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Sample records for impact linac coherent

  1. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  2. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  3. LINAC Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forty years after the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (now the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) developed its two-mile-long linear accelerator (linac), it received approval from the...

  4. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  5. Linac Coherent Light SourCe

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Linac Coherent Light SourCe after the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (now the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory) developed its two- mile-long linear accelerator (linac), it received approval from the Department of Energy to construct the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first free electron laser (FEL) facility that would be able to produce x-rays short and bright enough that individual molecules could be imaged in their natural states. 40 years Genesis of the idea In 1992, Dr.

  6. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES LCLS : Linac...

  7. Science and Instrumentation for the Linac Coherent Light Source...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    issues related to the unique properties of the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS): subpicosecond time-structure, coherence and unprecedented high averagepeak...

  8. Linac Coherent Light Source Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-03-15

    This suite consists of codes to generate an initial x-ray photon distribution and to propagate the photons through various objects. The suite is designed specifically for simulating the Linac Coherent Light Source, and x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) being built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The purpose is to provide sufficiently detailed characteristics of the laser to engineers who are designing the laser diagnostics.

  9. High Wavevector Temporal Speckle Correlations at the Linac Coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wavevector Temporal Speckle Correlations at the Linac Coherent Light Source Authors: Lee, Sooheyong ; SLAC DESY ; Roseker, Wojciech ; Gutt, Christian ; DESY ; Huang, Zhirong...

  10. LCLS Parameters Update | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Parameters Update The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has demonstrated FEL operations over the energy range 280 eV to 11.2 keV using the fundamental with pulse energies of at least 1-3 mJ depending on the pulse duration and photon energy (please note that operation above 10 keV requires special accelerator conditions that may not be available at all times). Third harmonic radiation is available up to 25 keV at about 1% of the fundamental pulse energy. The pulse length can be varied from

  11. Measurement and simulation of the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation on the Jefferson Laboratory energy recovery linac electron beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, C C.; Biedron, S G.; Edelen, A L.; Milton, S V.; Benson, S; Douglas, D; Li, R; Tennant, C D.; Carlsten, B E.

    2015-03-09

    In an experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR free-electron laser driver, the effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR recirculator. Here we examine the impact of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of bunch compression as well as the impact of CSR on the energy spectrum of the bunch. Simulation of beam dynamics in the machine, including the one-dimensional CSR model, shows very good agreement with themore » measured effect of CSR on the average energy loss as a function of compression. Finally, a well-defined structure is observed in the energy spectrum with a feature in the spectrum that varies as a function of the compression. This effect is examined in simulations, as well, and a simple explanation for the variation is proposed.« less

  12. EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 E-mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov

  13. The Linac Coherent Light Source is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the LCLS x-rays will be emitted co herently and with the same wavelength-the essential prop erties of a laser. Coherent means all the x-ray photons are in phase with each other...

  14. LCLS Users' Organization Executive Committee | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users' Organization Executive Committee SAVE THE DATE: SSRL/LCLS Users' Conference and Workshops, October 5-7, 2016 Read summary of 2015 users' conference. During the annual meeting, users also have the opportunity to vote for their Users Executive Committee Representatives. The LCLS Users' Organization (LCLS UO) provides an organized framework and independent vehicle for interaction between the scientists who are interested in using the Linac Coherent Light Source (the users) and LCLS/SLAC

  15. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Bunch-Length Monitor using Coherent Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Juhao; Emma, P.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a SASE x-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL) based on the final kilometer of the Stanford Linear Accelerator. One of the most critical diagnostic devices is the bunch length monitor (BLM), which is to be installed right after each compressor utilizing coherent radiation from the last bending magnet. We describe the components and the optical layout of such a BLM. Based on the setup geometry, we discuss some issues about the coherent radiation signal.

  16. EA-1975: LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE prepared an EA on the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the existing LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The proposed LCLS-II would extend the photon energy range, increase control over photon pulses, and enable two-color pump-probe experiments. The X-ray laser beams generated by LCLS-II would enable a new class of experiments: the simultaneous investigation of a material’s electronic and structural properties.

  17. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electronmore » laser sources.« less

  18. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  19. X-ray detectors at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blaj, Gabriel; Caragiulo, Pietro; Carini, Gabriella; Carron, Sebastian; Dragone, Angelo; Freytag, Dietrich; Haller, Gunther; Hart, Philip; Hasi, Jasmine; Herbst, Ryan; et al

    2015-04-21

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) present new challenges for camera development compared with conventional light sources. At SLAC a variety of technologies are being used to match the demands of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and to support a wide range of scientific applications. In this paper an overview of X-ray detector design requirements at FELs is presented and the various cameras in use at SLAC are described for the benefit of users planning experiments or analysts looking at data. Features and operation of the CSPAD camera, which is currently deployed at LCLS, are discussed, and the ePix family, a newmore » generation of cameras under development at SLAC, is introduced.« less

  20. The Development of the Linac Coherent Light Source RF Gun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, David H.; Jongewaard, Erik; Lewandowski, James; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Li, Zenghai; Schmerge, John; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2008-09-24

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is the first x-ray laser user facility based upon a free electron laser (FEL) requiring extraordinary beam quality to saturate at 1.5 angstroms within a 100 meter undulator.[1] This new type of light source is using the last kilometer of the three kilometer linac at SLAC to accelerate the beam to an energy as high as 13.6 GeV and required a new electron gun and injector to produce a very bright beam for acceleration. At the outset of the project it was recognized that existing RF guns had the potential to produce the desired beam but none had demonstrated it. Therefore a new RF gun or at least the modification of an existing gun was necessary. The parameters listed in Table 1 illustrate the unique characteristics of LCLS which drive the requirements for the electron gun as given in Table 2. The gun beam quality needs to accommodate emittance growth as the beam is travels through approximately one kilometer of linac and two bunch compressors before reaching the undulator. These beam requirements were demonstrated during the recent commissioning runs of the LCLS injector and linac [2] due to the successful design, fabrication, testing and operation of the LCLS gun. The goal of this paper is to relate the technical background of how the gun was able to achieve and in some cases exceed these requirements by understanding and correcting the deficiencies of the prototype s-band RF photocathode gun, the BNL/SLAC/UCLA Gun III. This paper begins with a brief history and technical description of Gun III and the Gun Test Facility (GTF) at SLAC, and studies of the gun's RF and emittance compensation solenoid. The work at the GTF identified the gun and solenoid deficiencies, and helped to define the specifications for the LCLS gun. Section 1.1.5 describes the modeling used to compute and correct the gun RF fields and Section 1.1.6 describes the use of these fields in the electron beam simulations. The magnetic design and measurements of the emittance compensation solenoid are discussed in Section 1.1.7. The novel feature of the LCLS solenoid is the embedded quadrupole correctors. The thermo-mechanical engineering of the LCLS gun is discussed in Section 1.1.8, and the cold and hot RF tests are described in Section 1.1.9. The results of this work are summarized and concluding remarks are given in Section 1.1.10.

  1. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon...

  2. Longitudinal dynamics of twin electron bunches in the Linac Coherent Light

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Source (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Longitudinal dynamics of twin electron bunches in the Linac Coherent Light Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Longitudinal dynamics of twin electron bunches in the Linac Coherent Light Source Authors: Zhang, Zhen ; Ding, Yuantao ; Marinelli, Agostino ; Huang, Zhirong Publication Date: 2015-03-02 OSTI Identifier: 1181464 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review Special Topics -

  3. Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities X-Ray Light Sources Advanced Light Source (ALS) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home

  4. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; ,

    2011-08-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  5. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Caronna, Chiara; Chollet, Matthieu; Curtis, Robin; Damiani, Daniel S.; Defever, Jim; Feng, Yiping; Flath, Daniel L.; Glownia, James M.; Lee, Sooheyong; et al

    2015-03-03

    The X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument is dedicated to the study of dynamics in condensed matter systems using the unique coherence properties of free-electron lasers. It covers a photon energy range of 4–25 keV. The intrinsic temporal characteristics of the Linac Coherent Light Source, in particular the 120 Hz repetition rate, allow for the investigation of slow dynamics (milliseconds) by means of X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is presented.

  6. The Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ferguson, Ken R.; Bucher, Maximilian; Bozek, John D.; Carron, Sebastian; Castagna, Jean-Charles; Coffee, Ryan; Curiel, G. Ivan; Holmes, Michael; Krzywinski, Jacek; Messerschmidt, Marc; et al

    2015-05-01

    The Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) provides a tight soft X-ray focus into one of three experimental endstations. The flexible instrument design is optimized for studying a wide variety of phenomena requiring peak intensity. There is a suite of spectrometers and two photon area detectors available. An optional mirror-based split-and-delay unit can be used for X-ray pump–probe experiments. Recent scientific highlights illustrate the imaging, time-resolved spectroscopy and high-power density capabilities of the AMO instrument.

  7. The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Mengning; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Hayes, Matt; Milathianaki, Despina; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; et al

    2015-04-15

    The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument specializes in hard X-ray, in-vacuum, high power density experiments in all areas of science. Two main sample chambers, one containing a 100 nm focus and one a 1 µm focus, are available, each with multiple diagnostics, sample injection, pump–probe and detector capabilities. The flexibility of CXI has enabled it to host a diverse range of experiments, from biological to extreme matter.

  8. The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Mengning; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Hayes, Matt; Milathianaki, Despina; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Schafer, Donald W.; Guillet, Serge; Busse, Armin; Bergan, Robert; Olson, William; Fox, Kay; Stewart, Nathaniel; Curtis, Robin; Miahnahri, Alireza Alan; Boutet, Sbastien

    2015-04-15

    The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument specializes in hard X-ray, in-vacuum, high power density experiments in all areas of science. Two main sample chambers, one containing a 100 nm focus and one a 1 m focus, are available, each with multiple diagnostics, sample injection, pumpprobe and detector capabilities. The flexibility of CXI has enabled it to host a diverse range of experiments, from biological to extreme matter.

  9. Second user workshop on high-power lasers at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimann, Phil; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-05-28

    The second international workshop on the physics enabled by the unique combination of high-power lasers with the world-class Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron X-ray laser beam was held in Stanford, CA, on October 7–8, 2014. The workshop was co-organized by UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratories. More than 120 scientists, including 40 students and postdoctoral scientists who are working in high-intensity laser-matter interactions, fusion research, and dynamic high-pressure science came together from North America, Europe, and Asia. The focus of the second workshop was on scientific highlights and the lessons learned from 16 new experiments that were performed on the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument since the first workshop was held one year ago.

  10. Second user workshop on high-power lasers at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heimann, Phil; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-05-28

    The second international workshop on the physics enabled by the unique combination of high-power lasers with the world-class Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron X-ray laser beam was held in Stanford, CA, on October 7–8, 2014. The workshop was co-organized by UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratories. More than 120 scientists, including 40 students and postdoctoral scientists who are working in high-intensity laser-matter interactions, fusion research, and dynamic high-pressure science came together from North America, Europe, and Asia. The focus of the second workshop was on scientific highlights and the lessons learned from 16 newmore » experiments that were performed on the Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) instrument since the first workshop was held one year ago.« less

  11. Photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; Kroll, Thomas; Chollet, Mathieu; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Kern, Jan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Nordlund, Dennis; et al

    2015-04-15

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) have opened unprecedented possibilities to study the structure and dynamics of matter at an atomic level and ultra-fast timescale. Many of the techniques routinely used at storage ring facilities are being adapted for experiments conducted at FELs. In order to take full advantage of these new sources several challenges have to be overcome. They are related to the very different source characteristics and its resulting impact on sample delivery, X-ray optics, X-ray detection and data acquisition. Here it is described how photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy techniques can be applied to study the electronic structure andmore » its dynamics of transition metal systems with ultra-bright and ultra-short FEL X-ray pulses. In particular, some of the experimental details that are different compared with synchrotron-based setups are discussed and illustrated by recent measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source.« less

  12. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, Joshua J.; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Hwang, Harold Y.; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; et al

    2015-04-11

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm⁻¹ electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  13. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    as a whole. Thus, there would be no disproportionate effects on minority or low-income populations. S During operations, the Proposed Action would increase the number of...

