lead times by detecting small scale features sooner with increased reliability; however, current operational mesoscale model domains utilize grid spacing several times larger than the legacy data resolution, and therefore the added resolution of radar data is not fully exploited. The assimilation of super resolution reflectivity and velocity data into high resolution numerical weather model forecasts where grid spacing is comparable to the radar data resolution is investigated here to determine the impact of the improved data resolution on model predictions.

Chiswell, S

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

NYCCS | Economic Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

biotechnology, national security and finance, is accomplished through high performance computing. Some examples of impactful areas are listed below: Modeling, simulation and...

274

he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study  

SciTech Connect

This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earth??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Developments in computation, modeling and experimentation: Impacts on R&D  

SciTech Connect

The original objective was to document the feasibility of the coordinated research program sponsored by ECUT called ``Materials-by-Design (MBD).`` The MBD program funds research to develop hierarchical models to predict materials` performance based on microstructural information. This paper was specifically prepared for this meeting to help technical staff and their managers justify and plan for an advanced computer infrastructure within their companies. In order to do this, several additional objectives for this paper are (1) to foster an appreciation of the dramatic increase in computational power that have occurred over the last forty years, (2) to encourage better utilization of supercomputing in current scientific research by identifying current issues and opportunities, and (3) to promote anticipation and enthusiasm for the dramatic changes supercomputers currently being developed will offer scientists in the near future.

Young, J.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Application of price uncertainty quantification models and their impacts on project evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents an analysis of several recently published methods for quantifying the uncertainty in economic evaluations due to uncertainty in future oil prices. Conventional price forecasting methods used in the industry typically underestimate the range of uncertainty in oil and gas price forecasts. These forecasts traditionally consider pessimistic, most-likely, and optimistic cases in an attempt to quantify economic uncertainty. The recently developed alternative methods have their unique strengths as well as weaknesses that may affect their applicability in particular situations. While stochastic methods can improve the assessment of price uncertainty they can also be tedious to implement. The inverted hockey stick method is found to be an easily applied alternative to the stochastic methods. However, the primary basis for validating this method has been found to be unreliable. In this study, a consistent and reliable validation of uncertainty estimates predicted by the inverted hockey stick method is presented. Verifying the reliability of this model will ensure reliable quantification of economic uncertainty. Although we cannot eliminate uncertainty from investment evaluations, we can better quantify the uncertainty by accurately predicting the volatility in future oil and gas prices. Reliably quantifying economic uncertainty will enable operators to make better decisions and allocate their capital with increased efficiency.

Fariyibi, Festus Lekan

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

J. Phys. I France 6 (1996) 301-308 FEBRUARY 1996, PAGE 301 Ising Models of Social Impact: the Role of Cumulative Advantage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In particular, Nowak, Szamrej and Latané (NSL) [2j attempted to build a simple model based upon the successful impact proposed by Nowak, Szamrej and Latané (NSL) [2] to include learning of tl~e primary qualities;308 JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE I N°2 References iii Latané. B., Am. Psgchoi. 36 (1981) 343. [2] Nowak A., Szamrej J

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

278

A Large-Scale, High-Resolution Hydrological Model Parameter Data Set for Climate Change Impact Assessment for the Conterminous US  

SciTech Connect

To extend geographical coverage, refine spatial resolution, and improve modeling efficiency, a computation- and data-intensive effort was conducted to organize a comprehensive hydrologic dataset with post-calibrated model parameters for hydro-climate impact assessment. Several key inputs for hydrologic simulation including meteorologic forcings, soil, land class, vegetation, and elevation were collected from multiple best-available data sources and organized for 2107 hydrologic subbasins (8-digit hydrologic units, HUC8s) in the conterminous United States at refined 1/24 (~4 km) spatial resolution. Using high-performance computing for intensive model calibration, a high-resolution parameter dataset was prepared for the macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model. The VIC simulation was driven by DAYMET daily meteorological forcing and was calibrated against USGS WaterWatch monthly runoff observations for each HUC8. The results showed that this new parameter dataset may help reasonably simulate runoff at most US HUC8 subbasins. Based on this exhaustive calibration effort, it is now possible to accurately estimate the resources required for further model improvement across the entire conterminous United States. We anticipate that through this hydrologic parameter dataset, the repeated effort of fundamental data processing can be lessened, so that research efforts can emphasize the more challenging task of assessing climate change impacts. The pre-organized model parameter dataset will be provided to interested parties to support further hydro-climate impact assessment.

Oubeidillah, Abdoul A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL] [ORNL; Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Tootle, Glenn [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa] [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protocols for Demand Response Load Impacts Estimates,Potter 2006. The Demand ResponseBaseline,v.1.75. Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering,

Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote, Sila

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Mller: Modeling the Impact of a Learning Phase on the Business Value of a Pair Programming Project. APSEC 11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Pair programmers need a warmup phase before the pair can work at full speed. The length of the learning interval varies, depending on how experienced the developers are with pair programming and how familiar they are with each other. We study how large the impact of the lower pair productivity during warmup is on the business value of the pair programming project. To this end, we extend our net present value model for pair programming to explicitly include a learning interval for pairs. We then carry out a simulation study where we vary the shape of the learning curve, the length of the learning interval, the final productivity level of the pairs, the market pressure, and the size of the workforce. Our simulations show that the cost of the warmup phase is reasonably small compared to the project value, but nonetheless must be taken into account when estimating the project. Our results also suggest that the learning overhead is not an obstacle to introducing and using pair programming in a real environment.

Frank Padberg

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Environmental Impact  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environmental Impact - a single comprehensive bibliographic information resource on climate change & other impacts of humans on the biosphere.

282

A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Chondrocyte outgrowth into a gelatin scaffold in a single impact load model of damage/repair - effect of BMP-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,11,12]. Each disc, with the articular surface facing down was impacted from a height of 2.5 cm using a weight of 500 g. The approximate impact energy applied to each disc was 0.175 J, impacted at a velocity of approx- imately 0.7 m/s. To ensure constant... , Bessho K, Fujimura K, Okubo Y, Segami N, Iizuka T: Regen- eration of defects in the articular cartilage in rabbit tempo- romandibular joints by bone morphogenetic protein-2. British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2002, 40:201-206. 11. Bowe EA...

Henson, Frances M D; Vincent, Thea A

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

Measuring the Impact of Observations on the Predictability of the Kuroshio Extension in a Shallow-Water Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, sequential importance sampling is used to assess the impact of observations on an ensemble prediction for the decadal path transitions of the Kuroshio Extension. This particle-filtering approach gives access to the probability ...

Werner Kramer; Henk A. Dijkstra; Stefano Pierini; Peter Jan van Leeuwen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Estimation of Climate-Change Impacts on the Urban Heat Load Using an Urban Climate Model and Regional Climate Projections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pragmatic approach to estimate the impact of climate change on the urban environment, here called the cuboid method, is presented. This method allows one to simulate the urban heat load and the frequency of air temperature threshold exceedances ...

Barbara Frh; Paul Becker; Thomas Deutschlnder; Johann-Dirk Hessel; Meinolf Kossmann; Ingrid Mieskes; Joachim Namyslo; Marita Roos; Uwe Sievers; Thomas Steigerwald; Heidelore Turau; Uwe Wienert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Impact of Clouds on the Shortwave Radiation Budget of the Surface-Atmosphere System: Interfacing Measurements and Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two datasets have been combined to demonstrate how the availability of more comprehensive datasets could serve to elucidate the shortwave radiative impact of clouds on both the atmospheric column and the surface. These datasets consist of two ...

Robert D. Cess; Seth Nemesure; Ellsworth G. Dutton; John J. Deluisi; Gerald L. Potter; Jean-Jacques Morcrette

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Impact of Manually Derived Southern Hemisphere Sea Level Pressure Data upon Forecasts from a Global Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted within the framework of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's global data assimilation and prediction system to assess the forecast impact of Southern Hemisphere sea level pressure estimates [paid observations (...

R. Seaman; P. Steinle; W. Bourke; T. Hart

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

IM-GEO: Impact of R and D on cost of geothermal power: Documentation of Model Version 2. 09  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

IM-GEO is an analysis used to estimate the impact of technology improvements on the relative cost of hydrothermal power. The analysis is available in a tutorial program for use on personal computers. It is designed for use by R and D program managers to evaluate R and D options. Only the potential impact of technologies is considered with all economic factors being held constant. This analysis has one unique feature. The economic impact of reducing risk by improving reservoir characterization is included using a strategy currently employed by financial institutions. This report describes the basis of the calculations, documents the code, and describes the operational procedures. Application of the code to study potential cost reductions due to R and D success will be done by R and D managers to evaluate and direct their own programs.

Petty, S.; Entingh, D.; Livesay, B.J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Impact of a Statistical Bias Correction on the Projected Hydrological Changes Obtained from Three GCMs and Two Hydrology Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future climate model scenarios depend crucially on the models adequate representation of the hydrological cycle. Within the EU integrated project Water and Global Change (WATCH), special care is taken to use state-of-the-art climate model output ...

Stefan Hagemann; Cui Chen; Jan O. Haerter; Jens Heinke; Dieter Gerten; Claudio Piani

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Methodology and results of the impacts of modeling electric utilities ; a comparative evaluation of MEMM and REM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study compares two models of the U.S. electric utility industry including the EIA's electric utility submodel in the Midterm Energy Market Model (MEMM), and the Baughman-Joskow Regionalized Electricity Model (REM). ...

Baughman, Martin L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Downscaling Aerosols and the Impact of Neglected Subgrid Processes on Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing for a Representative Global Climate Model Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to many global climate models include detailed, prognostic aerosol calculations intended to better reproduce the observed climate. However, the trace gas and aerosol fields are treated at the grid-cell scale with no attempt to account for sub-grid impacts on the aerosol fields. This paper begins to quantify the error introduced by the neglected sub-grid variability for the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a representative climate model grid spacing of 75 km. An analysis of the value added in downscaling aerosol fields is also presented to give context to the WRF-Chem simulations used for the sub-grid analysis. We found that 1) the impact of neglected sub-grid variability on the aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in regions of complex topography and complicated flow patterns, and 2) scale-induced differences in emissions contribute strongly to the impact of neglected sub-grid processes on the aerosol radiative forcing. The two of these effects together, when simulated at 75 km vs. 3 km in WRF-Chem, result in an average daytime mean bias of over 30% error in top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a large percentage of central Mexico during the MILAGRO field campaign.

Gustafson, William I.; Qian, Yun; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

OR Forum---Modeling the Impacts of Electricity Tariffs on Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging, Costs, and Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have been touted as a transportation technology with lower fuel costs and emissions impacts than other vehicle types. Most analyses of PHEVs assume that the power system operator can either directly or indirectly ... Keywords: environment, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, pricing

Ramteen Sioshansi

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Field of Dreams or Dream Team? Assessing Two Models for Drought Impact Reporting in the Semiarid Southwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To make decisions about drought declarations, status, and relief funds, decision makers need high-quality local-level drought impact data. In response to this need in Arizona the Arizona DroughtWatch program was created, which includes an online drought ...

Alison M. Meadow; Michael A. Crimmins; Daniel B. Ferguson

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Field of Dreams, or Dream Team?: Assessing Two Models For Drought Impact Reporting in the Semiarid Southwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To make decisions about drought declarations, status, and relief funds decision makers need high quality local-level drought impact data. In response to this need in Arizona, the Arizona DroughtWatch program was created, which includes an online drought ...

Alison M. Meadow; Michael A. Crimmins; Daniel B. Ferguson

295

Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the  

SciTech Connect

Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Impact of GEM and MM5 Modeled Meteorological Conditions on CMAQ Air Quality Modeling Results in Eastern Canada and the Northeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNational Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) is currently the meteorological model most widely used as input into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. In ...

