Sample records for impact models jedi

  1. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

  2. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  3. Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

  4. Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

  5. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Downloading the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL isDataWorking with Us PhotoJEDI Models

  6. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  7. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  8. NREL: Energy Analysis - Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | NationalWebmaster To contactK-12BSM -JEDI Jobs

  9. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL isDataWorking with Us PhotoJEDI

  10. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  11. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWindJEDI

  12. JEDI Models | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search7JEDI

  13. transcript_jedi_model.doc | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    transcriptjedimodel.doc More Documents & Publications TAP Webcast Transcript July-29, 2009 Scenario Jedi Tools for Designing & Implementing Better Finance Programs...

  14. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL isDataWorking with Us Photo ofAModels

  15. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About JEDI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL isDataWorking with UsPublicationsMarine &

  16. JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power (Poster)

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWindJEDI II:

  17. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model and provides four case studies of potential offshore wind deployment scenarios in different regions of the...

  18. Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarmsPower Co LtdTN LLC JumpJilin HuayiJilin Wind

  19. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Advanced Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL isDataWorking with Us Photo

  20. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Limitations of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL isDataWorking with Us PhotoJEDIJEDI

  1. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Methodology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL isDataWorking with Us

  2. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL isDataWorking with UsPublications The

  3. NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid Integration NREL isDataWorking with UsPublications

  4. Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

  5. How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Project (TAP) for state and local officials; Gail Mosey and Eric Lantz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Wind Model.

  6. Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Starting more than a year ago, NREL initiated work to expand the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model to include fixed-bottom offshore wind technology. Following the completion of the...

  7. JEDI: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts Model, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation PeerNOON 2004 February 12, 2004 ¢CJEDI: Jobs

  8. Counting Jobs and Economic Impacts from Distributed Wind in the United States (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference poster describes the distributed wind Jobs and Economic Development Imapcts (JEDI) model. The goal of this work is to provide a model that estimates jobs and other economic effects associated with the domestic distributed wind industry. The distributed wind JEDI model is a free input-output model that estimates employment and other impacts resulting from an investment in distributed wind installations. Default inputs are from installers and industry experts and are based on existing projects. User input can be minimal (use defaults) or very detailed for more precise results. JEDI can help evaluate potential scenarios, current or future; inform stakeholders and decision-makers; assist businesses in evaluating economic development impacts and estimating jobs; assist government organizations with planning and evaluating and developing communities.

  9. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for Offshore Wind, is a computer tool for studying the economic impacts of fixed-bottom offshore wind projects in the United States. This presentation provides the results of an analysis of four offshore wind development scenarios in the Southeast Atlantic, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions.

  10. Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWindJEDIJob and

  11. Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NRELs JEDI Model

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWindJEDIJob%

  12. How Many Jobs are there in the Domestic Small Wind Industry? (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster introduces the preliminary small wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model.

  13. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  14. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  15. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.; Flores, F.; Zammit, D.; Kraemer, M.; Miles, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Mid-Atlantic region.

  16. Preliminary Analysis of the Jobs and Economic Impacts of Renewable Energy Projects Supported by the ..Section..1603 Treasury Grant Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, D.; Porro, G.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis responds to a request from the Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to estimate the direct and indirect jobs and economic impacts of projects supported by the Section 1603 Treasury grant program. The analysis employs the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models to estimate the gross jobs, earnings, and economic output supported by the construction and operation of the large wind (greater than 1 MW) and solar photovoltaic (PV) projects funded by the Section 1603 grant program.

  17. Economic Impacts from Indiana's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.; Flores-Espino, F.; Hauser, R.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of Indiana's available wind resource indicates that the development of wind power infrastructure has the potential to support millions of dollars of economic activity in the state. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, are tools used to estimate some of the economic impacts of energy projects at the state level. JEDI calculates results in the form of jobs, earnings, and economic output in three categories: project development and onsite labor, local revenue and supply chain, and induced impacts. According to this analysis, the first 1,000 MW of wind power development in Indiana (projects built between 2008 and 2011): supported employment totaling more than 4,400 full-time-equivalent jobs in Indiana during the construction periods; supports approximately 260 ongoing Indiana jobs; supported nearly $570 million in economic activity for Indiana during the construction periods; supported and continues to support nearly $40 million in annual Indiana economic activity during the operating periods; generates more than $8 million in annual property taxes; generates nearly $4 million annually in income for Indiana landowners who lease their land for wind energy projects.

  18. Scenario Jedi

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    right at the point of entry. This obviates the inconvenience of having to flip to search for information in FAQs. - Marked increase in use of "breadcrumbs," hot link buttons...

  19. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Southeast Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Southeast (defined here as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia).

  20. DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for...

  1. Educating the Army's Jedi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Kevin Charles

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the decisions taken during the development of the concept for the School of Advanced Military Studies and its subsequent refinement in the first ten years of its history. The other line of inquiry ...

  2. Climate Impact of Transportation A Model Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girod, Bastien; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Grahn, Maria; Kitous, Alban; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global service demand (passenger-kilometers, ton-kilometers), fuel use, and CO2 emissions of five different global transport models using harmonized input assumptions on income and population. For four models we also evaluate the impact of a carbon tax. All models project a steep increase in service demand over the century. Technology is important for limiting energy consumption and CO2 emissions, but quite radical changes in the technology mix are required to stabilize or reverse the trend. While all models project liquid fossil fuels dominating up to 2050, they differ regarding the use of alternative fuels (natural gas, hydrogen, biofuels, and electricity), because of different fuel price projections. The carbon tax of US$200/tCO2 in 2050 stabilizes or reverses global emission growth in all models. Besides common findings many differences in the model assumptions and projections indicate room for improvement in modeling and empirical description of the transport system.

  3. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

  4. Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USA MODELLING THE IMPACT OF USER BEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTIONUSA The second point of interest to research was modelling the excess energy consumptionUSA Figure 3. Actual heating and hot water energy consumption

  5. Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of Aerosols Over California Research may clarify the effectiveness of regional pollution controls May 28, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper Contact: Linda Vu,...

  6. Modeling impact of urban air pollution on health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Modeling impact of urban air pollution on health: Preliminary results and testing a methodology with hospitals for the study of air pollution impact on specific deceases (old people admitted in emergency morbidity data and pollutants concentrations at the regional/urban scale Health and air quality in France

  7. A quasi-static model of drop impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    We develop a conceptually simple theoretical model of non-wetting drop impact on a rigid surface at small Weber numbers. Flat and curved impactor surfaces are considered, and the influence of surface curvature is elucidated. ...

  8. Digestion Modelling in the Small Intestine : Impact of Dietary Fibre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Digestion Modelling in the Small Intestine : Impact of Dietary Fibre M. Taghipoor , G. Barles , C. Georgelin , J.R. Licois & Ph. Lescoat Abstract In this work, we continue the modelling of the digestion the role of dietary fibre on digestion, we model their two principal physiochemical characteristics which

  9. Ionosphere Threat to LAAS: Updated Model, User Impact, and Mitigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 Ionosphere Threat to LAAS: Updated Model, User Impact, and Mitigations Ming Luo, Sam Pullen-4], a "linear spatial gradient front" model was established and a threat space was extrapolated based on data from the 6 April 2000 ionospheric storm. User vertical error was estimated based on this threat model

  10. Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Opportunities in Earth Systems Modeling and Climate Impacts on Hydrology and Water research assistantships available in the general area of earth systems modeling and climate impacts

  11. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locatelli, R.

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model ...

  12. Neutrino Mass Models: Impact of non-zero reactor angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen F. King

    2011-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk neutrino mass models are reviewed and the impact of a non-zero reactor angle and other deviations from tri-bimaximal mixing are discussed. We propose some benchmark models, where the only way to discriminate between them is by high precision neutrino oscillation experiments.

  13. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : model and implementation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report a model for simulating aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls is presented. The model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular (DEM) package within the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Modeling the interactions of small particles is relevant to a number of applications (e.g., soils, powders, colloidal suspensions, etc.). Modeling the behavior of aerosol particles during agglomeration and cluster dynamics upon impact with a wall is of particular interest. In this report we describe preliminary efforts to develop and implement physical models for aerosol particle interactions. Future work will consist of deploying these models to simulate aerosol cluster behavior upon impact with a rigid wall for the purpose of developing relationships for impact speed and probability of stick/bounce/break-up as well as to assess the distribution of cluster sizes if break-up occurs. These relationships will be developed consistent with the need for inputs into system-level codes. Section 2 gives background and details on the physical model as well as implementations issues. Section 3 presents some preliminary results which lead to discussion in Section 4 of future plans.

  14. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) of the causative parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida bitten by infected insect vectors. There are 130 species in the subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera

  15. An Impact Assessment Model for Distributed Adaptive Security Situation Assessment*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1 An Impact Assessment Model for Distributed Adaptive Security Situation Assessment* Mark Heckman mechanism is not simply to stop attacks, but to protect a computing resource so that the resource can continue to perform its function. A computing resource, however, is only a component of a larger system

  16. Impacts of Contaminant Storage on Indoor Air Quality: Model Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development. Atmospheric Environment. LBNL the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure

  17. Original article Modelling herbicide treatment impact on groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Modelling herbicide treatment impact on groundwater quality in a central Italy of different weed control strategies on groundwater quality in a Central Italy area (Umbria) where the drinking and twenty-two weed control strategies were tested for their groundwater concentrations. Two maps reporting

  18. Scenario Jedi | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - Policy Advisor, EnergyA look at toolsThis document summarizes

  19. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming, E-mail: qmzhang@bit.edu.cn; Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Gong, Zizheng [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Reliability and Environment Engineering, Beijing Institute of Spacecraft Environment Engineering, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4?mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23?mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3?km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e})???v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  20. Dynamical modeling of the Deep Impact dust ejecta cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanyu Bonev; Nancy Ageorges; Stefano Bagnulo; Luis Barrera; Hermann B{}hnhardt; Olivier Hainaut; Emmanuel Jehin; Hans-Ullrich K{}ufl; Florian Kerber; Gaspare LoCurto; Jean Manfroid; Olivier Marco; Eric Pantin; Emanuela Pompei; Ivo Saviane; Fernando Selman; Chris Sterken; Heike Rauer; Gian Paolo Tozzi; Michael Weiler

    2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The collision of Deep Impact with comet 9P/Tempel 1 generated a bright cloud of dust which dissipated during several days after the impact. The brightness variations of this cloud and the changes of its position and shape are governed by the physical properties of the dust grains. We use a Monte Carlo model to describe the evolution of the post-impact dust plume. The results of our dynamical simulations are compared to the data obtained with FORS2, the FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph for the VLT of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), to derive the particle size distribution and the total amount of material contained in the dust ejecta cloud.

  1. Modeling the onset of photosynthesis after the Chicxulub asteroid impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Noel; Martin, Osmel; Rojas, Reinaldo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We do a preliminary modelling of the photosynthetic rates of phytoplankton at the very beginning of the Paleogene, just after the impact of the Chicxulub asteroid, which decisively contributed to the last known mass extinction of the Phanerozoic eon. We assume the worst possible scenario from the photobiological point of view: an already clear atmosphere with no ozone, as the timescale for soot and dust settling (years) is smaller than that of the full ozone regeneration (decades). Even in these conditions we show that most phytoplankton species would have had reasonable potential for photosynthesis in all the three main optical ocean water types. This modelling could help explain why the recovery of phytoplankton was relatively rapid after the huge environmental stress of that asteroid impact. In a more general scope, it also reminds us of the great resilience of the unicellular biosphere against huge environmental perturbations.

  2. Modeling Climate and Production-related Impacts on Ice-core Beryllium-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Climate and Production-related Impacts on Ice-core Beryllium-10 Christy Veeder Submitted Modeling Climate and Production-related Impacts on Ice-core Beryllium-10 Christy Veeder I use the Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE general circulation model to ex- amine the how beryllium-10, a cosmogenic

  3. Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie M.; McNeil, Michael A.

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a model to estimate the nationalenergy and economic impacts of the Department of Energy Building Americaprogram. The program goal is to improve energy performance in newresidential construction, by working with builders to design andconstruct energy-efficient homes at minimal cost. The model is anadaptation of the method used to calculate the national energy savingsfor appliance energy efficiency standards. The main difference is thatthe key decision here is not the consumer decision to buy anefficienthouse, but rather the builder decision to offer such a house inthe market. The builder decision is treated by developing a number ofscenarios in which the relative importance of first costs vs. energysavings is varied.

  4. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Hult, Erin L.

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

  5. Influence of air quality model resolution on uncertainty associated with health impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Tammy M.

    We use regional air quality modeling to evaluate the impact of model resolution on uncertainty associated with the human health benefits resulting from proposed air quality regulations. Using a regional photochemical model ...

  6. Modeling of Wave Impact Using a Pendulum System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Chunyong

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    For high speed vessels and offshore structures, wave impact, a main source of environmental loads, causes high local stresses and structural failure. However, the prediction of wave impact loads presents numerous challenges due to the complex nature...

  7. Modeling of Wave Impact Using a Pendulum System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Chunyong

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    For high speed vessels and offshore structures, wave impact, a main source of environmental loads, causes high local stresses and structural failure. However, the prediction of wave impact loads presents numerous challenges due to the complex nature...

  8. Webinar: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model, originally presented on May 22, 2012.

  9. Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Rafael

    Evaluation of Economic Impact of Three-Dimensional Modeling in Precast Concrete Engineering Rafael (IT); Concrete, precast; Economic factors; Three-dimensional models. Introduction "The application to this; but the funda- mental reason undoubtedly was economic." (Mitchell 1977). Intuitive assessments

  10. Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

  11. Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks Committee Probabilistic Modelling of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Impacts on Distribution Networks) Departmental Member Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) represent a promising future direction

  12. Impact fracture behavior of model system modified polypropylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, Albert Jesse

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -edge-notched three-point-bend tests were performed to obtain the values of fracture toughness. A correlation exists between the Izod impact values and the size of the damage zone after fracture. Damage analysis using the double-notch four-point-bend Charpy impact...

  13. Modeling environmental impact of unfired bricks in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachau Walker, Miriam E. (Miriam Elizabeth)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brick manufacturing requires a considerable amount of energy and land, but these numbers have been difficult to quantify in rural parts of the developing world. The environmental impact of unfired bricks in India is ...

  14. Valuing Climate Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models: The MIT IGSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a strategy for investigating the impacts of climate change on Earths physical, biological and human resources and links to their socio-economic consequences. The features of the integrated global system framework ...

  15. Wednesday, March 25, 2009 IMPACTS I: MODELS AND EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    of the Decomposition Boundary of CaCO3 at High Temperature: Implications for Impact-induced Degassing of CaCO3 [#1569] We experimentally determined the decomposition boundary of CaCO3 up to ~5000 K and ~10 GPa with a technique of laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Then, impact-induced degassing of CaCO3 is discussed using

  16. Impact of Ethanol on Benzene Plume Lengths: Microbial and Modeling Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Impact of Ethanol on Benzene Plume Lengths: Microbial and Modeling Studies Rula A. Deeb1 ; Jonathan with Federal Clean Air Act requirements for carbon monoxide and ozone attainment, ethanol is being considered as a replacement for MTBE. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential impact of ethanol on benzene

  17. Accepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    geometrical effects on divertor erosion dynamics. Lithium expansion in divertor and SOL areas may potentiallyAccepted Manuscript Integrated models to study the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium the impact of ELMs and disruptions on lithium in the NSTX divertor, Journal of Nuclear Materials (2010), doi

  18. Evolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Evolution of a Visual Impact Model to Evaluate Nuclear Plant Siting and Design Option1 2/ Brian A and economic options for the analysis of nuclear plant siting possibilities (Burnham 1974; Jones, April 1975 of nuclear plant siting options for the AEC. BNWL's multi-disciplinary impact evaluation pro- cedure required

  19. Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1007, doi:10.1029/2008GB003180. 1. Introduction [2] Carbon (C) sequestration has

  20. Impact of Jitter-based Techniques on Flooding over Wireless Ad hoc Networks: Model and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Impact of Jitter-based Techniques on Flooding over Wireless Ad hoc Networks: Model and Analysis Philippe.Jacquet@inria.fr Emmanuel Baccelli INRIA, France Emmanuel.Baccelli@inria.fr Abstract--Jitter. This paper investigates on the impact of the standardized jitter mechanism on network-wide packet

  1. Coral reefs reduce tsunami impact in model simulations Catherine M. Kunkel,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    Coral reefs reduce tsunami impact in model simulations Catherine M. Kunkel,1 Robert W. Hallberg,2 14 December 2006. [1] Significant buffering of the impact of tsunamis by coral reefs is suggested against tsunamis. Citation: Kunkel, C. M., R. W. Hallberg, and M. Oppenheimer (2006), Coral reefs reduce

  2. Modeling High-Impact Weather and Climate: Lessons From a Tropical Cyclone Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Suzuki-Parker, Asuka

    2013-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the societal impact of a weather event increases with the rarity of the event, our current ability to assess extreme events and their impacts is limited by not only rarity but also by current model fidelity and a lack of understanding of the underlying physical processes. This challenge is driving fresh approaches to assess high-impact weather and climate. Recent lessons learned in modeling high-impact weather and climate are presented using the case of tropical cyclones as an illustrative example. Through examples using the Nested Regional Climate Model to dynamically downscale large-scale climate data the need to treat bias in the driving data is illustrated. Domain size, location, and resolution are also shown to be critical and should be guided by the need to: include relevant regional climate physical processes; resolve key impact parameters; and to accurately simulate the response to changes in external forcing. The notion of sufficient model resolution is introduced together with the added value in combining dynamical and statistical assessments to fill out the parent distribution of high-impact parameters. Finally, through the example of a tropical cyclone damage index, direct impact assessments are resented as powerful tools that distill complex datasets into concise statements on likely impact, and as highly effective communication devices.

  3. Modeling the large-scale water balance impact of different irrigation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Modeling the large-scale water balance impact of different irrigation systems J. P. Evans1 and B. F precipitation causes the Turkish government to invest in modernizing its own irrigation systems balance impact of different irrigation systems, Water Resour. Res., 44, W08448, doi:10.1029/2007WR006671

  4. Impact of aerothermal modeling on the estimation of turbine blade life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collin, Jean E., 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of aerothermal modeling on estimates of turbine blade heat transfer and life was assessed for three high pressure turbine blades. The work was conducted as part of a project aimed at the evaluation of the effect ...

  5. Dynamic Model for Assessing Impact of Regeneration Actions on System Availability: Application to Weapon Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Dynamic Model for Assessing Impact of Regeneration Actions on System Availability: Application) Key Words: failure, damage, regeneration, availability assessment, stochastic activity networks, Monte Carlo simulations SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS Availability is a determining factor in systems characterization

  6. Modeling the Impact of Agricultural Terrace Walls on Spatial Patterns of Erosion and Landscape Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaubius, Jennifer

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the Impact of Agricultural Terrace Walls on Spatial Patterns of Erosion and Landscape Evolution Jennifer Glaubius Department of Geography University of Kansas Research Objectives 2 1. Implement terrace walls within a landscape evolution...

  7. Webinar: DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model, originally presented on December 11, 2012.

  8. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  9. 11.482J / 1.285J / ESD.193J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polenske, Karen R.

    Reviews regional economic theories and models and provides students with experience in using alternative economic impact assessment models on microcomputers. Problem sets are oriented around infrastructure, housing, energy, ...

  10. LAAS Ionosphere Spatial Gradient Threat Model and Impact of LGF and Airborne Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    LAAS Ionosphere Spatial Gradient Threat Model and Impact of LGF and Airborne Monitoring Ming Luo of users for the current Category I LAAS architecture. In the ionosphere threat model used by previous-case ionosphere conditions. In this paper, the ionosphere threat model is reexamined based on WAAS and IGS data

  11. An impact model of the electrostatic force: Coulomb's law re-visited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Wilhelm; B. N. Dwivedi; H. Wilhelm

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrostatic force is described in this model by the action of electric dipole distributions on charged particles. The individual hypothetical dipoles are propagating at the speed of light in vacuum transferring momentum and energy between charges through interactions on a local basis. The model is constructed in analogy to an impact model describing the gravitational forces.

  12. DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department of Energy -StateOffshore Wind Economic ImpactsStudent

  13. Modeling the Global Trade and Environmental Impacts of Biofuel Policies |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers IncMississippi:MiyiImpacts (MESSAGE)

  14. Optimal Execution Under Jump Models For Uncertain Price Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    May 12, 2011 ... Unfortunately current quantitative analysis of the execution cost ... Thus risk assessment under this model, particularly the tail risk, is likely to be...

  15. Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an area that currently supports important populations of greater sage-grouse and has high wind energy development potential. This early model prototype demonstrated the utility of...

  16. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials to the timescale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model

  17. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avedisian, C. T. (Cornell University, Ithaca, NY); Presser, Cary (National Institute of Standard & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); DesJardin, Paul Edward (University at Buffalo, New York, NY); Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  18. Modeling of CO2 Reduction Impacts on Energy Prices with Modelica Philip Machanick1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machanick, Philip

    Modeling of CO2 Reduction Impacts on Energy Prices with Modelica Philip Machanick1 , Ariel Liebman1 and benefits, which may be better addressed by earlier interven- tion. In this paper we present a Modelica at the ap- propriate rate. In this paper we present a Modelica model which explores the trade

  19. Temperature-aware NBTI modeling and the impact of input vector control on performance degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yu

    Temperature-aware NBTI modeling and the impact of input vector control on performance degradation performance degradation in dig- ital circuits by affecting PMOS threshold voltage, is emerging as one devices and propose a novel temporal performance degradation model for digital cir- cuits considering

  20. Study of the impact of stochasticity on fish stock using a state space model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchesne, Thierry

    Study of the impact of stochasticity on fish stock using a state space model Thierry Duchesne and fish stock CRM, Oct. 19, 2007 1 / 23 #12;Summary Outline 1 Introduction 2 Equilibrium conditions 3 Stochastic Surplus Production Model 4 Estimation of the fish stock from data 5 Example: Georges Bank Haddock

  1. A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

  2. Energy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy consumption in cellular network: ON-OFF model and impact of mobility Thanh Tung Vu Telecom consumption in cellular network and we focus on the distribution of energy consumed by a base station. We first define the energy consumption model, in which the consumed energy is divided into two parts

  3. Modeling Low Impact Development at the Small-Watershed Scale: Implications for the Decision Making Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Mijin

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    and soluble phosphorus loadings according to the impact of the three types of land use changes (conversion to deforestation, urbanization, and agricultural land) using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Bhattarai et al. (2011) investigated water... higher peak flow and nitrogen and phosphorus loads than the other two designs because of high impervious surfaces and low open space and urban forests. Yang and Li (2011) evaluated the impact of two different urban planning types (high-density and low...

  4. Seventh International Symposium on Technology and Mine Problem, NPS, Monterey, California, USA, 2-4 May, 2006 1 Abstract -The Navy's Impact Burial Model (IMPACT35)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    -4 May, 2006 1 1 Abstract - The Navy's Impact Burial Model (IMPACT35) predicts the cylindrical mine.S. Navy from "blue" water, anti-Soviet focus, towards a concentration on the regional littoral threats of the world. With the increasing number of regional and asymmetric threats, the Navy must operate effectively

  5. 3D Rigid Body Impact Burial Prediction Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    -fixed coordinate (E-coordinate) cylinder's main-axis following coordinate (M-coordinate) hydrodynamic force-Coordiante Hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) are easily calculated. #12;Moment of Momentum Equations #12;Interfacial;Experiment Hydrodynamic Model Development Behavior of Falling Cylinder in Water Column (Chaotic

  6. Digestion Modelling in the Small Intestine : Impact of Dietary Fibre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; Georgelin, Christine; Licois, Jean-Ren; Lescoat, Philippe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we continue the modelling of the digestion in the small intestine, started in a previous article, by investigating the effects of dietary fibre. We recall that this model aims at taking into account the three main phenomena of the digestion, namely the transit of the bolus, the degradation of feedstuffs and the absorption through the intestinal wall. In order to study the role of dietary fibre on digestion, we model their two principal physiochemical characteristics which interact with the function of the small intestine, i.e. viscosity and water holding capacity. This leads us to consider some features of digestion which have not been taken into account previously, in particular the interrelationship between the evolution of dry matter and water in the bolus. The numerical results are in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fibre on the velocity of bolus along the small intestine and on its degradation. These results highlight the negative effect of soluble dietary fibre on d...

  7. Modeling In-stream Tidal Energy Extraction and Its Potential Environmental Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Copping, Andrea; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in harnessing in-stream tidal energy in response to concerns of increasing energy demand and to mitigate climate change impacts. While many studies have been conducted to assess and map tidal energy resources, efforts for quantifying the associated potential environmental impacts have been limited. This paper presents the development of a tidal turbine module within a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model and its application for assessing the potential environmental impacts associated with tidal energy extraction. The model is used to investigate in-stream tidal energy extraction and associated impacts on estuarine hydrodynamic and biological processes in a tidally dominant estuary. A series of numerical experiments with varying numbers and configurations of turbines installed in an idealized estuary were carried out to assess the changes in the hydrodynamics and biological processes due to tidal energy extraction. Model results indicated that a large number of turbines are required to extract the maximum tidal energy and cause significant reduction of the volume flux. Preliminary model results also indicate that extraction of tidal energy increases vertical mixing and decreases flushing rate in a stratified estuary. The tidal turbine model was applied to simulate tidal energy extraction in Puget Sound, a large fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast.