  14. Demonstration of simultaneous experiments using thin crystal multiplexing at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Y.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Barends, T. R. M.; Blank, V. D.; Botha, S.; Chollet, M.; Damiani, D. S.; Doak, R. B.; Glownia, J. M.; Koglin, J. M.; et al

    2015-04-10

    Multiplexing of the Linac Coherent Light Source beam was demonstrated for hard X-rays by spectral division using a near-perfect diamond thin-crystal monochromator operating in the Bragg geometry. The wavefront and coherence properties of both the reflected and transmitted beams were well preserved, thus allowing simultaneous measurements at two separate instruments. In this report, the structure determination of a prototypical protein was performed using serial femtosecond crystallography simultaneously with a femtosecond time-resolved XANES studies of photoexcited spin transition dynamics in an iron spin-crossover system. The results of both experiments using the multiplexed beams are similar to those obtained separately, using amore » dedicated beam, with no significant differences in quality.« less

  15. Creating an EPICS Based Test Stand Development System for a BPM Digitizer of the Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is required to deliver a high quality electron beam for producing coherent X-rays. As a result, high resolution beam position monitoring is required. The Beam Position Monitor (BPM) digitizer acquires analog signals from the beam line and digitizes them to obtain beam position data. Although Matlab is currently being used to test the BPM digitizer?s functions and capability, the Controls Department at SLAC prefers to use Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS). This paper discusses the transition of providing similar as well as enhanced functionalities, than those offered by Matlab, to test the digitizer. Altogether, the improved test stand development system can perform mathematical and statistical calculations with the waveform signals acquired from the digitizer and compute the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the signals. Finally, logging of meaningful data into files has been added.

  16. EA-1975: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1975: Finding of No Significant Impact LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California DOE has...

  17. EA-1426: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1426: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source Project, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California The DOE proposes to construct and operate a new research facility at SLAC, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), as a collaborative effort with other DOE facilities. PDF icon U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford

  18. Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stohr, J

    2011-11-16

    The LCLS-II Project is designed to support the DOE Office of Science mission, as described in the 22 April 2010 Mission Need Statement. The scope of the Project was chosen to provide an increase in capabilities and capacity for the facility both at project completion in 2017 and in the subsequent decade. The Project is designed to address all points of the Mission Need Statement (MNS): (1) Expanded spectral reach; (2) Capability to provide x-ray beams with controllable polarization; (3) Capability to provide 'pump' pulses over a vastly extended range of photon energies to a sample, synchronized to LCLS-II x-ray probe pulses with controllable inter-pulse time delay; and (4) Increase of user access through parallel rather than serial x-ray beam use within the constraint of a $300M-$400M Total Project Cost (TPC) range. The LCLS-II Project will construct: (1) A hard x-ray undulator source (2-13 keV); (2) A soft x-ray undulator source (250-2,000 eV); (3) A dedicated, independent electron source for these new undulators, using sectors 10-20 of the SLAC linac; (4) Modifications to existing SLAC facilities for the injector and new shielded enclosures for the undulator sources, beam dumps and x-ray front ends; (5) A new experiment hall capable of accommodating four experiment stations; and (6) Relocation of the two soft x-ray instruments in the existing Near Experiment Hall (NEH) to the new experiment hall (Experiment Hall-II). A key objective of LCLS-II is to maintain near-term international leadership in the study of matter on the fundamental atomic length scale and the associated ultrafast time scales of atomic motion and electronic transformation. Clearly, such studies promise scientific breakthroughs in key areas of societal needs like energy, environment, health and technology, and they are uniquely enabled by forefront X-ray Free Electron Laser (X-FEL) facilities. While the implementation of LCLS-II extends to about 2017, it is important to realize that LCLS-II only constitutes a stepping stone to what we believe is needed over a longer time scale. At present, a practical time horizon for planning is about 15 years into the future, matching that of worldwide planning activities for competitive X-FEL facilities in Europe and Asia. We therefore envision LCLS-II as an important stage in development to what is required by about 2025, tentatively called LCLS-2025, for continued US leadership even as new facilities around the world are being completed. We envision LCLS primarily as a hard x-ray FEL facility with some soft x-ray capabilities. A survey of planned X-FEL facilities around the world suggests that US planning to 2025 needs to include an internationally competitive soft x-ray FEL facility which complements the LCLS plans outlined in this document.

  19. Photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    different source characteristics and its resulting impact on sample delivery, X-ray optics, X-ray detection and data acquisition. Here it is described how photon-in photon-out...

  20. Impact of the MLC on the MRI field distortion of a prototype MRI-linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolling, Stefan; Keall, Paul; Oborn, Brad

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To cope with intrafraction tumor motion, integrated MRI-linac systems for real-time image guidance are currently under development. The multileaf collimator (MLC) is a key component in every state-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment system, allowing for accurate field shaping and tumor tracking. This work quantifies the magnetic impact of a widely used MLC on the MRI field homogeneity for such a modality.Methods: The finite element method was employed to model a MRI-linac assembly comprised of a 1.0?T split-bore MRI magnet and the key ferromagnetic components of a Varian Millennium 120 MLC, namely, the leaves and motors. Full 3D magnetic field maps of the system were generated. From these field maps, the peak-to-peak distortion within the MRI imaging volume was evaluated over a 30?cm diameter sphere volume (DSV) around the isocenter and compared to a maximum preshim inhomogeneity of 300??T. Five parametric studies were performed: (1) The source-to-isocenter distance (SID) was varied from 100 to 200?cm, to span the range of a compact system to that with lower magnetic coupling. (2) The MLC model was changed from leaves only to leaves with motors, to determine the contribution to the total distortion caused by MLC leaves and motors separately. (3) The system was configured in the inline or perpendicular orientation, i.e., the linac treatment beam was oriented parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field direction. (4) The treatment field size was varied from 0 0 to 2020?cm{sup 2}, to span the range of clinical treatment fields. (5) The coil currents were scaled linearly to produce magnetic field strengths B{sub 0} of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5?T, to estimate how the MLC impact changes with B{sub 0}.Results: (1) The MLC-induced MRI field distortion fell continuously with increasing SID. (2) MLC leaves and motors were found to contribute to the distortion in approximately equal measure. (3) Due to faster falloff of the fringe field, the field distortion was generally smaller in the perpendicular beam orientation. The peak-to-peak DSV distortion was below 300??T at SID?130?cm (perpendicular) and SID?140?cm (inline) for the 1.0?T design. (4) The simulation of different treatment fields was identified to cause dynamic changes in the field distribution. However, the estimated residual distortion was below 1.2?mm geometric distortion at SID?120?cm (perpendicular) and SID?130?cm (inline) for a 10?mT/m frequency-encoding gradient. (5) Due to magnetic saturation of the MLC materials, the field distortion remained constant at B{sub 0}>1.0?T.Conclusions: This work shows that the MRI field distortions caused by the MLC cannot be ignored and must be thoroughly investigated for any MRI-linac system. The numeric distortion values obtained for our 1.0?T magnet may vary for other magnet designs with substantially different fringe fields, however the concept of modest increases in the SID to reduce the distortion to a shimmable level is generally applicable.

  1. EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA Based on the findings in the EA, DOE has...

  2. Welcome to Linac Coherent Light Source | Linac Coherent Light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome to the LCLS User Resources Site Check-In | Computer Accounts | Data Collection & Analysis | Policies | Proposals | Schedules | Shipping | User Portal Important...

  3. Safety | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    only. Linux and other third party browsers, such as Google Chrome, are not supported. Java and Flash are also required to access the web training. A complete list of system...

  4. SAC - Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    von der Linde - University of Essen, Germany Justin Wark,-Oxford University, USA C. Lewis Cocke-Kansas State University, USA Robert Schoenlein-LBNL, USA Philip Anfinrud-NIH,...

  5. LANSCE | About | LINAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Linear Accelerator (LINAC) LINAC The core LANSCE facility is one of the nation's most powerful proton linear accelerators or LINAC. The 800-mega-electron-volt (800 MeV) LINAC provides beam current, simultaneously, to five major facilities with unique capabilities: the Proton Radiography (pRad) facility that supports NNSA Defense Program (DP) missions; the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR) that supports DP missions; the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center that supports DP and DOE Office of

  6. High Resolution Simulation of Beam Dynamics in Electron Linacs for Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryne, R.D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Qiang, J.

    2009-01-05

    In this paper we report on large scale multi-physics simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for next generation free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wake fields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake fields, and treatment of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. A macroparticle up-sampling scheme is described that reduces the shot noise from an initial distribution with a smaller number of macroparticles while maintaining the global properties of the original distribution. We present a study of the microbunching instability which is a critical issue for future FELs due to its impact on beam quality at the end of the linac. Using parameters of a planned FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is needed to control numerical shot noise that drives the microbunching instability. We also explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We show that acceptable results are obtained with around 2048 longitudinal grid points, and we discuss this in view of the spectral growth rate predicted from linear theory. As an application, we present results from simulations using one billion macroparticles of the FEL linac under design at LBNL. We show that the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam depends not only on the initial uncorrelated energy spread but also depends strongly on the shape of the initial current profile. By using a parabolic initial current profile, 5 keV initial uncorrelated energy spread at 40 MeV injection energy, and improved linac design, those simulations demonstrate that a reasonable beam quality can be achieved at the end of the linac, with the final distribution having about 100 keV energy spread, 2.4 GeV energy, and 1.2 kA peak current.

  7. Proposal Submission | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nozzle (GDVN) liquid jet system and fixed targets in vacuum at CXI. Other liquid jet systems supplied by user groups compatible with the basic CXI system will also be considered...

  8. User Research Administration & Support | Linac Coherent Light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration Services, Proposal Submission, Experiment Scheduling & Logistics Natalya Brown LCLS Proposal Administrator Tel: (650) 926-8758 Fax: (650) 926-3175 Elizabeth Z....

  9. Working at SLAC | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working at SLAC View map/guide to help get acquainted with SLAC and LCLS. Site Access SLAC has proximity card readers at all entrances and internal gates. Please review Gate Hours & Services and important changes to user badging and access: BEFORE TRAVELING TO SLAC, inform your colleagues about access changes. Ensure all experimenters are listed on proposals & beam time/support requests and complete the following steps: 1. Register through the user portal to provide or update contact

  10. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    only. Linux and other third party browsers, such as Google Chrome, are not supported. Java and Flash are also required to access the web training. A complete list of system...

  11. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome to the LCLS User Resources Site Resource moved to: LCLS Resources

  12. STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Name, Authorized Representative for Int'l User Group) (Name of Int'l User Group Organization) the Foreign Principal Party in Interest, that is subject to the jurisdiction...

  13. After Beamtime | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    issues and continually improve user resources and support. Feedback is shared with LCLS management, advisory committees and staff. Users are also encouraged to contact the...