Steven C. Smyth; Dazhong Yin; Helmut Roth; Weimin Jiang; Michael D. Moran; Louis-Philippe Crevier

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Influence of climate model biases and daily-scale temperature and precipitation events on hydrological impacts assessment: A case study of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report concludes that climate change is now unequivocal, and associated increases in evaporation and atmospheric water content could intensify the hydrological cycle. However, the biases and coarse spatial resolution of global climate models limit their usefulness in hydrological impact assessment. In order to reduce these limitations, we use a high-resolution regional climate model (RegCM3) to drive a hydrological model (variable infiltration capacity) for the full contiguous United States. The simulations cover 1961-1990 in the historic period and 2071-2100 in the future (A2) period. A quantile-based bias correction technique is applied to the times series of RegCM3-simulated precipitation and temperature. Our results show that biases in the RegCM3 fields not only affect the magnitude of hydrometeorological variables in the baseline hydrological simulation, but they also affect the response of hydrological variables to projected future anthropogenic increases in greenhouse forcing. Further, we find that changes in the intensity and occurrence of severe wet and hot events are critical in determining the sign of hydrologic change. These results have important implications for the assessment of potential future hydrologic changes, as well as for developing approaches for quantitative impacts assessment.

Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL; Bowling, Laura C. [Purdue University; Cherkauer, Keith [Purdue University; Pal, Jeremy [Loyola University; Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Impact of Nudging in the Meteorological Model for Retrospective Air Quality Simulations. Part I: Evaluation against National Observation Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is common practice to use Newtonian relaxation, or nudging, throughout meteorological model simulations to create dynamic analyses that provide the characterization of the meteorological conditions for retrospective air quality model ...

Tanya L. Otte

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Implementation and validation of a meteorological dispersion model applied on volcanic gas emission for studies of environmental impact.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Lagrangian atmospheric transport model FLEXPART-WRF was implemented to model dispersion of volcanic gas emitted from the three volcanoes Popocatpetl in Mexico (lat: 19.02, lon: (more)

Landgren, Oskar A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

302

The Impact of Parameterized Subgrid-Scale Orographic Forcing on Systematic Errors in a Global NWP Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global momentum budget for December 1993, diagnosed from a series of two-time-step integrations of the U.K. Meteorological Office global Unified Model, suggests that the parameterized mechanical dissipation in the model is underestimated. The ...

S. F. Milton; C. A. Wilson

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Impact of Scale and Aggregation on the Terrestrial Water Exchange: Integrating Land Surface Models and Rhne Catchment Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface models (LSMs) used in climate modeling include detailed above-ground biophysics but usually lack a good representation of runoff. Both processes are closely linked through soil moisture. Soil moisture however has a high spatial ...

Reto Stckli; Pier Luigi Vidale; Aaron Boone; Christoph Schr

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The Impact of GPS Precipitable Water Assimilation on Mesoscale Model Retrievals of Orographic Rainfall during SALPEX'96  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of GPS precipitable water (PW) to improve mesoscale model retrievals of orographic precipitation is investigated for a prolonged rainfall event observed during the 1996 Southern Alps Experiment (SALPEX'96). The model is the Advanced ...

Mark Falvey; John Beavan

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Tropical Atlantic Decadal Oscillation and Its Potential Impact on the Equatorial AtmosphereOcean Dynamics: A Simple Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simple coupled atmosphereocean models are used to study the potential influence of the tropical Atlantic Ocean decadal oscillation on the equatorial Atlantic atmosphereocean dynamics. Perturbing the model tropical Atlantic at the extratropics (...

Sang-Ki Lee; Chunzai Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Modeling the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect

This research project has two primary objectives: (1) to further develop and refine the Multiscale Air Quality Simulation Platform-Variable Grid Resolution (MAQSIP-VGR) model, an advanced variable-grid-resolution air quality model, to provide detailed, accurate representation of the dynamical and chemical processes governing the fate of anthropogenic emissions in coastal environments; and (2) to improve current understanding of the potential impact of onshore and offshore oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) emissions on O{sub 3} and particulate matter nonattainment in the Gulf of Mexico and surrounding states.

Kiran Alapaty; Adel Hanna

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

307

Program on Technology Innovation: Modeling the Impact of Climate Policy on Expansion and Operation of the Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents interim results of a multiyear effort to better understand how climate policy could impact electric power sector investment and operating decisions. The report presents an analytical methodology and base case representation of the electric sector through the year 2030. This framework is exercised to show how the electric sector would respond to a price on CO2 and how uncertainty in both the ability to deploy large quantities of new low-carbon generation and the cost of building new p...

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modeling Thermal-Hydrologic Processes for a Heated Fractured Rock System: Impact of a Capillary-Pressure Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drift-scale thermal test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Lawrencemechanical analyses of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Testwaste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The modeling

Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Lee, K. H.; Hao, Y.; James, S. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The impact of agricultural intensification and irrigation on landatmosphere interactions and Indian monsoon precipitation --A mesoscale modeling perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Indian monsoon precipitation -- A mesoscale modeling perspective E.M. Douglas a, , A. Beltrán-Przekurat b: irrigation Indian monsoon Regional Atmospheric Modeling System agriculture Land Use Land Cover Change Using convergence, mesoscale convection, and precipitation patterns over the Indian monsoon region. Four experiments

Niyogi, Dev

310

The impact of agricultural intensification and irrigation on landatmosphere interactions and Indian monsoon precipitation --A mesoscale modeling perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Indian monsoon precipitation -- A mesoscale modeling perspective E.M. Douglas a, , A. Beltrán-Przekurat b Keywords: irrigation Indian monsoon Regional Atmospheric Modeling System agriculture Land Use Land Cover and regional convergence, mesoscale convection, and precipitation patterns over the Indian monsoon region. Four

Douglas, Ellen M.

311

Variation in Estimated Ozone-Related Health Impacts of Climate Change due to Modeling Choices and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

Future climate change may cause air quality degradation via climate-induced changes in meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and emissions into the air. Few studies have explicitly modeled the potential relationships between climate change, air quality, and human health, and fewer still have investigated the sensitivity of estimates to the underlying modeling choices.

Post, Ellen S.; Grambsch, A.; Weaver, C. P.; Morefield, Philip; Huang, Jin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Adams, P. J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Zhu, J.; Mahoney, Hardee

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems  

SciTech Connect

If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

Impact of Flow Dependence, Column Covariance, and Forecast Model Type on Surface-Observation Assimilation for Probabilistic PBL Profile Nowcasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A probabilistic verification and factor-separation analysis (FSA) elucidate skillful nowcasts of planetary boundary layer (PBL) temperature, moisture, and wind profiles with a single-column model (SCM) and ensemble filter (EF) assimilation of ...

Dorita Rostkier-Edelstein; Joshua P. Hacker

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modeling Thermal-Hydrologic Processes for a Heated Fractured Rock System: Impact of a Capillary-Pressure Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tsang, Y.W. : Modeling the thermal-hydrologic processes in aanalyses of heterogeneity and thermal-loading factors for a2005 Lin, W. , Sun, Y. : Thermal hydrological processes in

Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Lee, K. H.; Hao, Y.; James, S. C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

Flores, Alejandro N.

316

Analyzing the Potential Impacts of Soil Moisture on the Observed and Model-Simulated Australian Surface Temperature Variations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on observational and modeling analyses, this study aims to assess the potential influence of land surface conditions (soil moisture, in particular) on the Australian surface temperature variations. At first, a simple linear regression ...

Huqiang Zhang

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The impact of parallel programming models on the performance of iterative linear solvers for finite element applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parallel iterative linear solvers for unstructured grids in FEM applications, originally developed for the Earth Simulator (ES), are ported to various types of parallel computer. The performance of flat MPI and hybrid parallel programming models is compared ...

Kengo Nakajima

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Impact of Geographic-Dependent Parameter Optimization on Climate Estimation and Prediction: Simulation with an Intermediate Coupled Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the geographic dependence of model sensitivities and observing systems, allowing optimized parameter values to vary geographically may significantly enhance the signal in parameter estimation. Using an intermediate atmosphereoceanland ...

Xinrong Wu; Shaoqing Zhang; Zhengyu Liu; Anthony Rosati; Thomas L. Delworth; Yun Liu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

North Atlantic Simulations with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM): Impact of the Vertical Coordinate Choice, Reference Pressure, and Thermobaricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viability of a generalized (Hybrid) Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM), together with the importance of thermobaricity and the choice of reference pressure, is demonstrated by analyzing simulations carried out using the World Ocean Circulation ...

Eric P. Chassignet; Linda T. Smith; George R. Halliwell; Rainer Bleck

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Impact of a Newtonian Assimilation and Physical Initialization an the Initialization and Prediction by a Tropical Mesoscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study illustrates the capability of Newtonian nudging and physical initialization in improving the initialized state and forecasts in the Florida State University high-resolution regional tropical mesoscale model. In particular it is shown ...

Kok-Seng Yap

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Conservative Semi-Lagrangian Transport on a Sphere and the Impact on Vapor Advection in an Atmospheric General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conservative semi-Lagrangian scheme with rational function for interpolation is implemented in spherical geometry and tested in an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). The new scheme, different from the conventional semi-Lagrangian ...

Xindong Peng; Feng Xiao; Wataru Ohfuchi; Hiromitsu Fuchigami

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Impact of Bias-Correction Type and Conditional Training on Bayesian Model Averaging over the Northeast United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of a multimodel ensemble over the northeast United States is evaluated before and after applying bias correction and Bayesian model averaging (BMA). The 13-member Stony Brook University (SBU) ensemble at 0000 UTC is combined with ...

Michael J. Erickson; Brian A. Colle; Joseph J. Charney

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Impact of Parameter Estimation on the Performance of the FSU Global Spectral Model Using Its Full-Physics Adjoint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The full-physics adjoint of the Florida State University Global Spectral Model at resolution T42L12 is applied to carry out parameter estimation using an initialized analysis dataset. The three parameters, that is, the biharmonic horizontal ...

Yanqiu Zhu; I. M. Navon

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Statistical models of crop production to assess the impacts of a CO/sub 2/ induced climate change: Progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the use of mathematical models to forecast the effects of increased CO/sub 2/ concentration in the atmosphere. These models were created to predict crop yields under different climatic conditions. The authors have adapted them to consider climatic changes caused by the ''greenhouse effect.'' Principal climatic variables include monthly precipitation and temperature range. 26 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs. (TEM)

Decker, W.L.; Achutuni, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Coupling Aerosol-Cloud-Radiative Processes in the WRF-Chem Model: Investigating the Radiative Impact of Elevated Point Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local and regional influence of elevated point sources on summertime aerosol forcing and cloud-aerosol interactions in northeastern North America was investigated using the WRF-Chem community model. The direct effects of aerosols on incoming solar radiation were simulated using existing modules to relate aerosol sizes and chemical composition to aerosol optical properties. Indirect effects were simulated by adding a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, simulate aqueous phase chemistry, and tie a two-moment treatment of cloud water (cloud water mass and cloud droplet number) to an existing radiation scheme. Fully interactive feedbacks thus were created within the modified model, with aerosols affecting cloud droplet number and cloud radiative properties, and clouds altering aerosol size and composition via aqueous processes, wet scavenging, and gas-phase-related photolytic processes. Comparisons of a baseline simulation with observations show that the model captured the general temporal cycle of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and produced clouds of comparable thickness to observations at approximately the proper times and places. The model slightly overpredicted SO2 mixing ratios and PM2.5 mass, but reproduced the range of observed SO2 to sulfate aerosol ratios, suggesting that atmospheric oxidation processes leading to aerosol sulfate formation are captured in the model. The baseline simulation was compared to a sensitivity simulation in which all emissions at model levels above the surface layer were set to zero, thus removing stack emissions. Instantaneous, site-specific differences for aerosol and cloud related properties between the two simulations could be quite large, as removing above-surface emission sources influenced when and where clouds formed within the modeling domain. When summed spatially over the finest resolution model domain (the extent of which corresponds to the typical size of a single GCM grid cell) and temporally over a three day analysis period, total rainfall in the sensitivity simulation increased by 31% over that in the baseline simulation. Fewer optically thin clouds, arbitrarily defined as a cloud exhibiting an optical depth less than 1, formed in the sensitivity simulation. Domain-averaged AODs dropped from 0.46 in the baseline simulation to 0.38 in the sensitivity simulation. The overall net effect of additional aerosols attributable to primary particulates and aerosol precursors from point source emissions above the surface was a domain-averaged reduction of 5 W m-2 in mean daytime downwelling shortwave radiation.

Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Barnard, James C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Analysis of the impact of decentralized solar technology on electric utilities: comparison and synthesis of models. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The validation of the physical submodels of three solar-electric utility interface models is described. The validation problem is divided into two components, the accuracy of the submodels themselves and the accuracy of the data typically used to run these models. The data set required to study these problems with respect to utility requirements is discussed and its collection in the Philadelphia Metropolitan area described. The instrumentation employed in the gathering of the data is covered. Error statistics of data and submodel accuracy are presented and the current status of the study is presented.

Feldman, S.; Blair, P.

1980-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part I: Theoretical Model and Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As for a variable air volume (VAV) system, the air duct static pressure is a typical control variable maintained by modulating supply fan speed. The static pressure equals to the summation of the duct pressure loss downstream of the sensor to the terminal box and box inlet static pressure. Typically, the air duct static pressure is set as a constant set point based on the system design information and sensor location. However, under partial load conditions, the terminal box dampers have to be closed more since either required airflow is less than the design airflow which directly leads to much less pressure loss. Thus the static pressure set point should be reset lower in order to reduce fan power, avoid noise at terminal box dampers and box damper malfunction due to excessive pressure. Different static pressure reset schedules are reviewed and compared, considering the influence of outside air temperature on the building load, availability of the VAV box damper positions, the airflow ratio based static pressure reset has also applicable advantages over the existing constant static pressure set point and two typical reset methods. This paper present the theoretical models to express the impacts of static pressure reset on fan airflow, fan head, air leakage, fan power and thermal energy for both pressure independent and pressure dependent boxes. The impacts are also demonstrated using the parametric analysis and numerical results to show the benefits of the static pressure reset including reducing fan power, cooling energy and heating energy.

Liu, M.; Feng, J.; Wang, Z.; Wu, L.; Zheng, K.; Pang, W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mathematical Analysis of an HIV/AIDS Model: Impact of Educational Programs and Abstinence in Sub-Saharan Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We formulate a deterministic HIV/AIDS model to theoretically investigate how counselling and testing coupled with the resulting decrease in sexual activity could affect the HIV epidemic in resource-limited communities. The threshold quantities are determined ... Keywords: Abstinence, HIV/AIDS, Reproduction number, Resource-limited, Testing and counselling

C. P. Bhunu; S. Mushayabasa; H. Kojouharov; J. M. Tchuenche

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Use of a predictive model for the impact of cofiring coal/biomass blends on slagging and fouling propensity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes an investigation of slagging and fouling effects when cofiring coal/biomass blends by using a predictive model for large utility boilers. This model is based on the use a zone computational method to determine the midsection temperature profile throughout a boiler, coupled with a thermo-chemical model, to define and assess the risk of elevated slagging and fouling levels during cofiring of solid fuels. The application of this prediction tool was made for a 618 MW thermal wall-fired pulverized coal boiler, cofired with a typical medium volatile bituminous coal and two substitute fuels, sewage sludge and sawdust. Associated changes in boiler efficiency as well as various heat transfer and thermodynamic parameters of the system were analyzed with slagging and fouling effects for different cofiring ratios. The results of the modeling revealed that, for increased cofiring of sewage sludge, an elevated risk of slagging and high-temperature fouling occurred, in complete contrast to the effects occurring with the utilization of sawdust as a substitute fuel. 30 refs., 9 figs.,1 tab.

Piotr Plaza; Anthony J. Griffiths; Nick Syred; Thomas Rees-Gralton [Cardiff University, Cardiff (United Kingdom). Centre for Research in Energy

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual energy budget of the Arctic Ocean is characterized by a net heat loss at the airsea interface that is balanced by oceanic heat transport into the Arctic. Two 150-yr simulations (19502099) of a global climate model are used to examine ...

James R. Miller; Gary L. Russell

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time- and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (efficiently transfers momentum to the satellite. This latter point has an important implication: Eight (spaced) 5 cm debris objects can impart more momentum to the satellite, and likely cause more damage, than a single 10 cm debris object at the same velocity. Further studies are required to assess the satellite damage induced by 1-5 cm sized debris objects, as well as multiple debris objects, in this velocity range.

Springer, H K; Miller, W O; Levatin, J L; Pertica, A J; Olivier, S S

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

332

Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy  

SciTech Connect

Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

Callaway, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Force criterion prediction of damage for carbon/epoxy composite panels impacted by high velocity ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H, Kedward, K. T. Modeling Hail Ice Impacts and PredictingInvestigation of High Velocity Ice Impacts on Woven Carbon/Analysis Correlation of Hail Ice Impacting Composite

Rhymer, Jennifer D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

COMPARISON OF CONVECTIVE OVERSHOOTING MODELS AND THEIR IMPACT ON ABUNDANCES FROM INTEGRATED LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY OF YOUNG (<3 Gyr) STAR CLUSTERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing program to measure detailed chemical abundances in nearby galaxies, we use a sample of young- to intermediate-age clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud with ages of 10 Myr-2 Gyr to evaluate the effect of isochrone parameters, specifically core convective overshooting, on Fe abundance results from high-resolution, integrated light spectroscopy. In this work we also obtain fiducial Fe abundances from high-resolution spectroscopy of the cluster individual member stars. We compare the Fe abundance results for the individual stars to the results from isochrones and integrated light spectroscopy to determine whether isochrones with convective overshooting should be used in our integrated light analysis of young- to intermediate-age (10 Myr-3 Gyr) star clusters. We find that when using the isochrones from the Teramo group, we obtain more accurate results for young- and intermediate-age clusters over the entire age range when using isochrones without convective overshooting. While convective overshooting is not the only uncertain aspect of stellar evolution, it is one of the most readily parameterized ingredients in stellar evolution models, and thus important to evaluate for the specific models used in our integrated light analysis. This work demonstrates that our method for integrated light spectroscopy of star clusters can provide unique tests for future constraints on stellar evolution models of young- and intermediate-age clusters.

Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A., E-mail: jcolucci@ucolick.org, E-mail: rab@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 1156 High Street, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

NGFAST: a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U.S. state borders and import points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. ...

Edgar C. Portante; Brian A. Craig; Stephen M. Folga

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Final Report for proposal "The Interface between Earth System Models and Impacts on Society Workshop, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The creation of a new Community Earth System Model (CESM) working group, combining science-driven research with user-driven requirements, will further broaden the CESM user base and will considerably enrich the project by building formal links to sectoral scientists and decision makers. The first step in this process is a small (~25 person) workshop to identify the goals and objectives of the new working group, to discuss how it will interact with existing CESM working groups, and to identify a few, initial pilot projects to explore how to use climate information to manage climate risk more effectively. This proposal is to support the travel costs of non-NCAR participants in this planning workshop.

Jim Hurrell

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING): A Model for Estimating Microbial Communities in Repository Drifts at Yucca Mountain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geochemical and microbiological modeling was performed to evaluate the potential quantities and impact of microorganisms on the geochemistry of the area adjacent to and within nuclear waste packages in the proposed repository drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The microbial growth results from the introduction of water, ground support, and waste package materials into the deep unsaturated rock. The simulations, which spanned one million years, were accomplished using a newly developed computer code, Microbial Impacts to the Near-Field Environment Geochemistry (MING). MING uses environmental thresholds for limiting microbial growth to temperatures below 120 C and above relative humidities of 90 percent in repository drifts. Once these thresholds are met, MING expands upon a mass balance and thermodynamic approach proposed by McKinley and others (1997), by using kinetic rates to supply constituents from design materials and constituent fluxes including solubilized rock components into the drift, to perform two separate mass-balance calculations as a function of time. The first (nutrient limit) assesses the available nutrients (C, N, P and S) and calculates how many microorganisms can be produced based on a microorganism stoichiometry of C{sub 160}(H{sub 280}O{sub 80})N{sub 30}P{sub 2}S. The second (energy limit) calculates the energy available from optimally combined redox couples for the temperature, and pH at that time. This optimization maximizes those reactions that produce > 15kJ/mol (limit on useable energy) using an iterative linear optimization technique. The final available energy value is converted to microbial mass at a rate of 1 kg of biomass (dry weight) for every 64 MJ of energy. These two values (nutrient limit and energy limit) are then compared and the smaller value represents the number of microorganisms that can be produced over a specified time. MING can also be adapted to investigate other problems of interest as the model can be used in saturated and unsaturated environments and in laboratory situations to establish microbial growth limitations. Other projected uses include investigations of contaminated locations where monitored natural attenuation or engineered bioremediation could be employed.

D.M. Jolley; T.F. Ehrhorn; J. Horn

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Modeling the Power Distribution Network of a Virtual City and Studying the Impact of Fire on the Electrical Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The smooth and reliable operation of key infrastructure components like water distribution systems, electric power systems, and telecommunications is essential for a nation?s economic growth and overall security. Tragic events such as the Northridge earthquake and Hurricane Katrina have shown us how the occurrence of a disaster can cripple one or more such critical infrastructure components and cause widespread damage and destruction. Technological advancements made over the last few decades have resulted in these infrastructure components becoming highly complicated and inter-dependent on each other. The development of tools which can aid in understanding this complex interaction amongst the infrastructure components is thus of paramount importance for being able to manage critical resources and carry out post-emergency recovery missions. The research work conducted as a part of this thesis aims at studying the effects of fire (a calamitous event) on the electrical distribution network of a city. The study has been carried out on a test bed comprising of a virtual city named Micropolis which was modeled using a Geographic Information System (GIS) based software package. This report describes the designing of a separate electrical test bed using Simulink, based on the GIS layout of the power distribution network of Micropolis. It also proposes a method of quantifying the damage caused by fire to the electrical network by means of a parameter called the Load Loss Damage Index (LLDI). Finally, it presents an innovative graph theoretic approach for determining how to route power across faulted sections of the electrical network using a given set of Normally Open switches. The power is routed along a path of minimum impedance. The proposed methodologies are then tested by running numerous simulations on the Micropolis test bed, corresponding to different fire spread scenarios. The LLDI values generated from these simulation runs are then analyzed in order to determine the most damaging scenarios and to identify infrastructure components of the city which are most crucial in containing the damage caused by fire to the electrical network. The conclusions thereby drawn can give useful insights to emergency response personnel when they deal with real-life disasters.

Bagchi, Arijit

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Adopting Biophysics Methods in Pursuit of Biogeophysical Research: Advancing the measurement and modeling of electrical signatures of microbe-mineral transformations impacting contaminant transport  

SciTech Connect

This exploratory project involved laboratory experiments to investigate three hypotheses: (H1) Physics-based modeling of low-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as alpha) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy (DS) data can quantify pore-scale geometric changes impacting contaminant transport resulting from biomineralization; (H2) Physics-based modeling of high-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as beta) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy data can quantify rates of mineral growth in/on the cell wall; (H3) Application of this measurement and modeling approach can enhance geophysical interpretation of bioremediation experiments conducted at the RIFLE IFC by providing constraints on bioremediation efficiency (biomass concentration, mineral uptake within the cell wall, biomineralization rate). We tested H1 by performing DS measurements (alpha and beta range) on iron (Fe) particles of dimensions similar to microbial cells, dispersed within agar gels over a range of Fe concentrations. We have tested the ability of the physics-based modeling to predict volume concentrations of the Fe particles by assuming that the Fe particles are polarizable inclusions within an otherwise nonpolarizable medium. We evaluated the smallest volume concentration that can be detected with the DS method. Similar experiments and modeling have been performed on the sulfate-reducing bacteria D. vulgaris. Synchrotron x-ray absorption measurements were conducted to determine the local structure of biominerals coatings on D. vulgaris which were grown in the presence of different Fe concentrations. We imaged the mineral growth on cell wall using SEM. We used dielectric spectroscopy to differentiate between iron sulfide precipitates of biotic and abiotic nature. Biotic measurements were made on D. vulgaris bacteria grown in the presence of different concentrations of iron to form different thicknesses of iron sulfide precipitates around themselves and abiotic measurements were made on different concentrations of pyrrhotite particles suspended in agar. Results show a decrease in dielectric permittivity as a function of frequency for biotic minerals and an opposite trend is observed for abiotic minerals. Our results suggest that dielectric spectroscopy offers a noninvasive and fast approach for distinguishing between abiotic and biotic mineral precipitates.