  8. Environmental Impact and Sustainability Applied General Equilibrium Model

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolisEnviroMission Ltd JumpFund Place:

  9. About the Impact of Model Risk on Capital Reserves: A Quantitative Analysis. Philip Bertram1, Philipp Sibbertsen and Gerhard Stahl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Stefan

    About the Impact of Model Risk on Capital Reserves: A Quantitative Analysis. Philip Bertram1 the idea of model risk in the environment of internal model building. We define various types of model risk including estimation risk, model risk in distri- bution and model risk in functional form

  10. Using Dempster-Shafer Theory to model uncertainty in climate change and environmental impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Using Dempster-Shafer Theory to model uncertainty in climate change and environmental impact]. The design wave overtopping in a context of changing climate cannot be deterministically predicted due defense structure due to (1) uncertain elevation of the mean water level and (2) uncertain level of storm

  11. The Impact of Mathematical Modeling on the Production of Special Purpose Cement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    The Impact of Mathematical Modeling on the Production of Special Purpose Cement Domenico Lahaye in the production industry? Our partnership with Almatis B.V., a special purpose cement manufacturer, resulted with experts in various engineering disciplines. Production of Special Purpose Cement Commonly used cement

  12. Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    . Research has targeted the assessment toward economic loss evaluation Grossman and Alan 1995; Ofiara 2001Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process and spatial characteristics of different water quality parameters, and simulating economic loss of water

  13. Modeling to discern nitrogen fertilization impacts on carbon sequestration in a Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling to discern nitrogen fertilization impacts on carbon sequestration in a Pacific Northwest A R K J O H N S O N } *LREIS Institute of Geographic Sciences & Nature Resources Research, Chinese of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4, zBiometeorology and Soil Physics

  14. TOOLS TO MODEL ROAD IMPACTS Providing scientific knowledge and technology to sustain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    TOOLS TO MODEL ROAD IMPACTS Providing scientific knowledge and technology to sustain our nation://www.fs.fed.us/rm/boise/AWAE_home.shtml BACKGROUND The Rocky Mountain Research Station has a long his- tory of developing tools that meet the needs. Existing tools have been optimized to answer particular man- agement questions at specific spatial scales

  15. The Impact of the Topology on Cascading Failures in a Power Grid Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Mieghem, Piet

    allocation according to Kirchoff Laws. Experimental verification on synthetic power systems showsThe Impact of the Topology on Cascading Failures in a Power Grid Model Yakup Koa,1 Martijn on the IEEE 118 bus power system to improve its robustness against cascading failures. 1. Introduction

  16. MODELING DROUGHT IMPACT ON H. BRASILIENSIS TRANSPIRATION, GROWTH AND LATEX PRODUCTION OF A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , growth and production for a pure rubber tree stand. However, in our conditions of much degraded soil and latex production are two distinct physiological phenomena in rubber trees (Rao et al., 19981 MODELING DROUGHT IMPACT ON H. BRASILIENSIS 2 TRANSPIRATION, GROWTH AND LATEX PRODUCTION

  17. MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste

    MODELLING RADIATIVELY ACTIVE WATER-ICE CLOUDS: IMPACT ON THE THERMAL STRUCTURE AND WATER CYCLE. J. The essential role of water-ice clouds in shaping the thermal structure of the martian atmosphere has been long presumed [1] but neglected in GCMs because of the lack of observations and difficulty to predict

  18. Modeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    events (SPEs) the flux of high-energy protons from the Sun is markedly increased. In order to investigateModeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar charged particles of solar and cosmic origin. Therefore variations of the geomagnetic field occurring

  19. A modeling study of benthic detritus flux's impacts on heterotrophic processes in Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Changsheng

    A modeling study of benthic detritus flux's impacts on heterotrophic processes in Lake Michigan food web in Lake Michigan were examined using a three- dimensional (3-D) coupled biological to simulate the heterotrophic process in southern Lake Michigan. INDEX TERMS: 4815 Oceanography: Biological

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER "Modeling the impact of natural resource-based poverty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    ORIGINAL PAPER "Modeling the impact of natural resource-based poverty traps on food security and Dynamic Poverty Traps in East Africa. The Rockefeller Foundation is providing key financial support the interactions between natural resource-based poverty traps and food security for small- holder farms in highland

  1. Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled with CHIMERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    Impact of realistic hourly emissions profiles on air pollutants concentrations modelled Keywords: Atmospheric composition European air quality Anthropogenic emissions a b s t r a c t Regional inputs data like anthropogenic surface emissions of NOx, VOCs and particulate matter. These emissions

  2. Evaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    Accepted 13 March 2013 Available online 26 March 2013 Keywords: Snow Energy-balance Temperature intercepts snow- fall, alters the snow/atmosphere energy exchange and reduces wind speed. Dense canopies tendEvaluation of distributed hydrologic impacts of temperature-index and energy-based snow models

  3. A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through Validity Testing of a Comparitive-Projection Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, J. E.; Heideman, K. E.

    An established economic simulation model for reservoir development was applied to ten reservoir projects throughout Texas. The model as a predictor of economic impact was given a difficult test because of the diversity of geographic, economic...

  4. A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through Validity Testing of a Comparitive-Projection Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, J. E.; Heideman, K. E.

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An established economic simulation model for reservoir development was applied to ten reservoir projects throughout Texas. The model as a predictor of economic impact was given a difficult test because of the diversity of ...

  5. Abstract--This paper presents the impact of different types of load models in distribution network with distributed wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    as a major enabler of the smart grid for the integration of small and medium sized renewable energy based that modeling of loads has a significant impact on the voltage dynamics of the distribution systemAbstract--This paper presents the impact of different types of load models in distribution network

  6. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  7. Methods for modeling impact-induced reactivity changes in small reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tallman, Tyler N.; Radel, Tracy E.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Villa, Daniel L.; Smith, Brandon M. (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Radel, Ross F.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wilson, Paul Philip Hood (U. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes techniques for determining impact deformation and the subsequent reactivity change for a space reactor impacting the ground following a potential launch accident or for large fuel bundles in a shipping container following an accident. This technique could be used to determine the margin of subcriticality for such potential accidents. Specifically, the approach couples a finite element continuum mechanics model (Pronto3D or Presto) with a neutronics code (MCNP). DAGMC, developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is used to enable MCNP geometric queries to be performed using Pronto3D output. This paper summarizes what has been done historically for reactor launch analysis, describes the impact criticality analysis methodology, and presents preliminary results using representative reactor designs.

  8. Analysis of the environmental impact of China based on STIRPAT model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin Shoufu, E-mail: linshf2003@126.co [School of Economics, FuJian Normal University, Fuzhou City, 350007, Fujian Province (China) and School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China) and Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Zhao Dingtao, E-mail: box@ustc.edu.c [School of Management, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei City, 230026, Anhui Province (China); Marinova, Dora, E-mail: D.Marinova@curtin.edu.a [Curtin University Sustainability Policy Institute, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BoxU1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming that energy consumption is the main source of GHG emissions in China, this paper analyses the effect of population, urbanisation level, GDP per capita, industrialisation level and energy intensity on the country's environmental impact using the STIRPAT model with data for 1978-2006. The analysis shows that population has the largest potential effect on environmental impact, followed by urbanisation level, industrialisation level, GDP per capita and energy intensity. Hence, China's One Child Policy, which restrains rapid population growth, has been an effective way of reducing the country's environmental impact. However, due to the difference in growth rates, GDP per capita had a higher effect on the environmental impact, contributing to 38% of its increase (while population's contribution was at 32%). The rapid decrease in energy intensity was the main factor restraining the increase in China's environmental impact but recently it has also been rising. Against this background, the future of the country looks bleak unless a change in human behaviour towards more ecologically sensitive economic choices occurs.

  9. A Modeling Study of the Potential Water Quality Impacts from In-Stream Tidal Energy Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To assess the effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality in a simplified estuarine system, which consists of a tidal bay connected to the coastal ocean through a narrow channel where energy is extracted using in-stream tidal turbines, a three-dimensional coastal ocean model with built-in tidal turbine and water quality modules was applied. The effects of tidal energy extraction on water quality were examined for two energy extraction scenarios as compared with the baseline condition. It was found, in general, that the environmental impacts associated with energy extraction depend highly on the amount of power extracted from the system. Model results indicate that, as a result of energy extraction from the channel, the competition between decreased flushing rates in the bay and increased vertical mixing in the channel directly affects water quality responses in the bay. The decreased flushing rates tend to cause a stronger but negative impact on water quality. On the other hand, the increase of vertical mixing could lead to higher bottom dissolved oxygen at times. As the first modeling effort directly aimed at examining the impacts of tidal energy extraction on estuarine water quality, this study demonstrates that numerical models can serve as a very useful tool for this purpose. However, more careful efforts are warranted to address system-specific environmental issues in real-world, complex estuarine systems.

  10. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C.; Ghan, S.J.; Walton, J.J.; Weissman, P.R.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans substantially mitigates land surface cooling, an effect that one-dimensional models cannot quantify. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stage of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. These two differences between three-dimensional and one-dimensional model simulations were noted previously in studies of ''nuclear winter; '' GCM-simulated climatic changes in the Alvarez-inspired scenario of ''asteroid/comet winter,'' however, are more severe than in ''nuclear winter'' because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects -- which would occur much more frequently than the Cretaceous/Tertiary event deduced by Alvarez and coworkers -- could also lead to dramatic, though less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. Our conclusion is that it is difficult to imagine an asteroid or comet impact leading to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts at the Alvarez level, or even smaller, dramatically alter the climate in at least a ''patchy'' sense. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

  12. The impact of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction on student self-determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Palmer, Susan B.; Williams-Diehm, Kendra; Little, Todd D.; Boulton, Aaron Jacob

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    multifaceted construct and interventions that achieve the best outcomes are multicomponent interventions. The SDLMI (Wehmeyer et al., 2000) is a model of teaching (i.e., intended for teachers as end users to guide and direct instruction) that supports teachers... the impact of the SDLMI (Wehmeyer et al., 2000) on self-determination. Project personnel contacted school districts, and districts that agreed to participate ( < 20) identi- fied high school campuses {n < 39) to participate. Next, the primary district...

  13. ImSET 3.1: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies Model Description and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Livingston, Olga V.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This 3.1 version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the next generation of the previously-built ImSET model (ImSET 2.0) that was developed in 2005 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. In particular, a special-purpose version of the Benchmark National Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version features the use of the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis 2002 national input-output table and the central processing code has been moved from the FORTRAN legacy operating environment to a modern C++ code. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. While it does not include the ability to model certain dynamic features of markets for labor and other factors of production featured in the more complex models, for most purposes these excluded features are not critical. The analysis is credible as long as the assumption is made that relative prices in the economy would not be substantially affected by energy efficiency investments. In most cases, the expected scale of these investments is small enough that neither labor markets nor production cost relationships should seriously affect national prices as the investments are made. The exact timing of impacts on gross product, employment, and national wage income from energy efficiency investments is not well-enough understood that much special insight can be gained from the additional dynamic sophistication of a macroeconomic simulation model. Thus, we believe that this version of ImSET is a cost-effective solution to estimating the economic impacts of the development of energy-efficient technologies.

  14. Climate Change Impacts for Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 2. Models and Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Brown, Robert A.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere and contribute to rising global temperatures, it is important to examine how a changing climate may affect natural and managed ecosystems. In this series of papers, we study the impacts of climate change on agriculture, water resources and natural ecosystems in the conterminous United States using a suite of climate change predictions from General Circulation Models (GCMs) as described in Part 1. Here we describe the agriculture model EPIC and the HUMUS water model and validate them with historical crop yields and streamflow data. We compare EPIC simulated grain and forage crop yields with historical crop yields from the US Department of Agriculture and find an acceptable level of agreement for this study. The validation of HUMUS simulated streamflow with estimates of natural streamflow from the US Geological Survey shows that the model is able to reproduce significant relationships and capture major trends.

  15. Models for environmental impact assessments of releases of radioactive substances from CERN facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vojtyla, P

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document describes generic models for environmental impact assessments of releases of radioactive substances from CERN facilities. Except for few models developed in the Safety Commission, the models are based on the 1997 Swiss directive HSK-R-41 and on the 2001 IAEA Safety Report No. 19. The writing style is descriptive, facilitating the practical implementation of the models at CERN. There are four scenarios assumed for airborne releases: (1) short-term releases for release limit calculations, (2) actual short-term releases, (3) short-term releases during incidents/accidents, and (4) chronic long-term releases during the normal operation of a facility. For water releases, two scenarios are considered: (1) a release into a river, and (2) a release into a water treatment plant. The document shall be understood as a reference for specific environmental studies involving radioactive releases and as a recommendation of the Safety Commission.

  16. Models for Assessment of the environmental impact of Radioactive releases from CERN facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vojtyla, P

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document describes generic models for environmental impact assessment of radioactive releases from CERN facilities. Except for few models developed in the TIS Division, the models are based on the 1997 Swiss directive HSK-R-41 and on the 2001 IAEA Safety Report No. 19. The writing style is descriptive, facilitating the practical implementation of the models at CERN. There are four scenarios assumed for airborne releases: (1) short-term releases for release limit calculations, (2) actual short-term releases, (3) short-term releases during incidents/accidents, and (4) chronic long-term releases during the normal operation of a facility. For water releases, two scenarios are considered: (1) a release into a river, and (2) a release into a water treatment plant. The document shall be understood as a reference for specific environmental studies involving radioactive releases and as a recommendation of the TIS Division.

  17. Wind stress measurements from the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission and the impact on an ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Wind stress measurements from the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission and the impact by the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission (AprilOctober 2003) and their impact on ocean model simulation. The diurnal variability captured by twice-daily scatterometer wind from the tandem mission

  18. Modeling of the Terminal Velocities of the Dust Ejected Material by the Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Rengel; M. Kueppers; H. U. Keller; P. Gutierrez

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the distribution of velocities of the particles ejected by the impact of the projectile released from NASA Deep Impact spacecraft on the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1 on the successive 20 hours following the collision. This is performed by the development and use of an ill-conditioned inverse problem approach, whose main ingredients are a set of observations taken by the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) of OSIRIS onboard the Rosetta spacecraft, and a set of simple models of the expansion of the dust ejecta plume for different velocities. Terminal velocities are derived using a maximum likelihood estimator. We compare our results with published estimates of the expansion velocity of the dust cloud. Our approach and models reproduce well the velocity distribution of the ejected particles. We consider these successful comparisons of the velocities as an evidence for the appropriateness of the approach. This analysis provides a more thorough understanding of the properties of the Deep Impact dust cloud.

  19. Modelling the fate of nonylphenolic compounds in1 the Seine River -part 2: assessing the impact of2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with the modelling of the global change10 influence on endocrine disruptor concentrations in surface water. Among1 Modelling the fate of nonylphenolic compounds in1 the Seine River - part 2: assessing the impact.09.0299 10 This study aims at modelling the daily concentrations of nonylphenolic compounds such as 4

  20. Impacts of WRF Physics and Measurement Uncertainty on California Wintertime Model Wet Bias

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, H S; Caldwell, P M; Bader, D C

    2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model version 3.0.1 is used to explore California wintertime model wet bias. In this study, two wintertime storms are selected from each of four major types of large-scale conditions; Pineapple Express, El Nino, La Nina, and synoptic cyclones. We test the impacts of several model configurations on precipitation bias through comparison with three sets of gridded surface observations; one from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, and two variations from the University of Washington (without and with long-term trend adjustment; UW1 and UW2, respectively). To simplify validation, California is divided into 4 regions (Coast, Central Valley, Mountains, and Southern California). Simulations are driven by North American Regional Reanalysis data to minimize large-scale forcing error. Control simulations are conducted with 12-km grid spacing (low resolution) but additional experiments are performed at 2-km (high) resolution to evaluate the robustness of microphysics and cumulus parameterizations to resolution changes. We find that the choice of validation dataset has a significant impact on the model wet bias, and the forecast skill of model precipitation depends strongly on geographic location and storm type. Simulations with right physics options agree better with UW1 observations. In 12-km resolution simulations, the Lin microphysics and the Kain-Fritsch cumulus scheme have better forecast skill in the coastal region while Goddard, Thompson, and Morrison microphysics, and the Grell-Devenyi cumulus scheme perform better in the rest of California. The effect of planetary boundary layer, soil-layer, and radiation physics on model precipitation is weaker than that of microphysics and cumulus processes for short- to medium-range low-resolution simulations. Comparison of 2-km and 12-km resolution runs suggests a need for improvement of cumulus schemes, and supports the use of microphysics schemes in coarser-grid applications.

  1. Impact of PK/PD, Disease Models and Personalized Medicine to Influence FDA Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Robert

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact of PK/PD, Disease Models and Personalized Medicine to Influence FDA Decisions Bob Powell, Pharm.D. Pharmacometrics Offices of Clinical Pharmacology & Translational Sciences Center for Drug Evaluation & Research FDA robert... 0 2 0 4 0 6 0 8 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 T r o u g h C o n c e n t r a t i o n i n u g / m L Cmin in Phase 2 and Phase 3 at Different Doses 500/200 Study 52 750/200 Study 52 500/200 Study 12/48 TPV Cmin, IC50, T20 co-administration significantly influence...

  2. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Monache, L D; Stull, R B

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. Reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate. Urban air quality, and particularly airborne particles, is a major concern in terms of human health impacts. Sea-spray is known to be a major component of the particle ensemble at coastal sites yet relatively few air quality models include the interaction of gases with sea-spray and the fate of the particles produced. Sea-spray is not an inert addition to the particle ensemble because heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray droplets changes the droplets composition and the particle size distribution, which impacts deposition and the ion balance in different particle size fractions. It is shown that the ISOPART model is capable of simulating gas and particle concentrations in the coastal metropolis of Vancouver and the surrounding valley. It is also demonstrated that to accurately simulate ambient concentrations of particles and reactive/soluble gases in a coastal valley it is absolutely critical to include heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray. Partitioning of total particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} between sea-spray and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is highly sensitive to the amount of sea-spray present, and hence the initial vertical profile, sea-spray source functions [48] and the wind speed. When a fixed wind speed is used to initialize the sea-spray vertical profiles, as expected, the sea-spray concentration decays with distance inland, but the particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration decays more slowly because it is also a function of the uptake rate for HNO{sub 3}. The simulation results imply model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield highly misleading results in terms of emission sensitivities of the PM size distribution. The sensitivity of the model results to the initial sea spray profile further suggests there would be great benefit in better definition of the vertical profile of size resolved sea-spray for use in such model studies.

  3. A Budget Impact Model for Paclitaxel-eluting Stent in Femoropopliteal Disease in France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Cock, Erwin, E-mail: erwin.decock@unitedbiosource.com [United BioSource Corporation, Peri- and Post-Approval Services (Spain); Sapoval, Marc, E-mail: Marc.sapoval2@egp.aphp.fr [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology (France)] [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Universite Rene Descartes, Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology (France); Julia, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.julia@egp.aphp.fr [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Universite Rene Descartes, Cardiovascular Surgery Department (France)] [Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou, Universite Rene Descartes, Cardiovascular Surgery Department (France); Lissovoy, Greg de, E-mail: gdelisso@jhsph.edu [Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management (United States); Lopes, Sandra, E-mail: Sandra.Lopes@CookMedical.com [Cook Medical, Health Economics and Reimbursement (Denmark)] [Cook Medical, Health Economics and Reimbursement (Denmark)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent (Cook Ireland Ltd., Limerick, Ireland) represents an advance in endovascular treatments for atherosclerotic superficial femoral artery (SFA) disease. Clinical data demonstrate improved clinical outcomes compared to bare-metal stents (BMS). This analysis assessed the likely impact on the French public health care budget of introducing reimbursement for the Zilver PTX stent. A model was developed in Microsoft Excel to estimate the impact of a progressive transition from BMS to Zilver PTX over a 5-year horizon. The number of patients undergoing SFA stenting was estimated on the basis of hospital episode data. The analysis from the payer perspective used French reimbursement tariffs. Target lesion revascularization (TLR) after primary stent placement was the primary outcome. TLR rates were based on 2-year data from the Zilver PTX single-arm study (6 and 9 %) and BMS rates reported in the literature (average 16 and 22 %) and extrapolated to 5 years. Net budget impact was expressed as the difference in total costs (primary stenting and reinterventions) for a scenario where BMS is progressively replaced by Zilver PTX compared to a scenario of BMS only. The model estimated a net cumulative 5-year budget reduction of Euro-Sign 6,807,202 for a projected population of 82,316 patients (21,361 receiving Zilver PTX). Base case results were confirmed in sensitivity analyses. Adoption of Zilver PTX could lead to important savings for the French public health care payer. Despite higher initial reimbursement for the Zilver PTX stent, fewer expected SFA reinterventions after the primary stenting procedure result in net savings.

  4. Threshold law for electron impact ionization in the model of Temkin and Poet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macek, J.H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The angle-Sturmian theory is used to derive the threshold law for ionization of atomic hydrogen by electron impact in the model of Temkin and Poet. In this model, the exact electron-electron interaction is replaced by its monopole term. As for Wannier`s theory with the real interaction, ionization occurs only for electrons that start out nearly equidistant from the proton. Because there is a high propensity for one electron to be captured into a bound state, ionization is strongly suppressed, giving rise to a threshold law of the form {sigma} {proportional_to} exp[{minus}aE{sup {minus}1/6} + bE{sup 1/6}], where a and b are constants. The exponential law appears to be the quantal counterpart of the classical offset of the ionization threshold. Relative energy distribution are computed and found to favor configurations with unequal energy sharing.

  5. Impacts of increased bioenergy demand on global food markets: an AgMIP economic model intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Kyle, G. Page; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Havlik, Petr; van Meijl, Hans; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Popp, Alexander; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk; Wise, Marshall A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated Assessment studies have shown that meeting ambitious greenhouse gas mitigation targets will require substantial amounts of bioenergy as part of the future energy mix. In the course of the Agricultural Model Comparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP), five global agro-economic models were used to analyze a future scenario with global demand for ligno-cellulosic bioenergy rising to about 100 ExaJoule in 2050. From this exercise a tentative conclusion can be drawn that ambitious climate change mitigation need not drive up global food prices much, if the extra land required for bioenergy production is accessible or if the feedstock, e.g. from forests, does not directly compete for agricultural land. Agricultural price effects across models by the year 2050 from high bioenergy demand in an RCP2.6-type scenario appear to be much smaller (+5% average across models) than from direct climate impacts on crop yields in an RCP8.5-type scenario (+25% average across models). However, potential future scarcities of water and nutrients, policy-induced restrictions on agricultural land expansion, as well as potential welfare losses have not been specifically looked at in this exercise.

  6. Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

  7. Impact on sludge inventory and control strategies using the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 1 with the Brger-Diehl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brger, Raimund

    Impact on sludge inventory and control strategies using the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 1 concentration predictions, plant sludge inventory and mixed liquor suspended solids based control actions-Diehl model allows for more realistic predictions of the underflow sludge concentration which is essential

  8. Modeling the natural attenuation of benzene in groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuels: Effect of ethanol content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Modeling the natural attenuation of benzene in groundwater impacted by ethanol-blended fuels: Effect of ethanol content on the lifespan and maximum length of benzene plumes Diego E. Gomez1 and Pedro 10 March 2009. [1] A numerical model was used to evaluate how the concentration of ethanol

  9. Impact of Mouse Model on Pre-Clinical Dosimetry in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Samir Boutaleb1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/1 Impact of Mouse Model on Pre-Clinical Dosimetry in Targeted Radionuclide Therapy Samir Boutaleb animal dosimetry serves as an important link in establishing a relationship between absorbed dose are based on models aiming at representing the animals used during pre-clinical experiments. However

  10. FastFEM: Breaking Wave Impact on Ships Wave breaking and wave impact on maritime structures are difficult to model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    are difficult to model mathematically and numerically. The challenge is that nonlinear and breaking waves with fine-scale dynamic air-water interfaces need to be modelled efficiently, including their interactions measurements in wave basins. These potential flow models will be developed further at the University of Twente

  11. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  12. No-Impact Threshold Values for NRAPs Reduced Order Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Murray, Christopher J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Jordan, Preston D.; Sharma, Maneesh

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop methodologies for establishing baseline datasets and statistical protocols for determining statistically significant changes between background concentrations and predicted concentrations that would be used to represent a contamination plume in the Gen II models being developed by NRAPs Groundwater Protection team. The initial effort examined selected portions of two aquifer systems; the urban shallow-unconfined aquifer system of the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer System (being used to develop the ROM for carbon-rock aquifers, and the a portion of the High Plains Aquifer (an unconsolidated and semi-consolidated sand and gravel aquifer, being used to development the ROM for sandstone aquifers). Threshold values were determined for Cd, Pb, As, pH, and TDS that could be used to identify contamination due to predicted impacts from carbon sequestration storage reservoirs, based on recommendations found in the EPAs Unified Guidance for Statistical Analysis of Groundwater Monitoring Data at RCRA Facilities (US Environmental Protection Agency 2009). Results from this effort can be used to inform a no change scenario with respect to groundwater impacts, rather than the use of an MCL that could be significantly higher than existing concentrations in the aquifer.

  13. Thermal Properties of Methane Hydrate by Experiment and Modeling and Impacts on Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warzinski, R.P.; Gamwo, I.K.; Rosenbaum, E.M.; Jiang, Hao; Jordan, K.D.; English, N.J. (Univ. College Dublin, IRELAND); Shaw, D.W. (Geneva College, Beaver Falls, PA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal properties of pure methane hydrate, under conditions similar to naturally occurring hydrate-bearing sediments being considered for potential production, have been determined both by a new experimental technique and by advanced molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). A novel single-sided, Transient Plane Source (TPS) technique has been developed and used to measure thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity values of low-porosity methane hydrate formed in the laboratory. The experimental thermal conductivity data are closely matched by results from an equilibrium MDS method using in-plane polarization of the water molecules. MDS was also performed using a non-equilibrium model with a fully polarizable force field for water. The calculated thermal conductivity values from this latter approach were similar to the experimental data. The impact of thermal conductivity on gas production from a hydrate-bearing reservoir was also evaluated using the Tough+/Hydrate reservoir simulator.

  14. Aerosol cluster impact and break-up : II. Atomic and Cluster Scale Models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Takato, Yoichi (State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the interaction of aerosol particle clusters/flocs with surfaces is an area of interest for a number of processes in chemical, pharmaceutical, and powder manufacturing as well as in steam-tube rupture in nuclear power plants. Developing predictive capabilities for these applications involves coupled phenomena on multiple length and timescales from the process macroscopic scale ({approx}1m) to the multi-cluster interaction scale (1mm-0.1m) to the single cluster scale ({approx}1000 - 10000 particles) to the particle scale (10nm-10{micro}m) interactions, and on down to the sub-particle, atomic scale interactions. The focus of this report is on the single cluster scale; although work directed toward developing better models of particle-particle interactions by considering sub-particle scale interactions and phenomena is also described. In particular, results of mesoscale (i.e., particle to single cluster scale) discrete element method (DEM) simulations for aerosol cluster impact with rigid walls are presented. The particle-particle interaction model is based on JKR adhesion theory and is implemented as an enhancement to the granular package in the LAMMPS code. The theory behind the model is outlined and preliminary results are shown. Additionally, as mentioned, results from atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations are also described as a means of developing higher fidelity models of particle-particle interactions. Ultimately, the results from these and other studies at various scales must be collated to provide systems level models with accurate 'sub-grid' information for design, analysis and control of the underlying systems processes.

  15. Modeling regional transportation demand in China and the impacts of a national carbon constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishimoto, Paul

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate and energy policy in China will have important and uneven impacts on the countrys regionally heterogeneous transport system. In order to simulate these impacts, transport sector detail is added to a multi-sector, ...

  16. A regional economic impact model for identifying the relationship between transportation investments and economic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freyre, German Eleodoro

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allocation of Project Investment Calculation for Efficiency Savings Calculation of Mobility Savings Calculation of Safety Savings FHWA-47 Form Program Structure Basic Procedures Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Urban Interstate System... Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Urban Primary System Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Rural Interstate System Regional Impacts by the Amount Invested in an Rural Primary System 15 17 18 20 . 23 27 56 58 95 96 97...

  17. Computable General Equilibrium Models for Eco-nomic Policy Evaluation and Impact Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    to the assessment of the economic impacts of policies ranging from tax reforms to the mitigation and adaptation

  18. Assessing the prospective environmental impacts of photovoltaic systems based on a simplified LCA model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Assessing the prospective environmental impacts of photovoltaic systems based on a simplified LCA the environmental impacts of PV systems are small during their operating phase, they are more significant during the use of LCA to assess the environmental impacts of one electricity-production technology. To address

  19. Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: IMPACT CRATERING FROM EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    : Implications for Light Source Distribution [#2353] The distribution and evolution of the impact flash light the impact site, seismic signal, as well as plume evolution and material dispersion in the upper atmosphere. This study shows that impact induced tsunami-like waves decay much more rapid than previously assumed. Thus

  20. The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

    2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earths albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

  1. Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

  2. Energy Integration for 2050 - A Strategic Impact Model (2050 SIM), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States (U.S.) energy infrastructure is among the most reliable, accessible, and economic in the world. On the other hand, it is also excessively reliant on foreign energy sources, experiences high volatility in energy prices, does not always practice good stewardship of finite indigenous energy resources, and emits significant quantities of greenhouse gas. The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting research and development on advanced nuclear reactor concepts and technologies, including High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) technologies, directed at helping the United States meet its current and future energy challenges. This report discusses the Draft Strategic Impact Model (SIM), an initial version of which was created during the later part of FY-2010. SIM was developed to analyze and depict the benefits of various energy sources in meeting the energy demand and to provide an overall system understanding of the tradeoffs between building and using HTGRs versus other existing technologies for providing energy (heat and electricity) to various energy-use sectors in the United States. This report also provides the assumptions used in the model, the rationale for the methodology, and the references for the source documentation and source data used in developing the SIM.