  14. Spokesperson Checklist | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are provided in help the proposal spokesperson (or their lead contact) prepare for LCLS beam time. 1. Log in to the User Portal to submit a beam time support request. From the...

  15. SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source User Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committees & Contacts LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) LCLS Detector Advisory Committee (LDAC) LCLS Proposal Review Panel LCLS Users' Organization LCLS Collaborators User...

  16. Becoming a User | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Becoming a User LCLS beam lines are open to academic and industrial users for scientific research. All research proposals are subjected to peer review and ranked against competing...

  17. Bioimaging Workshop - Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Contact Us | Visitor Information User Resources LUSI Cost & Schedule Glossary News LCLS SAC LCLS FAC LCLS Science LCLS Machine FEL Resources Stanford University logo Stanford...

  18. User Shipments | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the U.S. The following contact information should be included on all shipments to LCLS: Spokesperson's Name and co Instrument Scientist SLAC, LCLS Bldg. 950 (specify...

  19. Collaborator Checklist | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaborator Checklist These instructions are provided to help proposal collaborators prepare for LCLS beam time. 1. Before traveling to SLAC, log in to the User Portal to register as a new user (include your proposal spokesperson, number, instrument, scheduled beam time). Confirm that a User Agreement has been completed with your institution. 2. Review important access changes and complete the following steps: Contact URA for additional requirements for users from certain foreign countries.

  20. Committees & Contacts | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committees & Contacts LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) LCLS Detector Advisory Committee (LDAC) LCLS Proposal Review Panel LCLS Users' Organization LCLS User Research Administration SLAC Directory Stanford Directory Lightsources.org NUFO

  1. LCLS Policies | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policies Check-In | Computer Accounts | Data Collection & Analysis | Proposals | Schedules | Shipping | User Portal Integration of User-Supplied Equipment at LCLS Integration of User-Supplied End Stations for the Soft X-ray (SXR) Instrument Instrument Enhancements at LCLS Reporting Requirements and Acknowledgement Statements Reporting Requirements and Acknowledgement Statements for SXR Guidelines for Press Releases and Public Communications Proposal Review Process Beam Time Allocation and

  2. Food Options | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from a number of the local restaurants from midday to late evening. Avanti (Pizza and Italian) - http:www.avantipizzafreshpasta.com Siam Orchid (Thai) - http:...

  3. Contact Us | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us Tel: 650-926-2246 | Fax: 650-926-3615 LCLSSLAC is located on 426 acres of Stanford University property, just three miles west of the main campus. The main entrance to...

  4. User Agreements | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPAIN 2019-10-30 IDAHO NATIONAL LAB-BATTELLE ENERGY ALLIA 2018-05-13 IFIC - INST FISICA CORPUSCULAR SPAIN 2017-12-04 ILL - INST LAUE-LANGEVIN GRENOBLE FRANCE 2018-05-07 IMCB,...

  5. User Financial Accounts | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Financial Accounts Why Have a User Financial Account? Each user group should establish a user financial account to procure gases, chemicals, supplies or services to support their ...

  6. Identifying Longitudinal Jitter Sources in the LCLS Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, Franz-Josef; Akre, Ron; Brachmann, Axel; Craft, Jim; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Loos, Henrik; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Ratner, Daniel; Smith, Tonee; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC is an x-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) with wavelengths of 0.15 nm to 1.5 nm. The electron beam stability is important for good lasing. While the transverse jitter of the beam is about 10-20% of the rms beam sizes, the jitter in the longitudinal phase space is a multiple of the energy spread and bunch length. At the lower energy of 4.3 GeV (corresponding to the longest wavelength of 1.5 nm) the relative energy jitter can be 0.125%, while the rms energy spread is with 0.025% five times smaller. An even bigger ratio exists for the arrival time jitter of 50 fs and the bunch duration of about 5 fs (rms) in the low charge (20 pC) operating mode. Although the impact to the experiments is reduced by providing pulse-by-pulse data of the measured energy and arrival time, it would be nice to understand and mitigate the root causes of this jitter. The thyratron of the high power supply of the RF klystrons is one of the main contributors. Another suspect is the multi-pacting in the RF loads. Phase measurements down to 0.01 degree (equals 10 fs) along the RF pulse were achieved, giving hints to the impact of the different sources.

  7. R and D energy recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko,V.N.; Beavis, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Burrill, A.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Chang, X.; Drees, A.; Ganetis, G.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Hershcovitch, A.; Hseuh, H-C.; Jain, A.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Lambiase, R.; Lederle, D.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Nehring, T.; Oerter, B.; Pai, C.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Pozdeyev, E.; Rao, T.; Reich, J.; Roser, T.; Russo, T.; Smith, K.; Tuozzolo, J.; Weiss, D.; Williams, N.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Favale, A.; Bluem, H.; Cole, M.; Holmes, D.; Rathke, J.; Schultheiss, T.; Todd, A.; Delayen, J.; Funk, L.; Phillips, L.; Preble, J.

    2008-06-23

    Collider Accelerator Department at BNL is in the final stages of developing the 20-MeV R and D energy recovery linac with super-conducting 2.5 MeV RF gun and single-mode super-conducting 5-cell RF linac. This unique facility aims to address many outstanding questions relevant for high current (up to 0.5 A of average current), high brightness energy-recovery linacs with novel ZigZag-type merger. Recent development in the R and D ERL plans include gun and 5-cell cavity (G5) test and possibility of using R and D ERL for proof-of-principle test of Coherent Electron Cooling at RHIC.

  8. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  9. Coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  10. Before Arriving at SLAC | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Before Arriving at SLAC □ Contact the Stanford Guest House to make reservations □ Review Check-In Procedures & Advance Requirements for Foreign Nationals □ Review Safety of Scheduled Experiments & Complete Training □ Complete User Agreements □ Establish or Confirm User Financial Accounts □ Order Chemicals, Gases, Cryogenics □ Coordinate Equipiment Modifications □ Establish or Confirm Computer Accounts, Set up & Access Electronic Logbooks (eLogs) □ Coordinate

  11. LCLS Experimental Run Schedules | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Experimental Run Schedules Check-In | Computer Accounts | Data Collection & Analysis | Policies | Proposals | Shipping | User Portal LCLS generally operates November through August, using the shutdown period for upgrades and maintenance projects. LCLS Tentative Long-Range Operating Plans Run 13 (March to August 2016) Run 12 (October 2015 to March 2016) Run 11 (March to August 2015) Run 10 (October 2014 to March 2015) Run 9 (March to August 2014) Run 8 (July 2013 to March 2014) Run 7

  12. LCLS User Check-In Procedures | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Check-In Procedures Data Collection & Analysis | Policies | Proposals | Schedules | Shipping | User Portal Prior to traveleing to SLAC, review changes for badging/automated access and updated user check-in procedures: STEP 1. Register or Update User Portal. Provide or update your user information through the user portal (this must be completed prior to arrival). Ensure that you have correctly listed your current institution. If a user agreement with your institution is not executed in

  13. Longitudinal dynamics of twin electron bunches in the Linac Coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Beams Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-4402 Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of...

  14. Commissioning of the 112 MHz SRF Gun and 500 MHz bunching cavities for the CeC PoP Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J. C.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntosh, P.; Moss, A.; Narayan, G.; Orfin, P.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, E.; Wheelhouse, A.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Xin, T.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment at BNL includes a short electron linac. During Phase 1, a 112 MHz superconducting RF photo-emission gun and two 500 MHz normal conducting bunching cavities were installed and are under commissioning. The paper describes the Phase1 linac layout and presents commissioning results for the cavities and associated RF, cryogenic and other sub-systems

  15. Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac (Conference)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac You are accessing a document from the...

  16. Benchmarking / Crosschecking DFS in the ILC Main Linac (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Benchmarking Crosschecking DFS in the ILC Main Linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Benchmarking Crosschecking DFS in the ILC Main Linac In an effort to compare ...

  17. TRANSVERSE MATCHING OF THE SNS LINAC BASED ON PROFILE MEASUREMENTS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect TRANSVERSE MATCHING OF THE SNS LINAC BASED ON PROFILE MEASUREMENTS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: TRANSVERSE MATCHING OF THE SNS LINAC BASED ON PROFILE MEASUREMENTS For a high intensity linac such as the SNS linac, it matters to match transversely adequately to minimize the beam mismatch and potential beam loss. The technique of doing the matching using the wire-scanners in series was employed [1]. It was verified that matching was improved through

  18. Energy Recovery Linacs for Commercial Radioisotope Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sy, Amy; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Johnson, Rolland; Roberts, Tom; Boulware, Chase; Hollister, Jerry

    2015-09-01

    Photonuclear reactions with bremsstrahlung photon beams from electron linacs can generate radioisotopes of critical interest. An SRF Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) provides a path to a more diverse and reliable domestic supply of short-lived, high-value, high-demand isotopes in a more compact footprint and at a lower cost than those produced by conventional reactor or ion accelerator methods. Use of an ERL enables increased energy efficiency of the complex through energy recovery of the waste electron beam, high electron currents for high production yields, and reduced neutron production and shielding activation at beam dump components. Simulation studies using G4Beamline/GEANT4 and MCNP6 through MuSim, as well as other simulation codes, will design an ERL-based isotope production facility utilizing bremsstrahlung photon beams from an electron linac. Balancing the isotope production parameters versus energy recovery requirements will inform a choice of isotope production target for future experiments.

  19. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  20. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  1. A Stability of LCLS Linac Modulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, F.-J.; Krasnykh, A.; Morris, B.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13

    Information concerning to a stability of LCLS RF linac modulators is allocated in this paper. In general a 'pulse-to-pulse' modulator stability (and RF phase as well) is acceptable for the LCLS commission and FEL programs. Further modulator stability improvements are possible and approaches are discussed based on our experimental results.

  2. HIGH CURRENT ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LITVINENKO,V.N.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BARTON,D.S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    We present the design and parameters of an energy recovery linac (ERL) facility, which is under construction in the Collider-Accelerator Department at BNL. This R&D facility has the goal of demonstrating CW operation of an ERL with an average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere and with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The possibility of a future upgrade to a two-pass ERL is also being considered. The heart of the facility is a 5-cell 703.75 MHz super-conducting RF linac with strong Higher Order Mode (HOM) damping. The flexible lattice of the ERL provides a test-bed for exploring issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities and diagnostics of intense CW electron beams. This ERL is also perfectly suited for a far-IR FEL. We present the status and plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

  3. High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir N. Litvinenko; Donald Barton; D. Beavis; Ilan Ben-Zvi; Michael Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X. Chang; Roger Connolly; D. Gassner; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.C. Hseuh; P. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R. Lambiase; G. McIntyre; W. Meng; T. C. Nehring; A. Nicoletti; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; T. Srinivasan-Rao; N. Williams; K.-C. Wu; Vitaly Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; Mike Cole; A. Favale; D. Holmes; John Rathke; Tom Schultheiss; A. Todd; J. Delayen; W. Funk; L. Phillips; Joe Preble

    2004-08-01

    We present the design, the parameters of a small test Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) facility, which is under construction at Collider-Accelerator Department, BNL. This R&D facility has goals to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1 - 1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. A possibility for future up-grade to a two-pass ERL is considered. The heart of the facility is a 5-cell 700 MHz super-conducting RF linac with HOM damping. Flexible lattice of ERL provides a test-bed for testing issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities and diagnostics of intense CW e-beam. ERL is also perfectly suited for a far-IR FEL. We present the status and our plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

  4. Preliminary Study on Emittance Growth in the LHEC Recirculating Linac

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Preliminary Study on Emittance Growth in the LHEC Recirculating Linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Preliminary Study on Emittance Growth in the LHEC Recirculating Linac In this paper, we estimate the emittance growth in the LHeC recirculating Linac, the lattice design of which is presented in another paper of IPAC10 proceedings. The possible sources for emittance growth included here are: energy spread from RF acceleration in the SRF

  5. Analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment in FACET commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-05

    In this note, the analysis on linac quadrupole misalignment is presented for the FACET linac section LI05-09 plus LI11-19. The effectiveness of the beam-based alignment technique is preliminarily confirmed by the measurement. Beam-based alignment technique was adopted at SLAC linac since SLC time. Here the beam-based alignment algorithms are further developed and applied in the FACET commissioning during 2012 run.