Prodan, Camelia [NJIT

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ecological Impacts of the Cerro Grande Fire: Predicting Elk Movement and Distribution Patterns in Response to Vegetative Recovery through Simulation Modeling October 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 17,200 ha in north-central New Mexico as the result of an escaped prescribed burn initiated by Bandelier National Monument. The interaction of large-scale fires, vegetation, and elk is an important management issue, but few studies have addressed the ecological implications of vegetative succession and landscape heterogeneity on ungulate populations following large-scale disturbance events. Primary objectives of this research were to identify elk movement pathways on local and landscape scales, to determine environmental factors that influence elk movement, and to evaluate movement and distribution patterns in relation to spatial and temporal aspects of the Cerro Grande Fire. Data collection and assimilation reflect the collaborative efforts of National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory) personnel. Geographic positioning system (GPS) collars were used to track 54 elk over a period of 3+ years and locational data were incorporated into a multi-layered geographic information system (GIS) for analysis. Preliminary tests of GPS collar accuracy indicated a strong effect of 2D fixes on position acquisition rates (PARs) depending on time of day and season of year. Slope, aspect, elevation, and land cover type affected dilution of precision (DOP) values for both 2D and 3D fixes, although significant relationships varied from positive to negative making it difficult to delineate the mechanism behind significant responses. Two-dimensional fixes accounted for 34% of all successfully acquired locations and may affect results in which those data were used. Overall position acquisition rate was 93.3% and mean DOP values were consistently in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 leading to the conclusion collar accuracy was acceptable for modeling purposes. SAVANNA, a spatially explicit, process-oriented ecosystem model, was used to simulate successional dynamics. Inputs to the SAVANNA included a land cover map, long-term weather data, soil maps, and a digital elevation model. Parameterization and calibration were conducted using field plots. Model predictions of herbaceous biomass production and weather were consistent with available data and spatial interpolations of snow were considered reasonable for this study. Dynamic outputs generated by SAVANNA were integrated with static variables, movement rules, and parameters developed for the individual-based model through the application of a habitat suitability index. Model validation indicated reasonable model fit when compared to an independent test set. The finished model was applied to 2 realistic management scenarios for the Jemez Mountains and management implications were discussed. Ongoing validation of the individual-based model presented in this dissertation provides an adaptive management tool that integrates interdisciplinary experience and scientific information, which allows users to make predictions about the impact of alternative management policies.

S.P. Rupp

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Economic impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In federal fiscal year 2000 (FY00), Berkeley Lab had 4,347 full- and part-time employees. In addition, at any given time of the year, there were more than 1,000 Laboratory guests. These guests, who also reside locally, have an important economic impact on the nine-county Bay Area. However, Berkeley Lab's total economic impact transcends the direct effects of payroll and purchasing. The direct dollars paid to the Lab's employees in the form of wages, salaries, and benefits, and payments made to contractors for goods and services, are respent by employees and contractors again and again in the local and greater economy. Further, while Berkeley Lab has a strong reputation for basic scientific research, many of the Lab's scientific discoveries and inventions have had direct application in industry, spawning new businesses and creating new opportunities for existing firms. This analysis updates the Economic Impact Analysis done in 1996, and its purpose is to describe the economic and geographic impact of Laboratory expenditures and to provide a qualitative understanding of how Berkeley Lab impacts and supports the local community. It is intended as a guide for state, local, and national policy makers as well as local community members. Unless otherwise noted, this analysis uses data from FY00, the most recent year for which full data are available.

Technology Transfer Department

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electric power lines and climate change model Electric power lines and climate change model Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts application/pdf icon eaei-org-chart-11-2013.pdf The Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department analyzes U.S. and global energy consumption and the associated social, economic, and environmental impacts, including human health, greenhouse gas emissions, and global climate change. Researchers conduct R&D and provide technical assistance to governments on: Lifecycle analysis of products and industries; How energy use affects health in the indoor environment; Energy markets and utility policy; Renewable energy policy and economics; Energy efficiency standards and codes; International energy and environmental impacts in the developed and

343

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance, Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range Title Natural Gas...

344

Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events  

SciTech Connect

Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time- and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (< 1-5mm, dependent on mesh resolution), especially in large CM overlap simulations. While the inclusion of the smallest debris is critical to enforcing mass and momentum conservation in hydrocode simulations, there seems to be relatively little interest in their disposition. Based on comparing our results to observations, it is unlikely that the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event was a large mass-overlap collision. We also performed separate simulations studying the debris generated by the collision of 5 and 10 cm spherical projectiles on the Iridium 33 satellite at closing velocities of 5, 10, and 15 km/s. It is important to understand the vulnerability of satellites to small debris threats, given their pervasiveness in orbit. These studies can also be merged with probabilistic conjunction analysis to better understand the risk to space assets. In these computational studies, we found that momentum transfer, kinetic energy losses due to dissipative mechanisms (e.g., fracture), fragment number, and fragment velocity increases with increasing velocity for a fixed projectile size. For a fixed velocity, we found that the smaller projectile size more efficiently transfers momentum to the satellite. This latter point has an important implication: Eight (spaced) 5 cm debris objects can impart more momentum to the satellite, and likely cause more damage, than a single 10 cm debris object at the same velocity. Further studies are required to assess the satellite damage induced by 1-5 cm sized debris objects, as well as multiple debris objects, in this velocity range.

Springer, H K; Miller, W O; Levatin, J L; Pertica, A J; Olivier, S S

2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

345

MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM - PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that come in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter off-gas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

346

MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

347

Climatic impacts of land-use change due to crop yield increases and a universal carbon tax from a scenario model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future land cover will have a significant impact on climate and is strongly influenced by the extent of agricultural land-use. Differing assumptions of crop yield increase and carbon pricing mitigation strategies affect projected expansion of ...

T. Davies-Barnard; P. J. Valdes; J. S. Singarayer; C. D. Jones

348

Numerical Modeling of Sulfur and Nitrogen Chemistry in a Narrow Cold-Frontal Rainband: The Impact of Meteorological and Chemical Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better understand the impact of various meteorological and chemical parameters on chemical deposition from winter storms, the chemistry and microphysics of a narrow cold-frontal rainband and its associated stratiform region were examined with ...

Mary C. Barth

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Impacts of Urban Albedo Increase on Local Air Temperature at DailyAnnual Time Scales: Model Results and Synthesis of Previous Work  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors combine urban and soilvegetation surface parameterization schemes with one-dimensional (1D) boundary layer mixing and radiation parameterizations to estimate the maximum impact of increased surface albedo on urban air temperatures. ...

E. Scott Krayenhoff; James A. Voogt

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Impacts of Indirect Soil Moisture Assimilation and Direct Surface Temperature and Humidity Assimilation on a Mesoscale Model Simulation of an Indian Monsoon Depression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the impact of the Flux-Adjusting Surface Data Assimilation System (FASDAS) and the four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA) using analysis nudging on the simulation of a monsoon depression that formed over India during ...

Vinodkumar; A. Chandrasekar; K. Alapaty; Dev Niyogi

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 OctNov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

352

Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ngfast : a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U. S. state borders and import points.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. The concepts presented are most useful to state and national energy agencies tasked as first responders to such emergencies. Within minutes of the occurrence of a break, NGfast can generate an HTML-formatted report to support briefing materials for state and federal emergency responders. Sample partial results of a simulation of a real system in the United States are presented.

Portante, E. C.; Craig, B. A.; Folga, S.M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Impact of Nudging in the Meteorological Model for Retrospective Air Quality Simulations. Part II: Evaluating Collocated Meteorological and Air Quality Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For air quality modeling, it is important that the meteorological fields that are derived from meteorological models reflect the best characterization of the atmosphere. It is well known that the accuracy and overall representation of the modeled ...

Tanya L. Otte

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Technology's Impact on Production  

SciTech Connect

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Technology's Impact on Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) ?? entitled Technologys Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level ? ? the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies ??Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Amann, Rachel; Deweese, Ellis; Shipman, Deborah

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Study of Vehicle Front Structure Crashworthiness Based on Pole Impact with Different Position  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of occupant injury severity in frontal pole impact, this paper conducted a computer simulation study on the frontal pole impact of passenger car. Three types of frontal pole impact FE analysis models were developed according to different impact ... Keywords: Frontal pole impact, Impact position, Vehicle Structure Deformation, Crashworthiness

Qihui Li, Jikuang Yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

PV Installation Labor Market Analysis and PV JEDI Tool Developments (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential economic benefits of the growing renewable energy sector have led to increased federal, state, and local investments in solar industries, including federal grants for expanded workforce training for U.S. solar installers. However, there remain gaps in the data required to understand the size and composition of the workforce needed to meet the demand for solar power. Through primary research on the U.S. solar installation employer base, this report seeks to address that gap, improving policymakers and other solar stakeholders understanding of both the evolving needs of these employers and the economic opportunity associated with solar market development. Included are labor market data covering current U.S. employment, expected industry growth, and employer skill preferences for solar installation-related occupations. This study offers an in-depth look at the solar installation sectors. A study published by the Solar Foundation in October 2011 provides a census of labor data across the entire solar value chain.

Friedman, B.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Updated Skill Set with Annual Skill Set Model Review and VISION Training completion. Revision does not impact MGTF-002 Template 08_1014. Added EOTA IT Security Course and Exam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

330 330 Reformatted and reorganized entire document. Broke down by position and bumped against Position Descriptions for accuracy, updated names of documents and made consistent throughout 09_0623 Updated Skill Set with Annual Skill Set Model Review and VISION Training completion. Revision does not impact MGTF-002 Template 08_1014. Added EOTA IT Security Course and Exam to process section. 09_0807 Updated Skill Set with Annual Skill Set Model Review. Added Required DOE contractor Training (IT Security, FEOSH & Cyber Security). Added EOTA IT Security Course and Exam to process section. 08_1014 Removed employee no longer with EOTA. MGTP-004, Employee Satisfaction Process no longer active. 08_0829 Annual Skill Set Model Review completed and documented for all EOTA staff. Additional lines added for future training items.

360

Dynamical Downscaling over the Great Lakes Basin of North America Using the WRF Regional Climate Model: The Impact of the Great Lakes System on Regional Greenhouse Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is employed to dynamically downscale global warming projections produced using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). The analyses are focused on the Great Lakes Basin of North America and the ...

Jonathan Gula; W. Richard Peltier

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Poverty Social Impact Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poverty Social Impact Analysis Poverty Social Impact Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Poverty Social Impact Analysis Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/TOPICS/EXTPSIA/0,,contentMDK:2041525 Related Tools Poverty Social Impact Analysis Intertemporal Computable Equilibrium System (ICES) Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS An ex-ante or ex-post analysis that predicts the distributional social impacts of public policies, with particular emphasis on the poor and vulnerable. This approach generates evidence to inform policy dialogue, debate and decision-making. In climate change mitigation projects, PSIA can

362

Impact of Hight Velocity Cold Spray Particles  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents experimental data and an computational model of the cold spray solid particle impact process. Copper particles impacting onto a polished stainless steel substrate are examined. The high velocity impact causes significant plastic deformation of both the particle and the sub- strate, but no melting is observed. The plastic deformation exposes clean surfaces that, under the high impact pressures, result in significant bond strengths between the particle and substrate. Experimental measurements of the splat and crater sizes compare well with the numerical calculations. It is shown that the crater depth is significant and increases with impact velocity. However, the splat diameter is much less sensitive to the impact velocity. It is also shown that the geometric lengths of the splat and crater scale linearly with the diameter of the impacting particle. It is hoped that the results presented will allow better understanding of the bonding process during cold spray.

Dykhuizen, R.C.; Gilmore, D.L.; Jiang, X.; Neiser, R.A.; Sampath, S.; Smith, M.F.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Small Particles, Big Impact  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Particles, Big Impact Small Particles, Big Impact Small-scale effects of Aerosols Add up Over Time August 24, 2011 | Tags: Climate Research, Earth Sciences, Environmental...