  3. Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

  4. Modelling air quality impact of a biomass energy power plant in a mountain valley in Central Italy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curci, Gabriele

    Modelling air quality impact of a biomass energy power plant in a mountain valley in Central Italy in revised form 31 July 2012 Accepted 1 August 2012 Keywords: Biomass energy Air quality CALPUFF NO2 SO2 fuel power plants with those fuelled with modern biomass (IPCC, 2011). However, from an air quality

  5. Modelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios of future climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). A consequence of climatic warming in the high Arctic will be an increase in surface melting of glaciers and ice component of the mass accumulation of many glaciers and ice caps in thModelling the impact of superimposed ice on the mass balance of an Arctic glacier under scenarios

  6. Transient Inverse Calibration of Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts - 1943 to 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Thorne, Paul D.; Orr, Samuel; Mckinley, Mathew I.

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of predictions made with the Hanford site-wide groundwater flow and transport model. The focus is on characterizing major uncertainties in the current model. PNNL will develop and implement a calibration approach and methodology that can be used to evaluate alternative conceptual models of the Hanford aquifer system. The calibration process will involve a three-dimensional transient inverse calibration of each numerical model to historical observations of hydraulic and water quality impacts to the unconfined aquifer system from Hanford operations since the mid-1940s.

  7. Examination of Housing Price Impacts on Residential Properties Before and After Superfund Remediation Using Spatial Hedonic Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mhatre, Pratik Chandrashekhar

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and sociodemographic change after remediation. This study examines the extent and size of the economic impact of Superfund sites on surrounding single-family residential properties before and after remediation in Miami-Dade County and examines trends... in neighborhoods with remedied Superfund sites albeit more so in low housing submarkets than premium submarkets. Spatial hedonic models outperformed traditional OLS models in presenting unbiased efficient parameter estimates, correcting for spatial dependence...

  8. Calibration of an EnergyPlus Building Energy Model to Assess the Impact of Demand Response Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavigne, K.; Sansregret, S.; Daoud, A.; Leclair, L. A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Karine Lavigne Simon Sansregret Ahmed DaoudLouis-Alexandre Leclaire CALIBRATION OF AN ENERGYPLUS BUILDING ENERGY MODEL TO ASSESS THE IMPACT OF DEMAND RESPONSE MEASURES ICEBO 2013, Montr?al Groupe ? Technologie2 ICEBO-2013 Contextualization... ICEBO-2013 Groupe ? Technologie Calibrated Results 22 ICEBO-2013 12 Groupe ? Technologie Conclusion 23 ICEBO-2013 > Calibrating model for a demand response objective : Challenging and High Effort > Capturing building and human erratic behaviour...

  9. EMIT: explicit modeling of interactive-engagement techniques for physics graduate teaching assistants and the impact on instruction and student performance in calculus-based physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezrailson, Cathy Mariotti

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This study measures the effect of a model of explicit instruction (EMIT) on the: 1) physics graduate teaching assistants? adherence to reformed teaching methods, 2) impact of the instructional model on GTAs? beliefs about the nature of physics...

  10. Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling ?? Application to the wavelet variability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

  11. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  12. Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones: An Investigation Using Convection-permitting Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Anupam; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Taraphdar, Sourav; Chen, J. P.; Cotton, William R.

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of aerosols effect on two tropical cyclones over Bay of Bengal are investigated using a convection permitting model with two-moment mixed-phase bulk cloud microphysics scheme. The simulation results show the role of aerosol on the microphysical and dynamical properties of cloud and bring out the change in efficiency of the clouds in producing precipitation. The tracks of the TCs are hardly affected by the changing aerosol types, but the intensity exhibits significant sensitivity due to the change in aerosol contribution. It is also clearly seen from the analyses that higher heating in the middle troposphere within the cyclone center is in response to latent heat release as a consequence of greater graupel formation. Greater heating in the middle level is particularly noticeable for the clean aerosol regime which causes enhanced divergence in the upper level which, in turn, forces the lower level convergence. As a result, the cleaner aerosol perturbation is more unstable within the cyclone core and produces a more intense cyclone as compared to other two perturbations of aerosol. All these studies show the robustness of the concept of TC weakening by storm ingestion of high concentrations of CCN. The consistency of these model results gives us confidence in stating there is a high probability that ingestion of high CCN concentrations in a TC will lead to weakening of the storm but has little impact on storm direction. Moreover, as pollution is increasing over the Indian sub-continent, this study suggests pollution may be weakening TCs over the Bay of Bengal.

  13. What is the importance of climate model bias when projecting the impacts of climate change on land surface processes?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, M. L.; Rajagopalan, K.; Chung, S. H.; Jiang, X.; Harrison, J. H.; Nergui, T.; Guenther, Alex B.; Miller, C.; Reyes, J.; Tague, C. L.; Choate, J. S.; Salathe, E.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Adam, J. C.

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional climate change impact (CCI) studies have widely involved downscaling and bias-correcting (BC) Global Climate Model (GCM)-projected climate for driving land surface models. However, BC may cause uncertainties in projecting hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to future climate due to the impaired spatiotemporal covariance of climate variables and a breakdown of physical conservation principles. Here we quantify the impact of BC on simulated climate-driven changes in water variables(evapotranspiration, ET; runoff; snow water equivalent, SWE; and water demand for irrigation), crop yield, biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), nitric oxide (NO) emissions, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export over the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Region. We also quantify the impacts on net primary production (NPP) over a small watershed in the region (HJ Andrews). Simulation results from the coupled ECHAM5/MPI-OM model with A1B emission scenario were firstly dynamically downscaled to 12 km resolutions with WRF model. Then a quantile mapping based statistical downscaling model was used to downscale them into 1/16th degree resolution daily climate data over historical and future periods. Two series climate data were generated according to the option of bias-correction (i.e. with bias-correction (BC) and without bias-correction, NBC). Impact models were then applied to estimate hydrologic and biogeochemical responses to both BC and NBC meteorological datasets. These im20 pact models include a macro-scale hydrologic model (VIC), a coupled cropping system model (VIC-CropSyst), an ecohydrologic model (RHESSys), a biogenic emissions model (MEGAN), and a nutrient export model (Global-NEWS). Results demonstrate that the BC and NBC climate data provide consistent estimates of the climate-driven changes in water fluxes (ET, runoff, and water demand), VOCs (isoprene and monoterpenes) and NO emissions, mean crop yield, and river DIN export over the PNW domain. However, significant differences rise from projected SWE, crop yield from dry lands, and HJ Andrewss ET between BC and NBC data. Even though BC post-processing has no significant impacts on most of the studied variables when taking PNW as a whole, their effects have large spatial variations and some local areas are substantially influenced. In addition, there are months during which BC and NBC post-processing produces significant differences in projected changes, such as summer runoff. Factor-controlled simulations indicate that BC post-processing of precipitation and temperature both substantially contribute to these differences at region scales. We conclude that there are trade-offs between using BC climate data for offline CCI studies vs. direct modeled climate data. These trade-offs should be considered when designing integrated modeling frameworks for specific applications; e.g., BC may be more important when considering impacts on reservoir operations in mountainous watersheds than when investigating impacts on biogenic emissions and air quality (where VOCs are a primary indicator).

  14. A simplified model for estimating population-scale energy impacts of building envelope air-tightening and mechanical ventilation retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J. M.; Turner, W. J.N.; Walker, I. S.; Singer, B. C.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing the air exchange rate of a home (the sum of the infiltration and mechanical ventilation airflow rates) affects the annual thermal conditioning energy. Large-scale changes to air exchange rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the residential sector's energy consumption. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models is a barrier to the accurate quantification of the impact of policy changes on a state or national level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study combines the output of simple air exchange models with a limited set of housing characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modellers to use existing databases of housing characteristics to determine the impact of ventilation policy change on a population scale. The IVE model estimates of energy change when applied to US homes with limited parameterisation are shown to be comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model.

  15. Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operating Costs with Engineering and Econometric Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirti Ryerson, Megan; Hansen, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Engineering and Econometric Models Megan Smirti RyersonCosts with Engineering and Econometric Models Megan Smirtiforces. To this end, an econometric operating cost model (

  16. Potential impacts of vertical cable seismic: modeling, resolution and multiple attenuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ryan Justin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical cable seismic methods are becoming more relevant as we require high quality and high resolution seismic data in both land and marine environments. Our goal in this thesis is to demonstrate the impacts of vertical cable surveying...

  17. Modeling the impacts of biomass burning on air quality in and around Mexico City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, W.

    The local and regional impacts of open fires and trash burning on ground-level ozone (O[subscript 3]) and fine carbonaceous aerosols in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and surrounding region during two high fire ...

  18. Threshold law for the triplet state for electron-impact ionization in the Temkin-Poet model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ihra, W.; Mota-Furtado, F.; OMahony, P.F. [Department of Mathematics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW200EX (United Kingdom)] [Department of Mathematics, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW200EX (United Kingdom); Macek, J.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1501 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1501 (United States); [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Post Office Box 2009 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the analytical threshold behavior for the triplet cross section for electron-impact ionization in the Temkin-Poet model. The analytical results indicate that the most recent numerical calculations may fail to reproduce the correct threshold behavior in an energy regime below about E=0.1 a.u. We also present an analytical expression for the energy distribution of the two electrons near threshold. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Modelling the Impact of User Mobility on the Throughput in Networks of Wireless 802.11 LANs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Mei, Rob

    Modelling the Impact of User Mobility on the Throughput in Networks of Wireless 802.11 LANs Sandjai The Netherlands Email: sbhulai@few.vu.nl Rob van der Mei a,b b CWI Advanced Communication Networks P.O. Box 94079@feweb.vu.nl Abstract-- The wireless LAN technology 802.11, also called Wi-Fi, offers high speed wireless Internet

  20. On the modeling of the Taylor cylinder impact test for orthotropic textured materials: Calculations and experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maudlin, P.J.; Bingert, J.F.; House, J.W.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Taylor impact tests using specimens cut from a rolled plate of Ta were conducted. The Ta was well-characterized in terms of flow stress and crystallographic texture. A piece-wise yield surface was interrogated from this orthotropic texture, and used in EPIC-95 3D simulations of the Taylor test. Good agreement was realized between the calculations and the post-test geometries in terms of major and minor side profiles and impact-interface footprints.

  1. Dose-Response Modeling for Life Cycle Impact Assessment: Findingsof the Portland Review Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Kyle, Amy D.; Jolliet, Olivier; Olsen, StigIrving; Hauschild, Michael

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative aims at putting life cycle thinking into practice and at improving the supporting tools for this process through better data and indicators. The initiative has thus launched three programs with associated working groups (see http://www.uneptie.org/pc/sustain/lcinitiative/). The Task Force on Toxic Impacts was established under the Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) program to establish recommended practice and guidance for use in human toxicity, ecosystem toxicity, and related categories with direct effects on human health and ecosystem health. The workshop consisted of three elements. (A) presentations summarizing (1) the goals of the LCIA Task Force (2) historical approaches to exposure and toxic impacts in LCIA (3) current alternative proposals for addressing human health impacts. Viewgraphs from two of these presentations are provided in Appendix B to this report. (B) Discussion among a panel of experts about the scientific defensibility of these historical and proposed approaches in the context of the goals of the LCIA Task Force 3 on toxicity impacts. (C) Development of the recommendations to the LCIA program and working group for optimum short- and long-term strategies for addressing human health impacts in LCA.

  2. Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCARs Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoqing Wu

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations.

  3. Impact of Higher Fidelity Models on Active Aerodynamic Load Control For Fatigue Damage Reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |HotImpact of Generator Flexibility onImpact

  4. The impact of uncertainty on shape optimization of idealized bypass graft models in unsteady flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Alison L.

    in the upstream proximal angle. The impact of cost function choice on the optimal solution was explored construction of a graft over a blocked blood vessel. Depending on the location and the underlying disease of surgical geometry on flow fields and hence wall- shear stress WSS , oscillatory shear index OSI , wall

  5. Modeling economic impacts of climate change on U.S. forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, Claudio Ney Martins De

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is expected to modify forest growth. As a result, the forestry sector of the United States could be affected. The primary objective of this study was to examine the economic impacts of climate change on the U.S. forestry sector...

  6. Informatica 25 (2001) xxxyyy 1 Multi-attribute modelling of economic and ecological impacts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohanec, Marko

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanistic and realistic knowledge about economic and ecological impacts of GM crops on the soil. Economic material and validate their use. 4. Provide economic assessment of GM crops and conventional crops systems using GM or conventional crops, respectively. 2. Provide an ecological risk assessment of a GM

  7. Deterministic and Probabilistic Simple Model for Single Pile Behavior under Lateral Truck Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirdamadi, Alireza

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    is a simple model with an estimation of each parameter. In order to contribute uncertainties in parameters and the model, a probabilistic model is also designed, and finally a fragility estimation is made by using these models. The research covers 4...

  8. Impact of subgrid-scale radiative heating variability on the stratocumulus-to-trade cumulus transition in climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Wang, Hailong

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Subgrid-scale interactions between turbulence and radiation are potentially important for accurately reproducing marine low clouds in climate models. To better understand the impact of these interactions, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is configured for large eddy simulation (LES) to study the stratocumulus-to-trade cumulus (Sc-to-Cu) transition. Using the GEWEX Atmospheric System Studies (GASS) composite Lagrangian transition case and the Atlantic Trade Wind Experiment (ATEX) case, it is shown that the lack of subgrid-scale turbulence-radiation interaction, as is the case in current generation climate models, accelerates the Sc-to-Cu transition. Our analysis suggests that in cloud-topped boundary layers subgrid-scale turbulence-radiation interactions contribute to stronger production of temperature variance, which in turn leads to stronger buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy and helps to maintain the Sc cover.

  9. Impact of the U.S. National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS) on Building Energy Performance Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazjanac, Vladimir

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. National Institute for Building Sciences (NIBS) started the development of the National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS). Its goal is to define standard sets of data required to describe any given building in necessary detail so that any given AECO industry discipline application can find needed data at any point in the building lifecycle. This will include all data that are used in or are pertinent to building energy performance simulation and analysis. This paper describes the background that lead to the development of NBIMS, its goals and development methodology, its Part 1 (Version 1.0), and its probable impact on building energy performance simulation and analysis.

  10. Modeling the Impact of Product Portfolio on the Economic and Environmental Performance of Recycling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmus, Jeffrey B.

    hrough the development of a general model of electronics recycling systems, the effect of product portfolio choices on economic and environmental system performance is explored. The general model encompasses the three main ...

  11. Climate change uncertainty evaluation, impacts modelling and resilience of farm scale dynamics in Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivington, Michael

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    evidence of how primary production components of agriculture in Scotland may change under a future climate. The work used a generic Integrated Modelling Framework to structure the following sequence of investigations: Evaluate a Regional Climate Model...

  12. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment, Monthlygeneration Penn State/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5), NCAR,in a Coupled Land Surface Mesoscale Model H.S. Cooley Energy

  13. Impact of relative permeability models on fluid flow behavior for gas condensate reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapata Arango, Jose? Francisco

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 6 Integral from immiscible to miscible transition models for gas condensate relative permeability. 5 . 6 . . 8 9 . 10 . 12 . 16 . 18 . 20 . 23 CHAPTER III CASE STUDY. . . 27 3. 1 Tuning of the reservoir fluid model 3. 2 Relative... model . 5. 2. 2 Anisotropic model . 64 . 74 . 77 . 90 CHAPTER VI SUMMARY . 105 6. 1 Conclusions. . 6. 1. 1 Conclusions from the literature review and case study . . . . . . 6. 1. 2 Conclusions from the simulation study 6. 1. 3 Conclusions from...

  14. Impact of relative permeability models on fluid flow behavior for gas condensate reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapata Arango, Jose? Francisco

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 6 Integral from immiscible to miscible transition models for gas condensate relative permeability. 5 . 6 . . 8 9 . 10 . 12 . 16 . 18 . 20 . 23 CHAPTER III CASE STUDY. . . 27 3. 1 Tuning of the reservoir fluid model 3. 2 Relative... model . 5. 2. 2 Anisotropic model . 64 . 74 . 77 . 90 CHAPTER VI SUMMARY . 105 6. 1 Conclusions. . 6. 1. 1 Conclusions from the literature review and case study . . . . . . 6. 1. 2 Conclusions from the simulation study 6. 1. 3 Conclusions from...

  15. Modeling of Human Brain Tissues and Head Injuries Induced by Blast and Ballistic Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Sahil G

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    (Bilisik and Turhan, 2009). The ACH thus has a higher ballistic and impact protection capability than the PASGT helmet at a smaller weight. The ACH also has a pad system inside the helmet, replacing the nylon cord suspension system used in the PASGT... helmet with the PASGT helmet (Ivins et al., 2007) Problem Type Percentage of all ACH users (n = 535) Percentage of all PASGT users (n = 570) Loose Screws 11 1.8 Loose/Broken Straps 5.8 3.7 Hard/Loose pads 4.1 No padding Heat Retention 1.5 0...

  16. The Impact of Spatial Resolution on Model-Derived Radiative Heating

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,AuditTheImpact of Spatial Resolution on

  17. Impact of rainstorm and runoff modeling on predicted consequences of atmospheric releases from nuclear reactor accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, L.T.; Brown, W.D.; Wayland, J.R.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general temperate latitude cyclonic rainstorm model is presented which describes the effects of washout and runoff on consequences of atmospheric releases of radioactive material from potential nuclear reactor accidents. The model treats the temporal and spatial variability of precipitation processes. Predicted air and ground concentrations of radioactive material and resultant health consequences for the new model are compared to those of the original WASH-1400 model under invariant meteorological conditions and for realistic weather events using observed meteorological sequences. For a specific accident under a particular set of meteorological conditions, the new model can give significantly different results from those predicted by the WASH-1400 model, but the aggregate consequences produced for a large number of meteorological conditions are similar.

  18. Predicted impacts of future water level decline on monitoring wells using a ground-water model of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wurstner, S.K.; Freshley, M.D.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ground-water flow model was used to predict water level decline in selected wells in the operating areas (100, 200, 300, and 400 Areas) and the 600 Area. To predict future water levels, the unconfined aquifer system was stimulated with the two-dimensional version of a ground-water model of the Hanford Site, which is based on the Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) Code in conjunction with the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software package. The model was developed using the assumption that artificial recharge to the unconfined aquifer system from Site operations was much greater than any natural recharge from precipitation or from the basalt aquifers below. However, artificial recharge is presently decreasing and projected to decrease even more in the future. Wells currently used for monitoring at the Hanford Site are beginning to go dry or are difficult to sample, and as the water table declines over the next 5 to 10 years, a larger number of wells is expected to be impacted. The water levels predicted by the ground-water model were compared with monitoring well completion intervals to determine which wells will become dry in the future. Predictions of wells that will go dry within the next 5 years have less uncertainty than predictions for wells that will become dry within 5 to 10 years. Each prediction is an estimate based on assumed future Hanford Site operating conditions and model assumptions.

  19. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011).pdf. . 2012a. Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2012. 2013. Annual Energy Outlook - Model Documentation. forecast, the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) (DOE EIA 2012a).

  20. Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    weather files for representative cities within each climatewas modeled in the representative city for each of the sevenclimate zones and representative cities were used: 2A hot/

  1. Model error estimation in composite impact response prediction using hierarchical Bayes networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salas Mendez, Pablo Antonio

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Progressive Failure Analysis . . . 4.0.2 ModelingPuck and H. Schurmann, Failure analysis of frp laminates byComposite laminate failure analysis using multi- continuum

  2. Modeling the resuspension of radionuclides in Ukranian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nair, S.K.; Thiessen, K.M.; Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the 1986 Chernobyl event, large amounts of radioactive materials were deposited in nearby areas. Concentrations of various radionuclides were measured in air and surface soil. To study the resuspension of radioactive particulate, three different exposure situations were developed on the basis of the collected data under the auspices of the international BIOMOVS II (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) project. Modelers were asked to predict seasonal air concentrations and resuspension factors at several locations at different distances from Chernobyl for six successive years following the accident. Measurements of radionuclide deposition on topsoil were provided for each site along with information on soil, vegetation, land use, surface roughness, meteorology, and climate. In this paper, the three exposure situations are described, along with the initial data set provided to the modelers; two modeling approaches used to make the endpoint predictions are also presented. After the model predictions were submitted, the measured air concentrations and resuspension factors were released to the modelers. Generally, the predictions were well within an order of magnitude of the measured values. Time-dependent trends in predictions and measurements were in good agreement with one of the models, which (a) explicitly accounted for loss processes in soil and (b) used calibration to improve its predictive capabilities. Reasons for variations between predictions and measurements, suggestions for the improvement of models, and conclusions from the model validation study are presented. 12 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPPs scientific objective of improving climate models. We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Nio in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

  4. Lakes & Reservoirs: Research and Management 2002 7: 189199 Modelling the impact of historical land uses on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uses on surface-water quality using groundwater flow and solute-transport models Karen G. Wayland,1-use effects on surface-water quality. Key words groundwater lag time, groundwater modelling, land use, water quality, watersheds. INTRODUCTION The biogeochemistry of surface water and groundwater are related to land

  5. Climate change and hydropower production in the Swiss Alps:potential impacts and modelling uncertainties Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 11911205, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    climate change scenarios based on global-mean warming scenarios, the corresponding discharge model). Apart from the obvious economic interest in electricity production from water accumulated in reservoirsClimate change and hydropower production in the Swiss Alps:potential impacts and modelling

  6. Impact of drainage on soil-forming mechanisms in a French Albeluvisol: Input of mineralogical data in mass-balance modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Impact of drainage on soil-forming mechanisms in a French Albeluvisol: Input of mineralogical data. This was considered as a model case to study the velocity of mineralogical changes in soil as a result of eluviation modelling based on mineralogical data in order to identify and characterise the mineralogical

  7. Technical Aspects of an Impact Acceleration Traumatic Brain Injury Rat Model with Potential Suitability for both Microdialysis and PtiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    molecules are now conceivable to ameliorate severe head-injury treatment. Keywords: Traumatic Brain Injury of anaesthesia and/or neuroprotection, a traumatic brain injury (TBI) animal model, similar to human head injury1 Technical Aspects of an Impact Acceleration Traumatic Brain Injury Rat Model with Potential

  8. A modeling study on the climate impacts of black carbon aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.

    The role of black carbon (BC) aerosols in climate change is important because of its strong capability in causing extinction of solar radiation. A three-dimensional interactive aerosol-climate model has been used to study ...

  9. A Model of Global Learning: How Students Change Through International High-Impact Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redwine, Tobin Dean

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    is warranted. The purpose of this study was to develop a model to explain the viewpoints of student changes by students who participate in a study abroad experience. To meet that purpose, three objectives were utilized. First, a qualitative phenomenology...

  10. Impact of Lepton Number Violation at the LHC on Models of Leptogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; Julia Harz

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of lepton number violation (LNV) at the LHC would have profound consequences for the viability of high-scale leptogenesis models. As an example, we discuss the case of observing a signal with two same-sign leptons, two jets and no missing energy. This would imply a large washout factor for the lepton number density in the early Universe, which leads to a significant constraint on any high-scale model for the generation of the observed baryon asymmetry. In a standard leptogenesis scenario, the corresponding washout factor would strongly decrease a pre-existing lepton asymmetry and thus would render leptogenesis models that generate a (B-L) asymmetry far above the LHC scale ineffective. Therefore, LHC searches focused on LNV processes without missing energy are powerful probes for high-scale leptogenesis models and correspondingly shed light on the nature of baryogenesis and neutrino masses.

  11. Impacts of Modeled Recommendations of the National Commission on Energy Policy

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the Energy Information Administration's analysis of those National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP) energy policy recommendations that could be simulated using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS).

  12. Green Water Flow Kinematics and Impact Pressure on a Three Dimensional Model Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ariyarathne, Hanchapola Appuhamilage Kusalika Suranjani

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow kinematics of green water due to plunging breaking waves interacting with a simplified, three-dimensional model structure was investigated in laboratory. Two breaking wave conditions were tested: one with waves impinging and breaking...

  13. Modeling the Impact of State and Federal Incentives on Concentrating Solar Power Market Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Short, W.; Mehos, M.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents methodology and results from the Regional Energy Deployment System Model (ReEDS) examining the ability of concentrating solar power (CSP), other renewables, and electricity storage to contribute to the U.S. electric sector.

  14. Assessment of Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Hydrodynamic Model Domain Expansion and Refinement, and Online Dissemination of Model Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we describe the 1) the expansion of the PNNL hydrodynamic model domain to include the continental shelf along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Vancouver Island; and 2) the approach and progress in developing the online/Internet disseminations of model results and outreach efforts in support of the Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OPF). Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics, for fiscal year 2010 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

  15. A Risk Based Model for Quantifying the Impact ofInformation Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borek, Alexander; Parlikad, Ajith Kumar; Woodall, Philip; Tomasella, Maurizio

    2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    & Networks 3,500 380 Million E Electric, Electronics, Connectivity & Networks 440 47 Million F Water 2,000 1.047 Billion Table 1: Summary of Case Study Backgrounds Figure 1: Research Methodology A questionnaire was given at the end of each of case... aspects and measures of overall utility. The criteria ensure that the model strikes the right balance between industrial applicability and rigor of the model output. Each criterion was evaluated on a five step scale from 1 (very high), 2 (high), 3 (neutral...

  16. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  17. Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonse, S. R.; Singer, B. C.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a larger study of liquefied natural gas impacts on device performance and pollutant emissions for existing equipment in California, this report describes a cmoputer modeling study of a partially premixed flame issueing from a single cooktop burner port. The model consisted of a reactive computational fluid dynamics three-dimensional spatial grid and a 71-species chemical mechanism with propane combustion capability. Simulations were conducted with a simplified fuel mixture containing methane, ethane, and propane in proportions that yield properties similar to fuels distributed throughout much of California now and in recent years (baseline fuel), as well as with two variations of simulated liquefied natural gas blends. A variety of simulations were conducted with baseline fuel to explore the effect of several key parameters on pollutant formation and other flame characteristics. Simulations started with fuel and air issuing through the burner port, igniting, and continuing until the flame was steady with time. Conditions at this point were analyzed to understand fuel, secondary air and reaction product flows, regions of pollutant formation, and exhaust concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and formaldehyde. A sensitivity study was conducted, varying the inflow parameters of this baseline gs about real-world operating conditions. Flame properties responded as expected from reactive flow theory. In the simulation, carbon monoxide levels were influenced more by the mixture's inflow velocity than by the gas-to-air ratio in the mixture issuing from the inflow port. Additional simulations were executed at two inflow conditions - high heat release and medium heat release - to examine the impact of replacing the baseline gas with two mixtures representative of liquefied natural gas. Flame properties and pollutant generation rates were very similar among the three fuel mixtures.