  6. Practical transverse matching of a high intensity SNS linac (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Practical transverse matching of a high intensity SNS linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Practical transverse matching of a high intensity SNS linac It is important to accomplish adequate matching for a high intensity linear accelerator such as the SNS linac to minimize the mismatch and potential beam loss. In the early stage of the SNS linac design, there was a discussion over whether to match the core or to match the tail. A study shows that the

  7. High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear ...

  8. Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lattice Design for the LHEC Recirculating Linac In this paper, we present a lattice design for the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) recirculating linac. The recirculating linac consists of one roughly 3-km long linac hosting superconducting RF (SRF) accelerating cavities, two arcs and one transfer line for the recirculation. In two passes through a pulsed SRF linac the electron beam can

  9. Optical emission spectroscopy of the Linac4 and superconducting proton Linac plasma generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettry, J.; Kronberger, M.; Mahner, E.; Schmitzer, C.; Sanchez, J.; Scrivens, R.; Midttun, O.; O'Neil, M.; Pereira, H.; Paoluzzi, M.; Fantz, U.; Wuenderlich, D.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Myllyperkioe, P.; Tarvainen, O.

    2012-02-15

    CERN's superconducting proton Linac (SPL) study investigates a 50 Hz high-energy, high-power Linac for H{sup -} ions. The SPL plasma generator is an evolution of the DESY ion source plasma generator currently operated at CERN's Linac4 test stand. The plasma generator is a step towards a particle source for the SPL, it is designed to handle 100 kW peak RF-power at a 6% duty factor. While the acquisition of an integrated hydrogen plasma optical spectrum is straightforward, the measurement of a time-resolved spectrum requires dedicated amplification schemes. The experimental setup for visible light based on photomultipliers and narrow bandwidth filters and the UV spectrometer setup are described. The H{sub {alpha}}, H{sub {beta}}, and H{sub {gamma}} Balmer line intensities, the Lyman band and alpha transition were measured. A parametric study of the optical emission from the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator as a function of RF-power and gas pressure is presented. The potential of optical emission spectrometry coupled to RF-power coupling measurements for on-line monitoring of short RF heated hydrogen plasma pulses is discussed.

  10. MEIC Proton Beam Formation with a Low Energy Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    The MIEC proton and ion beams are generated, accumulated, accelerated and cooled in a new green-field ion injector complex designed specifically to support its high luminosity goal. This injector consists of sources, a linac and a small booster ring. In this paper we explore feasibility of a short ion linac that injects low energy protons and ions into the booster ring.

  11. coherent-structures-html

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Role of Coherent Structures in Scour Process Around Bridge Piers and Abutments

  12. PERFORMANCE OF THE DIAGNOSTICS FOR NSLS-II LINAC COMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller III, R.; Padrazo, D.; Wang, G.M.; Heese, R.; Hseuh H.-C.; Johanson, M.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Pinayev, I.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state of the art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The transfer lines not only provide a means to deliver the beam from one machine to another, they also provide a suite of diagnostics and utilities to measure the properties of the beam to be delivered. In this paper we discuss the suite of diagnostics that will be used to commission the NSLS-II linac and measure the beam properties. The linac to booster transfer line can measure the linac emittance with a three screens measurement or a quadrupole scan. Energy and energy spread are measured in a dispersive section. Total charge and charge uniformity are measured with wall current monitors in the linac and transformers in the transfer line. We show that the performance of the diagnostics in the transfer line will be sufficient to ensure the linac meets its specifications and provides a means of trouble shooting and studying the linac in future operation.

  13. R&D Energy Recovery Linac at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, Vladimir; Beavis, D.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Burrill, Andrew; Calaga, Rama; Cameron, Peter; Chang, Xiangyun; Drees, K.A.; Ganetis, G.; Gamble, Michael; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Hseuh, H.C.; Jain, A.K.; Kayran, A.; Kewisch, Jorg; Lambiase, R.F.; Lederle, D.L.; Mahler, G.J.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Nehring, T.C.; Oerter, B.; Pai, C.; Pate, D.; Phillips, Daniel; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Rao, Triveni; Reich, J.; Roser, Thomas; Russo, T.; Smith, K.; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Weiss, D.; Williams, N.W.W.; Yip, Kin; Zaltsman, A.; Bluem, Hans; Cole, Michael; Favale, Anthony; Holmes, D.; Rathke, John; Schultheiss, Tom; Delayen, Jean; Funk, L.; Phillips, H.; Preble, Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Collider Accelerator Department at BNL is in the final stages of developing the 20-MeV R&D energy recovery linac with super-conducting 2.5 MeV RF gun and single-mode super-conducting 5-cell RF linac. This unique facility aims to address many outstanding questions relevant for high current (up to 0.5 A of average current), high brightness energy-recovery linacs with novel Zigzag-type merger. We present the performance of the R&D ERL elements and detailed commissioning plan.

  14. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Neil

    2011-04-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  15. Benchmarking / Crosschecking DFS in the ILC Main Linac (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Benchmarking / Crosschecking DFS in the ILC Main Linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Benchmarking / Crosschecking DFS in the ILC Main Linac × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this

  16. A novel electron gun for inline MRI-linac configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantin, Dragoş E. Fahrig, Rebecca; Holloway, Lois; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This work introduces a new electron gun geometry capable of robust functioning in the presence of a high strength external magnetic field for axisymmetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-linac configurations. This allows an inline MRI-linac to operate without the need to isolate the linear accelerator (linac) using a magnetic shield. This MRI-linac integration approach not only leaves the magnet homogeneity unchanged but also provides the linac flexibility to move along the magnet axis of symmetry if the source to target distance needs to be adjusted. Methods: Simple electron gun geometry modifications of a Varian 600C electron gun are considered and solved in the presence of an external magnetic field in order to determine a set of design principles for the new geometry. Based on these results, a new gun geometry is proposed and optimized in the fringe field of a 0.5 T open bore MRI magnet (GE Signa SP). A computer model for the 6 MeV Varian 600C linac is used to determine the capture efficiency of the new electron gun-linac system in the presence of the fringe field of the same MRI scanner. The behavior of the new electron gun plus the linac system is also studied in the fringe fields of two other magnets, a 1.0 T prototype open bore magnet and a 1.5 T GE Conquest scanner. Results: Simple geometrical modifications of the original electron gun geometry do not provide feasible solutions. However, these tests show that a smaller transverse cathode diameter with a flat surface and a slightly larger anode diameter could alleviate the current loss due to beam interactions with the anode in the presence of magnetic fields. Based on these findings, an initial geometry resembling a parallel plate capacitor with a hole in the anode is proposed. The optimization procedure finds a cathode-anode distance of 5 mm, a focusing electrode angle of 5°, and an anode drift tube length of 17.1 mm. Also, the linac can be displaced with ±15 cm along the axis of the 0.5 T magnet without capture efficiency reduction below the experimental value in zero field. In this range of linac displacements, the electron beam generated by the new gun geometry is more effectively injected into the linac in the presence of an external magnetic field, resulting in approximately 20% increase of the target current compared to the original gun geometry behavior at zero field. The new gun geometry can generate and accelerate electron beams in external magnetic fields without current loss for fields higher than 0.11 T. The new electron-gun geometry is robust enough to function in the fringe fields of the other two magnets with a target current loss of no more than 16% with respect to the current obtained with no external magnetic fields. Conclusions: In this work, a specially designed electron gun was presented which can operate in the presence of axisymmetric strong magnetic fringe fields of MRI magnets. Computer simulations show that the electron gun can produce high quality beams which can be injected into a straight through linac such as Varian 600C and accelerated with more efficiency in the presence of the external magnetic fields. Also, the new configuration allows linac displacements along the magnet axis in a range equal to the diameter of the imaging spherical volume of the magnet under consideration. The new electron gun-linac system can function in the fringe field of a MRI magnet if the field strength at the cathode position is higher than 0.11 T. The capture efficiency of the linac depends on the magnetic field strength and the field gradient. The higher the gradient the better the capture efficiency. The capture efficiency does not degrade more than 16%.

  17. A novel electron gun for inline MRI-linac configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantin, Drago? E. Fahrig, Rebecca; Holloway, Lois; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This work introduces a new electron gun geometry capable of robust functioning in the presence of a high strength external magnetic field for axisymmetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-linac configurations. This allows an inline MRI-linac to operate without the need to isolate the linear accelerator (linac) using a magnetic shield. This MRI-linac integration approach not only leaves the magnet homogeneity unchanged but also provides the linac flexibility to move along the magnet axis of symmetry if the source to target distance needs to be adjusted. Methods: Simple electron gun geometry modifications of a Varian 600C electron gun are considered and solved in the presence of an external magnetic field in order to determine a set of design principles for the new geometry. Based on these results, a new gun geometry is proposed and optimized in the fringe field of a 0.5 T open bore MRI magnet (GE Signa SP). A computer model for the 6 MeV Varian 600C linac is used to determine the capture efficiency of the new electron gun-linac system in the presence of the fringe field of the same MRI scanner. The behavior of the new electron gun plus the linac system is also studied in the fringe fields of two other magnets, a 1.0 T prototype open bore magnet and a 1.5 T GE Conquest scanner. Results: Simple geometrical modifications of the original electron gun geometry do not provide feasible solutions. However, these tests show that a smaller transverse cathode diameter with a flat surface and a slightly larger anode diameter could alleviate the current loss due to beam interactions with the anode in the presence of magnetic fields. Based on these findings, an initial geometry resembling a parallel plate capacitor with a hole in the anode is proposed. The optimization procedure finds a cathode-anode distance of 5 mm, a focusing electrode angle of 5, and an anode drift tube length of 17.1 mm. Also, the linac can be displaced with 15 cm along the axis of the 0.5 T magnet without capture efficiency reduction below the experimental value in zero field. In this range of linac displacements, the electron beam generated by the new gun geometry is more effectively injected into the linac in the presence of an external magnetic field, resulting in approximately 20% increase of the target current compared to the original gun geometry behavior at zero field. The new gun geometry can generate and accelerate electron beams in external magnetic fields without current loss for fields higher than 0.11 T. The new electron-gun geometry is robust enough to function in the fringe fields of the other two magnets with a target current loss of no more than 16% with respect to the current obtained with no external magnetic fields. Conclusions: In this work, a specially designed electron gun was presented which can operate in the presence of axisymmetric strong magnetic fringe fields of MRI magnets. Computer simulations show that the electron gun can produce high quality beams which can be injected into a straight through linac such as Varian 600C and accelerated with more efficiency in the presence of the external magnetic fields. Also, the new configuration allows linac displacements along the magnet axis in a range equal to the diameter of the imaging spherical volume of the magnet under consideration. The new electron gun-linac system can function in the fringe field of a MRI magnet if the field strength at the cathode position is higher than 0.11 T. The capture efficiency of the linac depends on the magnetic field strength and the field gradient. The higher the gradient the better the capture efficiency. The capture efficiency does not degrade more than 16%.