364

Aluminum Honeycomb Impact Limiter Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scale model testing, static-materials testing, and static and dynamic structural analyses of data on impact limiters provided data for NRC licensing of a spent-fuel transport cask. The analysis of quarter-scale drop test data is reconciled with static and dynamic structural analysis data produced using the ANSYS program.

1991-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

365

USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A very typical statistical/econometric model assumes something like yt ? i.i.d. f (y, x, ?) (1) where f () is a parametric family known up to parameters ?. Parameter estimation: maximum likelihood ?n = arg max ? ln f (Yt, Xt, ?) (2) t What if the basic model assumptions of (1) are violated? The parametric family may not contain the true model f0(x, y) that generated the data; or the data may not be i.i.d.; etc. Misspecified

Stas Kolenikov; U Of Missouri; U Of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

3D Simulations in Environmental Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase of petrol cost and the failure of Kyoto agreement generated huge investments in renewable energy sources. In recent times a lot of local authorities allowed wind farm location. In many cases, environmental impact assessments do not take ... Keywords: 3D CAD models, 3D GIS analysis, Multimedia techniques, Viewshed, Visual impact assessment, Wind farm

Maria Danese; Giuseppe Las Casas; Beniamino Murgante

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Impact of the Land Surface Physics in the Operational NCEP Eta Model on Simulating the Diurnal Cycle: Evaluation and Testing Using Oklahoma Mesonet Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 31 January 1996, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Environmental Modeling Center (NCEP/EMC) implemented a state-of-the-art land surface parameterization in the operational Eta Model. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and ...

Curtis H. Marshall; Kenneth C. Crawford; Kenneth E. Mitchell; David J. Stensrud

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Limit order markets, liquidity, and price impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I explore various aspects of market liquidity and analyze its effect on asset prices. First, in a model of a limit order market I explain how to define liquidity and derive a price impact function. Second, ...

Rosu, Ioanid, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Urban Aerosol Impacts on Downwind Convective Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of urban-enhanced aerosol concentrations on convective storm development and precipitation over and downwind of St. Louis, Missouri, are investigated. This is achieved through the use of a cloud-resolving mesoscale model, in which ...

Susan C. van den Heever; William R. Cotton

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Impact of Cloud-Nucleating Aerosols in Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Warm-Rain Precipitation in the East China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-nucleating aerosols emitted from mainland China have the potential to influence cloud and precipitation systems that propagate through the region of the East China Sea. Both simulations from the Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; Wesley Berg; Susan van den Heever; Tristan LEcuyer

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Impact of Data Assimilation on Forecasting Convection over the United Kingdom Using a High-Resolution Version of the Met Office Unified Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution data assimilation system has been implemented and tested within a 4-km grid length version of the Met Office Unified Model (UM). A variational analysis scheme is used to correct larger scales using conventional observation ...

Mark Dixon; Zhihong Li; Humphrey Lean; Nigel Roberts; Sue Ballard

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Impacts of Climate Variation and Catchment Area on Water Balance and Lake Hydrologic Type in Groundwater-Dominated Systems: A Generic Lake Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lakes are a major geologic feature in humid regions, and multiple lake hydrologic types exist with varying physical and chemical characteristics, connections among lakes, and relationships to the landscape. The authors developed a model of water ...

Jeffrey Cardille; Michael T. Coe; Julie A. Vano

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Impact of Airmass Boundaries on the Propagation of Deep Convection: A Modeling-Based Study in a High-CAPE, Low-Shear Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A suite of experiments conducted using a cloud-resolving model is examined to assess the role that preexisting airmass boundaries can play in regulating storm propagation. The 27 May 1997 central Texas tornadic event is used to guide these ...

Adam L. Houston; Robert B. Wilhelmson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Application of Boyds Periodization and Relaxation Method in a Spectral Atmospheric Limited-Area Model. Part II: Accuracy Analysis and Detailed Study of the Operational Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectral limited-area models face a particular challenge at their lateral boundaries: the fields need to be made periodic. Boyd proposed a windowing-based method to improve the periodization and relaxation. In a companion paper, the implementation ...

Daan Degrauwe; Steven Caluwaerts; Fabrice Voitus; Rafiq Hamdi; Piet Termonia

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nested-Model Simulation of Moist Convection: The Impact of Coarse-Grid Parameterized Convection on Fine-Grid Resolved Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future-generation, operational, weather prediction systems will likely include storm-scale, limited-area models that will explicitly resolve convective precipitation. However, the high-resolution convection-resolving grids will need to be ...

Thomas T. Warner; Hsiao-Ming Hsu

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Diagnosing the Relative Impact of Sneaks, Phantoms, and Volatility in Sequences of Lagged Ensemble Probability Forecasts with a Simple Dynamic Decision Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulation of sequences of lagged ensemble probability forecasts is undertaken using Markov transition law estimated from a reforecast ensemble. A simple three-state, three-action dynamic decision model is then applied to the Monte ...

Justin G. McLay

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The use of statistical climate-crop models for simulating yield to project the impacts of CO/sub 2/ induced climate change  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the use of mathematical models to forecast the effects of increased CO/sub 2/ concentration in the atmosphere. These models were created to predict crop yields under different climatic conditions. The authors have adapted them to consider climatic changes caused by the ''greenhouse effect.'' Principal climatic variables include monthly precipitation and temperature range. 40 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs. (TEM)

Decker, W.L.; Achutuni, R.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Environmental Impacts of Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~~"'"""""""""'l.. _ _ 4 Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operation and Monitoring, and Closure 4-iii Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 4. Environmental Impacts of Repository Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure ..............4-1 4.1 Preclosure Environmental Impacts of Construction, Operations, Monitoring, and Closure of a Repository ...............................................................................................................................4-3 4.1.1 Impacts to Land Use and Ownership .......................................................................................4-4

380

Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural and human-induced environmental changes have been altering the earth's surface and hydrological processes, and thus directly contribute to the severity of flood hazards. To understand these changes and their impacts, this research developed a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data have been addressed. This research develops an object-oriented hydrological modeling framework. Compared with traditional lumped or cell-based distributed hydrological modeling frameworks, the object-oriented framework allows basic spatial hydrologic units to have various size and irregular shape. This framework is capable of assimilating various GIS and remotely-sensed data with different spatial resolutions. It ensures the computational efficiency, while preserving sufficient spatial details of input data and model outputs. Sensitivity analysis and comparison of high resolution LIDAR DEM with traditional USGS 30m resolution DEM suggests that the use of LIDAR DEMs can greatly reduce uncertainty in calibration of flow parameters in the hydrologic model and hence increase the reliability of modeling results. In addition, subtle topographic features and hydrologic objects like surface depressions and detention basins can be extracted from the high resolution LiDAR DEMs. An innovative algorithm has been developed to efficiently delineate surface depressions and detention basins from LiDAR DEMs. Using a time series of Landsat images, a retrospective analysis of surface imperviousness has been conducted to assess the hydrologic impact of urbanization. The analysis reveals that with rapid urbanization the impervious surface has been increased from 10.1% to 38.4% for the case study area during 1974 - 2002. As a result, the peak flow for a 100-year flood event has increased by 20% and the floodplain extent has expanded by about 21.6%. The quantitative analysis suggests that the large regional detentions basins have effectively offset the adverse effect of increased impervious surface during the urbanization process. Based on the simulation and scenario analyses of land subsidence and potential climate changes, some planning measures and policy implications have been derived for guiding smart urban growth and sustainable resource development and management to minimize flood hazards.

Wang, Lei

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Impact of Land Surface Processes on Simulations of the U.S. Hydrological Cycle: A Case Study of the 1993 Flood Using the SSiB Land Surface Model in the NCEP Eta Regional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a methodology for coupling the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB) to the regional Eta Model of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), and presents the application of the coupled system in regional ...

Y. Xue; F. J. Zeng; K. E. Mitchell; Z. Janjic; E. Rogers

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

383

Representation of Subgrid-Scale Orographic Effects in a General Circulation Model. Part I: Impact on the Dynamics of Simulated January Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of subgrid-scale orography are represented in most large-scale models of the atmosphere by means of parameterizing subgrid-scale orographic gravity wave drag and/or enhancing grid-scale orography, such as envelope orography, with the ...

Young-Joon Kim

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy Impacts of Envelope Tightening and Mechanical Ventilation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or absolute standards along with mechanical ventilation throughout the U.S. housing stock. We used a physics-based modeling framework to simulate the impact of envelope...

385

Adaptation for Nature: Ecological Impacts of Climate Change and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models CyberGIS for Geospatial Discovery and Innovation Ecological Impacts of Climate Change Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics in CAM5 Adaptation for Nature: Ecological...

386

Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn (more)

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Application of a multi-block CFD code to investigate the impact of geometry modeling on centrifugal compressor flow field predictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CFD codes capable of utilizing multi-block grids provide the capability to analyze the complete geometry of centrifugal compressors. Attendant with this increased capability is potentially increased grid setup time and more computational overhead with the resultant increase in wall clock time to obtain a solution. If the increase in difficulty of obtaining a solution significantly improves the solution from that obtained by modeling the features of the tip clearance flow or the typical bluntness of a centrifugal compressor`s trailing edge, then the additional burden is worthwhile. However, if the additional information obtained is of marginal use, then modeling of certain features of the geometry may provide reasonable solutions for designers to make comparative choices when pursuing a new design. In this spirit a sequence of grids were generated to study the relative importance of modeling versus detailed gridding of the tip gap and blunt trailing edge regions of the NASA large low-speed centrifugal compressor for which there is considerable detailed internal laser anemometry data available for comparison. The results indicate: (1) There is no significant difference in predicted tip clearance mass flow rate whether the tip gap is gridded or modeled. (2) Gridding rather than modeling the trailing edge results in better predictions of some flow details downstream of the impeller, but otherwise appears to offer no great benefits. (3) The pitchwise variation of absolute flow angle decreases rapidly up to 8% impeller radius ratio and much more slowly thereafter. Although some improvements in prediction of flow field details are realized as a result of analyzing the actual geometry there is no clear consensus that any of the grids investigated produced superior results in every case when compared to the measurements. However, if a multi-block code is available, it should be used, as it has the propensity for enabling better predictions than a single block code.

Hathaway, M.D. [Vehicle Technology Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Wood, J.R. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Impact of IBM Cell Technology on the Programming Paradigm in the Context of Computer Systems for Climate and Weather Models  

SciTech Connect

The call for ever-increasing model resolutions and physical processes in climate and weather models demands a continual increase in computing power. The IBM Cell processor's order-of-magnitude peak performance increase over conventional processors makes it very attractive to fulfill this requirement. However, the Cell's characteristics, 256KB local memory per SPE and the new low-level communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. As a trial, we selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics components (half the total computational time), (2) has an extremely high computational intensity: the ratio of computational load to main memory transfers, and (3) exhibits embarrassingly parallel column computations. In this paper, we converted the baseline code (single-precision Fortran) to C and ported it to an IBM BladeCenter QS20. For performance, we manually SIMDize four independent columns and include several unrolling optimizations. Our results show that when compared with the baseline implementation running on one core of Intel's Xeon Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2, the Cell is approximately 8.8x, 11.6x, and 12.8x faster, respectively. Our preliminary analysis shows that the Cell can also accelerate the dynamics component (~;;25percent total computational time). We believe these dramatic performance improvements make the Cell processor very competitive as an accelerator.

Zhou, Shujia; Duffy, Daniel; Clune, Thomas; Suarez, Max; Williams, Samuel; Halem, Milton

2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Regional Climate Information & Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information & Modeling Print E-mail The specific impacts and vulnerabilities posed by climate change are largely defined by regional differences 9in things like geography,...

390

Predicting Performance Impacts due to Resolution Changes in Parallel Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-resolution models are often used to accelerate simulation-based analysis without significantly impacting the fidelity of the simulations. We have developed a web-enabled, component-based, multi-resolution modeling and Time Warp synchronized parallel ...