  18. Impact Assessment of Satellite-Derived Leaf Area Index Datasets Using a General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Yongkang

    source (i.e., Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer measurements) on a general circulation model: 10.1175/JCLI4054.1 © 2007 American Meteorological Society #12;Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR radiative energy into latent and sensible heat fluxes, which results in discernable warming and decrease

  19. Review of uncertainty estimates associated with models for assessing the impact of breeder reactor radioactivity releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.; Little, C.A.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose is to summarize estimates based on currently available data of the uncertainty associated with radiological assessment models. The models being examined herein are those recommended previously for use in breeder reactor assessments. Uncertainty estimates are presented for models of atmospheric and hydrologic transport, terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and internal and external dosimetry. Both long-term and short-term release conditions are discussed. The uncertainty estimates presented in this report indicate that, for many sites, generic models and representative parameter values may be used to calculate doses from annual average radionuclide releases when these calculated doses are on the order of one-tenth or less of a relevant dose limit. For short-term, accidental releases, especially those from breeder reactors located in sites dominated by complex terrain and/or coastal meteorology, the uncertainty in the dose calculations may be much larger than an order of magnitude. As a result, it may be necessary to incorporate site-specific information into the dose calculation under these circumstances to reduce this uncertainty. However, even using site-specific information, natural variability and the uncertainties in the dose conversion factor will likely result in an overall uncertainty of greater than an order of magnitude for predictions of dose or concentration in environmental media following shortterm releases.

  20. QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF 3D MODELLING OF BUILDING STRUCTURES ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Rafael

    to the firm's overall activity, because the greatest increase in productivity is achieved in this area; that construction companies can leverage the benefits in error reduction and logistics improvements that result PRODUCTIVITY Rafael Sacks1 and Ronen Barak2 ABSTRACT Parametric three-dimensional modelling of buildings

  1. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanza, Rachel; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Y.; Albani, Samuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral components in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as +0.05Wm?2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy and compare this both with simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17Wm?2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, ?0.05 and ?0.17Wm?2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in-situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.

  2. Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

  3. Impact of Stent Design on In-Stent Stenosis in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Grenacher, L.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Arnegger, F. U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery (Germany); Rehnitz, C.; Thierjung, H. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Stampfl, S. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Berger, I. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Pathology (Germany); Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on in-stent stenosis in rabbit iliac arteries. Four different types of stent were implanted in rabbit iliac arteries, being different in stent design (crown or wave) and strut thickness (50 or 100 {mu}m). Ten stents of each type were implanted. Each animal received one crown and one wave stent with the same strut thickness. Follow-up was either 12 weeks (n = 10 rabbits) or 24 weeks (n = 10 rabbits). Primary study end points were angiographic and microscopic in-stent stenosis. Secondary study end points were vessel injury, vascular inflammation, and stent endothelialization. Average stent diameter, relative stent overdilation, average and minimal luminal diameter, and relative average and maximum luminal loss were not significantly different. However, a trend to higher relative stent overdilation was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents. A trend toward higher average and minimal luminal diameter and lower relative average and maximum luminal loss was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 100 {mu}m. Neointimal height, relative luminal area stenosis, injury score, inflammation score, and endothelialization score were not significantly different. However, a trend toward higher neointimal height was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 50 {mu}m and a follow-up of 24 weeks. In conclusion, in this study, crown stents seem to trigger neointima. However, the optimized radial force might equalize the theoretically higher tendency for restenosis in crown stents. In this context, also more favorable positive remodeling in crown stents could be important.

  4. Data collection handbook to support modeling the impacts of radioactive material in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.J.; Jones, L.G.; Wang, Y.Y.; Faillace, E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Loureiro, C. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Chia, Y.P. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Geology

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pathway analysis computer code called RESRAD has been developed for implementing US Department of Energy Residual Radioactive Material Guidelines. Hydrogeological, meteorological, geochemical, geometrical (size, area, depth), and material-related (soil, concrete) parameters are used in the RESRAD code. This handbook discusses parameter definitions, typical ranges, variations, measurement methodologies, and input screen locations. Although this handbook was developed primarily to support the application of RESRAD, the discussions and values are valid for other model applications.

  5. ON THE IMPACT OF SUPER RESOLUTION WSR-88D DOPPLER RADAR DATA ASSIMILATION ON HIGH RESOLUTION NUMERICAL MODEL FORECASTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiswell, S

    2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Assimilation of radar velocity and precipitation fields into high-resolution model simulations can improve precipitation forecasts with decreased 'spin-up' time and improve short-term simulation of boundary layer winds (Benjamin, 2004 & 2007; Xiao, 2008) which is critical to improving plume transport forecasts. Accurate description of wind and turbulence fields is essential to useful atmospheric transport and dispersion results, and any improvement in the accuracy of these fields will make consequence assessment more valuable during both routine operation as well as potential emergency situations. During 2008, the United States National Weather Service (NWS) radars implemented a significant upgrade which increased the real-time level II data resolution to 8 times their previous 'legacy' resolution, from 1 km range gate and 1.0 degree azimuthal resolution to 'super resolution' 250 m range gate and 0.5 degree azimuthal resolution (Fig 1). These radar observations provide reflectivity, velocity and returned power spectra measurements at a range of up to 300 km (460 km for reflectivity) at a frequency of 4-5 minutes and yield up to 13.5 million point observations per level in super-resolution mode. The migration of National Weather Service (NWS) WSR-88D radars to super resolution is expected to improve warning lead times by detecting small scale features sooner with increased reliability; however, current operational mesoscale model domains utilize grid spacing several times larger than the legacy data resolution, and therefore the added resolution of radar data is not fully exploited. The assimilation of super resolution reflectivity and velocity data into high resolution numerical weather model forecasts where grid spacing is comparable to the radar data resolution is investigated here to determine the impact of the improved data resolution on model predictions.

  6. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keene, William C. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia] [University of Virginia

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry??s MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences of marine aerosol production on the microphysical properties of aerosol populations and clouds over the ocean and the corresponding direct and indirect effects on radiative transfer; (2) atmospheric burdens of reactive halogen species and their impacts on O3, NOx, OH, DMS, and particulate non-sea-salt SO42-; and (3) the global production and influences of marine-derived particulate organic carbon. The model reproduced major characteristics of the marine aerosol system and demonstrated the potential sensitivity of global, decadal-scale climate metrics to multiphase marine-derived components of Earth??s troposphere. Due to the combined computational burden of the coupled system, the currently available computational resources were the limiting factor preventing the adequate statistical analysis of the overall impact that multiphase chemistry might have on climate-scale radiative transfer and climate.

  7. Impact of early versus later fluoroquinolone treatment on the clinical, microbiological and resistance outcomes in a mouse-lung model of Pasteurella multocida infection.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    , for a given marbofloxacin dose, the clinical and bacteriological outcomes were better, and the selectionImpact of early versus later fluoroquinolone treatment on the clinical, microbiological and resistance outcomes in a mouse-lung model of Pasteurella multocida infection. Aude A. Ferran, Pierre

  8. Data from the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) will impact modeling of processes occurring in neutron-rich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data from the Versatile Array of Neutron Detectors at Low Energy (VANDLE) will impact modeling of processes occurring in neutron-rich environments ·The energies of beta-delayed neutrons emitted from 25 strong feeding to high-lying states that emit high energy neutrons while others have broad distributions

  9. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23 0.31 resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-DPP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance atmorethe surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.less

  10. Compartment modeling of dynamic brain PETThe impact of scatter corrections on parameter errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hggstrm, Ida, E-mail: ida.haggstrom@radfys.umu.se; Karlsson, Mikael; Larsson, Anne [Department of Radiation Sciences, Ume University, Ume 90187 (Sweden); Schmidtlein, C. Ross [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York 10065 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of scatter and its correction on kinetic parameters in dynamic brain positron emission tomography (PET) tumor imaging. The 2-tissue compartment model was used, and two different reconstruction methods and two scatter correction (SC) schemes were investigated. Methods: The GATE Monte Carlo (MC) software was used to perform 2 15 full PET scan simulations of a voxelized head phantom with inserted tumor regions. The two sets of kinetic parameters of all tissues were chosen to represent the 2-tissue compartment model for the tracer 3?-deoxy-3?-({sup 18}F)fluorothymidine (FLT), and were denoted FLT{sub 1} and FLT{sub 2}. PET data were reconstructed with both 3D filtered back-projection with reprojection (3DRP) and 3D ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM). Images including true coincidences with attenuation correction (AC) and true+scattered coincidences with AC and with and without one of two applied SC schemes were reconstructed. Kinetic parameters were estimated by weighted nonlinear least squares fitting of image derived timeactivity curves. Calculated parameters were compared to the true input to the MC simulations. Results: The relative parameter biases for scatter-eliminated data were 15%, 16%, 4%, 30%, 9%, and 7% (FLT{sub 1}) and 13%, 6%, 1%, 46%, 12%, and 8% (FLT{sub 2}) for K{sub 1}, k{sub 2}, k{sub 3}, k{sub 4}, V{sub a}, and K{sub i}, respectively. As expected, SC was essential for most parameters since omitting it increased biases by 10 percentage points on average. SC was not found necessary for the estimation of K{sub i} and k{sub 3}, however. There was no significant difference in parameter biases between the two investigated SC schemes or from parameter biases from scatter-eliminated PET data. Furthermore, neither 3DRP nor OSEM yielded the smallest parameter biases consistently although there was a slight favor for 3DRP which produced less biased k{sub 3} and K{sub i} estimates while OSEM resulted in a less biased V{sub a}. The uncertainty in OSEM parameters was about 26% (FLT{sub 1}) and 12% (FLT{sub 2}) larger than for 3DRP although identical postfilters were applied. Conclusions: SC was important for good parameter estimations. Both investigated SC schemes performed equally well on average and properly corrected for the scattered radiation, without introducing further bias. Furthermore, 3DRP was slightly favorable over OSEM in terms of kinetic parameter biases and SDs.

  11. A Large-Scale, High-Resolution Hydrological Model Parameter Data Set for Climate Change Impact Assessment for the Conterminous US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oubeidillah, Abdoul A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL] [ORNL; Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Tootle, Glenn [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa] [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To extend geographical coverage, refine spatial resolution, and improve modeling efficiency, a computation- and data-intensive effort was conducted to organize a comprehensive hydrologic dataset with post-calibrated model parameters for hydro-climate impact assessment. Several key inputs for hydrologic simulation including meteorologic forcings, soil, land class, vegetation, and elevation were collected from multiple best-available data sources and organized for 2107 hydrologic subbasins (8-digit hydrologic units, HUC8s) in the conterminous United States at refined 1/24 (~4 km) spatial resolution. Using high-performance computing for intensive model calibration, a high-resolution parameter dataset was prepared for the macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model. The VIC simulation was driven by DAYMET daily meteorological forcing and was calibrated against USGS WaterWatch monthly runoff observations for each HUC8. The results showed that this new parameter dataset may help reasonably simulate runoff at most US HUC8 subbasins. Based on this exhaustive calibration effort, it is now possible to accurately estimate the resources required for further model improvement across the entire conterminous United States. We anticipate that through this hydrologic parameter dataset, the repeated effort of fundamental data processing can be lessened, so that research efforts can emphasize the more challenging task of assessing climate change impacts. The pre-organized model parameter dataset will be provided to interested parties to support further hydro-climate impact assessment.

  12. USEtox - The UNEP-SETAC toxicity model: recommended characterisation factors for human toxicity and freshwater ecotoxicity in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Bachmann, Till M.; Swirsky Gold, Lois; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Jolliet, Olivier; Juraske, Ronnie; Koehler, Annette; Larsen, Henrik F.; MacLeod, Matthew; Margni, Manuele; McKone, Thomas E.; Payet, Jerome; Schuhmacher, Marta; van de Meent, Dik; Hauschild, Michael Z.

    2008-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Background, Aim and Scope. In 2005 a comprehensive comparison of LCIA toxicity characterisation models was initiated by the UNEP-SETAC Life Cycle Initiative, directly involving the model developers of CalTOX, IMPACT 2002, USES-LCA, BETR, EDIP, WATSON, and EcoSense. In this paper we describe this model-comparison process and its results--in particular the scientific consensus model developed by the model developers. The main objectives of this effort were (i) to identify specific sources of differences between the models' results and structure, (ii) to detect the indispensable model components, and (iii) to build a scientific consensus model from them, representing recommended practice. Methods. A chemical test set of 45 organics covering a wide range of property combinations was selected for this purpose. All models used this set. In three workshops, the model comparison participants identified key fate, exposure and effect issues via comparison of the final characterisation factors and selected intermediate outputs for fate, human exposure and toxic effects for the test set applied to all models. Results. Through this process, we were able to reduce inter-model variation from an initial range of up to 13 orders of magnitude down to no more than 2 orders of magnitude for any substance. This led to the development of USEtox, a scientific consensus model that contains only the most influential model elements. These were, for example, process formulations accounting for intermittent rain, defining a closed or open system environment, or nesting an urban box in a continental box. Discussion. The precision of the new characterisation factors (CFs) is within a factor of 100-1000 for human health and 10-100 for freshwater ecotoxicity of all other models compared to 12 orders of magnitude variation between the CFs of each model respectively. The achieved reduction of inter-model variability by up to 11 orders of magnitude is a significant improvement.Conclusions. USEtox provides a parsimonious and transparent tool for human health and ecosystem CF estimates. Based on a referenced database, it has now been used to calculate CFs for several thousand substances and forms the basis of the recommendations from UNEP-SETAC's Life Cycle Initiative regarding characterization of toxic impacts in Life Cycle Assessment. Recommendations and Perspectives. We provide both recommended and interim (not recommended and to be used with caution) characterisation factors for human health and freshwater ecotoxicity impacts. After a process of consensus building among stakeholders on a broad scale as well as several improvements regarding a wider and easier applicability of the model, USEtox will become available to practitioners for the calculation of further CFs.

  13. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the Western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada using CCSM4 (CAM4/CLM4) global model with a 0.23 0.31 resolution for simulations over 6 years. In 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation [3-D ? PP (plane-parallel)] adjustment to ensure that energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization.moreWe show that deviations of the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains, but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while decreases for higher elevations with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases in higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.less

  14. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo model calculations for the antiproton-induced ionization of atomic hydrogen at low impact energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkadi, L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-body dynamics of the ionization of the atomic hydrogen by 30 keV antiproton impact has been investigated by calculation of fully differential cross sections (FDCS) using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method. The results of the calculations are compared with the predictions of quantum mechanical descriptions: The semi-classical time-dependent close-coupling theory, the fully quantal, time-independent close-coupling theory, and the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state model. In the analysis particular emphasis was put on the role of the nucleus-nucleus (NN) interaction played in the ionization process. For low-energy electron ejection CTMC predicts a large NN interaction effect on FDCS, in agreement with the quantum mechanical descriptions. By examining individual particle trajectories it was found that the relative motion between the electron and the nuclei is coupled very weakly with that between the nuclei, consequently the two motions can be treated independently. A simple ...

  15. A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

  16. Impacts of Large-scale Surface Modifications on Meteorological Conditions and Energy Use: A 10-Region Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taha, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    104. Pielke, R, 1984: Mesoscale Meteorological Modeling . the CSUMM, as any other mesoscale model, is typically runApplications International Mesoscale Model. SYSAPP- 921069,

  17. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  18. Modelling the global prospects and impacts of heavy duty liquefied natural gas vehicles in computable general equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yip, Arthur Hong Chun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas vehicles have the prospects of making substantial contributions to transportation needs. The adoption of natural gas vehicles could lead to impacts on energy and environmental systems. An analysis of the main ...

  19. Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

  20. IM-GEO: Impact of R and D on cost of geothermal power: Documentation of Model Version 2. 09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, S.; Entingh, D.; Livesay, B.J.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IM-GEO is an analysis used to estimate the impact of technology improvements on the relative cost of hydrothermal power. The analysis is available in a tutorial program for use on personal computers. It is designed for use by R and D program managers to evaluate R and D options. Only the potential impact of technologies is considered with all economic factors being held constant. This analysis has one unique feature. The economic impact of reducing risk by improving reservoir characterization is included using a strategy currently employed by financial institutions. This report describes the basis of the calculations, documents the code, and describes the operational procedures. Application of the code to study potential cost reductions due to R and D success will be done by R and D managers to evaluate and direct their own programs.

  1. Methodology and results of the impacts of modeling electric utilities ; a comparative evaluation of MEMM and REM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baughman, Martin L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares two models of the U.S. electric utility industry including the EIA's electric utility submodel in the Midterm Energy Market Model (MEMM), and the Baughman-Joskow Regionalized Electricity Model (REM). ...

  2. The impact of centennial-scale solar forcing on the Holocene climate: simulations with a coupled climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renssen, Hans

    lasts about 50-year longer than the TSI anomaly. This is caused by extensive sea-ice build- up, which. During shorter TSI anomalies, such as event B centered at 2300 BP, sea-ice build-up is insufficientThe impact of centennial-scale solar forcing on the Holocene climate: simulations with a coupled

  3. Estimating model parameters for an impact-produced shock-wave simulation: Optimal use of partial data with the extended Kalman filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Jim [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Applied Physics Division, P.O. Box 1663, MS T086, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: kao@lanl.gov; Flicker, Dawn [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Applied Physics Division, P.O. Box 1663, MS T086, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ide, Kayo [University of California at Los Angeles (United States); Ghil, Michael [University of California at Los Angeles (United States)

    2006-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper builds upon our recent data assimilation work with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) method [J. Kao, D. Flicker, R. Henninger, S. Frey, M. Ghil, K. Ide, Data assimilation with an extended Kalman filter for an impact-produced shock-wave study, J. Comp. Phys. 196 (2004) 705-723.]. The purpose is to test the capability of EKF in optimizing a model's physical parameters. The problem is to simulate the evolution of a shock produced through a high-speed flyer plate. In the earlier work, we have showed that the EKF allows one to estimate the evolving state of the shock wave from a single pressure measurement, assuming that all model parameters are known. In the present paper, we show that imperfectly known model parameters can also be estimated accordingly, along with the evolving model state, from the same single measurement. The model parameter optimization using the EKF can be achieved through a simple modification of the original EKF formalism by including the model parameters into an augmented state variable vector. While the regular state variables are governed by both deterministic and stochastic forcing mechanisms, the parameters are only subject to the latter. The optimally estimated model parameters are thus obtained through a unified assimilation operation. We show that improving the accuracy of the model parameters also improves the state estimate. The time variation of the optimized model parameters results from blending the data and the corresponding values generated from the model and lies within a small range, of less than 2%, from the parameter values of the original model. The solution computed with the optimized parameters performs considerably better and has a smaller total variance than its counterpart using the original time-constant parameters. These results indicate that the model parameters play a dominant role in the performance of the shock-wave hydrodynamic code at hand.

  4. Influence of climate model biases and daily-scale temperature and precipitation events on hydrological impacts assessment: A case study of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL; Bowling, Laura C. [Purdue University; Cherkauer, Keith [Purdue University; Pal, Jeremy [Loyola University; Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report concludes that climate change is now unequivocal, and associated increases in evaporation and atmospheric water content could intensify the hydrological cycle. However, the biases and coarse spatial resolution of global climate models limit their usefulness in hydrological impact assessment. In order to reduce these limitations, we use a high-resolution regional climate model (RegCM3) to drive a hydrological model (variable infiltration capacity) for the full contiguous United States. The simulations cover 1961-1990 in the historic period and 2071-2100 in the future (A2) period. A quantile-based bias correction technique is applied to the times series of RegCM3-simulated precipitation and temperature. Our results show that biases in the RegCM3 fields not only affect the magnitude of hydrometeorological variables in the baseline hydrological simulation, but they also affect the response of hydrological variables to projected future anthropogenic increases in greenhouse forcing. Further, we find that changes in the intensity and occurrence of severe wet and hot events are critical in determining the sign of hydrologic change. These results have important implications for the assessment of potential future hydrologic changes, as well as for developing approaches for quantitative impacts assessment.

  5. Calculating Impacts of Energy Standards on Energy Demand in U.S. Buildings under Uncertainty with an Integrated Assessment Model: Technical Background Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Hathaway, John E.; Lansing, Carina S.; Liu, Ying; McJeon, Haewon C.; Moss, Richard H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data and assumptions employed in an application of PNNLs Global Change Assessment Model with a newly-developed Monte Carlo analysis capability. The model is used to analyze the impacts of more aggressive U.S. residential and commercial building-energy codes and equipment standards on energy consumption and energy service costs at the state level, explicitly recognizing uncertainty in technology effectiveness and cost, socioeconomics, presence or absence of carbon prices, and climate impacts on energy demand. The report provides a summary of how residential and commercial buildings are modeled, together with assumptions made for the distributions of statelevel population, Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per worker, efficiency and cost of residential and commercial energy equipment by end use, and efficiency and cost of residential and commercial building shells. The cost and performance of equipment and of building shells are reported separately for current building and equipment efficiency standards and for more aggressive standards. The report also details assumptions concerning future improvements brought about by projected trends in technology.

  6. Development of a Kelp-type Structure Module in a Coastal Ocean Model to Assess the Hydrodynamic Impact of Seawater Uranium Extraction Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Long, Wen; Gill, Gary A.

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, with the rapid growth of global energy demand, the interest in extracting uranium from seawater for nuclear energy has been renewed. While extracting seawater uranium is not yet commercially viable, it serves as a backstop to the conventional uranium resources and provides an essentially unlimited supply of uranium resource. With recent advances in seawater uranium extraction technology, extracting uranium from seawater could be economically feasible when the extraction devices are deployed at a large scale (e.g., several hundred km2). There is concern however that the large scale deployment of adsorbent farms could result in potential impacts to the hydrodynamic flow field in an oceanic setting. In this study, a kelp-type structure module was incorporated into a coastal ocean model to simulate the blockage effect of uranium extraction devices on the flow field. The module was quantitatively validated against laboratory flume experiments for both velocity and turbulence profiles. The model-data comparison showed an overall good agreement and validated the approach of applying the model to assess the potential hydrodynamic impact of uranium extraction devices or other underwater structures in coastal oceans.

  7. A Conceptual Model of the Mechanisms by which Ego Resiliency Impacts Academic Engagement and Achievement: Social Relatedness as a Mediator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreke, Linda L.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    have more negative interactions with the teacher than does the student with advanced self-regulatory skills. In turn, these negative interactions provide feedback for the student that she is not as competent at school, and may impact the level...-risk individuals positively adapt to life stressors (Luthar, Cicchetti, & Becker, 2000). 4 The Construct: ?Ego Resiliency? The current study considers the construct of ego-resiliency (ER), a within-child characteristic stemming from temperamental...

  8. Essays on Modeling the Economic Impacts of a Foreign Animal Disease on the United States Agricultural Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagerman, Amy Deann

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . In the analysis, strategies are examined in the context of California's dairy industry. Alternative vaccination, disease detection and movement restriction strategies are considered as are trade restrictions. The results reported include epidemic impacts... indicate it is a risk reducing strategy. Risk in foreign animal disease outbreaks is present from several sources; however, studies comparing alternative control strategies assume risk neutrality. In reality, there will be a desire to minimize...

  9. Evaluation of TVA`s model site and individual technology pollution prevention demonstration programs and their impact on the agrichemical industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, G.S.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high volume of fertilizer and pesticides funneled through a relatively small number of distribution outlets has made these agribusiness sites potential sources of surface/groundwater contamination in watersheds surrounding the agrichemical facilities. The agrichemical industry came under increased pressures in the mid-1980s to implement environmentally sound management practices and to install containment structures around fertilizer and chemical storage/handling areas to prevent future contamination of existing sites or the movement of contaminants offsite. TVA`s long and successful history of technology transfer to the retail fertilizer industry, as well as the technical expertise of the Agency`s staff, made TVA ideally suited to handle the new environmental challenge. It was during this time period that TVA`s Model Site Demonstration Program (MSD) and Individual Technology Demonstration Program (ITD) were conceived. Since inception, the pollution prevention program and the technologies advanced by it have made a very positive impact on the US agrichemical industry, as well as on other TVA programs. This paper is an attempt to document these impacts, with primary focus being placed on the program`s impact on the agribusiness dealer who implements the pollution prevention technologies/practices recommended by TVA.

  10. A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through the Development of a Comparative-Projection Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, J.E.

    Using two established reservoir projects, an economic simulation model for reservoir development was constructed. The two comparative areas used for the model development are both reservoirs in central Texas and were constructed during approximately...

  11. Multi-lane hybrid traffic flow model: a theory on the impacts of lane-changing maneuvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daganzo, Carlos F.

    is parsimonious; it requires only one more parameter than the simple kinematic wave model. The extra parameter flow models do not address lane-changing phenomena properly. Extensions to kinematic wave (KW) theory

  12. Florian SEITZ: Atmospheric and oceanic impacts to Earth rotations numerical studies with a dynamic Earth system model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuh, Harald

    with a dynamic Earth system model (completed in October 2004) Variations of Earth rotation are caused Earth system model DyMEG has been developed. It is based on the balance of angular momentum

  13. Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

  14. Impact of horizontal resolution on simulation of precipitation extremes in an aqua-planet version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.; Algieri, C.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One key question regarding current climate models is whether the projection of climate extremes converges to a realistic representation as the spatial and temporal resolutions of the model are increased. Ideally the model extreme statistics should approach a fixed distribution once the resolutions are commensurate with the characteristic length and time scales of the processes governing the formation of the extreme phenomena of interest. In this study, a series of AGCM runs with idealized 'aquaplanet-steady-state' boundary conditions have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3 to investigate the effect of horizontal resolution on climate extreme simulations. The use of the aquaplanet framework highlights the roles of model physics and dynamics and removes any apparent convergence in extreme statistics due to better resolution of surface boundary conditions and other external inputs. Assessed at a same large spatial scale, the results show that the horizontal resolution and time step have strong effects on the simulations of precipitation extremes. The horizontal resolution has a much stronger impact on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Updrafts are strongly correlated with extreme precipitation at tropics at all the resolutions, while positive low-tropospheric temperature anomalies are associated with extreme precipitation at mid-latitudes.

  15. Evaluating the impact of urban morphology configurations on the accuracy of urban canopy model temperature simulations with MODIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monaghan, Andrew J.; Hu, Leiqiu; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Barlage, Michael; Wilhelmi, Olga V.

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of the urban-built environment within models. Using a 10 year (20032012) series of offline 1 km simulations over Greater Houston with the High-Resolution Land Data Assimilation System (HRLDAS), this study explores the model accuracy gained by progressively...

  16. Variation in Estimated Ozone-Related Health Impacts of Climate Change due to Modeling Choices and Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, Ellen S.; Grambsch, A.; Weaver, C. P.; Morefield, Philip; Huang, Jin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Nolte, Christopher G.; Adams, P. J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Zhu, J.; Mahoney, Hardee

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future climate change may cause air quality degradation via climate-induced changes in meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and emissions into the air. Few studies have explicitly modeled the potential relationships between climate change, air quality, and human health, and fewer still have investigated the sensitivity of estimates to the underlying modeling choices.