  18. Studies Of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation And Longitudinal Space Charge In The Jefferson Lab FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant, Christopher D.; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL Driver provides an ideal test bed for studying a variety of beam dynamical effects. Recent studies focused on characterizing the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with the goal of benchmarking measurements with simulation. Following measurements to characterize the beam, we quantitatively characterized energy extraction via CSR by measuring beam position at a dispersed location as a function of bunch compression. In addition to operating with the beam on the rising part of the linac RF waveform, measurements were also made while accelerating on the falling part. For each, the full compression point was moved along the backleg of the machine and the response of the beam (distribution, extracted energy) measured. Initial results of start-to-end simulations using a 1D CSR algorithm show remarkably good agreement with measurements. A subsequent experiment established lasing with the beam accelerated on the falling side of the RF waveform in conjunction with positive momentum compaction (R56) to compress the bunch. The success of this experiment motivated the design of a modified CEBAF-style arc with control of CSR and microbunching effects.

  19. Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC We consider three scenarios for the recirculating electron linear accelerator (RLA) of a linac-ring type electron-proton collider based on the LHC (LHeC): (i) a pulsed linac with a final beam energy of 60 GeV ['p-60'], (ii) a higher luminosity configuration with two cw linacs and energy-recovery (ERL) also at 60 GeV ['erl'], and (iii) a high energy option using a pulsed linac with 140-GeV final

  20. Emittance and Phase Space Tomography for the Fermilab Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, F.G.G.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moore, C.D.; Newhart, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Linac delivers a variable intensity, 400-MeV beam to the MuCool Test Area experimental hall via a beam line specifically designed to facilitate measurements of the Linac beam emittance and properties. A 10 m, dispersion-free and magnet-free straight utilizes an upstream quadrupole focusing triplet in combination with the necessary in-straight beam diagnostics to fully characterize the transverse beam properties. Since the Linac does not produce a strictly elliptical phase space, tomography must be performed on the profile data to retrieve the actual particle distribution in phase space. This is achieved by rotating the phase space distribution using different waist focusing conditions of the upstream triplet and performing a deconvolution of the profile data. Preliminary measurements using this diagnostic section are reported here. These data represent a first-pass measurement of the Linac emittance based on various techniques. It is clear that the most accurate representation of the emittance is given by the 3-profile approach. Future work will entail minimizing the beam spot size on MW5 to test and possibly improve the accuracy of the 2-profile approach. The 95% emittance is {approx} 18{pi} in the vertical and {approx} 13{pi} in the horizontal, which is especially larger than anticipated - 8-10{pi} was expected. One possible explanation is that the entire Linac pulse is extracted into the MTA beamline and during the first few microseconds, the feed forward and RF regulation are not stable. This may result in a larger net emittance observed versus beam injected into Booster, where the leading part of the Linac beam pulse is chopped. Future studies will clearly entail a measurement of the emittance vs. pulse length. One additional concern is that the Linac phase space is most likely aperture-defined and non-elliptical in nature. A non-elliptical phase-space determination would require a more elaborate analysis and provide another explanation of the large emittance measured.

  1. The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectroscopy. Double-pulse schemes could probe dynamics on the picosecond timescale. In addition, a description of the instrument capabilities and recent achievements is...

  2. The X-ray PumpProbe instrument at the LinacCoherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chollet, Matthieu; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Cammarata, Marco; Damiani, Daniel; Defever, Jim; Delor, James T.; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Langton, J. Brian; Nelson, Silke; Ramsey, Kelley; Robert, Aymeric; Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Stefanescu, Daniel; Srinivasan, Venkat; Zhu, Diling; Lemke, Henrik T.; Fritz, David M.

    2015-04-21

    The X-ray PumpProbe instrument achieves femtosecond time-resolution with hard X-ray methods using a free-electron laser source. It covers a photon energy range of 424 keV. A femtosecond optical laser system is available across a broad spectrum of wavelengths for generating transient states of matter. The instrument is designed to emphasize versatility and the scientific goals encompass ultrafast physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the transformation of matter and transfer of energy at the atomic scale.

  3. The Linac Coherent Light Source (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Identifier: 1208906 GrantContract Number: AC30-76SF00515 Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Journal of Synchrotron Radiation (Online) Additional Journal Information:...

  4. Photon-in photon-out hard X-ray spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and ultra-fast timescale. Many of the techniques routinely used at storage ring facilities are being adapted for experiments conducted at FELs. In order to take full advantage...

  5. The Soft X-ray research instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dakovski, Georgi L.; Heimann, Philip; Holmes, Michael; Krupin, Oleg; European XFEL, Hamburg; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan; Rowen, Michael; Schlotter, William F.; et al

    2015-04-02

    The Soft X-ray Research instrument provides intense ultrashort X-ray pulses in the energy range 280–2000 eV. A diverse set of experimental stations may be installed to investigate a broad range of scientific topics such as ultrafast chemistry, highly correlated materials, magnetism, surface science, and matter under extreme conditions. A brief description of the main instrument components will be given, followed by some selected scientific highlights.

  6. The matter in extreme conditions instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nagler, Bob; Arnold, Brice; Bouchard, Gary; Boyce, Richard F.; Boyce, Richard M.; Callen, Alice; Campell, Marc; Curiel, Ruben; Galtier, Eric; Garofoli, Justin; et al

    2015-04-21

    The LCLS beam provides revolutionary capabilities for studying the transient behavior of matter in extreme conditions. The particular strength of the Matter in Extreme Conditions instrument is that it combines the unique LCLS beam with high-power optical laser beams, and a suite of dedicated diagnostics tailored for this field of science. In this paper an overview of the beamline, the capabilities of the instrumentation, and selected highlights of experiments and commissioning results are presented.

  7. The Linac Coherent Light Source (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a...

  8. The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chollet, Matthieu; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Cammarata, Marco; Damiani, Daniel; Defever, Jim; Delor, James T.; Feng, Yiping; Glownia, James M.; Langton, J. Brian; Nelson, Silke; et al

    2015-04-21

    The X-ray Pump–Probe instrument achieves femtosecond time-resolution with hard X-ray methods using a free-electron laser source. It covers a photon energy range of 4–24 keV. A femtosecond optical laser system is available across a broad spectrum of wavelengths for generating transient states of matter. The instrument is designed to emphasize versatility and the scientific goals encompass ultrafast physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the transformation of matter and transfer of energy at the atomic scale.

  9. User 'To Do' List after Beam Time is Assigned | Linac Coherent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is required for users who were born in, are citizens of, or have had afffiliations with Cuba, Iran, Sudan or Syria. Review Safety of Scheduled Experiments & Complete Training...

  10. The Soft X-ray research instrument at the Linac Coherent Light...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ankush 1 ; Moeller, Stefan 1 ; Rowen, Michael 1 ; Schlotter, William F. 1 ; Turner, Joshua J. 1 + Show Author Affiliations SLAC National Accelerator Labortory, Menlo ...

  11. The Soft X-ray Research instrument at the Linac Coherent Light...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... As an instrument designed to provide high transmission, medium resolution and minimal pulse broadening of the ultrashort FEL pulses, gratings with groove density of 100 and 200 ...

  12. A hot-spare injector for the APS linac.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewellen, J. W.

    1999-04-13

    Last year a second-generation SSRL-type thermionic cathode rf gun was installed in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac. This gun (referred to as ''gun2'') has been successfully commissioned and now serves as the main injector for the APS linac, essentially replacing the Koontz-type DC gun. To help ensure injector availability, particularly with the advent of top-up mode operation at the APS, a second thermionic-cathode rf gun will be installed in the APS linac to act as a hot-spare beam source. The hot-spare installation includes several unique design features, including a deep-orbit Panofsky-style alpha magnet. Details of the hot-spare beamline design and projected performance are presented, along with some plans for future performance upgrades.

  13. SRF cavities for CW option of Project X Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lunin, A.; Perunov, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Alternative option of Project X is based on the CW SC 2GeV Linac with the average current 1mA. Possible option of the CW Linac considered in the paper includes low energy part consisted of a few families SC Spoke cavities (from 2.5 MeV to 466 MeV) and high energy part consisted of 2 types of elliptical cavities (v/c=0.81 and v/c=1). Requirements and designed parameters of cavities are considered.

  14. BEAM SIMULATIONS USING VIRTUAL DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE DRIVER LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. C. York; X. Wu; Q. Zhao

    2011-12-21

    End-to-end beam simulations for the driver linac have shown that the design meets the necessary performance requirements including having adequate transverse and longitudinal acceptances. However, to achieve reliable operational performance, the development of appropriate beam diagnostic systems and control room procedures are crucial. With limited R&D funding, beam simulations provide a cost effective tool to evaluate candidate beam diagnostic systems and to provide a critical basis for developing early commissioning and later operational activities. We propose to perform beam dynamic studies and engineering analyses to define the requisite diagnostic systems of the driver linac and through simulation to develop and test commissioning and operational procedures.

  15. Electron contamination modeling and reduction in a 1 T open bore inline MRI-linac system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborn, B. M.; Kolling, S.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Crozier, S.; Litzenberg, D. W.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: A potential side effect of inline MRI-linac systems is electron contamination focusing causing a high skin dose. In this work, the authors reexamine this prediction for an open bore 1 T MRI system being constructed for the Australian MRI-Linac Program. The efficiency of an electron contamination deflector (ECD) in purging electron contamination from the linac head is modeled, as well as the impact of a helium gas region between the deflector and phantom surface for lowering the amount of air-generated contamination. Methods: Magnetic modeling of the 1 T MRI was used to generate 3D magnetic field maps both with and without the presence of an ECD located immediately below the MLCs. Forty-seven different ECD designs were modeled and for each the magnetic field map was imported into Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations including the linac head, ECD, and a 30 30 30 cm{sup 3} water phantom located at isocenter. For the first generation system, the x-ray source to isocenter distance (SID) will be 160 cm, resulting in an 81.2 cm long air gap from the base of the ECD to the phantom surface. The first 71.2 cm was modeled as air or helium gas, with the latter encased between two windows of 50 ?m thick high density polyethlyene. 2D skin doses (at 70 ?m depth) were calculated across the phantom surface at 1 1 mm{sup 2} resolution for 6 MV beams of field size of 5 5, 10 10, and 20 20 cm{sup 2}. Results: The skin dose was predicted to be of similar magnitude as the generic systems modeled in previous work, 230% to 1400% ofD {sub max} for 5 5 to 20 20 cm{sup 2}, respectively. Inclusion of the ECD introduced a nonuniformity to the MRI imaging field that ranged from ?20 to ?140 ppm while the net force acting on the ECD ranged from ?151 N to ?1773 N. Various ECD designs were 100% efficient at purging the electron contamination into the ECD magnet banks; however, a small percentage were scattered back into the beam and continued to the phantom surface. Replacing a large portion of the extended air-column between the ECD and phantom surface with helium gas is a key element as it significantly minimized the air-generated contamination. When using an optimal ECD and helium gas region, the 70 ?m skin dose is predicted to increase moderately inside a small hot spot over that of the case with no magnetic field present for the jaw defined square beams examined here. These increases include from 12% to 40% of D {sub max} for 5 5 cm{sup 2}, 18% to 55% of D {sub max} for 10 10 cm{sup 2}, and from 23% to 65% of D {sub max} for 20 20 cm{sup 2}. Conclusions: Coupling an efficient ECD and helium gas region below the MLCs in the 160 cm isocenter MRI-linac system is predicted to ameliorate the impact electron contamination focusing has on skin dose increases. An ECD is practical as its impact on the MRI imaging distortion is correctable, and the mechanical forces acting on it manageable from an engineering point of view.