Dhananjai M. Rao; Philip A. Wilsey

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Uncertainty in Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in Models With High Scale Supersymmetry Breaking and its Impact on Interpretations of Searches For Supersymmetric Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some regions of parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with high scale supersymmetry breaking have extreme sensitivity of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) to the top quark mass through renormalisation group evolution effects. This leads to uncertainties in the predictions which need to be taken into account in the interpretation of searches for supersymmetric particles in these regions. As an example, we provide estimates of the current uncertainties on the position in parameter space of the region which does not break electroweak symmetry in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM). The position of the boundary of EWSB can vary by up to 2 TeV in m_0 due to the uncertainties coming from the current measurement errors on the top quark mass and from higher order corrections. In this dangerous region, for fixed CMSSM parameters the neutralino lightest supersymmetric particle mass has an associated large uncertainty of order 100%. These uncertainties therefore have a profound effect on the interpretation of LHC supersymmetric particle searches in terms of the CMSSM. We also show how to ameliorate poor convergence of the iterative numerical algorithm that calculates the MSSM spectrum near the boundary of EWSB.

B. C. Allanach; M. A. Parker

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

Epidemic modeling techniques for smallpox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infectious disease models predict the impact of outbreaks. Discrepancies between model predictions stem from both the disease parameters used and the underlying mathematics of the models. Smallpox has been modeled extensively ...

McLean, Cory Y. (Cory Yuen Fu)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Environmental Impact | Browse Tree Results  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environmental Impact. From climate change to biodiversity loss - documenting man's impact. CAB International. Home. Abstracts Database. News Articles. ...

394

Primer on Cumulative Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative impacts have become one of the most important aspects of environmental analysis and reporting in terms of transmission siting. This primer provides EPRI members with background information and fundamental understanding of the analysis process. The primer reviews the legal and regulatory framework, briefly examines case law that has helped to define both the cumulative impacts concept and subsequent analysis, and provides a structure for conducting or reviewing cumulative impacts analyses.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

mep client impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the mep net W or K Utah Manufacturing Extension Partnership ... Making an Impact on US Manufacturing manuFacturing extension partnership UTAH ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

Environment Impact Evaluation of Coal Development Based on BP Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the Environment impact of coal development, this paper selected evaluation indicators of the Environment impact of coal development according to certain principles and constructed Environment impact model of the coal development ... Keywords: Environment Impact, Coal Development, BP neural network

Kai Guo

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Aluminum Scrap Supply and Environmental Impact Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... It has been applied to the USA to forecast sources of aluminum scrap ... good balance between supply and demand on average over the years.

399

Outreach Asset-Impact Model (OAIM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knaggs Celeste Sturdevant Reed Outreach Partnerships University Outreach & Engagement #12;Overview for skills #12;Introduction to OAIM ZOOM instructions · Flip through the book page by page · Look at each

Liu, Taosheng

400

Modeling the impact of complexity on transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aimed to understand the drivers of total transportation costs during supply chain complexity events, in particular new product launches, in a fast moving consumer goods company in the United States. The research ...

Fernandez, Jose A. (Jose Antonio Fernandez Chavira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Model Homes Offer National IAQ Impact Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The new NIST set of more than 200 residential dwellings, representing 80 percent of the United States housing stock, can be combined with a ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

Numerical Modelling of Large Impact Crater Collapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% prompt and 30% slow evapora- tion) at a site northwest from the metropolitan area (PEMEX Correspondence detected in the PEMEX site; again, no correlation between Pb and chloride plumes was observed, suggesting the MCMA T1 T2 PEMEX Jasso MILAGRO (2006) outside MCMA revised 2006 US Air Quality Std. (TSP) Fig. 1

Collins, Gareth

403

The Economic Impact Model for Smart Grids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Smart grids are introduced as a promising concept to facilitate the future energy supply system without excessive distribution grid reinforcement, while maintaining the same level (more)

Tan, M.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Potential Impacts of the Use of Southern Oscillation Information on theTexas Aggregate Sorghum Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic decision models incorporating biophysical simulation models are used to examine the impact of the use of Southern Oscillation (SO) information on sorghum production in Texas. Production for 18 sites is aggregated to examine the impact of ...

Harvey S. J. Hill; James W. Mjelde; Wesley Rosenthal; Peter J. Lamb

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Environmental impact report (draft)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The three projects as proposed by Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the environmental analysis of the projects are discussed. Sections on the natural and social environments of the proposed projects and their surrounding areas consist of descriptions of the setting, discussions of the adverse and beneficial consequences of the project, and potential mitigation measures to reduce the effects of adverse impacts. The Environmental Impact Report includes discussions of unavoidable adverse effects, irreversible changes, long-term and cumulative impacts, growth-inducing effects, and feasible alternatives to the project. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Minority Economic Impact | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minority Economic Impact Minority Economic Impact Diversity and Inclusion Supporting Small Businesses Minority Economic Impact Partnering with Minority Serving Institutions...

407

Demand Impacted by Weather  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When you look at demand, its also interesting to note the weather. The weather has a big impact on the demand of heating fuels, if its cold, consumers will use ...

408

On the Climatic Impact of Wind Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climate model is used to study the climatic impact of the stress exerted on the ocean by the atmosphere. When this stress is set to zero everywhere, the climate becomes much colder, with global-mean near-surface air temperature dropping from ...

Oleg A. Saenko

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The economic impact of cyber terrorism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What is the economic impact of cyber terrorism? Can organizations achieve strategic advantage in the cyber terrorism game? A general game theoretical model is proposed to study the optimal information systems (ISs) security investment and then applied ... Keywords: Cyber terrorism, Game theory, Information systems security, Security investment

Jian Hua, Sanjay Bapna

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Impact of Heavy Duty Vehicle Emissions Reductions on Global Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a specified set of emissions reductions from heavy duty vehicles on climate change is calculated using the MAGICC 5.3 climate model. The integrated impact of the following emissions changes are considered: CO2, CH4, N2O, VOC, NOx, and SO2. This brief summarizes the assumptions and methods used for this calculation.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Environmental impact directory system: preliminary implementation for geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An Environmental Impact Directory System (EIDS) was proposed as a method for a computerized search of the widely distributed data files and models pertaining to energy-related environmental effects. To define the scope and content of the system, an example was prepared for the case of geothermal energy. The resulting sub-directory is known as GEIDs (Geothermal Environmental Impact Directory System). In preparing or reviewing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), the user may employ GEIDS as an extensive checklist to make sure he has taken into account all predictable impacts at any level of severity.

Hess, F.D.; Hall, R.T.; Fullenwider, E.D.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Impact of Dynamics and Atmospheric State on Cloud Vertical Overlap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observation and representation in general circulation models (GCMs) of cloud vertical overlap are the objects of active research due to their impacts on the earths radiative budget. Previous studies have found that vertically contiguous ...

Catherine M. Naud; Anthony Del Genio; Gerald G. Mace; Sally Benson; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Pavlos Kollias

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The Form of Cyclonic Precipitation and Its Thermal Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional, parameterized kinematic cloud microphysics model is described and used to simulate the form of cyclonic precipitation and its thermal impact in three idealized situations. The first situation represents a strong, warm, or ...

Stanley David Gedzelman; Robert Arnold

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Impact of Information Technologies on Air Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Air Transportation System and several key subsystems including the Aircraft, Airline, and Air Traffic Management are modeled as interacting control loops. The impact of Information Technologies on each of these subsystems ...

Hansman, R. John

415

Climate Change Impact on Rice Insurance Payouts in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors constructed the framework for a preliminary assessment of climate change impact on the rice insurance payout in Japan. The framework consisted of various models ranging from climate projection downscaling, rice yield estimation, yield ...

Toshichika Iizumi; Masayuki Yokozawa; Yousay Hayashi; Fujio Kimura

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

Webster, Mort D.

417

Impact of Gravity Waves on Marine Stratocumulus Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of gravity waves on marine stratocumulus is investigated using a large-eddy simulation model initialized with sounding profiles composited from the Variability of American Monsoon Systems (VAMOS) OceanCloudAtmosphereLand Study ...

Qingfang Jiang; Shouping Wang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn stover, and switchgrass. A life-cycle assessment approach ...

Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

An enhanced archive facilitating climate impacts and adaptation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capsule: We describe an expanded archive of downscaled model-based projections of future changes in regional climate, with a user-friendly web interface, to facilitate analysis of climate change impacts and adaptation.

Maurer; E.P.Brekke; L.Pruitt; T.Thrasher; B.Long; J.Duffy; P.Dettinger; M.Cayan; D.Arnold; J.

420

The impact of bidding aggregation levels on truckload rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis was to determine if line-haul rates are impacted by bid type, and if aggregation of bidding lanes can reduce costs for both shippers and carriers. Using regression analysis, we developed a model ...

Collins, Julia M. (Julia Marie)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Report: Strategic Planning Impacts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Planning Impacts Strategic Planning Impacts September 30, 2009 Submitted by the EMAB ARRA Implementation and Oversight Subcommittee Background: EM plans to use the influx of stimulus funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to fulfill compliance agreements, complete construction projects, and address the program's lower-tier activities such as decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) and soil and groundwater remediation. Using the ARRA funds to reduce the physical size of the EM complex will also help to lower overall lifecycle costs, create jobs, and allow the program to capitalize on its past successes. Implementation of ARRA is a high-visibility endeavor that has the potential to impact the EM base program's day-to-day operations and processes.

422

Granular Dynamics during Impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the impact of a projectile onto a bed of 3 mm grains immersed in an index-matched fluid. Specifically, we vary the amount of prestrain on the sample, strengthening the force chains within the system. We find this affects only the prefactor of linear depth-dependent term in the stopping force. We therefore attribute this term to pressure within the material, and not the grain-intruder friction as is sometimes suggested. Using a laser sheet scanning technique to visualize internal grain motion, a high-speed camera, and particle tracking, we can measure the trajectory of each grain throughout an impact event. Microscopically, our results indicate that weaker initial force chains result in more irreversible, plastic rearrangements during impact, suggesting static friction between grains does play a substantial role in the energy dissipation within the granular material.

Kerstin Nordstrom; Emily Lim; Matthew Harrington; Wolfgang Losert

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Launches JOBS and DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model (Text Version) on Digg

424

Modeling IVHSEmission Impacts. Volume 1: Background Issues And Modeling Capabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borroum, Caltrans - OPPD; Sacramento, CA; December 2,1992.Air Resources Board; Sacramento, CA; March and July, 1993.Support Division; Sacramento, CA; May 16,1991. Walker, W.

Guensler, Randall; Washington, Simon; Sperling, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Virtual impact: visualizing the potential effects of cosmic impact in human history  

SciTech Connect

Current models indicate that catastrophic impacts by asteroids and comets capable of killing more than one quarter of Earth's human population have occurred on average once every million years; smaller impacts, such the 1908 Tunguska impact that leveled more than 2,000 square km of Siberian forest, occur every 200-300 years. Therefore, cosmic impact likely significantly affected hominine evolution and conceivably played a role in Holocene period human culture history. Regrettably, few archaeologists are trained to appreciate the nature and potential effects of cosmic impact. We have developed a conceptual model for an extensible set of educational and research tools based on virtual reality collaborative environments to engage archaeologists and the general public on the topic of the role of cosmic impact in human history. Our initial focus is on two documented asteroid impacts in Argentina during the period of 4000 to 1000 B.C. Campo del Cicio resulted in an energy release of around 2-3 megatons (100-150 times the Hiroshima atomic weapon), and left several craters and a strewn field covering 493 km{sup 2} in northeastern Argentina. Rio Cuarto was likely more than 1000 megatons and may have devastated an area greater than 50,000 km{sup 2} in central Argentina. We are focusing on reconstructions of these events and their potential effects on contemporary hunter and gatherers. Our vinual reality tools also introduce interactive variables (e.g., impactor physical properties, climate, vegetation, topography, and social complexity) to allow researchers and students to better investigate and evaluate the factors that significantly influence cosmic impact effects.