  17. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Tawil, J.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this research was to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in developing methods for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts due to the effects of increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ on agricultural production. First, a comprehensive literature search was undertaken to determine what types of models and methods have been developed, which could be effectively used to conduct assessments of the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon models and methods for assessing the physical impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields; national and multi-regional agricultural sector models; and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The second task involved a thorough investigation of the research efforts being conducted by other public and private sector organizations in order to determine how more recent analytical methods being developed outside of DOE could be effectively integrated into a more comprehensive analysis of the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. The third and final task involved synthesizing the information gathered in the first two tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes originating in the agricultural sector of the US economy. It is concluded that the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ on the agricultural sector and the indirect economic impacts caused by spillover effects from agriculture to other sectors of the economy will be pervasive; however, the direction and magnitude of these impacts on producers and consumers cannot be determined a priori.

  18. Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

  19. Impact of Hillslope-Scale Organization of Topography, Soil Moisture, Soil Temperature, and Vegetation on Modeling Surface Microwave Radiation Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, Alejandro N.

    Microwave radiometry will emerge as an important tool for global remote sensing of near-surface soil moisture in the coming decade. In this modeling study, we find that hillslope-scale topography (tens of meters) influences ...

  20. Impact of Rotor Surface Velocity, Leakage Models and Real Gas Properties on Rotordynamic Force Predictions of Gas Labyrinth Seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorat, Manish R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotordynamic coefficients of a gas labyrinth seal are assumed to be frequency independent. However, this assumption loses its validity as rotor surface velocity approaches Mach 1. The solution procedure of 1CV model by Childs and Scharrer which...

  1. article deep impact: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    traits among species arose early in the evolutionary history of major clades (deep history Pianka, Eric R. 6 IMPACT CRATERING THEORY AND MODELING FOR THE DEEP IMPACT MISSION:...

  2. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

  3. A Model and Case Study of the Impacts of Stochastic Capacity on Freeway Traffic Flow Benefits and Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    and Costs Alexander Bigazzi1 and Dr. Miguel Figliozzi2 1 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering conditions with the accompanying heavy congestion costs. As the traffic volume at which flow breaks down is uncertain, this research utilizes a stochastic capacity model to estimate congestion costs in terms

  4. Statistical representation of clouds in a regional model and the impact on the diurnal cycle of convection during Tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    water static energy. Application of the parameterization in a regional model during a 30-day period of the Tropical Convection, Cirrus and Nitrogen Oxides (TROCCINOX) experiment over southern Brazil demonstrates of cloud mass at tropospheric inversions (e.g., trade wind inversion, melting level, tropo- pause

  5. Impact of hydrological variations on modeling of peatland CO2 fluxes: Results from the North American Carbon Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    in ecosystem models due to differences in nutrients, peat properties, and plant communities. Citation: Sulman cycle due to large carbon pools resulting from the long-term accumulation of organic matter in peat of the water table exposes peat soils to oxygen, resulting in higher rates of ecosystem respiration (ER

  6. Two-level Stochastic Fluid Tandem Queuing Model for Burst Impact Yong Huang, Yong Liu, Weibo Gong, Don Towsley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    , Weibo Gong, Don Towsley Abstract-- Queuing analysis is important in providing guid- ing principles are modeled as continuous fluid. The continuous nature of fluid makes Yong Huang and Weibo Gong, gong@ecs.umass.edu. Yong Liu is with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic

  7. The impact of agricultural intensification and irrigation on landatmosphere interactions and Indian monsoon precipitation --A mesoscale modeling perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    and Indian monsoon precipitation -- A mesoscale modeling perspective E.M. Douglas a, , A. Beltrn-Przekurat b convergence, mesoscale convection, and precipitation patterns over the Indian monsoon region. Four experiments pattern and changes in mesoscale precipitation. These agricultural changes, including irrigation modify

  8. Impact of utilizing 3D digital urban models on the design content of urban design plans in US cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Douri, Firas A. Salman

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    aspects. The research applies a novel perspective of examining both the methods of modeling-supported urban design and the design content of urban design to attempt to reveal a correlation or causal relation. Using the mixed method approach, this research...

  9. Impact of Not Fully Addressing Cross-Classified Multilevel Structure in Testing Measurement Invariance and Conducting Multilevel Mixture Modeling within Structural Equation Modeling Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Myung

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    data as hierarchical structure data in two different analytical settings under the structural equation modeling (SEM) framework. Study 1 evaluated the performance of conventional multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) which assumes hierarchical...

  10. Predictive modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep saline sandstone reservoirs: Impacts of geochemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balashov, Victor N.; Guthrie, George D.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Lopano, Christina L. J.; Rimstidt, Donald; Brantley, Susan L.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One idea for mitigating the increase in fossil-fuel generated CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is to inject CO{sub 2} into subsurface saline sandstone reservoirs. To decide whether to try such sequestration at a globally significant scale will require the ability to predict the fate of injected CO{sub 2}. Thus, models are needed to predict the rates and extents of subsurface rock-water-gas interactions. Several reactive transport models for CO{sub 2} sequestration created in the last decade predicted sequestration in sandstone reservoirs of ~17 to ~90 kg CO{sub 2} m{sup -3|. To build confidence in such models, a baseline problem including rock + water chemistry is proposed as the basis for future modeling so that both the models and the parameterizations can be compared systematically. In addition, a reactive diffusion model is used to investigate the fate of injected supercritical CO{sub 2} fluid in the proposed baseline reservoir + brine system. In the baseline problem, injected CO{sub 2} is redistributed from the supercritical (SC) free phase by dissolution into pore brine and by formation of carbonates in the sandstone. The numerical transport model incorporates a full kinetic description of mineral-water reactions under the assumption that transport is by diffusion only. Sensitivity tests were also run to understand which mineral kinetics reactions are important for CO{sub 2} trapping. The diffusion transport model shows that for the first ~20 years after CO{sub 2} diffusion initiates, CO{sub 2} is mostly consumed by dissolution into the brine to form CO{sub 2,aq} (solubility trapping). From 20-200 years, both solubility and mineral trapping are important as calcite precipitation is driven by dissolution of oligoclase. From 200 to 1000 years, mineral trapping is the most important sequestration mechanism, as smectite dissolves and calcite precipitates. Beyond 2000 years, most trapping is due to formation of aqueous HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Ninety-seven percent of the maximum CO{sub 2} sequestration, 34.5 kg CO{sub 2} per m{sup 3} of sandstone, is attained by 4000 years even though the system does not achieve chemical equilibrium until ~25,000 years. This maximum represents about 20% CO{sub 2} dissolved as CO{sub 2},aq, 50% dissolved as HCO{sub 3}{sup -}{sub ,aq}, and 30% precipitated as calcite. The extent of sequestration as HCO{sub 3}{sup -} at equilibrium can be calculated from equilibrium thermodynamics and is roughly equivalent to the amount of Na+ in the initial sandstone in a soluble mineral (here, oligoclase). Similarly, the extent of trapping in calcite is determined by the amount of Ca2+ in the initial oligoclase and smectite. Sensitivity analyses show that the rate of CO{sub 2} sequestration is sensitive to the mineral-water reaction kinetic constants between approximately 10 and 4000 years. The sensitivity of CO{sub 2} sequestration to the rate constants decreases in magnitude respectively from oligoclase to albite to smectite.

  11. WRF-Chem model predictions of the regional impacts of N2O5 heterogeneous processes on night-time chemistry over north-western Europe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lowe, Douglas; Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Morgan, Will; Allan, James D.; Utembe, Steve; Ouyang, Bin; Aruffo, Eleonora; Le Breton, Michael; Zaveri, Rahul A.; di Carlo, Piero; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical modelling studies have been conducted over north-western Europe in summer conditions, showing that night-time dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) heterogeneous reactive uptake is important regionally in modulating particulate nitrate and has a~modest influence on oxidative chemistry. Results from Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model simulations, run with a detailed volatile organic compound (VOC) gas-phase chemistry scheme and the Model for Simulating Aerosol Interactions and Chemistry (MOSAIC) sectional aerosol scheme, were compared with a series of airborne gas and particulate measurements made over the UK in July 2010. Modelled mixing ratios of key gas-phase species were reasonably accurate (correlationsmorewith measurements of 0.70.9 for NO2 and O3). However modelled loadings of particulate species were less accurate (correlation with measurements for particulate sulfate and ammonium were between 0.0 and 0.6). Sulfate mass loadings were particularly low (modelled means of 0.50.7 ?g kg?1air, compared with measurements of 1.01.5 ?g kg?1air). Two flights from the campaign were used as test cases one with low relative humidity (RH) (6070%), the other with high RH (8090%). N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry was found to not be important in the low-RH test case; but in the high-RH test case it had a strong effect and significantly improved the agreement between modelled and measured NO3 and N2O5. When the model failed to capture atmospheric RH correctly, the modelled NO3 and N2O5 mixing ratios for these flights differed significantly from the measurements. This demonstrates that, for regional modelling which involves heterogeneous processes, it is essential to capture the ambient temperature and water vapour profiles. The night-time NO3 oxidation of VOCs across the whole region was found to be 100300 times slower than the daytime OH oxidation of these compounds. The difference in contribution was less for alkenes ( 80) and comparable for dimethylsulfide (DMS). However the suppression of NO3 mixing ratios across the domain by N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry has only a very slight, negative, influence on this oxidative capacity. The influence on regional particulate nitrate mass loadings is stronger. Night-time N2O5 heterogeneous chemistry maintains the production of particulate nitrate within polluted regions: when this process is taken into consideration, the daytime peak (for the 95th percentile) of PM10 nitrate mass loadings remains around 5.6 ?g kg?1air, but the night-time minimum increases from 3.5 to 4.6 ?g kg?1air. The sustaining of higher particulate mass loadings through the night by this process improves model skill at matching measured aerosol nitrate diurnal cycles and will negatively impact on regional air quality, requiring this process to be included in regional models.less

  12. Empirical, probabilistic, and modelling approaches to assess cross-media impacts to marine sediments at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, W.L.; Vita, C.L. [URS Consultants, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Schrock, W. [Navy, Poulsbo, WA (United States). Engineering Field Activity Northwest; Leicht, G. [Navy, Bremerton, WA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dredge spoils, industrial fill, and liquid wastes from the 1940s to 1970s have resulted in inorganic and organic contamination of soils, groundwater, and marine sediments near the U.S.S. Missouri and Charleston Beach parking lots at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), in Bremerton, Washington. Extensive collection of environmental data from several studies including the recently completed Remedial Investigation conducted under CERCLA have confirmed contaminant levels above federal risk screening levels and state regulatory criteria for several heavy metals and organic compounds, including pesticides and PCBs. Although the correlation between contamination in marine sediments and those in on-shore fill appears to be strong, there is little evidence that a viable transport pathway currently exists from soils to groundwater and thence to sediments. Several methods used to estimate chemical mass flux from soil to groundwater to sediments and marine waters of Sinclair Inlet are corroborative in this regard. Nonetheless, this result is vexing because present groundwater concentrations exceed ARARs, yet are below levels of concern in terms of mass flux to marine waters. Despite the marginal risks posed by groundwater, various remedial alternatives, including perimeter containment using a subsurface waste-stabilized containment wall, were evaluated to determine whether chemical flux could be reduced to levels below those observed at the present time. Three-dimensional flow modelling and transport modelling also confirmed that chemical fluxes were limited in magnitude and could be addressed with more conventional remedial approaches.

  13. CO2 exposure at pressure impacts metabolism and stress responses in the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Hoyt, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Alderson, Paul A.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Tucker, Abigail E.; Walter, Eric D.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration drives physical and geochemical changes in deep subsurface environments that impact indigenous microbial activities. The combined effects of pressurized CO2 on a model sulfate-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, have been assessed using a suite of genomic and kinetic measurements. Novel high-pressure NMR time-series measurements using 13C-lactate were used to track D. vulgaris metabolism. We identified cessation of respiration at CO2 pressures of 10 bar, 25 bar, 50 bar, and 80 bar. Concurrent experiments using N2 as the pressurizing phase had no negative effect on microbial respiration, as inferred from reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Complementary pressurized batch incubations and fluorescence microscopy measurements supported NMR observations, and indicated that non-respiring cells were mostly viable at 50 bar CO2 for at least four hours, and at 80 bar CO2 for two hours. The fraction of dead cells increased rapidly after four hours at 80 bar CO2. Transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) measurements on mRNA transcripts from CO2-incubated biomass indicated that cells up-regulated the production of certain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine) following CO2 exposure at elevated pressures, likely as part of a general stress response. Evidence for other poorly understood stress responses were also identified within RNA-Seq data, suggesting that while pressurized CO2 severely limits the growth and respiration of D. vulgaris cells, biomass retains intact cell membranes at pressures up to 80 bar CO2. Together, these data show that geologic sequestration of CO2 may have significant impacts on rates of sulfate reduction in many deep subsurface environments where this metabolism is a key respiratory process.

  14. Global Scale Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asphaug, Erik; Jutzi, Martin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global scale impacts modify the physical or thermal state of a substantial fraction of a target asteroid. Specific effects include accretion, family formation, reshaping, mixing and layering, shock and frictional heating, fragmentation, material compaction, dilatation, stripping of mantle and crust, and seismic degradation. Deciphering the complicated record of global scale impacts, in asteroids and meteorites, will lead us to understand the original planet-forming process and its resultant populations, and their evolution in time as collisions became faster and fewer. We provide a brief overview of these ideas, and an introduction to models.

  15. Impact of Nighttime Shut Down on the Prediction Accuracy of Monthly Regression Models for Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Claridge, D. E.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the annual prediction error to 0.6% from -6.1 % . The modified heating regression models reduces the annual prediction error to 4.1% from 5.7%. Ec=6.6569+0.1 875(67.044-Tdb)'+0.6756(Tdb-67.044)7 Eh=0.909 1 -.3662(67.04-Tdb)'-.0462(Tdb-67.044)' Ec=5....8505+. 1736(67.7082-Tdb)*+.6794(Tdb-67.708)' ~h=0.97 18-0.341 (67.044-~db)'-0.0458(~db-67.044)+ CONCLUSIONS The results of the four cases studied indicate that when the AHUs operate 24 hours per day, the annual prediction error of the regular cooling...

  16. Modeling power-plant impacts on multipopulation systems: application of loop analysis to the Hudson River white perch population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The white perch population of the Hudson River suffers unusually high mortality due to impingement and entrainment at power plants. The long-term consequences of this mortality for the Hudson River ecosystem depend in part on interactions between the white perch population and its prey, competitors, and predators, many of which are themselves subject to mortality at power plants. Size multipopulation models were analyzed, using a technique known as loop analysis, to determine how patterns of interaction affect population responses to stress and to identify the parameters that have the greatest influence on those responses. These theoretical results, together with information on life history and vulnerability to power plants for Hudson River fish and macroinvertebrate populations, were used to assess the likely effects of power plant mortality on the white perch population and its prey, competitors, and predators. The results suggest that effects of interactions with other populations are insufficient to offset the effects of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River white perch population. The results also suggest that if mortality imposed by power plants does cause a substantial decline in the white perch population, then piscivore populations in the Hudson River should not be noticeably affected, a complementary increase in the abundance of competitors that are relatively invulnerable to power plants should occur, and a shift in the distribution of biomass within the white perch population toward the older age classes should occur.

  17. Model testing using Chernobyl data: III. Atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides in Ukrainian regions impacted by Chernobyl fallout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garger, E.K. [Inst. of Radioecology, Kiev (Ukraine); Hoffman, F.O. [SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States); Miller, C.W. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {open_quotes}Resuspension{close_quotes} scenario is designed to test models for atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides from contaminated soils. Resuspension can be a secondary source of contamination after a release has stopped, as well as a source of contamination for people and areas not exposed to the original release. The test scenario describes three exposure situations: (1) locations within the highly contaminated 30-km zone at Chernobyl, where exposures to resuspended material are probably dominated by local processes; (2) an urban area (Kiev) outside the 30-km zone, where local processes include extensive vehicular traffic; and (3) a location 40 to 60 km west of the Chernobyl reactor, where upwind sources of contamination are important. Input data include characteristics of the {sup 137}Cs ground contamination around specific sites, climatological data for the sites, characteristics of the terrain and topography, and locations of the sampling sites. Predictions are requested for average air concentrations of {sup 137}Cs at specified locations due to resuspension of Chernobyl fallout and for specified resuspension factors and rates. Test data (field measurements) are available for all endpoints. 9 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Source Term Modeling for Evaluating the Potential Impacts to Groundwater of Fluids Escaping from a Depleted Oil Reservoir Used for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years depleted oil reservoirs have received special interest as carbon storage reservoirs because of their potential to offset costs through collaboration with enhanced oil recovery projects. Modeling is currently being conducted to evaluate potential risks to groundwater associated with leakage of fluids from depleted oil reservoirs used for storage of CO2. Modeling results reported here focused on understanding how toxic organic compounds found in oil will distribute between the various phases within a storage reservoir after introduction of CO2, understanding the migration potential of these compounds, and assessing potential groundwater impacts should leakage occur. Two model scenarios were conducted to evaluate how organic components in oil will distribute among the phases of interest (oil, CO2, and brine). The first case consisted of 50 wt.% oil and 50 wt.% water; the second case was 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil. Several key organic compounds were selected for special attention in this study based upon their occurrence in oil at significant concentrations, relative toxicity, or because they can serve as surrogate compounds for other more highly toxic compounds for which required input data are not available. The organic contaminants of interest (COI) selected for this study were benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. Partitioning of organic compounds between crude oil and supercritical CO2 was modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state over temperature and pressure conditions that represent the entire subsurface system (from those relevant to deep geologic carbon storage environments to near surface conditions). Results indicate that for a typical set of oil reservoir conditions (75C, and 21,520 kPa) negligible amounts of the COI dissolve into the aqueous phase. When CO2 is introduced into the reservoir such that the final composition of the reservoir is 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil, a significant fraction of the oil dissolves into the vapor phase. As the vapor phase moves up through the stratigraphic column, pressures and temperatures decrease, resulting in significant condensation of oil components. The heaviest organic components condense early in this process (at higher pressures and temperatures), while the lighter components tend to remain in the vapor phase until much lower pressures and temperatures are reached. Based on the model assumptions, the final concentrations of COI to reach an aquifer at 1,520 kPa and 25C were quite significant for benzene and toluene, whereas the concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons that reach the aquifer were very small. This work demonstrates a methodology that can provide COI source term concentrations in CO2 leaking from a reservoir and entering an overlying aquifer for use in risk assessments.

  19. Adopting Biophysics Methods in Pursuit of Biogeophysical Research: Advancing the measurement and modeling of electrical signatures of microbe-mineral transformations impacting contaminant transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prodan, Camelia [NJIT

    2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This exploratory project involved laboratory experiments to investigate three hypotheses: (H1) Physics-based modeling of low-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as alpha) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy (DS) data can quantify pore-scale geometric changes impacting contaminant transport resulting from biomineralization; (H2) Physics-based modeling of high-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as beta) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy data can quantify rates of mineral growth in/on the cell wall; (H3) Application of this measurement and modeling approach can enhance geophysical interpretation of bioremediation experiments conducted at the RIFLE IFC by providing constraints on bioremediation efficiency (biomass concentration, mineral uptake within the cell wall, biomineralization rate). We tested H1 by performing DS measurements (alpha and beta range) on iron (Fe) particles of dimensions similar to microbial cells, dispersed within agar gels over a range of Fe concentrations. We have tested the ability of the physics-based modeling to predict volume concentrations of the Fe particles by assuming that the Fe particles are polarizable inclusions within an otherwise nonpolarizable medium. We evaluated the smallest volume concentration that can be detected with the DS method. Similar experiments and modeling have been performed on the sulfate-reducing bacteria D. vulgaris. Synchrotron x-ray absorption measurements were conducted to determine the local structure of biominerals coatings on D. vulgaris which were grown in the presence of different Fe concentrations. We imaged the mineral growth on cell wall using SEM. We used dielectric spectroscopy to differentiate between iron sulfide precipitates of biotic and abiotic nature. Biotic measurements were made on D. vulgaris bacteria grown in the presence of different concentrations of iron to form different thicknesses of iron sulfide precipitates around themselves and abiotic measurements were made on different concentrations of pyrrhotite particles suspended in agar. Results show a decrease in dielectric permittivity as a function of frequency for biotic minerals and an opposite trend is observed for abiotic minerals. Our results suggest that dielectric spectroscopy offers a noninvasive and fast approach for distinguishing between abiotic and biotic mineral precipitates.

  20. FINAL REPORT: Adopting Biophysics Methods in Pursuit of Biogeophysical Research: Advancing the Measurement and Modeling of Electrical Signatures of Microbe-Mineral Transformations Impacting Contaminant Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PRODAN, CAMELIA; SLATER, LEE; NTARLAGIANNIS, DIMITRIOS

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This exploratory project involved laboratory experiments to investigate three hypotheses: (H1) Physics-based modeling of low-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as alpha) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy (DS) data can quantify pore-scale geometric changes impacting contaminant transport resulting from biomineralization; (H2) Physics-based modeling of high-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as beta) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy data can quantify rates of mineral growth in/on the cell wall; (H3) Application of this measurement and modeling approach can enhance geophysical interpretation of bioremediation experiments conducted at the RIFLE IFC by providing constraints on bioremediation efficiency (biomass concentration, mineral uptake within the cell wall, biomineralization rate). We tested H1 by performing DS measurements (alpha and beta range) on iron (Fe) particles of dimensions similar to microbial cells, dispersed within agar gels over a range of Fe concentrations. We have tested the ability of the physics-based modeling to predict volume concentrations of the Fe particles by assuming that the Fe particles are polarizable inclusions within an otherwise nonpolarizable medium. We evaluated the smallest volume concentration that can be detected with the DS method. Similar experiments and modeling have been performed on the sulfate-reducing bacteria D. vulgaris. Synchrotron x-ray absorption measurements were conducted to determine the local structure of biominerals coatings on D. vulgaris which were grown in the presence of different Fe concentrations. We imaged the mineral growth on cell wall using SEM. We used dielectric spectroscopy to differentiate between iron sulfide precipitates of biotic and abiotic nature. Biotic measurements were made on D. vulgaris bacteria grown in the presence of different concentrations of iron to form different thicknesses of iron sulfide precipitates around themselves and abiotic measurements were made on different concentrations of pyrrhotite particles suspended in agar. Results show a decrease in dielectric permittivity as a function of frequency for biotic minerals and an opposite trend is observed for abiotic minerals. Our results suggest that dielectric spectroscopy offers a noninvasive and fast approach for distinguishing between abiotic and biotic mineral precipitates.

  1. Ecological Impacts of the Cerro Grande Fire: Predicting Elk Movement and Distribution Patterns in Response to Vegetative Recovery through Simulation Modeling October 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Rupp

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 17,200 ha in north-central New Mexico as the result of an escaped prescribed burn initiated by Bandelier National Monument. The interaction of large-scale fires, vegetation, and elk is an important management issue, but few studies have addressed the ecological implications of vegetative succession and landscape heterogeneity on ungulate populations following large-scale disturbance events. Primary objectives of this research were to identify elk movement pathways on local and landscape scales, to determine environmental factors that influence elk movement, and to evaluate movement and distribution patterns in relation to spatial and temporal aspects of the Cerro Grande Fire. Data collection and assimilation reflect the collaborative efforts of National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory) personnel. Geographic positioning system (GPS) collars were used to track 54 elk over a period of 3+ years and locational data were incorporated into a multi-layered geographic information system (GIS) for analysis. Preliminary tests of GPS collar accuracy indicated a strong effect of 2D fixes on position acquisition rates (PARs) depending on time of day and season of year. Slope, aspect, elevation, and land cover type affected dilution of precision (DOP) values for both 2D and 3D fixes, although significant relationships varied from positive to negative making it difficult to delineate the mechanism behind significant responses. Two-dimensional fixes accounted for 34% of all successfully acquired locations and may affect results in which those data were used. Overall position acquisition rate was 93.3% and mean DOP values were consistently in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 leading to the conclusion collar accuracy was acceptable for modeling purposes. SAVANNA, a spatially explicit, process-oriented ecosystem model, was used to simulate successional dynamics. Inputs to the SAVANNA included a land cover map, long-term weather data, soil maps, and a digital elevation model. Parameterization and calibration were conducted using field plots. Model predictions of herbaceous biomass production and weather were consistent with available data and spatial interpolations of snow were considered reasonable for this study. Dynamic outputs generated by SAVANNA were integrated with static variables, movement rules, and parameters developed for the individual-based model through the application of a habitat suitability index. Model validation indicated reasonable model fit when compared to an independent test set. The finished model was applied to 2 realistic management scenarios for the Jemez Mountains and management implications were discussed. Ongoing validation of the individual-based model presented in this dissertation provides an adaptive management tool that integrates interdisciplinary experience and scientific information, which allows users to make predictions about the impact of alternative management policies.

  2. Economic Impacts Associated With Commercializing Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles in California: An Analysis of the California Road Map Using the JOBS H2 Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report by Argonne National Laboratory summarizing an analysis of the economic impacts associated with commercializing fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) in California.

  3. air pollution impact: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Modeling impact of urban air pollution on health Geosciences Websites Summary: Modeling impact of urban air...

  4. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that comes in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter offgas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly, there are many process benefits to be gained by removing the steam-stripping step from the CPC c

  5. PV Installation Labor Market Analysis and PV JEDI Tool Developments (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, B.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential economic benefits of the growing renewable energy sector have led to increased federal, state, and local investments in solar industries, including federal grants for expanded workforce training for U.S. solar installers. However, there remain gaps in the data required to understand the size and composition of the workforce needed to meet the demand for solar power. Through primary research on the U.S. solar installation employer base, this report seeks to address that gap, improving policymakers and other solar stakeholders understanding of both the evolving needs of these employers and the economic opportunity associated with solar market development. Included are labor market data covering current U.S. employment, expected industry growth, and employer skill preferences for solar installation-related occupations. This study offers an in-depth look at the solar installation sectors. A study published by the Solar Foundation in October 2011 provides a census of labor data across the entire solar value chain.

  6. Impacts of anthropogenic aerosol and greenhouse gas emissions on clouds, convection, and precipitation as simulated by a super-parameterized global climate model /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kooperman, Gabriel J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 coupled Community Earth System Model simulations. The meancoupled NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM), which alsoPrediction using Earth System Models Program, the National

  7. Jobs and Economic Development Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Develop models to estimate jobs and economic impacts from geothermal project development and operation.

  8. Technology's Impact on Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

  9. Impact Burial Prediction for Mine Breaching Using IMPACT35 Peter C. Chu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Impact Burial, Hydrodynamics, Pseudo-Cylinder Parameterization, Four Coordinate Transform, Six Degree of Freedom (DOF) Model, IMPACT35, Inverse Method, Drag Coefficient, Lift Coefficient, NPS-MIDEX-II LONG IMPACT35 for operational mine shapes such as Manta, Rockan, etc. To implement a new technique (pseudo-cylinder

  10. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

  11. Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: A regional modeling study using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.; Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Berg, Larry K.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Morrison, H.