  16. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent scattering and speckle analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Schropp, Andreas; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg; Seiboth, Frank; Feng, Yiping; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Chollet, Matthieu; Lemke, Henrik T.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; et al

    2015-04-14

    X-ray focus optimization and characterization based on coherent scattering and quantitative speckle size measurements was demonstrated at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Its performance as a single-pulse free-electron laser beam diagnostic was tested for two typical focusing configurations. The results derived from the speckle size/shape analysis show the effectiveness of this technique in finding the focus' location, size and shape. In addition, its single-pulse compatibility enables users to capture pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in focus properties compared with other techniques that require scanning and averaging.

  17. Ultrafast X-Ray Coherent Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reis, David

    2009-05-01

    This main purpose of this grant was to develop the nascent #12;eld of ultrafast x-ray science using accelerator-based sources, and originally developed from an idea that a laser could modulate the di#11;racting properties of a x-ray di#11;racting crystal on a fast enough time scale to switch out in time a shorter slice from the already short x-ray pulses from a synchrotron. The research was carried out primarily at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) sector 7 at Argonne National Laboratory and the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) at SLAC; in anticipation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser that became operational in 2009 at SLAC (all National User Facilities operated by BES). The research centered on the generation, control and measurement of atomic-scale dynamics in atomic, molecular optical and condensed matter systems with temporal and spatial resolution . It helped develop the ultrafast physics, techniques and scienti#12;c case for using the unprecedented characteristics of the LCLS. The project has been very successful with results have been disseminated widely and in top journals, have been well cited in the #12;eld, and have laid the foundation for many experiments being performed on the LCLS, the world's #12;rst hard x-ray free electron laser.

  18. High-power linac for a US spallation-neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wangler, T.P.; Billen, J.; Jason, A. Krawczyk, F.; Nath, S.; Shafer, R.; Staples, J.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.

    1996-09-01

    We present status of high-power linac design studies for a proposed National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), based on a linac/accumulator-ring accelerator system. Overall project is a collaboration involving 5 national laboratories. ORNL will be responsible for the target, facilities, and conceptual design; BNL will be responsible for the ring; LBNL will be responsible for the injector, including the RFQ and a low-energy chopper in front of the RFQ; LANL will be responsible for the main linac; and ANL will be responsible for the instrumentation. The facility will be built at Oak Ridge. In the first phase, the dual-frequency linac with 402.5 and 805 MHz frequencies must deliver to the accumulator ring an H{sup -} beam near 1 GeV, with about 1 ms pulse length, a repetition rate 60 Hz, and average beam power {ge} 1 MW. The linac can be upgraded by a factor of 4 in beam power by increasing the dc injector current, and by funneling the beams from two 402.5 MHz low-energy linacs into the 805-MHz high-energy linac. Requirements for low beam loss in both linac and ring have important implications for linac design, including the requirement to provide efficient beam chopping to provide low-loss extraction for the ring. Linac design options and initial parameters are presented together with initial beam-dynamics simulation results.

  19. Assessment of Alternative RF Linac Structures for APT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-26

    The APT program has been examining both normal and superconducting variants of the APT linac for the past two years. A decision on which of the two will be the selected technology will depend upon several considerations including the results of ongoing feasibility experiments, the performance and overall attractiveness of each of the design concepts, and an assessment of the system-level features of both alternatives. The primary objective of the Assessment of Alternative RF Linac Structures for APT study reported herein was to assess and compare, at the system-level, the performance, capital and life cycle costs, reliability/availability/maintainability (RAM) and manufacturing schedules of APT RF linear accelerators based upon both superconducting and normal conducting technologies. A secondary objective was to perform trade studies to explore opportunities for system optimization, technology substitution and alternative growth pathways and to identify sensitivities to design uncertainties.

  20. Design of a Marx-Topology Modulator for FNAL Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, T. A.; Garcia, F. G.; Kufer, M. R.; Pfeffer, H.; Wolff, D.

    2015-04-28

    The Fermilab Proton Improvement Plan (PIP) was formed in late 2011 to address important and necessary upgrades to the Proton Source machines (Injector line, Linac and Booster). The goal is to increase the proton flux by doubling the Booster beam cycle rate while maintaining the same intensity per cycle, the same uptime, and the same residual activation in the enclosure. For the Linac, the main focus within PIP is to address reliability. One of the main tasks is to replace the present hard-tube modulator used on the 200 MHz RF system. Plans to replace this high power system with a Marx-topology modulator, capable of providing the required waveform shaping to stabilize the accelerating gradient and compensate for beam loading, will be presented, along with development data from the prototype unit.

  1. BEAM POSITION AND PHASE MONITORS FOR THE LANSCE LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrady, Rodney C.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Power, John F.

    2011-01-01

    New beam-position and phase monitors are under development for the linac at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Transducers have been designed and are being fabricated. We are considering many options for the electronic instrumentation to process the signals and provide position and phase data with the necessary precision and flexibility to serve the various required functions. We'll present the various options under consideration for instrumentation along with the advantages and shortcomings of these options.

  2. BEAM POSITION AND PHASE MONITORS FOR THE LANSCE LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrady, Rodney C.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Watkins, Heath A.

    2012-04-11

    New beam-position and phase monitors are under development for the linac at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE.) Transducers have been designed and are being installed. We are considering many options for the electronic instrumentation to process the signals and provide position and phase data with the necessary precision and flexibility to serve the various required functions. We'll present the various options under consideration for instrumentation along with the advantages and shortcomings of these options.

  3. High Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Heavy-Ions| U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Power Superconducting Continuous Wave Linacs for Protons and Heavy-Ions Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation / Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown

  4. SAR image effects on coherence and coherence estimation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Radar coherence is an important concept for imaging radar systems such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR). This document quantifies some of the effects in SAR which modify the coherence. Although these effects can disrupt the coherence within a single SAR image, this report will focus on the coherence between separate images, such as for coherent change detection (CCD) processing. There have been other presentations on aspects of this material in the past. The intent of this report is to bring various issues that affect the coherence together in a single report to support radar engineers in making decisions about these matters.

  5. Recent improvements to software used for optimization of SRF linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, Tom J.

    2014-12-01

    This work describes a software tool that allows one to vary parameters and understand the effects on the optimized costs of construction plus 10 year operations of an SRF linac, where operation costs includes the cost of the electrical utilities but not the labor or other costs. The program includes estimates for the associated cryogenic facility, and controls hardware. The software interface provides the ability to vary the cost of the different aspects of the machine as well as to change the cryomodule and cavity types. Additionally, this work will describe the recent improvements to the software that allow one to estimate the costs of energy-recovery based linacs and to enter arbitrary values of the low field Q0 and Q0 slope. The initial goal when developing the software was to convert a spreadsheet format to a graphical interface and to allow the ability to sweep different parameter sets. The tools also allow one to compare the cost of the different facets of the machine design and operations so as to better understand tradeoffs. An example of how it was used to independently investigate cost optimization tradeoffs for the LCLS-II linac will also be presented.

  6. Much Ado about Microbunching: Coherent Bunching in High Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, Daniel; /Stanford U. /SLAC

    2012-05-25

    The push to provide ever brighter coherent radiation sources has led to the creation of correspondingly bright electron beams. With billions of electrons packed into normalized emittances (phase space) below one micron, collective effects may dominate both the preservation and use of such ultra-bright beams. An important class of collective effects is due to density modulations within the bunch, or microbunching. Microbunching may be deleterious, as in the case of the Microbunching Instability (MBI), or it may drive radiation sources of unprecedented intensity, as in the case of Free Electron Lasers (FELs). In this work we begin by describing models of microbunching due to inherent beam shot noise, which sparks both the MBI as well as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, the world's first hard X-ray laser. We first use this model to propose a mechanism for reducing the inherent beam shot noise as well as for predicting MBI effects. We then describe experimental measurements of the resulting microbunching at LCLS, including optical radiation from the MBI, as well as the first gain length and harmonic measurements from a hard X-ray FEL. In the final chapters, we describe schemes that use external laser modulations to microbunch light sources of the future. In these sections we describe coherent light source schemes for both both linacs and storage rings.

  7. Numerical simulations of stripping effects in high-intensity hydrogen ion linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, J.-P.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; /Argonne

    2008-12-01

    Numerical simulations of H{sup -} stripping losses from blackbody radiation, electromagnetic fields, and residual gas have been implemented into the beam dynamics code TRACK. Estimates of the stripping losses along two high-intensity H{sup -} linacs are presented: the Spallation Neutron Source linac currently being operated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an 8 GeV superconducting linac currently being designed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

  8. Transverse beam dynamics in plasma-based linacs (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Conference: Transverse beam dynamics in plasma-based linacs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transverse beam dynamics in plasma-based linacs The transverse beam dynamics in plasma channels of possible future plasma-based linacs is discussed. The authors represent the transverse focusing of both a beam-driven and a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator by a uniform focusing channel. The transverse beam sizes and a basic offset tolerance are calculated, finding that

  9. Coherent soliton communication lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yushko, O. V. Redyuk, A. A.; Fedoruk, M. P.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2014-11-15

    The data transmission in coherent fiber-optical communication lines using solitons with a variable phase is studied. It is shown that nonlinear coherent structures (solitons) can be applied for effective signal transmission over a long distance using amplitude and optical-phase keying of information. The optimum ratio of the pulse width to the bit slot at which the spectral efficiency (transmitted bits per second and hertz) is maximal is determined. It is shown that soliton fiber-optical communication lines can ensure data transmission at a higher spectral efficiency as compared to traditional communication lines and at a high signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of ...

  11. Energy Recovery Linac cavity at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Energy Recovery Linac cavity at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear ...

  12. Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of 60 GeV 'p-60', (ii) a higher luminosity configuration with two cw linacs and ... ENERGY RECOVERY; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; LUMINOSITY; PERFORMANCE; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION ...

  13. Sandia Energy - Spontaneous Coherence and Spin Texture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spontaneous Coherence and Spin Texture Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Spontaneous Coherence and Spin Texture Spontaneous Coherence and Spin...

  14. Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, Bradly J.; Guenther, David C.

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

  15. Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Clean Energy Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement September 15, 2015 EA-1975: Supplement Analysis LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator...

  16. TU-C-BRE-03: Aggregation of Linac Measurement Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerns, J; Alvarez, P; Followill, D; Lowenstein, J; Molineu, A; Summers, P; Kry, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate data of linear accelerator radiation characteristics is important for treatment planning system commissioning as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The RPC has performed site visits of numerous machines . Data gathered from Varian machines from the past 15 years are presented. The data collected can be used as a secondary check or when commissioning a new machine to verify that values are reasonable. Methods: Data from the past 15 years of RPC site visits was compiled and analyzed. Data was composed from measurements from approximately 400 Varian machines. Each dataset consists of several point measurements at various locations in a water phantom to measure percentage depth dose, output factors, including small MLC fields, off-axis factors, and wedge factors if applicable. Common statistical values are presented for each machine type. Where applicable, data was compared to other reference data given by the vendor or a select number of previous researchers. Results: Data is separated by energy and parameter and then analyzed by machine class. Data distributions of the parameter data were normal except occasionally at the tails. Distributions of the data for each class and parameter are tabulated to give not simply a singular reference value, but metrics about the distribution: 5th and 95th percentile values and the standard deviation as well as the median. Conclusion: The RPC has collected numerous data on Varian linacs and presented the finding of the past 15 years. The data can be used as a reference data set for physicists to compare against. A linac that deviates from the values does not necessarily indicate there is a problem as long as the treatment planning system correlates to the machine. Comparison of linac and treatment planning system data to external reference data can prevent serious treatment errors.