Masse, W Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Janecky, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Forte, Maurizio [UC MERCED; Barrientos, Gustavo [UNIV OF LA PLATA, ARG.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Program Impact Analysis | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Impact Analysis Program Impact Analysis BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. Since the inception of the Program 20 years ago, cumulative full-fuel-cycle (FFC) energy savings from 1992- 2012 are estimated to be approximately 4.8 quads and cost savings to consumers have been more than $44 billion. These savings have resulted primarily from the Program's activities which upgrade the model energy codes, accelerate their adoption by states and localities, and improve code compliance by means of various software tools and other types of training and technical support. The federal budgetary cost of the Program over this same period (1992-2012) was estimated to be around $110 million, resulting in a ratio of more than $400

427

Optimal Portfolio Selection Under Concave Price Impact  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we study an optimal portfolio selection problem under instantaneous price impact. Based on some empirical analysis in the literature, we model such impact as a concave function of the trading size when the trading size is small. The price impact can be thought of as either a liquidity cost or a transaction cost, but the concavity nature of the cost leads to some fundamental difference from those in the existing literature. We show that the problem can be reduced to an impulse control problem, but without fixed cost, and that the value function is a viscosity solution to a special type of Quasi-Variational Inequality (QVI). We also prove directly (without using the solution to the QVI) that the optimal strategy exists and more importantly, despite the absence of a fixed cost, it is still in a 'piecewise constant' form, reflecting a more practical perspective.

Ma Jin, E-mail: jinma@usc.edu [University of Southern California, Department of Mathematics (United States); Song Qingshuo, E-mail: songe.qingshuo@cityu.edu.hk [City University of Hong Kong, Department of Mathematics (Hong Kong); Xu Jing, E-mail: xujing8023@yahoo.com.cn [Chongqing University, School of Economics and Business Administration (China); Zhang Jianfeng, E-mail: jianfenz@usc.edu [University of Southern California, Department of Mathematics (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Improving landscape-level environmental impact evaluations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New spatial data and advancements in GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses of the large datasets required when making programmatic evaluations of the ecological effects of proposed activities that cover a large area or region. Understanding the environmental impacts of proposed human developments is critical to making appropriate siting decisions and designing mitigation strategies to reduce impacts on important resources. Impact analyses conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) or Environmental Assessments (EAs) are intended to determine the resource-specific impacts of proposed activities of federal agencies and their alternatives using the best available information. Impacts to ecological resources are often a primary focus of these analyses. Information used in NEPA analyses include some measure of the known or probable presence of plants and wildlife in the project area, with special emphasis placed on threatened, endangered, and other special-status species. Site-specific information pertaining to ecological resources is usually easier to obtain for small-scale activities such as a local facility, road, or transmission upgrade project, where the ability to conduct fieldwork is more often feasible. However, site-specific data is more difficult-and sometimes impossible-to obtain for proposed activities that could affect a large area or region. These types of analyses often are considered in programmatic NEPA documents, in which a federal agency evaluates the implementation of a broad program or plan. Under these programmatic evaluations, the exact location and size of developments are often not known. Because obtaining quantitative information for ecological resources at such large spatial scales is difficult, programmatic impact evaluations typically rely on sketchy or partial information such as recorded species occurrences, species ranges, and general habitat descriptions. However, new spatial data and improved GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses using large, readily available datasets. The availability of large-scale regional data such as GAP land-cover models or species habitat suitability models, combined with more robust spatial analysis procedures available through ArcGIS for Desktop software, allowed the analysis of multiple datasets at large spatial scales. This enabled researchers to surpass previous qualitative evaluations by developing a more accurate and quantitative approach for determining the environmental impacts of human activities at larger spatial scales. These approaches, combined with the utility of ModelBuilder and operability of Python scripts in ArcGIS, allow a more timely and cost-effective synthesis of available spatial data for programmatic evaluations and add a quantitative basis to environmental decision making.

Walston, L.J.; LaGory, K.E.; Vinikour, W.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.L.; Cantwell, B. (Environmental Science Division)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A semantic approach to life cycle assessment applied on energy environmental impact data management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental impact assessment of goods and services is nowadays a major challenge for both economic and ethical reasons. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a well-accepted methodology for modelling environmental impacts of human activities. One stage ... Keywords: energy impact data management, life cycle assessment, ontology

Benjamin Bertin; Vasile-Marian Scuturici; Emmanuel Risler; Jean-Marie Pinon

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Simplified Approach for Estimating Impacts of Electricity Generation (SIMPACTS) Agency/Company /Organization: International Atomic Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Agriculture, Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.iaea.org/OurWork/ST/NE/Pess/PESSenergymodels.shtml References: Overview of IAEA PESS Models [1] Related Tools DNE21+ Integrated Global System Modeling Framework Prospective Outlook on Long-Term Energy Systems (POLES) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS

431

Statistical Modeling in Nonlinear Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of linear statistical methods in building climate prediction models is examined, particularly the use of anomalies. The authors perspective is that the climate system is a nonlinear interacting system, so the impact of modeling using ...

Edward P. Campbell

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas Volume 2 - Appendices U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE/EIS-0407D September 2009 Cover photos courtesy of (left to right): Southeast Renewable Fuels, LLC DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory Public domain Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas Volume 2 - Appendices U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE/EIS-0407D September 2009 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) COOPERATING AGENCY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development is a cooperating

433

Economic Impact & Diversity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ECONOMIC IMPACT AND DIVERSITY ECONOMIC IMPACT AND DIVERSITY FOURTH QUARTER STATUS (As of August 10, 2006) Executive Summary: ED is responsible for managing the department's on-going small business programs, Affirmative Action programs, Employee Concerns program, EEO programs, and the Department's Minority Education program. ED serves as the support office for department-wide efforts to broaden and/or diversify the Department's base as it relates to employment, contracting and financial assistance awards. Where we are today: ED finalized the reorganization/restructuring process which reduced the offices within ED from five to three. Along with this process, ED moved the Employee Concerns and Special Emphasis activities and personnel to the Office of Civil Rights and Diversity

434

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextineword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site August 1, 2009 U.S. Department of Energy; Office of Science; Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) System location - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA Name of Information iPASS System for DOE Office of Science laboratory fellowship programs, including

435

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office of Information Resources - FOIAXpress Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Depamnf!l1tal Elel1l~nt&$ite july 23, 2009 Office of Information Resources Office of Management DOE Headquarters, Germantown, Germantown Computer Center Server Room Nameonl1fol'l11i1tion Sysleijlprl'f 'Project FOIAXpress ExhibitProj~tUID TBD NeWPIA ~ Update D Please indicate whether this is a new

436

Project X Broader Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Part-3 of "Project X: Accelerator Reference Design, Physics Opportunities, Broader Impacts". The proposed Project X proton accelerator at Fermilab, with multi-MW beam power and highly versatile beam formatting, will be a unique world-class facility to explore particle physics at the intensity frontier. Concurrently, however, it can also facilitate important scientific research beyond traditional particle physics and provide unprecedented opportunities in applications to problems of great national importance in the nuclear energy and security sector.

Asner, D M; Henderson, S; Plunkett, R; Wootan, D W; Peterson, M A; Senor, D; Tschirhart, R; Grasselino, A; Romanenko, A; MacDougall, G; Heffner, R H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Cluster-Impact Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers the theoretical interpretation of cluster-impact fusion (CIF). The proton energy spectrum of CIF shows it to be hot fusion on a microscopic atomic scale. The temperature of the reaction can be determined by the Doppler-like broadening of the 3.025 MeV proton line. The spectrum also indicates that the high temperature results from a one-dimensional rather than a three-dimensional velocity distribution.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

Müller, Jens-Dominik

439

Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide This Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide describes and provides guidance...

440

Building Technologies Office: History and Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Impacts on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: History and Impacts on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: History and Impacts on Delicious Rank Building...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New AtmosphereSoilVegetation Model. Part II: Impacts on In-Canopy Latent Heat Flux over a Winter Wheat Field Determined by Detailed Calculation of Canopy Radiation Transmission and Stomatal Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the validation and sensitivity analysis of an atmospheresoilvegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and a radiation scheme for the transmission ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Simulating the Impact of Climate Change on Runoff in a Typical River Catchment of the Loess Plateau, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming will have direct impacts on regional water resources by accelerating the hydrological cycle. Hydrological simulation is an important approach to studying climate change impacts. In this paper, a snowmelt-based water balance model (...

G. Q. Wang; J. Y. Zhang; Y. Q. Xuan; J. F. Liu; J. L. Jin; Z. X. Bao; R. M. He; C. S. Liu; Y. L. Liu; X. L. Yan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Simulating the Impact of Climate Change on Runoff in a Typical River Catchment of the Loess Plateau, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global warming will have direct impacts on regional water resources by accelerating the hydrological cycle. Hydrological simulation is an important approach to studying climate change impacts. In this paper, a Snowmelt-based Water Balance Model (...

G. Q. Wang; J. Y. Zhang; Y. Q. Xuan; J. L. Jin; Z. X. Bao; R. M. He; C. S. Liu; Y. L. Liu; X. L. Yan

444

Impact of potential large-scale irrigation on the West African Monsoon and its dependence on location of irrigated area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the impact of potential large-scale irrigation on the West African Monsoon using the MIT Regional Climate Model (MRCM). A new irrigation module is implemented to assess the impact of location and scheduling of irrigation on ...

Eun-Soon Im; Marc P. Marcella; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

445

Open Source Impacts of REDD Incentives Spreadsheet (OSIRIS) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Open Source Impacts of REDD Incentives Spreadsheet (OSIRIS) Open Source Impacts of REDD Incentives Spreadsheet (OSIRIS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Open Source Impacts of REDD Incentives Spreadsheet (OSIRIS) Agency/Company /Organization: Conservation International Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.conservation.org/FMG/Articles/Pages/ci_osiris_database_new_climate Cost: Free Open Source Impacts of REDD Incentives Spreadsheet (OSIRIS) Screenshot References: OSIRIS[1] OSIRIS (Open Source Impacts of REDD Incentives Spreadsheet) is a tool developed by a partnership of researchers from Conservation International (CI), the Center for Social and Economic Research on the Environment at the

446

FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

447

Environmental Impact of Smart Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Smart Grid Impact of Smart Grid January 10, 2011 2 Agenda * Review of Paper - Introduction - Key Areas of Impact - Findings - Conclusions - Recommended Topics for Further Research 3 3 Introduction Provide background for the current state of environmental impact of Smart Grid * Summarize key components of criteria pollutants from electricity and transportation sectors * Define the Smart Grid and how it can be used to reduce pollutants * Evaluate impact from Smart Grid on reducing pollutants through: - Demand Response - Electric Vehicles - Demand Side Management - Renewables and Distributed Energy Resources - Transmission and Distribution Systems Use this knowledge to address topics for further research Key Areas of Impact 5 Key Areas of Review and Consideration for Environmental Impacts *

448

Impact of improved building thermal efficiency on residential energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The impact of improved building shell thermal efficiency on residential energy demand is explored in a theoretical framework. The important economic literature on estimating the price elasticity of residential energy demand is reviewed. The specification of the residential energy demand model is presented. The data used are described. The empirical estimation of the residential energy demand model is described. (MHR)

Adams, R.C.; Rockwood, A.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Maneuvering impact boring head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Maneuvering impact boring head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

452

Impact of Agulhas Leakage on the Atlantic Overturning Circulation in the CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of Agulhas leakage variability on the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) is investigated. In this model an advective connection exists that ...

Wilbert Weijer; Erik van Sebille

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The Impact of Initial Condition Uncertainty on Numerical Simulations of Blocking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of initial condition uncertainty (ICU) on the onset and maintenance of eastern North Pacific blocking is examined within the framework of a general circulation model (GCM) and the perfect model assumption. Comparisons are made with the ...

Paul A. Nutter; Steven L. Mullen; David P. Baumhefner

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact December 14, 2010 - 12:35pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs This past Thursday, Secretary Chu delivered remarks to the Nanotechnology Innovation Summit in National Harbor, Maryland on how breakthroughs in nanotechnology are poised to transform the energy landscape. According to the National Nanotechnology Initiative, "Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at this

455

Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact December 14, 2010 - 12:35pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs This past Thursday, Secretary Chu delivered remarks to the Nanotechnology Innovation Summit in National Harbor, Maryland on how breakthroughs in nanotechnology are poised to transform the energy landscape. According to the National Nanotechnology Initiative, "Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. Encompassing nanoscale science, engineering, and technology, nanotechnology involves imaging, measuring, modeling, and manipulating matter at this

456

The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The economic impact of coal mining in New Mexico is examined in this report. The analysis is based on economic multipliers derived from an input-output model of the New Mexico economy. The direct, indirect, and induced impacts of coal mining in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment, and labor income for calendar year 2007. Tax, rental, and royalty income to the State of New Mexico are also presented. Historical coal production, reserves, and price data are also presented and discussed. The impacts of coal-fired electricity generation will be examined in a separate report.