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 OctNov 16, 2008). The effects of oceanic aerosols on cloud properties, precipitation, and the shortwave forcing counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols. Despite the relatively small changes in Na concentrations (2-12%) from regional oceanic emissions, their net effect (direct and indirect) on the surface shortwave forcing is opposite and comparable or even larger in magnitude compared to those of regional anthropogenic emissions over the SEP. Two distinct regions are identified in the VOCALS-REx domain. The near-coast polluted region is characterized with strong droplet activation suppression of small particles by sea-salt particles, the more important role of the first than the second indirect effect, low surface precipitation rate, and low aerosol-cloud interaction strength associated with anthropogenic emissions. The relatively clean remote region is characterized with large contributions of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN, number concentration denoted by NCCN) and droplet number concentrations (Nd) from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), a significant amount of surface precipitation, and high aerosol-cloud interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. In the clean region, cloud properties have high sensitivity (e.g., 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% surface albedo increase) to the moderate increase in CCN concentration (?Nccn = 13 cm-3; 25%) produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The increased anthropogenic aerosols reduce the precipitation amount over the relatively clean remote ocean. The reduction of precipitation (as a cloud water sink) more than doubles the wet scavenging timescale, resulting in an increased aerosol lifetime in the marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol. The positive feedback ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The higher sensitivity of clouds to anthropogenic aerosols over this region is also related to a 16% entrainment rate increase due to anthropogenic aerosols. The simulated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions are stronger at night over the clean marine region, while during the day, solar heating results in more frequent decoupling, thinner clouds, reduced precipitation, and reduced sensitivity to anthropogenic emissions. The simulated high sensitivity to the increased anthropogenic emissions over the clean region suggests that the perturbation of the clean marine environment with anthropogenic aerosols may have a larger effect on climate than that of already polluted marine environments.

  12. 0 | P a g e Economic Impact of Medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    for Consideration 7 Economic Impact Evaluation of Medical School Models 8 Facility Considerations 10 Key Findings 110 | P a g e Economic Impact of Medical Education Expansion in Nevada EconomicImpact Assessment Table of Contents Page Introduction 2 Evaluation of Market Needs 3 Medical School Models

  13. The Impact of IBM Cell Technology on the Programming Paradigm in the Context of Computer Systems for Climate and Weather Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shujia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceleration of Numerical Weather Prediction, ProceedingsComputer Systems for Climate and Weather Models Shujia Zhouprocesses in climate and weather models demands a continual

  14. Efficient Algorithms for Infrastructure Networks: Planning Issues and Economic Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Mei, Rob

    down description of the techno-economic model Efficient Algorithms for Infrastructure Networks: Planning Issues and Economic Impact Frank and Economic Impact Academisch Proefschrift ter verkrijging van de graad van Doctor aan de Vrije Universiteit

  15. NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | NationalWebmaster To contactK-12BSM -JEDI

  16. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

  17. The Impacts of Indirect Soil Moisture Assimilation and Direct Surface Temperature and Humidity Assimilation on a Mesoscale Model Simulation of an Indian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Assimilation on a Mesoscale Model Simulation of an Indian Monsoon Depression VINODKUMAR AND A. CHANDRASEKAR-generation Pennsylvania State UniversityNCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) simulation utilized the humidity and temperature

  18. Original Impact Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  19. Pierre Y. Julien The Impact of Sedimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    : Haiti. 1. Upland Sediment Sources Upper Basin: high-elevation snowpack; snowmelt runoff Diverse: Sediment Impact in Haiti Example: Peligre Dam in Haiti #12;8 CASC2D-SED Modeling 2004 CASC2D-SED Modeling;9 Watershed Deforestation CASC2D-SED Modeling 2004 Haiti River Sedimentation Problems Can Be Important Peligre

  20. USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

  1. Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwater resources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact on groundwater systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan, Preston; Zhang, K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage on shallow groundwater and pressure-controlled72 5.2. Modeling of Regional Groundwater2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources Large-Scale

  2. The impact of misspecifying cross-classified random effects models in cross-sectional and longitudinal multilevel data: a Monte Carlo study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Wen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    as a special case of mixed linear models. The general mixed linear model is written as e?u??y ++= (2.14) 00 ? j0 ? 01 ? Occasion 1 Occasion 2 Occasion 3 j110 ?? + 0102 ?? ? 0203 ?? ? j110 ?? + 14 where y denotes the vector...

  3. Adaptation of a spatially explicit individual tree-based growth and yield model and long-term comparison between reduced-impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the regulation or control of timber that are compatible with sustainable forest management. We describe with appropriate systems for yield regulation. In the absence of silvicultural treatments, the model suggestsAdaptation of a spatially explicit individual tree-based growth and yield model and long

  4. LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Environmental Energy Technologies Division June 2012 LBNL-5796E #12;LBNL-XXXXX | Logue et al., Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model

  5. Potential impacts of climate change on tropospheric ozone in California: a preliminary episodic modeling assessment of the Los Angeles basin and the Sacramento valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this preliminary and relatively short modeling effort, an initial assessment is made for the potential air quality implications of climate change in California. The focus is mainly on the effects of changes in temperature and related meteorological and emission factors on ozone formation. Photochemical modeling is performed for two areas in the state: the Los Angeles Basin and the Sacramento Valley.

  6. Impact of subgrid-scale radiative heating variability on the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subgrid-scale radiative heating variability on the stratocumulus-to-trade cumulus transition in climate models. Impact of subgrid-scale radiative heating variability on the...

  7. A REVIEW OF AIR QUALITY MODELING TECHNIQUES. VOLUME 8 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, L.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

  8. The Impact of Abrupt Suspension of Solar Radiation Management (Termination Effect) in Experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew; Haywood, J.; Alterskjaer, Kari; Boucher, Olivier; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Robock, Alan; Schmidt, Hauke; Singh, Balwinder; Tilmes, S.; Watanabe, Shingo; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined changes in climate which result from the sudden termination of geoengineering after 50 years of offsetting a 1% per annum increase in CO2 concentra- tions as simulated by 11 different climate models in experiment G2 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project. The models agree on a rapid rate of global-mean warming following termination, accompanied by increases in global-mean precipitation rate and in plant net primary productivity, and decreases in sea-ice cover. While there is a considerable degree of consensus for the geographical distribution of warming, there is much less of an agreement regarding the patterns of change in the other quantities.

  9. DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1.1) Model Download the presentation slides from the...

  10. Analysis of the Impact of Using Improved Multi-Layer Window Models for Code-Compliant Residential Building Energy Simulation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jong-Hyo

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzed both window modeling methods with the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 2009 and the IECC 2012 conditions for climate zones in Texas. The results show that there are significant differences in annual building energy end-use, heating...

  11. Oral English development and its impact on emergent reading achievement: a comparative study of transitional bilingual and structured english immersion models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Fuhui

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This quantitative study derived from an on-going federal experimental research project targeting Spanish-speaking English language learners (ELLs) receiving services in four program models: control/experimental transitional bilingual education (TBE...

  12. A formula for low achievement: using multi-level models to understand the impact of individual level effects and school level effects on mathematics achievement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Kathrin Ann

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The following study utilizes data from the High School and Beyond Study in order to predict mathematics achievement using both student characteristics and school level characteristics. Utilizing Hierarchical Linear Modeling, this study extends...

  13. Analysis of the Impact of Using Improved Multi-Layer Window Models for Code-Compliant Residential Building Energy Simulation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jong-Hyo

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzed both window modeling methods with the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 2009 and the IECC 2012 conditions for climate zones in Texas. The results show that there are significant differences in annual building energy end-use, heating...

  14. Conceptualising the effectiveness of impact assessment processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanchitpricha, Chaunjit, E-mail: chaunjit@g.sut.ac.th [School of Environmental Health, Suranaree University of Technology, 111 University Avenue, Maung District, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand)] [School of Environmental Health, Suranaree University of Technology, 111 University Avenue, Maung District, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom) [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Unit for Environmental Sciences and Management School of Geo and Spatial Sciences, Internal Box 375, North West University (Potchefstroom campus) (South Africa)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims at conceptualising the effectiveness of impact assessment processes through the development of a literature-based framework of criteria to measure impact assessment effectiveness. Four categories of effectiveness were established: procedural, substantive, transactive and normative, each containing a number of criteria; no studies have previously brought together all four of these categories into such a comprehensive, criteria-based framework and undertaken systematic evaluation of practice. The criteria can be mapped within a cycle/or cycles of evaluation, based on the logic model, at the stages of input, process, output and outcome to enable the identification of connections between the criteria across the categories of effectiveness. This framework is considered to have potential application in measuring the effectiveness of many impact assessment processes, including strategic environmental assessment (SEA), environmental impact assessment (EIA), social impact assessment (SIA) and health impact assessment (HIA). -- Highlights: Conceptualising effectiveness of impact assessment processes. Identification of factors influencing effectiveness of impact assessment processes. Development of criteria within a framework for evaluating IA effectiveness. Applying the logic model to examine connections between effectiveness criteria.

  15. Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Dan

    Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Paper: Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building John residential light- frame wood buildings and wave and surge loading be- cause often little is left residential structures and wave loading. To do this, one-sixth scale residen- tial building models typical

  16. SU-C-12A-03: The Impact of Contrast Medium On Radiation Dose in CT: A Systematic Evaluation Across 58 Patient Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahbaee, P [NC State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Segars, W [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the effect of contrast medium on radiation dose as a function of time via Monte Carlo simulation from the liver CT scan across a library of 5D XCAT models Methods: A validated Monte Carlo simulation package (PENELOPE) was employed to model a CT system (LightSpeed 64 VCT, GE Healthcare). The radiation dose was estimated from a common abdomen CT examination. The dose estimation was performed on a library of adult extended cardiac-torso (5D XCAT) phantoms (35 male, 23 female, mean age 51.5 years, mean weight 80.2 kg). The 5D XCAT models were created based on patient-specific iodine concentration-time results from our computational contrast medium propagation model for different intravenous injection protocols. To enable a dynamic estimation of radiation dose, each organ in the model was assigned to its own time-concentration curve via the PENELOPE package, material.exe. Using the Monte Carlo, for each scan time point after the injection, 80 million photons were initiated and tracked through the phantoms. Finally, the dose to the liver was tallied from the deposited energy. Results: Monte Carlo simulation results of radiation dose delivered to the liver from the XCAT models indicated up to 30% increase in dose for different time after the administration of contrast medium. Conclusion: The contrast enhancement is employed in over 60% of imaging modalities, which not only remarkably affects the CT image quality, but also increases the radiation dose by as much as 70%. The postinjection multiple acquisition in several enhanced CT protocols, makes the radiation dose increment through the use of contrast medium, an inevitable factor in optimization of these protocols. The relationship between radiation dose and injected contrast medium as a function of time studied in this work allows optimization of contrast administration for vulnerable individuals.

  17. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  18. Mine Impact Burial Prediction Experimental (MIBEX)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    School Steven D. Haeger Naval Oceanographic Office #12;Modeling Mine Impact Burial Depth Modeling.5 0.6 Hs ig For MIS O S ite Hsig(m) Yea rday of 2000 #12;Surface Elevation Variance #12;R/V John

  19. Analysis of the Load Impacts and Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Time of Use (TOU) rate plan, called "Analysis of the Load Impacts and Economic Benefits model. The TOU data was rerun through the new spreadsheet model and the results are reported here. · Participation in the TOU rate option also resulted in an average net reduction of 292 kWh/year in annual

  20. The Impact of IBM Cell Technology on the Programming Paradigm in the Context of Computer Systems for Climate and Weather Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Shujia; Duffy, Daniel; Clune, Thomas; Suarez, Max; Williams, Samuel; Halem, Milton

    2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The call for ever-increasing model resolutions and physical processes in climate and weather models demands a continual increase in computing power. The IBM Cell processor's order-of-magnitude peak performance increase over conventional processors makes it very attractive to fulfill this requirement. However, the Cell's characteristics, 256KB local memory per SPE and the new low-level communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. As a trial, we selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics components (half the total computational time), (2) has an extremely high computational intensity: the ratio of computational load to main memory transfers, and (3) exhibits embarrassingly parallel column computations. In this paper, we converted the baseline code (single-precision Fortran) to C and ported it to an IBM BladeCenter QS20. For performance, we manually SIMDize four independent columns and include several unrolling optimizations. Our results show that when compared with the baseline implementation running on one core of Intel's Xeon Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2, the Cell is approximately 8.8x, 11.6x, and 12.8x faster, respectively. Our preliminary analysis shows that the Cell can also accelerate the dynamics component (~;;25percent total computational time). We believe these dramatic performance improvements make the Cell processor very competitive as an accelerator.

  1. Physical Impacts of Climate Change on the Western US Electricity System: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into actual modeling exercises. Electric System Planningelectric system planners and scientists engaged in climate impacts modelingelectric system planners to use climate data in their modeling

  2. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-002-2014_Second-Generation Reduced-Order Model for Calculation of Groundwater Impacts_20140407.do

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE LMI-EFRCAddendum 1April 1, 2011 DOE Modeling

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: PV Reliability & Performance Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generator Modeling Radar Friendly Blades Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014...

  4. Impact of CO2 quota allocation to new entrants in the electricity market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -economic consequences and impacts on long-term CO2 -emission from the electricity sector. Allocation to new entrantsImpact of CO2 quota allocation to new entrants in the electricity market Hans Henrik Lindboe SUBSIDY 5 MODEL ASSUMPTIONS 6 IMPACT ON INVESTMENTS AND CO2 -EMISSION 7 ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES 8 IMPACTS

  5. The impact of energy conservation in transport models on the $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ multiplicity ratio in heavy-ion collisions and the symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cozma, M D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate energy central heavy-ion collisions has been proposed as a suitable observable to constrain the high density dependence of the isovector part of the equation of state, with contradicting results. Using an upgraded version of the T\\"ubingen QMD transport model, which allows the conservation of energy at a local or global level by accounting for the potential energy of hadrons in two-body collisions and leading thus to particle production threshold shifts, we demonstrate that compatible constraints for the symmetry energy stiffness can be extracted from pion multiplicity and elliptic flow observables. Nevertheless, pion multiplicities are proven to be highly sensitive to the yet unknown isovector part of the in-medium $\\Delta$(1232) potential which hinders presently the extraction of meaningful information on the high density dependence of the symmetry energy. A solution to this problem together with the inclusion of contributions presently neglected, such as ...

  6. The impact of energy conservation in transport models on the $?^-/?^+$ multiplicity ratio in heavy-ion collisions and the symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Cozma

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The charged pion multiplicity ratio in intermediate energy central heavy-ion collisions has been proposed as a suitable observable to constrain the high density dependence of the isovector part of the equation of state, with contradicting results. Using an upgraded version of the T\\"ubingen QMD transport model, which allows the conservation of energy at a local or global level by accounting for the potential energy of hadrons in two-body collisions and leading thus to particle production threshold shifts, we demonstrate that compatible constraints for the symmetry energy stiffness can be extracted from pion multiplicity and elliptic flow observables. Nevertheless, pion multiplicities are proven to be highly sensitive to the yet unknown isovector part of the in-medium $\\Delta$(1232) potential which hinders presently the extraction of meaningful information on the high density dependence of the symmetry energy. A solution to this problem together with the inclusion of contributions presently neglected, such as in-medium pion potentials and retardation effects, are needed for a final verdict on this topic.

  7. Epidemic modeling techniques for smallpox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLean, Cory Y. (Cory Yuen Fu)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Infectious disease models predict the impact of outbreaks. Discrepancies between model predictions stem from both the disease parameters used and the underlying mathematics of the models. Smallpox has been modeled extensively ...

  8. Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate Change Projections on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States.I. Climate change scenarios and impacts on irrigation water supply simulated with the HUMUS model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes methodology and results of a study by researchers at PNNL contributing to the water sector study of the U.S. National Assessment of Climate Change. The vulnerability of water resources in the conterminous U.S. to climate change in 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095--as projected by the HadCM2 general circulation model--was modeled with HUMUS (Hydrologic Unit Model of the U.S.). HUMUS consists of a GIS that provides data on soils, land use and climate to drive the hydrology model Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The modeling was done at the scale of the 2101 8-digit USGS hydrologic unit areas (HUA). Results are aggregated to the 4-digit and 2-digit (Major Water Resource Region, MWRR) scales for various purposes. Daily records of temperature and precipitation for 1961-1990 provided the baseline climate. Water yields (WY)--sum of surface and subsurface runoff--increases from the baseline period over most of the U.S. in 2030 and 2095. In 2030, WY increases in the western US and decreases in the central and southeast regions. Notably, WY increases by 139 mm from baseline in the Pacific NW. Decreased WY is projected for the Lower Mississippi and Texas Gulf basins, driven by higher temperatures and reduced precipitation. The HadCM2 2095 scenario projects a climate significantly wetter than baseline, resulting in WY increases of 38%. WY increases are projected throughout the eastern U.S. WY also increases in the western U.S. Climate change also affects the seasonality of the hydrologic cycle. Early snowmelt is induced in western basins, leading to dramatically increased WYs in late winter and early spring. The simulations were run at current (365 ppm) and elevated (560 ppm) atmospheric CO2 concentrations to account for the potential impacts of the CO2-fertilization effect. The effects of climate change scenario were considerably greater than those due to elevated CO2 but the latter, overall, decreased losses and augmented increases in water yield.

  9. Simulated combined abnormal environment fire calculations for aviation impacts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Alexander L.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aircraft impacts at flight speeds are relevant environments for aircraft safety studies. This type of environment pertains to normal environments such as wildlife impacts and rough landings, but also the abnormal environment that has more recently been evidenced in cases such as the Pentagon and World Trade Center events of September 11, 2001, and the FBI building impact in Austin. For more severe impacts, the environment is combined because it involves not just the structural mechanics, but also the release of the fuel and the subsequent fire. Impacts normally last on the order of milliseconds to seconds, whereas the fire dynamics may last for minutes to hours, or longer. This presents a serious challenge for physical models that employ discrete time stepping to model the dynamics with accuracy. Another challenge is that the capabilities to model the fire and structural impact are seldom found in a common simulation tool. Sandia National Labs maintains two codes under a common architecture that have been used to model the dynamics of aircraft impact and fire scenarios. Only recently have these codes been coupled directly to provide a fire prediction that is better informed on the basis of a detailed structural calculation. To enable this technology, several facilitating models are necessary, as is a methodology for determining and executing the transfer of information from the structural code to the fire code. A methodology has been developed and implemented. Previous test programs at the Sandia National Labs sled track provide unique data for the dynamic response of an aluminum tank of liquid water impacting a barricade at flight speeds. These data are used to validate the modeling effort, and suggest reasonable accuracy for the dispersion of a non-combustible fluid in an impact environment. The capability is also demonstrated with a notional impact of a fuel-filled container at flight speed. Both of these scenarios are used to evaluate numeric approximations, and help provide an understanding of the quantitative accuracy of the modeling methods.

  10. Environmental impact report (draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three projects as proposed by Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the environmental analysis of the projects are discussed. Sections on the natural and social environments of the proposed projects and their surrounding areas consist of descriptions of the setting, discussions of the adverse and beneficial consequences of the project, and potential mitigation measures to reduce the effects of adverse impacts. The Environmental Impact Report includes discussions of unavoidable adverse effects, irreversible changes, long-term and cumulative impacts, growth-inducing effects, and feasible alternatives to the project. (MHR)

  11. A framework for combining social impact assessment and risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoudi, Hossein, E-mail: mahmoudi@uni-hohenheim.de [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany) [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Environmental Sciences Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Renn, Ortwin [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany)] [Department of Technology and Environmental Sociology (and DIALOGIK), University of Stuttgart (Germany); Vanclay, Frank [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)] [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hoffmann, Volker [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany)] [Department of Social Sciences in Agriculture, University of Hohenheim (Germany); Karami, Ezatollah [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing focus on integrative approaches is one of the current trends in impact assessment. There is potential to combine impact assessment with various other forms of assessment, such as risk assessment, to make impact assessment and the management of social risks more effective. We identify the common features of social impact assessment (SIA) and social risk assessment (SRA), and discuss the merits of a combined approach. A hybrid model combining SIA and SRA to form a new approach called, risk and social impact assessment (RSIA) is introduced. RSIA expands the capacity of SIA to evaluate and manage the social impacts of risky projects such as nuclear energy as well as natural hazards and disasters such as droughts and floods. We outline the three stages of RSIA, namely: impact identification, impact assessment, and impact management. -- Highlights: A hybrid model to combine SIA and SRA namely RSIA is proposed. RSIA can provide the proper mechanism to assess social impacts of natural hazards. RSIA can play the role of ex-post as well as ex-ante assessment. For some complicated and sensitive cases like nuclear energy, conducting a RSIA is necessary.

  12. What Is An Environmental Impact ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    What Is An Environmental Impact Statement? What Is An Environmental Impact Statement? An EIS is prepared in a series of steps: gathering government and public comments to define...

  13. Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Impact Statement for the Searchlight Wind Energy Project NVN-084626 and NVN-086777 DES 11-52 Bureau of Land Management Las Vegas Field Office in cooperation with...

  14. Cool Farming: Climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Cool Farming: Climate impacts of agriculture and mitigation potential greenpeace.org Campaigningfor meat categories as well as milk and selected plant products for comparison. 36 Figure 1: Total global

  15. A state-impact-state methodology for assessing environmental impact in land use planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Longgao [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Yang, Xiaoyan [Institute of land resources, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Chen, Longqian, E-mail: cumt_chenlongqian@163.com [School of Environmental Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Potter, Rebecca; Li, Yingkui [Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The implementation of land use planning (LUP) has a large impact on environmental quality. There lacks a widely accepted and consolidated approach to assess the LUP environmental impact using Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). In this paper, we developed a state-impact-state (SIS) model employed in the LUP environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). With the usage of Matter-element (ME) and Extenics method, the methodology based on the SIS model was established and applied in the LUPEA of Zoucheng County, China. The results show that: (1) this methodology provides an intuitive and easy understanding logical model for both the theoretical analysis and application of LUPEA; (2) the spatial multi-temporal assessment from base year, near-future year to planning target year suggests the positive impact on the environmental quality in the whole County despite certain environmental degradation in some towns; (3) besides the spatial assessment, other achievements including the environmental elements influenced by land use and their weights, the identification of key indicators in LUPEA, and the appropriate environmental mitigation measures were obtained; and (4) this methodology can be used to achieve multi-temporal assessment of LUP environmental impact of County or Town level in other areas. - Highlights: A State-Impact-State model for Land Use Planning Environmental Assessment (LUPEA). Matter-element (ME) and Extenics methods were embedded in the LUPEA. The model was applied to the LUPEA of Zoucheng County. The assessment shows improving environment quality since 2000 in Zoucheng County. The method provides a useful tool for the LUPEA in the county level.

  16. Impacted material placement plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, M.J.

    1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility.

  17. Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts (MESSAGE) (Redirected from Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts) Jump to:...

  18. air pollution impacts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air pollution impacts First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Modeling impact of urban air...

  19. Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assess systematically the interference of complex interacting forces that affect economic performance, environmental quality, and social conditions. This paper investigates the use...

  20. Modeling the impact of complexity on transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Jose A. (Jose Antonio Fernandez Chavira)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aimed to understand the drivers of total transportation costs during supply chain complexity events, in particular new product launches, in a fast moving consumer goods company in the United States. The research ...

  1. WINDExchange: Jobs and Economic Development Impact Models

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 m 01-APR-2011

  2. Researchers Model Impact of Aerosols Over California

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronic Public ReadingResearch Nuclear Physics

  3. Impalement transitions in droplets impacting microstructured superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Hyvluoma; J. Timonen

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid droplets impacting a superhydrophobic surface decorated with micro-scale posts often bounce off the surface. However, by decreasing the impact velocity droplets may land on the surface in a fakir state, and by increasing it posts may impale droplets that are then stuck on the surface. We use a two-phase lattice-Boltzmann model to simulate droplet impact on superhydrophobic surfaces, and show that it may result in a fakir state also for reasonable high impact velocities. This happens more easily if the surface is made more hydrophobic or the post height is increased, thereby making the impaled state energetically less favourable.

  4. Community Impact Analysis Emerging Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    to require preparation of an environmental impact statement. When an environmental impact statement, then the environmental impact statement will discuss all of these effects on the human environment. #12;PrioritiesCommunity Impact Analysis Emerging Approaches #12;1960s 1964 Title VI of Civil Rights Act of 1964

  5. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejc, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  6. The Entrepreneurial Leadership Academy(ELA)NEED IMPACT STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    The Entrepreneurial Leadership Academy(ELA)NEED IMPACT STATEMENT INITIATIVE Discovery Park's Burton to test new business and operational models for the airline industry Development and launch of graduate on sustainable technologies related to energy, transportation, and agriculture #12;

  7. Biomass to ethanol : potential production and environmental impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groode, Tiffany Amber, 1979-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study models and assesses the current and future fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol produced from three feedstocks; corn grain, corn stover, and switchgrass. A life-cycle assessment approach ...

  8. Impact of geometric variability on compressor repeating-stage performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Antoine, 1979-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of geometric variability on compressor performance is investigated using a compressor repeating-stage model based on well-known correlations for profile losses, endwall blockage, deviation, and the onset of ...

  9. Estimating the Potential Impact of Renewable Energy on the Caribbean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Estimating the Potential Impact of Renewable Energy on the Caribbean Job Sector Rebekah Shirley renewable energy projects within the Caribbean region. We present a model scenario where together energy

  10. Global Health and Economic Impacts of Future Ozone Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Mort D.

    We assess the human health and economic impacts of projected 2000-2050 changes in ozone pollution using the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis-Health Effects (EPPA-HE) model, in combination with results from the ...

  11. Virtual impact: visualizing the potential effects of cosmic impact in human history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masse, W Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Janecky, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Forte, Maurizio [UC MERCED; Barrientos, Gustavo [UNIV OF LA PLATA, ARG.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current models indicate that catastrophic impacts by asteroids and comets capable of killing more than one quarter of Earth's human population have occurred on average once every million years; smaller impacts, such the 1908 Tunguska impact that leveled more than 2,000 square km of Siberian forest, occur every 200-300 years. Therefore, cosmic impact likely significantly affected hominine evolution and conceivably played a role in Holocene period human culture history. Regrettably, few archaeologists are trained to appreciate the nature and potential effects of cosmic impact. We have developed a conceptual model for an extensible set of educational and research tools based on virtual reality collaborative environments to engage archaeologists and the general public on the topic of the role of cosmic impact in human history. Our initial focus is on two documented asteroid impacts in Argentina during the period of 4000 to 1000 B.C. Campo del Cicio resulted in an energy release of around 2-3 megatons (100-150 times the Hiroshima atomic weapon), and left several craters and a strewn field covering 493 km{sup 2} in northeastern Argentina. Rio Cuarto was likely more than 1000 megatons and may have devastated an area greater than 50,000 km{sup 2} in central Argentina. We are focusing on reconstructions of these events and their potential effects on contemporary hunter and gatherers. Our vinual reality tools also introduce interactive variables (e.g., impactor physical properties, climate, vegetation, topography, and social complexity) to allow researchers and students to better investigate and evaluate the factors that significantly influence cosmic impact effects.