  17. WE-D-BRD-01: Innovation in Radiation Therapy Delivery: Advanced Digital Linac Features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, L; Wong, J; Li, R

    2014-06-15

    Last few years has witnessed significant advances in linac technology and therapeutic dose delivery method. Digital linacs equipped with high dose rate FFF beams have been clinically implemented in a number of hospitals. Gated VMAT is becoming increasingly popular in treating tumors affected by respiratory motion. This session is devoted to update the audience with these technical advances and to present our experience in clinically implementing the new linacs and dose delivery methods. Topics to be covered include, technical features of new generation of linacs from different vendors, dosimetric characteristics and clinical need for FFF-beam based IMRT and VMAT, respiration-gated VMAT, the concept and implementation of station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT), beam level imaging and onboard image guidance tools. Emphasis will be on providing fundamental understanding of the new treatment delivery and image guidance strategies, control systems, and the associated dosimetric characteristics. Commissioning and acceptance experience on these new treatment delivery technologies will be reported. Clinical experience and challenges encountered during the process of implementation of the new treatment techniques and future applications of the systems will also be highlighted. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of emerging digital linacs and summarize their key geometric and dosimetric features. SPORT as an emerging radiation therapy modality specifically designed to take advantage of digital linacs. Discuss issues related to the acceptance and commissioning of the digital linacs and FFF beams. Describe clinical utility of the new generation of digital linacs and their future applications.

  18. SU-E-J-239: IMRT Planning of Prostate Cancer for a MRI-Linac Based On MRI Only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X; Prior, P; Paulson, E; Lawton, C; Li, X

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: : To investigate dosimetric differences between MRI- and CT-based IMRT planning for prostate cancer, the impact of a magnetic field in a MRI-Linac, and to explore the feasibility of IMRT planning based on MRI alone. Methods: IMRT plans were generated based on CT and MRI images acquired on two representative prostate-cancer patients using clinical dose volume constraints. A research planning system (Monaco, Elekta), which employs a Monte Carlo dose engine and includes a perpendicular magnetic field of 1.5T from an MRI-Linac, was used. Bulk electron density assignments based on organ-specific values from ICRU 46 were used to convert MRI (T2) to pseudo CT. With the same beam configuration as in the original CT plan, 5 additional plans were generated based on CT or MRI, with or without optimization (i.e., just recalculation) and with or without the magnetic field. The plan quality in terms of commonly used dose volume (DV) parameters for all plans was compared. The statistical uncertainty on dose was < 1%. Results: For plans with the same contour set but without re-optimization, the DV parameters were different from those for the original CT plan, mostly less than 5% with a few exceptions. These differences were reduced to mostly less than 3% when the plans were re-optimized. For plans with contours from MRI, the differences in the DV parameters varied depending on the difference in the contours as compared to CT. For the optimized plans with contours from MR, the differences for PTV were less than 3%. Conclusion: The prostate IMRT plans based on MRI-only for a MR-Linac were practically similar as compared to the CT plan under the same beam and optimization configuration if the difference on the structure delineation is excluded, indicating the feasibility of using MRI-only for prostate IMRT.

  19. Overview and Status Update of the Fermilab HINS Linac R&D Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, R.C.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is continuing efforts to construct a first-of-a-kind superconducting H{sup -} linac. The goal of the HINS linac is to demonstrate, for the first time, acceleration of high intensity beam with superconducting spoke cavities, control of beam halo growth by use of solenoidal focusing optics throughout, and operation of many cavities from a single high-power RF source for acceleration of non-relativistic particles. The HINS effort is relevant to any future high brightness, high intensity linac and, in particular, to the linac proposed as part of Fermilab Project X to serve the next generation of neutrino physics and future muon storage ring/collider experiments. This paper updates the technical status of the various components being developed, built, and commissioned as a part of HINS and presents the outlook for the HINS program.

  20. Linac Alignment Algorithm: Analysis on 1-to-1 Steering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In a linear accelerator, it is important to achieve a good alignment between all of its components (such as quadrupoles, RF cavities, beam position monitors et al.), in order to better preserve the beam quality during acceleration. After the survey of the main linac components, there are several beam-based alignment (BBA) techniques to be applied, to further optimize the beam trajectory and calculate the corresponding steering magnets strength. Among these techniques the most simple and straightforward one is the one-to-one (1-to-1) steering technique, which steers the beam from quad center to center, and removes the betatron oscillation from quad focusing. For a future linear collider such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), the initial beam emittance is very small in the vertical plane (flat beam with {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 20-40nm), which means the alignment requirement is very tight. In this note, we evaluate the emittance growth with one-to-one correction algorithm employed, both analytically and numerically. Then the ILC main linac accelerator is taken as an example to compare the vertical emittance growth after 1-to-1 steering, both from analytical formulae and multi-particle tracking simulation. It is demonstrated that the estimated emittance growth from the derived formulae agrees well with the results from numerical simulation, with and without acceleration, respectively.

  1. Superconducting RF Linac Technology for ERL Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Tennant

    2005-08-01

    Energy Recovering Linacs (ERLs) offer an attractive alternative as drivers for light sources as they combine the desirable characteristics of both storage rings (high efficiency) and linear accelerators (superior beam quality). Using superconducting RF technology allows ERLs to operate more efficiently because of the inherent characteristics of SRF linacs, namely that they are high gradient-low impedance structures and their ability to operate in the long pulse or CW regime. We present an overview of the physics challenges encountered in the design and operation of ERL based light sources with particular emphasis on those issues related to SRF technology. These challenges include maximizing a cavity???????¢????????????????s Qo to increase cryogenic efficiency, maintaining control of the cavity field in the presence of the highest feasible loaded Q and providing adequate damping of the higher-order modes (HOMs). If not sufficiently damped, dipole HOMs can drive the multipass beam breakup (BBU) instability which ERLs are particularly susceptible to. Another challenge involves efficiently extracting the potentially large amounts of HOM power that are generated when a bunch traverses the SRF cavities and which may extend over a high range of frequencies. We present experimental data from the Jefferson Lab FEL Upgrade, a 10 mA ERL light source presently in operation, aimed at addressing some of these issues. We conclude with an outlook towards the future of ERL based light sources.

  2. Study of beam loading and its compensation in the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser injector linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lal, Shankar Pant, K. K.

    2014-12-15

    The RF properties of an accelerating structure, and the pulse structure and charge per bunch in the electron beam propagating through it are important parameters that determine the impact of beam loading in the structure. The injector linac of the Compact Ultrafast Terahertz Free-Electron Laser (CUTE-FEL) has been operated with two different pulse structures during initial commissioning experiments and the effect of beam loading on the accelerated electron beam parameters has been studied analytically for these two pulse structures. This paper discusses the analytical study of beam loading in a Standing Wave, Plane Wave Transformer linac employed in the CUTE-FEL setup, and a possible technique for its compensation for the electron beam parameters of the CUTE-FEL. A parametric study has been performed to study beam loading for different beam currents and to optimize injection time of the electron beam to compensate beam loading. Results from the parametric study have also been used to explain previously observed results from acceleration experiments in the CUTE-FEL setup.

  3. Coherent white light amplification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Igor; Barty, Christopher P.

    2004-05-25

    A system for coherent simultaneous amplification of a broad spectral range of light that includes an optical parametric amplifier and a source of a seed pulse is described. A first angular dispersive element is operatively connected to the source of a seed pulse. A first imaging telescope is operatively connected to the first angular dispersive element and operatively connected to the optical parametric amplifier. A source of a pump pulse is operatively connected to the optical parametric amplifier. A second imaging telescope is operatively connected to the optical parametric amplifier and a second angular dispersive element is operatively connected to the second imaging telescope.

  4. An Overview of the MaRIE X-FEL and Electron Radiography LINAC RF Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, Joseph Thomas III; Rees, Daniel Earl; Scheinker, Alexander; Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is to investigate the performance limits of materials in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility will utilize a 12 GeV linac to drive an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL). Most of the same linac will also be used to perform electron radiography. The main linac is driven by two shorter linacs; one short linac optimized for X-FEL pulses and one for electron radiography. The RF systems have historically been the one of the largest single component costs of a linac. We will describe the details of the different types of RF systems required by each part of the linacs. Starting with the High Power RF system, we will present our methodology for the choice of RF system peak power and pulselength with respect to klystron parameters, modulator parameters, performance requirements and relative costs. We will also present an overview of the Low Level RF systems that are proposed for MaRIE and briefly describe their use with some proposed control schemes.

  5. PULSED-FOCUSING RECIRCULATING LINACS FOR MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland PAUL

    2014-12-31

    Since the muon has a short lifetime, fast acceleration is essential for high-energy applications such as muon colliders, Higgs factories, or neutrino factories. The best one can do is to make a linear accelerator with the highest possible accelerating gradient to make the accelerating time as short as possible. However, the cost of such a single linear accelerator is prohibitively large due to expensive power sources, cavities, tunnels, and related infrastructure. As was demonstrated in the Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), an elegant solution to reduce cost is to use magnetic return arcs to recirculate the beam through the accelerating RF cavities many times, where they gain energy on each pass. In such a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA), the magnetic focusing strength diminishes as the beam energy increases in a conventional linac that has constant strength quadrupoles. After some number of passes the focusing strength is insufficient to keep the beam from going unstable and being lost. In this project, the use of fast pulsed quadrupoles in the linac sections was considered for stronger focusing as a function of time to allow more successive passes of a muon beam in a recirculating linear accelerator. In one simulation, it was shown that the number of passes could be increased from 8 to 12 using pulsed magnet designs that have been developed and tested. This could reduce the cost of linac sections of a muon RLA by 8/12, where more improvement is still possible. The expense of a greater number of passes and corresponding number of return arcs was also addressed in this project by exploring the use of ramped or FFAG-style magnets in the return arcs. A better solution, invented in this project, is to use combined-function dipole-quadrupole magnets to simultaneously transport two beams of different energies through one magnet string to reduce costs of return arcs by almost a factor of two. A patent application was filed for this invention and a detailed report published in Physical Review Special Topics. A scaled model using an electron beam was developed and proposed to test the concept of a dog bone RLA with combined-function return arcs. The efforts supported by this grant were reported in a series of contributions to particle accelerator conferences that are reproduced in the appendices and summarized in the body of this report.

  6. STATUS OF R AND D ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LITVINENKO,V.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ALDUINO, J.M.; BARTON, D.S.; BEAVIS, D.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    In this paper we present status and plans for the 20-MeV R&D energy recovery linac (ERL), which is under construction at Collider Accelerator Department at BNL. The facility is based on high current (up to 0.5 A of average current) super-conducting 2.5 MeV RF gun, single-mode super-conducting 5-cell RF linac and about 20-m long return loop with very flexible lattice. The R&D ERL, which is planned for commissioning in early 2009, aims to address many outstanding questions relevant for high current, high brightness energy recovery linacs.