Peach, James; Starbuck, C.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Environmental Impacts from the Operation of Cooling Towers at SRP  

SciTech Connect

An assessment has been made of the environmental effects that would occur from the operation of cooling towers at the SRP reactors. A more realistic numerical model of the cooling tower plume has been used to reassess the environmental impacts. The following effects were considered: (1) the occurrence of fog and ice and their impact on nearby structures, (2) drift and salt deposition from the plume, (3) the length and height of the visible plume, and (4) the possible dose from tritium.

Smith, F.G. III

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

458

Rail Yard Switcher Locomotive Electrification Opportunities, Challenges, and Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to identify opportunities, benefits, and challenges to the adoption of electric switcher locomotive technology within rail yards. The study uses public and industry data to evaluate the potential energy, atmospheric emissions, and economic impacts of electric switcher locomotive technology. An engineering model compares energy requirements of electric locomotives with their conventional diesel counterparts. Emissions impacts are estimated using energy consumption and emiss...

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Whatcom County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Whatcom County, Washington, near Mt. Baker, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Whatcom County was chosen due to both identified geotherrnal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Whatcom County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Geothermal : Economic Impacts of Geothermal Development in Skamania County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report estimates the local economic impacts that could be anticipated from the development of a 100 megawatt (MW) geothermal power plant in eastern Skamania County, Washington, near Mt. Adams, as shown in Figure 1. The study was commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration to quantify such impacts as part of regional confirmation work recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Skamania County was chosen due to both identified geothermal resources and developer interest. The analysis will focus on two phases: a plant construction phase, including well field development, generating plant construction, and transmission line construction; and an operations phase. Economic impacts will occur to the extent that construction and operations affect the local economy. These impacts will depend on the existing structure of the Skamania County economy and estimates of revenues that may accrue to the county as a result of plant construction, operation, and maintenance. Specific impacts may include additional direct employment at the plant, secondary impacts from wage payments being used to purchase locally produced goods and services, and impacts due to expenditures of royalty and tax payments received by the county. The basis for the analysis of economic impacts in this study is the US Forest Service IMPLAN input-output modeling system.

Lesser, Jonathan A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact models jedi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Modeling and Analysis of CSP Systems (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The models can also help analysts assess the potential market penetration and economic impact of CSP under different policy and deployment scenarios. The Solar Advisor Model (SAM)...

462

The Impact of Giant Cloud Condensation Nuclei on Drizzle Formation in Stratocumulus: Implications for Cloud Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of giant and ultragiant cloud condensation nuclei (>5-?m radius) on drizzle formation in stratocumuli is investigated within a number of modeling frameworks. These include a simple box model of collection, a trajectory ensemble model (...

Graham Feingold; William R. Cotton; Sonia M. Kreidenweis; Janel T. Davis

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Policy modeling in risk-driven environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the main challenges of applying ICT in policy modeling are described and a solution is proposed, which emphasizes policy impact exploration, monitoring and risk management. State of the art of policy modeling is given, with the summary ... Keywords: ICT, e-government, policy impact, policy modeling, risk management, semantic technology

Andrea K?; Andrs Gbor; Zoltn Szab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Cumulative Impacts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cumulative Impacts Cumulative Impacts Cumulative Impacts Selected documents on the topic of Cumulative Impacts and NEPA. June 24, 2005 Guidance on the Consideration of Past Actions in Cumulative Effects Analysis In this Memorandum, the Council on Environmental Quality provides guidance on the extent to which agencies of the Federal government are required to analyze the environmental effects of past actions when they describe the cumulative environmental effect of a proposed action. May 1, 1999 Consideration Of Cumulative Impacts In EPA Review of NEPA Documents The purpose of this guidance is to assist EPA reviewers of NEPA documents in providing accurate, realistic, and consistent comments on the assessment of cumulative impacts. The guidance focuses on specific issues that are

465

Baldrige Impacts, State by State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Several states are providing coverage for other states without current programs. To learn more about impacts and benefits in each state select a ...

466

On Impacts of Economic Growth.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents four papers on impacts of economic growth. The results indicate that faster economic growth improves the short-run political survival prospects of national (more)

Burke, Paul John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' 6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' w V' - > DOE/EIS--00 96-F-Vol.1 //C^ DE84 0 0 1 4 4 6 Final Environmental Impact Statement Remedial Actions at the Former Vitro Rare Metals Plant Site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania United States Department of Energy July 1983 Volume I r NOTICE } IPORTIONS OF THIS REPORT ARE ILLEGIBLE.' / It has been reproduced from the besi ' available copy to permit the broadest possible availability. This document is PUBLICLY RELEASABLl Authorizmg OfFtciai Date: Z P l ^ o " ? isTWBUTim ef T H I S m\jM] IS mm\m DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

468

Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement Statement for the Proposed Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas Volume 1 - Chapters U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE/EIS-0407D September 2009 Draft Cover photos courtesy of (left to right): Southeast Renewable Fuels, LLC DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory Public domain Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas Volume 1 - Chapters U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy DOE/EIS-0407D September 2009 DOE/EIS-0407D COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) COOPERATING AGENCY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development is a cooperating

469

Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model  

SciTech Connect

This model intends to provide projections of the impact on cost from changes in economic indicators such as the Gross Domestic Product and Producer Price Index.

Fingersh, L.; Hand, M.; Laxson, A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Microphysical Structure of the Marine Boundary Layer under Strong Wind and Spray Formation as Seen from Simulations Using a 2D Explicit Microphysical Model. Part I: The Impact of Large Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of large eddies (LE) on the marine boundary layer (MBL) microphysics and thermodynamics is investigated using a 2D Lagrangian model with spectral bin microphysics including effects of sea spray. The 600 m 400 m MBL computational area ...

J. Shpund; M. Pinsky; A. Khain

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Modelin the Transport and Chemical Evolution of Onshore and Offshore Emissions and Their Impact on Local and Regional Air Quality Using a Variable-Grid-Resolution Air Quality Model  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research project was to develop an innovative modeling technique to adequately model the offshore/onshore transport of pollutants. The variable-grid modeling approach that was developed alleviates many of the shortcomings of the traditionally used nested regular-grid modeling approach, in particular related to biases near boundaries and the excessive computational requirements when using nested grids. The Gulf of Mexico region contiguous to the Houston-Galveston area and southern Louisiana was chosen as a test bed for the variable-grid modeling approach. In addition to the onshore high pollution emissions from various sources in those areas, emissions from on-shore and off-shore oil and gas exploration and production are additional sources of air pollution. We identified case studies for which to perform meteorological and air quality model simulations. Our approach included developing and evaluating the meteorological, emissions, and chemistry-transport modeling components for the variable-grid applications, with special focus on the geographic areas where the finest grid resolution was used. We evaluated the performance of two atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) schemes, and identified the best-performing scheme for simulating mesoscale circulations for different grid resolutions. Use of a newly developed surface data assimilation scheme resulted in improved meteorological model simulations. We also successfully ingested satellite-derived sea surface temperatures (SSTs) into the meteorological model simulations, leading to further improvements in simulated wind, temperature, and moisture fields. These improved meteorological fields were important for variable-grid simulations, especially related to capturing the land-sea breeze circulations that are critical for modeling offshore/onshore transport of pollutants in the Gulf region. We developed SMOKE-VGR, the variable-grid version of the SMOKE emissions processing model, and tested and evaluated this new system. We completed the development of our variable-grid-resolution air quality model (MAQSIP-VGR) and performed various diagnostic tests related to an enhanced cloud parameterization scheme. We also developed an important tool for variable-grid graphics using Google Earth. We ran the MAQSIP-VGR for the Houston-Galveston and southern Louisiana domains for an August 23 to September 2, 2002, episode. Results of the modeling simulations highlighted the usefulness of the variable-grid modeling approach when simulating complex terrain processes related to land and sea close to an urban area. Our results showed that realistic SST patterns based on remote sensing are critical to capturing the land-sea breeze, in particular the inland intrusion of the reversed mesoscale circulation that is critical for simulating air pollution over urban areas near coastal regions. Besides capturing the correct horizontal gradient between land and sea surface temperatures, it is important to use an adequate ABL scheme in order to quantify correctly the vertical profiles of various parameters. The ABL scheme should capture the dynamics of the marine boundary layer, which is not often considered in a typical simulation over land. Our results further showed the effect of using satellite-derived SSTs on the horizontal and vertical extent of the modeled pollution pattern, and the increase in hourly ozone concentrations associated with changes in ABL characteristics resulting from the enhanced mesoscale circulation in the lower troposphere.

Adel Hanna

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

472

The Impact of using different parameterizations of unresolved horizontal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Impact of using different parameterizations of unresolved horizontal The Impact of using different parameterizations of unresolved horizontal variability of cloud water in the CCCma GCM Cole, Jason Meteorological Service of Canada Barker, Howard Meteorological Service of Canada Li, Jiangnan Canadian Center for Climate Modelling von Salzen, Knut Category: Modeling A current area of research in atmospheric radiative transfer involves description and inclusion of unresolved cloud structure in radiative transfer models that are used in global climate models (GCMs). One way of accounting for the structure of unresolved cloud in radiative transfer models is to use the Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation (McICA) (see the poster by H. Barker). In this poster we focus on description of unresolved horizontal variability of cloud water. By using McICA in the GCM

473

Catalysis-by-design impacts assessment  

SciTech Connect

Catalyst researchers have always recognized the need to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of catalytic processes, and have hoped that it would lead to developing a theoretical predictive base to guide the search for new catalysts. This understanding allows one to develop a set of hierarchical models, from fundamental atomic-level ab-initio models to detailed engineering simulations of reactor systems, to direct the search for optimized, efficient catalyst systems. During the last two decades, the explosions of advanced surface analysis techniques have helped considerably to develop the building blocks for understanding various catalytic reactions. An effort to couple these theoretical and experimental advances to develop a set of hierarchical models to predict the nature of catalytic materials is a program entitled Catalysis-by-Design (CRD).'' In assessing the potential impacts of CBD on US industry, the key point to remember is that the value of the program lies in developing a novel methodology to search for new catalyst systems. Industrial researchers can then use this methodology to develop proprietary catalysts. Most companies involved in catalyst R D have two types of ongoing projects. The first type, what we call market-driven R D,'' are projects that support and improve upon a company's existing product lines. Project of the second type, technology-driven R D,'' are longer term, involve the development of totally new catalysts, and are initiated through scientists' research ideas. The CBD approach will impact both types of projects. However, this analysis indicates that the near-term impacts will be on market-driven'' projects. The conclusions and recommendations presented in this report were obtained by the authors through personal interviews with individuals involved in a variety of industrial catalyst development programs and through the three CBD workshops held in the summer of 1989. 34 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

Fassbender, L L; Young, J K [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Sen, R K [Sen (R.K.) and Associates, Washington, DC (USA)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

European Commission Impact Assessment Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Commission Impact Assessment Tools European Commission Impact Assessment Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPTS-IA Tools Agency/Company /Organization: European Commission Joint Research Centre Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Other Website: iatools.jrc.ec.europa.eu/bin/view/IQTool/WebHome.html IPTS-IA Tools Screenshot References: IPTS-IA Tools[1] Overview "IA TOOLS is an online platform that provides Commission policy actors and impact assessment practitioners throughout Europe with a repository of guidance, information and best practices for the impact assessment of new policies and legislative measures. At one click, the IA TOOLS website provides expert and non-expert with guidance on the main steps to be

475

Power System Level Impacts of PHEVs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents investigations into various aspects of how plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) could impact the electric power system. The investigation is focused on impacts on the power system infrastructure and impacts on the primary fuel ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Air Quality Impact of Distributed Generation of Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality impact of distributed generation. California Energyquality impacts of distributed generation, Proceedings ofquality impacts of distributed generation, Proceedings of

Jing, Qiguo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z