  12. Optimal Portfolio Selection Under Concave Price Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Jin, E-mail: jinma@usc.edu [University of Southern California, Department of Mathematics (United States); Song Qingshuo, E-mail: songe.qingshuo@cityu.edu.hk [City University of Hong Kong, Department of Mathematics (Hong Kong); Xu Jing, E-mail: xujing8023@yahoo.com.cn [Chongqing University, School of Economics and Business Administration (China); Zhang Jianfeng, E-mail: jianfenz@usc.edu [University of Southern California, Department of Mathematics (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study an optimal portfolio selection problem under instantaneous price impact. Based on some empirical analysis in the literature, we model such impact as a concave function of the trading size when the trading size is small. The price impact can be thought of as either a liquidity cost or a transaction cost, but the concavity nature of the cost leads to some fundamental difference from those in the existing literature. We show that the problem can be reduced to an impulse control problem, but without fixed cost, and that the value function is a viscosity solution to a special type of Quasi-Variational Inequality (QVI). We also prove directly (without using the solution to the QVI) that the optimal strategy exists and more importantly, despite the absence of a fixed cost, it is still in a 'piecewise constant' form, reflecting a more practical perspective.

  13. Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmsen, E.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impacts uncertainty for water resources in the San JoaquinJournal of the American Water Resources Association.approach for surface subsurface water transport modeling in

  14. Journal title 2010 Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Emilio

    Journal title 2010 Impact Factor Information Sciences 2.833 Web Semantics 2.789 Artificial Intelligence 2.511 Future Generation Computer Systems 2.365 International Journal of Medical Informatics 2.244 Applied Soft Computing Journal 2.084 Expert Systems With Applications 1.924 Fuzzy Sets And Systems 1

  15. Environmental Impacts of Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Environmental Impacts of Nanotechnology Paul Westerhoff, Ph.D., PE Professor and Chair Civil Proposed Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEIN) Successes by ASU researchers #12 of nanotechnology? #12;Nanomaterials are used in everyday life (> 500 products to date) Nano-silver in Bandages

  16. Evaluating the Economic Impact of Film Production Incentives in South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Evaluating the Economic Impact of Film Production Incentives in South Carolina Prepared by Division (2008) February 2008 #12;Evaluating the Economic Impact of Film Production Incentives in South Carolina. #12;Evaluating the Economic Impact of Film Production Incentives in South Carolina, 2 This model

  17. The Economic Impact of Binghamton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    The Economic Impact of Binghamton University, FY2010 (July 1, 2009-June 30, 2010) Office .......................................................................................................... 2 ECONOMIC OUTPUT and Tioga counties and the overall impact of New York State in terms of economic output, jobs, and human

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/ REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS Area and Regulatory Amendments for Bering Sea Habitat Conservation May 2008 Lead Agency: National Juneau, AK 99802 (907) 586-7228 Abstract: This Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review

  19. Giant planet formation: episodic impacts vs. gradual core growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broeg, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the growth of gas giant planets in the core accretion scenario. The core growth is not modeled as a gradual accretion of planetesimals but as episodic impacts of large mass ratios, i.e. we study impacts of 0.02 - 1 Earth masses onto cores of 1-15 Earth masses. Such impacts could deliver the majority of solid matter in the giant impact regime. We focus on the thermal response of the envelope to the energy delivery. Previous studies have shown that sudden shut off of core accretion can dramatically speed up gas accretion. We therefore expect that giant impacts followed by periods of very low core accretion will result in a net increase in gas accretion rate. This study aims at modelling such a sequence of events and to understand the reaction of the envelope to giant impacts in more detail. To model this scenario, we spread the impact energy deposition over a time that is long compared to the sound crossing time, but very short compared to the Kelvin-Helmholtz time. The simulations are done in spher...

  20. A comparison of regulatory impacts to real target impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relative severity of regulatory impacts onto an essentially rigid target to impacts at higher velocities onto real targets. For impacts onto the essentially rigid target all of the kinetic energy of the package is absorbed by deformation of the package. For impacts onto real targets the kinetic energy is absorbed by deformation of the target as well as by deformation of the package. The amount of kinetic energy absorbed by the target does not increase the severity of the impact.

  1. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop Insurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFrance, Jeffrey T.; Shimshack, J. P.; Wu, S. Y.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    May 1996): 428-438. Environmental Impacts of Subsidized CropPaper No. 912 THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SUBSIDIZED CROPsuch copies. The Environmental Impacts of Subsidized Crop

  2. "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Environmental Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "" EPAT# Risk Assessments Appendixes Environmental Impact Statement NESHAPS for Radionuclides for Hazardous Air Pollutants Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS Radionuclides VOLUME 2 for Hazardous Air Pollutants EPA 520.1'1.-89-006,-2 Risk Assessments Environmental Impact Statement for NESHAPS

  3. Campus Planning Environmental Impact Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    F I N A L Campus Planning Environmental Impact Report UCSF Mount Zion Garage State Clearinghouse No ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT Under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the University of California procedures for implementing CEQA, following completion of a Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR

  4. GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mller, Jens-Dominik

    GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;#12;CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME 4 VICE: INNOVATIVE AND WORLD-CLASS 18 CONTACT 26 CONTENTS 3GLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND #12;Queen THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELANDGLOBAL IMPACT FROM THE HEART OF NORTHERN IRELAND CHANCELLOR'S WELCOME

  5. Atomic modelling of crystal/complex fluid/crystal contacts--Part II. Simulating AFM tests via the GenMol code for investigating the impact of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luquot, Linda

    the GenMol code for investigating the impact of CO2 storage on kaolinite/brine/kaolinite adhesion G. Pepe Force Microscopy (AFM) tests at a kaolinite/brine/kaolinite contact, the confined fluid in sub). Two external solutions are tested. Solution S1 is a neutral brine (pH7.5) leading to a possible

  6. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  7. DAMAGE AND ROCKVOLATILE MIXTURE EFFECTS ON IMPACT CRATER FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    DAMAGE AND ROCKVOLATILE MIXTURE EFFECTS ON IMPACT CRATER FORMATION JOHN D. O'KEEFE, SARAH T models for material damage, dilatancy, and inhomogeneous materials (mixtures). We found that a strength degradation (damage) model was necessary to produce faulting in homogeneous materials. Both normal and thrust

  8. DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEE ADOPTION AND ITS EFFECTS IN TEXAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambs, Jonathan G.

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    as the dependent variable and the second model looked at the total impact fee assed on new residential units as the dependent variable. Both models used the gross tax rate, debt per capita, change in city population as a percentage, city population, average price...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProgramsAnalysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014 Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014 The "20% Wind Energy by...

  10. Session: What do we know about cumulative or population impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerlinger, Paul; Manville, Al; Kendall, Bill

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of a panel discussion followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The panelists were Paul Kerlinger, Curry and Kerlinger, LLC, Al Manville, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Bill Kendall, US Geological Service. The panel addressed the potential cumulative impacts of wind turbines on bird and bat populations over time. Panel members gave brief presentations that touched on what is currently known, what laws apply, and the usefulness of population modeling. Topics addressed included which sources of modeling should be included in cumulative impacts, comparison of impacts from different modes of energy generation, as well as what research is still needed regarding cumulative impacts of wind energy development on bird and bat populations.

  11. Post-doctoral Position Title Quantify the net global climate impacts of past and future land-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouyanne, Nicolas

    objective is to make this protocol widely available so that other earth system modeling groups outside uses and land use changes in global earth system models, and test the impact of various implementation

  12. Assistance with Incorporating Impacts into Integrated Assessment PI: Thomas J. Wilbanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system modeling (CM/ESM), (b) integrated assess- ment modeling (IAM), and (c) impact, adaptation- quences of Climate Change. SIGNIFICANCE Climate change science is a combination of (a) climate science/earth

  13. Quantification of the impact of climate uncertainty on regional air quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, K.-J.

    Uncertainties in calculated impacts of climate forecasts on future regional air quality are investigated using downscaled MM5 meteorological fields from the NASA GISS and MIT IGSM global models and the CMAQ model in 2050 ...

  14. Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    emissions prices? How would CO2 regulations impact coal, gas, electricity, & SO2 markets? 3. Disruptions1 Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks Electrical Engineering Professor Jim Mc: integrated fuel, electricity networks environmental impacts electricity commodity markets behavior

  15. The Asteroid Impact Hazard: Historical Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    ;Chelyabinsk, Ural Mountains, Russia February 15, 2013 #12;#12;#12;#12;Tunguska Impact Impact in Russian

  16. Preliminary Energy Savings Impact Evaluation: Better Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings Impact Evaluation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Preliminary Energy Savings Impact Evaluation: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Preliminary Energy...

  17. Impact assisted segmented cutterhead

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Larson, David A. (Minneapolis, MN); Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, MN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An impact assisted segmented cutterhead device is provided for cutting various surfaces from coal to granite. The device comprises a plurality of cutting bit segments deployed in side by side relationship to form a continuous cutting face and a plurality of impactors individually associated with respective cutting bit segments. An impactor rod of each impactor connects that impactor to the corresponding cutting bit segment. A plurality of shock mounts dampening the vibration from the associated impactor. Mounting brackets are used in mounting the cutterhead to a base machine.

  18. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  19. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  20. Impacts | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)Hydrogen StorageITERITERBuildingNanoscaleImpacts At the MPC

  1. Wind Vision: Impacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to globalWindWind Vision: Impacts

  2. Innovation Impact Publications | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn Other News linkThermalInner Area PrinciplesInnovation Impact

  3. Practical calculation of amplitudes for electron-impact ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCurdy, C. William; Horner, Daniel A.; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integral expression that is formally valid only for short-range potentials is applied to the problem of calculating the amplitude for electron-impact ionization. It is found that this expression provides a practical and accurate path to the calculation of singly differential cross sections for electron-impact ionization. Calculations are presented for the Temkin-Poet and collinear models for ionization of hydrogen by electron impact. An extension of the finite-element approach using the discrete-variable representation, appropriate for potentials with discontinuous derivatives like the Temkin-Poet interaction, is also presented.

  4. The Economic Impact of Coal Mining in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peach, James; Starbuck, C.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economic impact of coal mining in New Mexico is examined in this report. The analysis is based on economic multipliers derived from an input-output model of the New Mexico economy. The direct, indirect, and induced impacts of coal mining in New Mexico are presented in terms of output, value added, employment, and labor income for calendar year 2007. Tax, rental, and royalty income to the State of New Mexico are also presented. Historical coal production, reserves, and price data are also presented and discussed. The impacts of coal-fired electricity generation will be examined in a separate report.

  5. Predicting on-site environmental impacts of municipal engineering works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangolells, Marta, E-mail: marta.gangolells@upc.edu; Casals, Miquel, E-mail: miquel.casals@upc.edu; Forcada, Nria, E-mail: nuria.forcada@upc.edu; Macarulla, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.macarulla@upc.edu

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research findings fill a gap in the body of knowledge by presenting an effective way to evaluate the significance of on-site environmental impacts of municipal engineering works prior to the construction stage. First, 42 on-site environmental impacts of municipal engineering works were identified by means of a process-oriented approach. Then, 46 indicators and their corresponding significance limits were determined on the basis of a statistical analysis of 25 new-build and remodelling municipal engineering projects. In order to ensure the objectivity of the assessment process, direct and indirect indicators were always based on quantitative data from the municipal engineering project documents. Finally, two case studies were analysed and found to illustrate the practical use of the proposed model. The model highlights the significant environmental impacts of a particular municipal engineering project prior to the construction stage. Consequently, preventive actions can be planned and implemented during on-site activities. The results of the model also allow a comparison of proposed municipal engineering projects and alternatives with respect to the overall on-site environmental impact and the absolute importance of a particular environmental aspect. These findings are useful within the framework of the environmental impact assessment process, as they help to improve the identification and evaluation of on-site environmental aspects of municipal engineering works. The findings may also be of use to construction companies that are willing to implement an environmental management system or simply wish to improve on-site environmental performance in municipal engineering projects. -- Highlights: We present a model to predict the environmental impacts of municipal engineering works. It highlights significant on-site environmental impacts prior to the construction stage. Findings are useful within the environmental impact assessment process. They also help contractors to implement environmental management systems.

  6. Scaling and dynamics of sphere and disk impact into granular media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel I Goldman; Paul B. Umbanhowar

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct measurements of the acceleration of spheres and disks impacting granular media reveal simple power law scalings along with complex dynamics which bear the signatures of both fluid and solid behavior. The penetration depth scales linearly with impact velocity while the collision duration is constant for sufficiently large impact velocity. Both quantities exhibit power law dependence on sphere diameter and density, and gravitational acceleration. The acceleration during impact is characterized by two jumps: a rapid, velocity dependent increase upon initial contact and a similarly sharp, depth dependent decrease as the impacting object comes to rest. Examining the measured forces on the sphere in the vicinity of these features leads to a new experimentally based granular force model for collision. We discuss our findings in the context of recently proposed phenomenological models that capture qualitative dynamical features of impact but fail both quantitatively and in their inability to capture significant acceleration fluctuations that occur during penetration and which depend on the impacted material.

  7. Bioenergy Impact on Wisconsin's Workforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Troy Runge, Wisconsin Bioenergy Initiative, presents on bioenergy's impact on Wisconsin's workforce development for the Biomass/Clean Cities States webinar.

  8. High Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    High Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL Commercial...

  9. Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment 1 Equality Impact Assessment summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment 1 Equality Impact Assessment summary Step 10 Name and programmes by which Forestry Commission Wales will help to deliver Woodlands for Wales ­ the Wales woodland of Demographic Equality Strands (2006) National Assembly for Wales · Forestry Commission survey of visitors

  10. Direct, Indirect and Cumulative Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    during creation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Public evaluations and input from independent, variances and non-compliance of permit conditions after the EIS is completed prevents public comment on the natural and human environment from mining in the Peace River Watershed. Environmental Impacts from

  11. Environmental Impacts of Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Environmental Impacts of Treated Wood 6495_C000.fm Page iii Wednesday, February 1, 2006 5:48 PM #12 through the Florida Center for Environmental Solutions, National Science Foundation Grant No. 0126172. Any of treated-wood research and their efforts in organizing the con- ference entitled Environmental Impacts

  12. The Climate Impacts LINK Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    The Climate Impacts LINK Project The Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia Funded by the UK Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions, Contract Ref EPG 1/1/68 The Climate Impacts LINK Project: Applying Results from the Hadley Centre's Climate Change Experiments for Climate

  13. The Ecological Impact of Biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The Ecological Impact of Biofuels Joseph E. Fargione,1 Richard J. Plevin,2 and Jason D. Hill3 1 land-use change Abstract The ecological impact of biofuels is mediated through their effects on land, air, and water. In 2008, about 33.3 million ha were used to produce food- based biofuels

  14. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  15. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejc, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 240 0.222 0.549 0.054 37 7.3 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  16. Catalysis-by-design impacts assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, L L; Young, J K [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Sen, R K [Sen (R.K.) and Associates, Washington, DC (USA)

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalyst researchers have always recognized the need to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of catalytic processes, and have hoped that it would lead to developing a theoretical predictive base to guide the search for new catalysts. This understanding allows one to develop a set of hierarchical models, from fundamental atomic-level ab-initio models to detailed engineering simulations of reactor systems, to direct the search for optimized, efficient catalyst systems. During the last two decades, the explosions of advanced surface analysis techniques have helped considerably to develop the building blocks for understanding various catalytic reactions. An effort to couple these theoretical and experimental advances to develop a set of hierarchical models to predict the nature of catalytic materials is a program entitled Catalysis-by-Design (CRD).'' In assessing the potential impacts of CBD on US industry, the key point to remember is that the value of the program lies in developing a novel methodology to search for new catalyst systems. Industrial researchers can then use this methodology to develop proprietary catalysts. Most companies involved in catalyst R D have two types of ongoing projects. The first type, what we call market-driven R D,'' are projects that support and improve upon a company's existing product lines. Project of the second type, technology-driven R D,'' are longer term, involve the development of totally new catalysts, and are initiated through scientists' research ideas. The CBD approach will impact both types of projects. However, this analysis indicates that the near-term impacts will be on market-driven'' projects. The conclusions and recommendations presented in this report were obtained by the authors through personal interviews with individuals involved in a variety of industrial catalyst development programs and through the three CBD workshops held in the summer of 1989. 34 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. QUALITY AND IMPACT Supplement 1 Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUALITY AND IMPACT Supplement 1 KoN09 Evaluation of Quality and Impact at SLU KoN Management Team Roland von Bothmer Johan Schnürer Boel ?ström Katarina Vrede Per Andersson Supplement #12;QUALITY AND IMPACT Supplement2 Evaluation of Quality and Impact at SLU (KoN 09), Supplement #12;QUALITY AND IMPACT

  18. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Yang

    1999-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future.

  19. Impact of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet interactions on climate sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    Impact of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheet interactions on climate sensitivity H. Goelzer P versions including interactive Greenland and Ant- arctic ice sheet models and model versions with fixed ice a few global climate models exist that include dynami- cally coupled models for the Greenland (e

  20. Sustainable EnergiesSustainable Energies & Their Environmental Impacts& Their Environmental Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    ? Hydroelectricity: Regional dependent Solar Energy: Technological dependent #12;Environmental Impacts of Solar Energy non-Recyclable waste produced #12;Environmental Impacts of Solar Energy Silicon tetrachlorideSustainable EnergiesSustainable Energies & Their Environmental Impacts& Their Environmental Impacts

  1. Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fingersh, L.; Hand, M.; Laxson, A.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This model intends to provide projections of the impact on cost from changes in economic indicators such as the Gross Domestic Product and Producer Price Index.

  2. assessing health impacts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commission Equality Impact Assessment Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Forestry Commission Equality Impact Assessment Forestry...

  3. Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lei

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data...

  4. POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON FLOODING IN WISCONSIN Ken Potter and Zach Schuster flood scenarios in Wisconsin Potential impact of climate change on Wisconsin flooding Ongoing #12;WISCONSIN INITIATIVE ON CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS Partnership between the University of Wisconsin

  5. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  6. Microsoft Word - Fish Impact Assessment 070512.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K Fish Habitat and Fish Population Impacts ASSESSMENT OF RELATIVE FISH HABITAT AND FISH POPULATION IMPACTS OF I-5 CORRIDOR REINFORCEMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES AND OPTIONS Report to:...

  7. Interagency Collaboration to Address Environmental Impacts of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interagency Collaboration to Address Environmental Impacts of Shale Gas Drilling Interagency Collaboration to Address Environmental Impacts of Shale Gas Drilling April 23, 2013 -...

  8. Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the...

  9. Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams Environmental Impacts of Increased Hydroelectric Development at Existing Dams This report describes...

  10. BY DR. PEARL KAMER ECONOMIC IMPACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and Workforce Development Programs................................. 9 ECONOMIC IMPACT OF BNL SPENDING: FISCAL and Workforce Development Programs................................. 9 ECONOMIC IMPACT OF BNL SPENDING: FISCAL Research...................................................................................... 8

  11. Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a process through which the environmental impacts potentially resulting from a proposed project are identified and assessed early in the planning process....

  12. Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)...

  13. Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development April 15, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Partnering with...

  14. The Physiological Impact of Lighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Arranged to Excert High Melanopic Stimulation * LED Spectrum with coolwhite and blue * 12000 K with Ra80 13 WojtysiakDoEPhysiological Impact.pptx | CT RI APP LQ | AW...

  15. Biofuels Impact on DPF Durability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biofuels Impact on DPF Durability Michael J. Lance, Todd J. Toops, Andrew A. Wereszczak, John M.E. Storey, Dane F. Wilson, Bruce G. Bunting, Samuel A. Lewis Sr., and Andrea...

  16. Biofuels Impact on DPF Durability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biofuels Impact on DPF Durability Michael J. Lance, Bruce G. Bunting, Andrew A. Wereszczak, Todd J. Toops, and Matt Ferber Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 15 th , 2012 PM040 This...

  17. Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

  18. Our Impact | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our Impact Argonne is the largest federally funded R&D center in Illinois and the entire Midwest. For 65 years, our scientific and engineering research has helped drive the...

  19. Energy systems impacts desalination in Jordan Poul Alberg stergaard*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

    Climate change mitigation calls for energy systems minimising end-use demands, optimising the fuel to the technologies' particular characteristics. The systems are analyses in energy systems analysis model Energy1 Energy systems impacts desalination in Jordan Poul Alberg stergaard* Department of Development

  20. The robust impact parameter profile of inelastic collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. M. Dremin

    2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the impact parameter profile of inelastic hadron collisions is robust to admissible variations of the shape of the diffraction cone of elastic scattering. This conclusion is obtained using the unitarity condition and experimental data only with no phenomenological model inputs.

  1. The Impact of Climate Policy on U.S. Aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winchester, Niven

    We evaluate the impact of an economy-wide cap-and-trade policy on U.S. aviation taking the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (H.R.2454) as a representative example. We use an economywide model to estimate the ...

  2. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C.; Ghan, S.J.; Walton, J.J.; Weissman, P.R. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA); Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (USA))

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans, not included in the one-dimensional model, substantially mitigates land surface cooling. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stages of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. GCM-simulated climatic changes in the scenario of asteroid/comet winter'' are more severe than in nuclear winter'' because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on Earth. Impacts of smaller objects could also lead to dramatic, though of course less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. An asteroid or comet impact would not lead to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts would dramatically alter the climate in at least a patchy'' sense.

  3. Climate change impact on the Mediterranean Sea circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    Climate change impact on the Mediterranean Sea circulation: a regional modelling approach Samuel number of studies about the stability of the THC in climate change scenario. A large range of climate Sea (Artegiani et al., 1997) which is the main source of the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water. Past-climate

  4. Impact of Power Generation Uncertainty on Power System Static Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    in load and generation are modeled as random variables and the output of the power flow computationImpact of Power Generation Uncertainty on Power System Static Performance Yu Christine Chen, Xichen--The rapid growth in renewable energy resources such as wind and solar generation introduces significant

  5. Prediction of vehicle impact forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaderka, Darrell Laine

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PREDICTION OF VEHICLE IMPACT FORCES A Thesis by DARRELL LAINE KADERKA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering PREDICTION OF VEHICLE IMPACT FORCES A Thesis by DARRELL LAINE KADERKA Approved as to style and content by: C. Eugene Buth (Chair of Committee) W. ynn Beason (Member) I? D n E. B ay (Member) es T. P. Yao (Departmen Head) May...

  6. Prediction of vehicle impact forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaderka, Darrell Laine

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PREDICTION OF VEHICLE IMPACT FORCES A Thesis by DARRELL LAINE KADERKA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering PREDICTION OF VEHICLE IMPACT FORCES A Thesis by DARRELL LAINE KADERKA Approved as to style and content by: C. Eugene Buth (Chair of Committee) W. ynn Beason (Member) I? D n E. B ay (Member) es T. P. Yao (Departmen Head) May...

  7. The impact of upper tropospheric friction and Gill-type heating on the location and strength of the Tropical Easterly Jet: Idealized physics in a dry Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Samrat

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with idealized and complete physics has been used to evaluate the Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) jet. In idealized physics, the role of upper tropospheric friction has been found to be important in getting realistic upper tropospheric zonal wind patterns in response to heating. In idealized physics, the location and strength of the TEJ as a response to Gill heating has been studied. Though the Gill model is considered to be widely successful in capturing the lower tropospheric response, it is found to be inadequate in explaining the location and strength of the upper level TEJ. Heating from the Gill model and realistic upper tropospheric friction does not lead to the formation of a TEJ.

  8. Reformulated gasoline: Costs and refinery impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of reformulated gasoline (RFG) costs and refinery impacts have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model (ORNL-RYM), a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy emissions constraints defined by preliminary complex emissions models. Policy makers may use the reformulation cost knee (the point at which costs start to rise sharply for incremental emissions control) to set emissions reduction targets, giving due consideration to the differences between model representations and actual refining operations. ORNL-RYM estimates that the reformulation cost knee for the US East Coast (PADD I) is about 15.2 cents per gallon with a 30 percent reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The estimated cost knee for the US Gulf Coast (PADD III) is about 5.5 cents per gallon with a VOC reduction of 35 percent. Reid vapor pressure (RVP) reduction is the dominant VOC reduction mechanism. Even with anti-dumping constraints, conventional gasoline appears to be an important sink which permits RFG to be blended with lower aromatics and sulfur contents in PADD III. In addition to the potentially large sensitivity of RFG production to different emissions models, RFG production is sensitive to the non-exhaust VOC share assumption for a particular VOC model. ORNL-RYM has also been used to estimate the sensitivity of RFG production to the cost of capital; to the RVP requirements for conventional gasoline; and to the percentage of RFG produced in a refining region.

  9. Impacts of a nuclear war in South Asia on rice production in Mainland China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    agricultural simulation model to simulate regional nuclear war impacts on rice yield in 24 provinces in China to avoid nuclear war impacts on agriculture is to avoid nuclear war, and this can only be guaranteed regional nuclear war could significantly influence agricultural productivity in regions far from

  10. Impacts of a Nuclear War in South Asia on Rice Production in Mainland China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    for Agrotechnology Transfer agricultural simulation model to simulate regional nuclear war impacts on rice yield limitations. The best solution to avoid nuclear war impacts on agriculture is to avoid nuclear war, those climate changes due a small regional nuclear war could significantly influence agricultural

  11. Economic Impacts of the Arkstorm Scenario1 Ian Sue Wing1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Ian Sue

    Economic Impacts of the Arkstorm Scenario1 Ian Sue Wing1 ; Adam Z. Rose2 ; and Anne M. Wein3 2 3 equilibrium model of the California economy to perform this economic consequence analysis.8 Economic and wind damages, economic impacts; business18 interruption; economic resilience; computable general

  12. Wind Turbine Shutdowns and Upgrades in Denmark: Timing Decisions and the Impact of Government Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    Wind Turbine Shutdowns and Upgrades in Denmark: Timing Decisions and the Impact of Government structural econometric model of wind turbine owners' decisions about whether and when to add new turbines the underlying profit structure for wind producers and evaluate the impact of technology and government policy

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2003 479 Impact Ionization Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapira, Yoram

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2003 479 Impact Ionization structure and a lateral layout for a given application and operational conditions is developed. Empirical current. Index Terms--Breakdown, empirical models, impact ionization, pseudomorphic high electron mobility

  14. Earth Planets Space, 58, 15, 2006 Deep Impact and Sample Return

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A'Hearn, Michael F.

    Earth Planets Space, 58, 1­5, 2006 Deep Impact and Sample Return Michael F. A'Hearn , Michael J, Ice, Nucleus. 1. Introduction Deep Impact delivered 19 Gjoules of kinetic energy to the nucleus scale increases left the strengths at smaller scales unconstrained. Estimates by modelers of the depth

  15. Tools for sustainability impact assessment of forestry policies: what role for social science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tools for sustainability impact assessment of forestry policies: what role for social science: · Models & tools developed for the forestry sector are typically under-used · Impact assessment has little involvement to be deliberative, we need analytical tools, commonly associated with `the experts'." · "The most

  16. The energy and CO2 emissions impact of renewable energy development in China*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The energy and CO2 emissions impact of renewable energy development in China* Tianyu Qi, Xiliang: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;The energy and CO2 emissions impact of renewable February 2014 Keywords: China Renewable energy CO2 emissions CGE modeling a b s t r a c t China has adopted

  17. Global impact of fossil fuel combustion on atmospheric NOx Larry W. Horowitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Global impact of fossil fuel combustion on atmospheric NOx Larry W. Horowitz Advanced Study Program, MA 02138 (email djj@io.harvard.edu) #12;Abstract. Fossil fuel combustion is the largest global source-dimensional model of tropospheric chemistry and transport to study the impact of fossil fuel combustion

  18. Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation Analysis How to Link Physical Climate Data and Economic There are a number of structural and conceptual differences between the information provided by climate change models of economic concepts applied to climate change impact and adaptation policy assessment, and to illustrate how

  19. THE ANALYSYS OF INFORMATION IMPACTS IN COORDINATING DEFENCE AGAINST MALICIOUS ATTACKS FOR INTERCONNECTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    .Napoli@polito.it fei.xue@polito.it Abstract In the analysis of power systems security recently a new concern related a specific model for the analysis of information impacts in handling on-line security after a malicious the impacts of different information scenarios. Keywords: Homeland security, malicious attack, power system

  20. Biofuel impacts on water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories and General Motors Global Energy Systems team conducted a joint biofuels systems analysis project from March to November 2008. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, implications, limitations, and enablers of large-scale production of biofuels. 90 billion gallons of ethanol (the energy equivalent of approximately 60 billion gallons of gasoline) per year by 2030 was chosen as the book-end target to understand an aggressive deployment. Since previous studies have addressed the potential of biomass but not the supply chain rollout needed to achieve large production targets, the focus of this study was on a comprehensive systems understanding the evolution of the full supply chain and key interdependencies over time. The supply chain components examined in this study included agricultural land use changes, production of biomass feedstocks, storage and transportation of these feedstocks, construction of conversion plants, conversion of feedstocks to ethanol at these plants, transportation of ethanol and blending with gasoline, and distribution to retail outlets. To support this analysis, we developed a 'Seed to Station' system dynamics model (Biofuels Deployment Model - BDM) to explore the feasibility of meeting specified ethanol production targets. The focus of this report is water and its linkage to broad scale biofuel deployment.

  1. Modeling Techniques Towards Christian Engelmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    of system behavior · Failure mode, root cause, impact and probability · Resilience mechanism type, capabilities and impact ­ Optimization towards "resilience computing" 2009 National HPC Workshop on Resilience in Checkpoint Scheduling Models · Some need better checkpoint overhead accuracy ­ Constant vs. non

  2. The Economic Impact of the University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    The Economic Impact of the University of British Columbia Walter Sudmant Planning and Institutional "economic impact"? 6 What do we mean by Economic Impact? 7 1. Direct spending by UBC 9 2. Student Spending 10 3. Visitor Spending 11 4. The Economic Impact of UBC Research 13 · Spillover Effect 14 a. A case

  3. Student Housing South Environmental Impact Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sze, Lawrence

    Appendices Student Housing South Environmental Impact Report APPENDIX A. NOTICE OF PREPARATION FOR THE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT AND COMMENT LETTERS #12;Appendices Student Housing South Environmental Impact Report #12;NOTICE OF PREPARATION: DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT DATE: September 25, 2013 TO

  4. A multi-scale metrics approach to forest fragmentation for Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eunyoung, E-mail: eykim@kei.re.kr [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Wonkyong, E-mail: wksong79@gmail.com [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)] [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongkun, E-mail: dklee7@snu.ac.kr [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Forests are becoming severely fragmented as a result of land development. South Korea has responded to changing community concerns about environmental issues. The nation has developed and is extending a broad range of tools for use in environmental management. Although legally mandated environmental compliance requirements in South Korea have been implemented to predict and evaluate the impacts of land-development projects, these legal instruments are often insufficient to assess the subsequent impact of development on the surrounding forests. It is especially difficult to examine impacts on multiple (e.g., regional and local) scales in detail. Forest configuration and size, including forest fragmentation by land development, are considered on a regional scale. Moreover, forest structure and composition, including biodiversity, are considered on a local scale in the Environmental Impact Assessment process. Recently, the government amended the Environmental Impact Assessment Act, including the SEA, EIA, and small-scale EIA, to require an integrated approach. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish an impact assessment system that minimizes the impacts of land development using an approach that is integrated across multiple scales. This study focused on forest fragmentation due to residential development and road construction sites in selected Congestion Restraint Zones (CRZs) in the Greater Seoul Area of South Korea. Based on a review of multiple-scale impacts, this paper integrates models that assess the impacts of land development on forest ecosystems. The applicability of the integrated model for assessing impacts on forest ecosystems through the SEIA process is considered. On a regional scale, it is possible to evaluate the location and size of a land-development project by considering aspects of forest fragmentation, such as the stability of the forest structure and the degree of fragmentation. On a local scale, land-development projects should consider the distances at which impacts occur in the vicinity of the forest ecosystem, and these considerations should include the impacts on forest vegetation and bird species. Impacts can be mitigated by considering the distances at which these influences occur. In particular, this paper presents an integrated environmental impact assessment system to be applied in the SEIA process. The integrated assessment system permits the assessment of the cumulative impacts of land development on multiple scales. -- Highlights: The model is to assess the impact of forest fragmentation across multiple scales. The paper suggests the type of forest fragmentation on a regional scale. The type can be used to evaluate the location and size of a land development. The paper shows the influence distance of land development on a local scale. The distance can be used to mitigate the impact at an EIA process.

  5. Three Essays on Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Wei

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    that the effect varies regionally across hydrologically heterogeneous regions. Also, water availability has a substantial impact on feedstock mix. In terms of biofuel feedstock production, the model results show that limited water resource cannot sustain expanded...

  6. The Impact of Virtual Reality-based Learning Environment Design Features on Students' Academic Achievements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Zahira

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    analyses examined factors that influence its effectiveness. The purpose of the second study was to examine a model of the impact of a 3-D desktop virtual reality environment on the learner characteristics (i.e. perceptual and psychological variables...

  7. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4: Modeling Emissions from Natural Gas-Related Sources 4.1Penetration of Liquefied Natural Gas Table ES2: Impacts ontypical summer demand of natural gas in the South Coast Air

  8. High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

  9. Avoiding Earth Impacts Using Albedo Modification as Applied to 99942 Apophis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margulieux, Richard Steven

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Current orbital solutions for 99942 Apophis predict a close approach to the Earth in April 2029. The parameters of that approach affect the future trajectory of Apophis, potentially leading to an impact in 2036, 2056, 2068, etc. The dynamic model...

  10. SCIX IMPACT ON DWPF CPC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A program was conducted to systematically evaluate potential impacts of the proposed Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). The program involved a series of interrelated tasks. Past studies of the impact of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) and monosodium titanate (MST) on DWPF were reviewed. Paper studies and material balance calculations were used to establish reasonable bounding levels of CST and MST in sludge. Following the paper studies, Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulant was modified to have both bounding and intermediate levels of MST and ground CST. The SCIX flow sheet includes grinding of the CST which is larger than DWPF frit when not ground. Nominal ground CST was not yet available, therefore a similar CST ground previously in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was used. It was believed that this CST was over ground and that it would bound the impact of nominal CST on sludge slurry properties. Lab-scale simulations of the DWPF CPC were conducted using SB10 simulants with no, intermediate, and bounding levels of CST and MST. Tests included both the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. Simulations were performed at high and low acid stoichiometry. A demonstration of the extended CPC flowsheet was made that included streams from the site interim salt processing operations. A simulation using irradiated CST and MST was also completed. An extensive set of rheological measurements was made to search for potential adverse consequences of CST and MST and slurry rheology in the CPC. The SCIX CPC impact program was conducted in parallel with a program to evaluate the impact of SCIX on the final DWPF glass waste form and on the DWPF melter throughput. The studies must be considered together when evaluating the full impact of SCIX on DWPF. Due to the fact that the alternant flowsheet for DWPF has not been selected, this study did not consider the impact of proposed future alternative DWPF CPC flowsheets. The impact of the SCIX streams on DWPF processing using the selected flowsheet need to be considered as part of the technical baseline studies for coupled processing with the selected flowsheet. In addition, the downstream impact of aluminum dissolution on waste containing CST and MST has not yet been evaluated. The current baseline would not subject CST to the aluminum dissolution process and technical concerns with performing the dissolution with CST have been expressed. Should this option become feasible, the downstream impact should be considered. The main area of concern for DWPF from aluminum dissolution is an impact on rheology. The SCIX project is planning for SRNL to complete MST, CST, and sludge rheology testing to evaluate any expected changes. The impact of ground CST transport and flush water on the DWPF CPC feed tank (and potential need for decanting) has not been defined or studied.

  11. Modeling urban runoff characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Alfred

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the impact that urban1zation has on storm runoff. An accurate method is required to model urban watersheds and to simulate storm runoff. Research Objectives The purpose of this research was to quantitatively define the effect that urbanization has... are typical in the sense that they follow the steps outlined above. These models include: the British Road Research Laboratory Nodel (RRL), 1962; the Chicago Hydrograph Method (NERO), 1970; the Environmental Protection Agency Storm Water Management Model...

  12. Accounting for the water impacts of ethanol production This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    assessment model to estimate the water resource impacts of bioenergy expansion scenarios at a county assessment, LCA, energy policy 1. Introduction Faced with erratic petroleum prices, security concerns

  13. SPRING 2014 wind energy's impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    SPRING 2014 wind energy's impact on birds, bats......... 2-3 school news........... 4-5 alumni news measurable benefits reaped by the use of wind energy. But, it is a fact: all energy sources, alternative Interactions with Offshore Wind Energy Facilities," involves the design, deployment and testing

  14. Ultrasonic-impact grinder system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calkins, N.C.

    1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to an ultrasonic impact grinding apparatus utilizing a counterweight to set an unloaded friction free condition. An added weight is used to optimize feed rate in accordance with the material to be cut, tool size and the like.

  15. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as Wireless Audio Delivery Listener cannot

  16. Infusion Pump Informatics IMPACT STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Infusion Pump Informatics NEED IMPACT STATEMENT INITIATIVE Working with Purdue's Rosen Center for Advanced Computing, RCHE developed the Infusion Pump Informatics (IPI) System. IPI member hospitals upload their infusion pump alert data to the system each month. The system is web-based and highly interactive. Drawing

  17. THE IMPACT OF THERMAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH ON GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, Patrick [Arizona State University; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Otanicar, Todd [University of Tulsa; Phelan, Bernadette [Phelan Research Solutions, Inc.; Prasher, Ravi [Arizona State University; Taylor, Robert [University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Tyagi, Himanshu [Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, India

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate change is recognized by many people around the world as being one of the most pressing issues facing our society today. The thermal engineering research community clearly plays an important role in addressing this critical issue, but what kind of thermal engineering research is, or will be, most impactful? In other words, in what directions should thermal engineering research be targeted in order to derive the greatest benefit with respect to global climate change? To answer this question we consider the potential reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, coupled with potential economic impacts, resulting from thermal engineering research. Here a new model framework is introduced that allows a technological, sector-by-sector analysis of GHG emissions avoidance. For each sector, we consider the maximum reduction in CO2 emissions due to such research, and the cost effectiveness of the new efficient technologies. The results are normalized on a country-by-country basis, where we consider the USA, the European Union, China, India, and Australia as representative countries or regions. Among energy supply-side technologies, improvements in coal-burning power generation are seen as having the most beneficial CO2 and economic impacts. The one demand-side technology considered, residential space cooling, offers positive but limited impacts. The proposed framework can be extended to include additional technologies and impacts, such as water consumption.

  18. Implementation impacts of PRL methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudill, J.A.; Krupa, J.F.; Meadors, R.E.; Odum, J.V.; Rodrigues, G.C.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report responds to a DOE-SR request to evaluate the impacts from implementation of the proposed Plutonium Recovery Limit (PRL) methodology. The PRL Methodology is based on cost minimization for decisions to discard or recover plutonium contained in scrap, residues, and other plutonium bearing materials. Implementation of the PRL methodology may result in decisions to declare as waste certain plutonium bearing materials originally considered to be a recoverable plutonium product. Such decisions may have regulatory impacts, because any material declared to be waste would immediately be subject to provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The decision to discard these materials will have impacts on waste storage, treatment, and disposal facilities. Current plans for the de-inventory of plutonium processing facilities have identified certain materials as candidates for discard based upon the economic considerations associated with extending the operating schedules for recovery of the contained plutonium versus potential waste disposal costs. This report evaluates the impacts of discarding those materials as proposed by the F Area De-Inventory Plan and compares the De-Inventory Plan assessments with conclusions from application of the PRL. The impact analysis was performed for those materials proposed as potential candidates for discard by the De-Inventory Plan. The De-Inventory Plan identified 433 items, containing approximately 1% of the current SRS Pu-239 inventory, as not appropriate for recovery as the site moves to complete the mission of F-Canyon and FB-Line. The materials were entered into storage awaiting recovery as product under the Department`s previous Economic Discard Limit (EDL) methodology which valued plutonium at its incremental cost of production in reactors. An application of Departmental PRLs to the subject 433 items revealed that approximately 40% of them would continue to be potentially recoverable as product plutonium.

  19. agent-based model supported: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism CERN Preprints Summary: This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to...

  20. agent-based market model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism CERN Preprints Summary: This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to...

  1. agent-based model contrasts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism CERN Preprints Summary: This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to...

  2. agent-based models analytical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism CERN Preprints Summary: This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to...

  3. agent-based market models: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism CERN Preprints Summary: This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to...

  4. agent-based modeling methods: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agent-Based Model to analyze the climate change impacts on the Andorra winter tourism CERN Preprints Summary: This study presents a georeferenced agent-based model to...

  5. Impact significance determination-Pushing the boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, David P. [P.O. Station A, Box 3475, Langley, B.C., V3A 4R8 (Canada)], E-mail: lawenv@telus.net

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impact significance determination practice tends to be highly variable. Too often insufficient consideration is given to good practice insights. Also, impact significance determinations are frequently narrowly defined addressing, for example, only individual, negative impacts, focusing on bio-physical impacts, and not seeking to integrate either the Precautionary Principle or sustainability. This article seeks to extend the boundaries of impact significance determination practice by providing an overview of good general impact significance practices, together with stakeholder roles and potential methods for addressing significance determination challenges. Relevant thresholds, criteria, contextual considerations and support methods are also highlighted. The analysis is then extended to address how impact significance determination practices change for positive as compared with negative impacts, for cumulative as compared with individual impacts, for socio-economic as compared with bio-physical impacts, when the Precautionary Principle is integrated into the process, and when sustainability contributions drive the EIA process and related impact significance determinations. These refinements can assist EIA practitioners in ensuring that the scope and nature of impact significance determinations reflect the broadened scope of emerging EIA requirements and practices. Suggestions are included for further refining and testing of the proposed changes to impact significance determination practice.

  6. Environmental Impact Assessment (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Province of PEI has established an environmental impact assessment process for projects that could have an impact on the environment. The Province and the Federal Government cooperate in the...

  7. Articles about Environmental Impacts and Siting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stories about environmental impacts and siting featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program.

  8. QUALITY AND IMPACT 1 Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUALITY AND IMPACT 1 KoN09 Evaluation of Quality and Impact at SLU KoN Management Team Roland von of Quality and Impact at SLU (KoN 09) KoN Management Team: Roland von Bothmer, Johan Schnürer, Boel ?ström Bothmer Johan Schnürer Boel ?ström Katarina Vrede Per Andersson #12;QUALITY AND IMPACT2 Evaluation

  9. Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact, Chapter 6 from the Clean Energy Finance Guide, Third Edition

  10. Factors Impacting Decommissioning Costs - 13576

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Karen; McGrath, Richard [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 3420 Hillview Ave., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied United States experience with decommissioning cost estimates and the factors that impact the actual cost of decommissioning projects. This study gathered available estimated and actual decommissioning costs from eight nuclear power plants in the United States to understand the major components of decommissioning costs. Major costs categories for decommissioning a nuclear power plant are removal costs, radioactive waste costs, staffing costs, and other costs. The technical factors that impact the costs were analyzed based on the plants' decommissioning experiences. Detailed cost breakdowns by major projects and other cost categories from actual power plant decommissioning experiences will be presented. Such information will be useful in planning future decommissioning and designing new plants. (authors)

  11. Emissions Reduction Impact of Renewables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. 1 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 EMISSIONS REDUCTION IMPACT OF RENEWABLES October 2012 Jeff Haberl, Bahman Yazdani, Charles Culp Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University p. 2 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012... Do TCEQ: Vince Meiller, Bob Gifford ERCOT: Warren Lasher USEPA: Art Diem, Julie Rosenberg ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS p. 3 Energy Systems Laboratory ? 2012 RENEWABLES Solar PV Solar Thermal Hydro Biomass Landfill Gas Geothermal p. 4...

  12. Impact origin of the Moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slattery, W.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A few years after the Apollo flights to the Moon, it became clear that all of the existing theories on the origin of the Moon would not satisfy the growing body of constraints which appeared with the data gathered by the Apollo flights. About the same time, researchers began to realize that the inner (terrestrial) planets were not born quietly -- all had evidences of impacts on their surfaces. This fact reinforced the idea that the planets had formed by the accumulation of planetesimals. Since the Earth`s moon is unique among the terrestrial planets, a few researchers realized that perhaps the Moon originated in a singular event; an event that was quite probable, but not so probable that one would expect all the terrestrial planets to have a large moon. And thus was born the idea that a giant impact formed the Moon. Impacts would be common in the early solar system; perhaps a really large impact of two almost fully formed planets of disparate sizes would lead to material orbiting the proto-earth, a proto-moon. This idea remained to be tested. Using a relatively new, but robust, method of doing the hydrodynamics of the collision (Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics), the author and his colleagues (W. Benz, Univ. of Arizona, and A.G.W. Cameron, Harvard College Obs.) did a large number of collision simulations on a supercomputer. The author found two major scenarios which would result in the formation of the Moon. The first was direct formation; a moon-sized object is boosted into orbit by gravitational torques. The second is when the orbiting material forms a disk, which, with subsequent evolution can form the Moon. In either case the physical and chemical properties of the newly formed Moon would very neatly satisfy the physical and chemical constraints of the current Moon. Also, in both scenarios the surface of the Earth would be quite hot after the collision. This aspect remains to be explored.

  13. EIS-0100: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    100: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0100: Final Environmental Impact Statement Liberty-Coolidge 230-kV Transmission Line, Arizona EIS-0100: Final Environmental Impact...

  14. The Environmental Impacts of Electric Bikes in Chinese Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, Christopher; Weinert, Jonathan; Ma, Chaktan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wang (2005). Environmental Impacts and Benefits of Regionalincludes energy and environmental impacts due to the miningThe Environmental Impacts of E-bikes in Chinese Cities

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW/ FINAL REGULATORY FLEXIBILITY ANALYSIS.0 NEPA REQUIREMENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE ALTERNATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 2.1 Environmental Impacts of the Alternatives

  16. Legal Adequacy of Environmental Discussions in Environmental Impact Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Eric

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potentially adverse environmental impacts and the manner inmust compare environmental impacts of proposed amendments tonote 10, 15126(c). ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORTS in an area

  17. 2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental Impact Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philliber, Jeff

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    locations. V.G.2 Impacts Environmental effects at the hillThis EIR IV. Environmental Setting, Impacts, and Mitigationanalysis of environmental impacts, and actual development

  18. EA-1336: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    336: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1336: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment This Finding of No Significant Impact is made...

  19. Collision Course: The Threat and Effects of an Asteroid Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Sharath

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reviewing asteroid impact threat. Retrieved from http://reviewing-asteroid-impact-threat/ Edwards, L. (2010, Octoberoccurring. Comparing the threat of an asteroid impact to the

  20. EIS-0256: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0256: Final Environmental Impact Statement Sierra Pacific Power Company Alturas Transmission Line Project This Environmental Impact...

  1. Coupling traffic models on networks and urban dispersion models for simulating sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceragioli, Francesca

    models for modeling and testing different traffic scenarios, in order to define the impact on air quality it with the urban dispersion model Sirane. Keywords: urban air quality, macroscopic traffic models, road networks, pollutant dispersion models, traffic emissions control. AMS subject classification: 35L65, 35L67, 60K30, 90B

  2. 4, 40374067, 2007 Impact of Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 4, 4037­4067, 2007 Impact of Climate Change in Thuringia P. Krause and S. Hanisch Title Page and analysis of the impact of climate change on the hydrological dynamics in Thuringia, Germany P. Krause and S. Krause (p.krause@uni-jena.de) 4037 #12;HESSD 4, 4037­4067, 2007 Impact of Climate Change in Thuringia P

  3. 5, 14071439, 2008 Impacts of climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HESSD 5, 1407­1439, 2008 Impacts of climate change on Blue Nile flows M. E. Elshamy et al. Title Impacts of climate change on Blue Nile flows using bias-corrected GCM scenarios M. E. Elshamy 1,2 , I. A of the European Geosciences Union. 1407 #12;HESSD 5, 1407­1439, 2008 Impacts of climate change on Blue Nile flows

  4. October 2013 ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING, IMPACTS, AND MITIGATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    October 2013 4-1 CHAPTER 4 ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING, IMPACTS, AND MITIGATION MEASURES This chapter discusses the environmental setting, impacts, and mitigation measures for the 14 fully evaluated to measure changes that would result #12;Chapter 4 Environmental Setting, Impacts, and Mitigation Measures

  5. ISSUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ISSUES AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH ONCE-THROUGH COOLING of the Studies Used to Detect Impacts to Marine Environments by California's Coastal Power Plants Using Once of Assumptions, Methods, and Analyses Used In Recent Studies to Assess the Impacts of Power Plants That Use

  6. Environmental Impact Assessment Biologist Biologist R24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Environmental Impact Assessment Biologist Biologist R24 Annual Salary: $58,332.28 - $66,652.94 Please note: While the current vacancy exists in Prince George or Smithers*, Environmental Impact, but at a lower classification. A great opportunity to make an impact on the province's environmental protection

  7. Green Impact Universities and Colleges: EXCELLENCE guidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Green Impact Universities and Colleges: EXCELLENCE guidance 1.0 Introduction Green Impact progressing through institutionally bespoke workbooks to green their departments and campuses, the need, rather than reaching a pre-set endpoint, so we are developing Green Impact to ensure our participants

  8. Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00-1 Planning Report Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials for Sulfur in Fossil Fuels Administration #12;February 2000 Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials for Sulfur in Fossil Fuels Final-006 Economic Impact of Standard Reference Materials for Sulfur in Fossil Fuels Final Report February 2000

  9. Receiving Water and Other Impacts Robert Pitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    5-1 Chapter 5 Receiving Water and Other Impacts Robert Pitt Desired Water Uses Versus Stormwater Impacts The main purpose of treating stormwater is to reduce its adverse impacts on receiving water of the detrimental effects that runoff is actually having on a receiving water. Urban receiving waters may have many

  10. 24 January 2014 Green Impact Environmental Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    24 January 2014 Green Impact Environmental Statement Human Resources Human Resources is one of the University of Kent's professional services departments involved in Green Impact. We gained Bronze Awards with an Excellence Project which will engage other Registry colleagues. Green Impact offers schools and departments

  11. Nonlinear Sound during Granular Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abram H. Clark; Alec J. Petersen; Lou Kondic; R. P. Behringer

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    How do dynamic stresses propagate in granular material after a high-speed impact? This occurs often in natural and industrial processes. Stress propagation in a granular material is controlled by the inter-particle force law, $f$, in terms of particle deformation, $\\delta$, often given by $f\\propto\\delta^{\\alpha}$, with $\\alpha>1$. This means that a linear wave description is invalid when dynamic stresses are large compared to the original confining pressure. With high-speed video and photoelastic grains with varying stiffness, we experimentally study how forces propagate following an impact and explain the results in terms of the nonlinear force law (we measure $\\alpha\\approx 1.4$). The spatial structure of the forces and the propagation speed, $v_f$, depend on a dimensionless parameter, $M'=t_cv_0/d$, where $v_0$ is the intruder speed at impact, $d$ is the grain diameter, and $t_c$ is a binary collision time between grains with relative speed $v_0$. For $M'\\ll 1$, propagati ng forces are chain-like, and the measured $v_f \\propto d/t_c\\propto v_b(v_0/v_b)^\\frac{\\alpha-1}{\\alpha+1}$, where $v_b$ is the bulk sound speed. For larger $M'$, the force response has a 2D character, and forces propagate faster than predicted by $d/t_c$ due to collective stiffening of a packing.

  12. Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot

  13. Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot

  14. Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J., Brown; B., Hoen; E., Lantz; J., Pender; R., Wiser

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show that penetrations of at least 20 percent are feasible. Several studies have used input-output models to predict direct, indirect, and induced economic development impacts. These analyses have often been completed prior to project construction. Available studies have not yet investigated the economic development impacts of wind development at the county level using post-construction econometric evaluation methods. Analysis of county-level impacts is limited. However, previous county-level analyses have estimated operation-period employment at 0.2 to 0.6 jobs per megawatt (MW) of power installed and earnings at $9,000/MW to $50,000/MW. We find statistically significant evidence of positive impacts of wind development on county-level per capita income from the OLS and spatial lag models when they are applied to the full set of wind and non-wind counties. The total impact on annual per capita income of wind turbine development (measured in MW per capita) in the spatial lag model was $21,604 per MW. This estimate is within the range of values estimated in the literature using input-output models. OLS results for the wind-only counties and matched samples are similar in magnitude, but are not statistically significant at the 10-percent level. We find a statistically significant impact of wind development on employment in the OLS analysis for wind counties only, but not in the other models. Our estimates of employment impacts are not precise enough to assess the validity of employment impacts from input-output models applied in advance of wind energy project construction. The analysis provides empirical evidence of positive income effects at the county level from cumulative wind turbine development, consistent with the range of impacts estimated using input-output models. Employment impacts are less clear.

  15. Final report : impacts analysis for cyber attack on electric power systems (National SCADA Test Bed FY08).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stamp, Jason Edwin; LaViolette, Randall A.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To analyze the risks due to cyber attack against control systems used in the United States electrical infrastructure, new algorithms are needed to determine the possible impacts. This research is studying the Reliability Impact of Cyber ttack (RICA) in a two-pronged approach. First, malevolent cyber actions are analyzed in terms of reduced grid reliability. Second, power system impacts are investigated using an abstraction of the grid's dynamic model. This second year of esearch extends the work done during the first year.

  16. 6.11 Atmospheric CO2 and O2 During the Phanerozoic: Tools, Patterns, and Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    6.11 Atmospheric CO2 and O2 During the Phanerozoic: Tools, Patterns, and Impacts DL Royer, Wesleyan.11.2 Models for Atmospheric CO2 and O2 Estimation 251 6.11.2.1 Key Principles 251 6.11.2.2 GEOCARB Models 252.11.2.2.5 Estimates of CO2 and O2 from the GEOCARB model 254 6.11.2.3 Other Models for CO2 and O2 Reconstruction 254 6

  17. Impacts of Advanced Combustion Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - Modeling and simulation; component & systems evaluations; vehicle systems optimization. * Directly supports US Drive ACECVSATT activities * Addresses the following VSST...

  18. Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

  19. Model for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Energy Supply System Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts (MESSAGE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Model for Energy Supply System...

  20. Toward an Earth System Modeling Approach to Simulate Irrigation...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Previous sensitivity studies of irrigation impacts on land surface provide limited analysis of uncertainties from the input data and model irrigation schemes. A team of...