  7. Interaction-Region Design Options for a Linac-Ring LHeC (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Interaction-Region Design Options for a Linac-Ring LHeC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interaction-Region Design Options for a Linac-Ring LHeC The interaction-region design for a linac-ring electron-proton collider based on the LHC ('LR-LHeC') poses numerous challenges related to collision scheme, synchrotron radiation, aperture, magnet technology, and optics. We report a first assessment and various options. Authors: Zimmermann, Frank ; /CERN ; Bettoni, Simona ;

  8. A FOURTH ORDER RESONANCE OF A HIGH INTENSITY LINAC (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect A FOURTH ORDER RESONANCE OF A HIGH INTENSITY LINAC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A FOURTH ORDER RESONANCE OF A HIGH INTENSITY LINAC The 4sigma=360 (or 4nu=1) resonance of a linac is manifested when the depressed tune sigma is close to and below 90 . It is observed that this fourth order resonance is dominating over the better known envelope instability and practically replacing it. Simulation study shows a clear emittance growth by this resonance and its stopband.

  9. SRF and RF systems for LEReC Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J. C.; Fedotov, A.; McIntyre, G.; Polizzo, S.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Veshcherevich, V.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The Low Energy RHIC electron Cooling (LEReC) is under development at BNL to improve RHIC luminosity at low energies. It will consist of a short electron linac and two cooling sections, one for blue and one for yellow rings. For the first stage of the project, LEReC-I, we will install a 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity and three normal conducting cavities operating at 9 MHz, 704 MHz and 2.1 GHz. The SRF cavity will boost the electron beam energy up to 2 MeV. The warm cavities will be used to correct the energy spread introduced in the SRF cavity. The paper describes layouts of the SRF and RF systems, their parameters and status.

  10. Integrated coherent matter wave circuits

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryu, C.; Boshier, M. G.

    2015-09-21

    An integrated coherent matter wave circuit is a single device, analogous to an integrated optical circuit, in which coherent de Broglie waves are created and then launched into waveguides where they can be switched, divided, recombined, and detected as they propagate. Applications of such circuits include guided atom interferometers, atomtronic circuits, and precisely controlled delivery of atoms. We report experiments demonstrating integrated circuits for guided coherent matter waves. The circuit elements are created with the painted potential technique, a form of time-averaged optical dipole potential in which a rapidly moving, tightly focused laser beam exerts forces on atoms through theirmoreelectric polarizability. Moreover, the source of coherent matter waves is a BoseEinstein condensate (BEC). Finally, we launch BECs into painted waveguides that guide them around bends and form switches, phase coherent beamsplitters, and closed circuits. These are the basic elements that are needed to engineer arbitrarily complex matter wave circuitry.less

  11. Beam Dynamics Studies for the First Muon Linac of the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Bontoiu,M. Aslaninejad,J. Pozimski,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    Within the Neutrino Factory Project the muon acceleration process involves a complex chain of accelerators including a (single-pass) linac, two recirculating linacs and an FFAG. The linac consists of RF cavities and iron shielded solenoids for transverse focusing and has been previously designed relying on idealized field models. However, to predict accurately the transport and acceleration of a high emittance 30 cm wide beam with 10 % energy spread requires detailed knowledge of fringe field distributions. This article presents results of the front-to-end tracking of the muon beam through numerically simulated realistic field distributions for the shielded solenoids and the RF fields. Real and phase space evolution of the beam has been studied along the linac and the results are presented and discussed.

  12. Overview of the High Intensity Neutrino Source Linac R&D program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, R.C.; Appollinari, G.; Carneiro, J.P.; Gonin, I.; Hanna, B.; Hays, S.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lanfranco, G.; Madrak, R.L.; Moretti, A.; Nicol, T.; /Fermilab /Argonne

    2008-09-01

    The Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) Linac R&D program is building a first-of-a-kind 60 MeV superconducting H- linac. The HINS Linac incorporates superconducting solenoids for transverse focusing, high power RF vector modulators for independent control of multiple cavities powered from a single klystron, and superconducting spoke-type accelerating cavities starting at 10 MeV. This will be the first application and demonstration of any of these technologies in a low-energy, high-intensity proton/H- linear accelerator. The HINS effort is relevant to a high intensity, superconducting H- linac that might serve the next generation of neutrino physics and muon storage ring/collider experiments. An overview of the HINS program, machine design, status, and outlook is presented.

  13. Formation of electron bunches with tailored current profiles using multi-frequency linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piot, P.; Behrens, C.; Gerth, C.; Lemery, F.; Mihalcea, D.; Stoltz, P.

    2012-12-21

    Tailoring an electron bunch with specific current profile can provide substantial enhancement of the transformer ratio in beam-driven acceleration methods. We present a method relying on the use of a linac with accelerating sections operating at different frequencies followed by a magnetic bunch compressor. The experimental verfification of the technique in a two-frequency linac is presented. The compatibility of the proposed technique with the formation and acceleration of a drive and witness bunches is numerically demonstrated.

  14. Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) | U.S. DOE Office of

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science (SC) Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities User Facilities Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Project Development Isotope Program Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of

  15. Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

  16. 7 Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-06-09

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  17. Conceptual Design for Replacement of the DTL and CCL with Superconducting RF Cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champion, Mark S; Doleans, Marc; Kim, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source Linac utilizes normal conducting RF cavities in the low energy section from 2.5 MeV to 186 MeV. Six Drift Tube Linac (DTL) structures accelerate the beam to 87 MeV, and four Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures provide further acceleration to 186 MeV. The remainder of the Linac is comprised of 81 superconducting cavities packaged in 23 cryomodules to provide final beam energy of approximately 1 GeV. The superconducting Linac has proven to be substantially more reliable than the normal conducting Linac despite the greater number of stations and the complexity associated with the cryogenic plant and distribution. A conceptual design has been initiated on a replacement of the DTL and CCL with superconducting RF cavities. The motivation, constraints, and conceptual design are presented.

  18. Transient quantum coherent response to a partially coherent radiation field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeq, Zaheen S.; Brumer, Paul

    2014-02-21

    The response of an arbitrary closed quantum system to a partially coherent electric field is investigated, with a focus on the transient coherences in the system. As a model we examine, both perturbatively and numerically, the coherences induced in a three level V system. Both rapid turn-on and pulsed turn-on effects are investigated. The effect of a long and incoherent pulse is also considered, demonstrating that during the pulse the system shows a coherent response which reduces after the pulse is over. Both the pulsed scenario and the thermally broadened CW case approach a mixed state in the long time limit, with rates dictated by the adjacent level spacings and the coherence time of the light, and via a mechanism that is distinctly different from traditional decoherence. These two excitation scenarios are also explored for a minimal toy model of the electronic levels in pigment protein complex PC645 by both a collisionally broadened CW laser and by a noisy pulse, where unexpectedly long transient coherence times are observed and explained. The significance of environmentally induced decoherence is noted.

  19. Preliminary Analysis on Linac Oscillation Data LI05-19 and Wake Field Energy Loss in FACET Commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    In this note, preliminary analysis on linac ocsillation data in FACET linac LI05-09 plus LI11-19 is presented. Several quadrupoles are identified to possibly have different strength, compared with their designed strength in the MAD optics model. The beam energy loss due to longitudinal wake fields in the S-band linac is also analytically calculated, also by LITRACK numerical simulations.

  20. Status of the plasma generator of the superconducting proton linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronberger, M.; Lettry, J.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pereira, H.; Arias, J. Sanchez; Schmitzer, C.; Scrivens, R.; Faircloth, D.

    2012-02-15

    In the framework of the superconducting proton linac (SPL) study at CERN, a new non-cesiated H{sup -} plasma generator driven by an external 2 MHz RF antenna has been developed and successfully operated at repetition rates of 50 Hz, pulse lengths of up to 3 ms, and average RF powers of up to 3 kW. The coupling efficiency of RF power into the plasma was determined by the cooling water temperatures and the analysis of the RF forward and reflected power and the antenna current and amounts to 50%-60%. The plasma resistance increases between 10 kW and 40 kW RF power from about 0.45 {Omega} to 0.65 {Omega}. Measurements of RF power dissipated in the ferrites and the magnets on a test bench show a 5-fold decrease of the power losses for the magnets when they are contained in a Cu box, thus validating the strategy of shielding the magnets with a high electrical conductivity material. An air cooling system was installed in the SPL plasma generator to control the temperatures of the ferrites despite hysteresis losses of several Watts.

  1. Design of the beryllium window for Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayak, S.; Mapes, M.; Raparia, D.

    2015-11-01

    In the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) beam line, there were two Beryllium (Be) windows with an air gap to separate the high vacuum upstream side from low vacuum downstream side. There had been frequent window failures in the past which affected the machine productivity and increased the radiation dose received by worker due to unplanned maintenance. To improve the window life, design of Be window is reexamined. Detailed structural and thermal simulations are carried out on Be window for different design parameters and loading conditions to come up with better design to improve the window life. The new design removed the air gap and connect the both beam lines with a Be window in-between. The new design has multiple advantages such as 1) reduces the beam energy loss (because of one window with no air gap), 2) reduces air activation due to nuclear radiation and 3) increased the machine reliability as there is no direct pressure load during operation. For quick replacement of this window, an aluminum bellow coupled with load binder was designed. There hasnt been a single window failure since the new design was implemented in 2012.

  2. The linac and booster RF systems for a dedicated injector for SPEAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, J.N.; Baird, S., Baltay, M.; Borland, M.; Nuhn, H.D.; Safranek, J.; Chavis, C.; Emery, L.; Genin, R.D.; Hettel, R.; Morales, H.; Sebek, J.; Voss, J.; Wang, H.; Wiedemann, H.; Youngmann, B. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Miller, R.H. )

    1991-05-01

    A 120 MeV, 2856 MHz, TW linac, with a microwave gun, alpha magnet, and chopper, has been built at SSRL as a preinjector for and along with a 3 GeV booster synchrotron ring. The resulting injector will be available on demand to fill SPEAR, which is a storage ring now dedicated to synchrotron light production. The linac sections were purchased from China, the XK-5 klystrons were obtained surplus from SLAC, the modulators are a variation on those at SLAC and were built by SSRL, the alpha magnet and chopper were designed and built at SSRL and the microwave gun was designed and built in collaboration with Varian Associates. The rf system for the booster ring is similar to those at SPEAR and PEP and was built by SSRL. Some of the interesting mechanical and electrical details are discussed and the operating characteristics of the linac and ring rf system are highlighted. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Transverse Beam Emittance Measurements of a 16 MeV Linac at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Setiniyaz, T.A. Forest, K. Chouffani, Y. Kim, A. Freyberger

    2012-07-01

    A beam emittance measurement of the 16 MeV S-band High Repetition Rate Linac (HRRL) was performed at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The HRRL linac structure was upgraded beyond the capabilities of a typical medical linac so it can achieve a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Measurements of the HRRL transverse beam emittance are underway that will be used to optimize the production of positrons using HRRL's intense electron beam on a tungsten converter. In this paper, we describe a beam imaging system using on an OTR screen and a digital CCD camera, a MATLAB tool to extract beamsize and emittance, detailed measurement procedures, and the measured transverse emittances for an arbitrary beam energy of 15 MeV.

  4. Resonance Excitation of Longitudinal High Order Modes in Project X Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khabiboulline, T.N.; Sukhanov, A.AUTHOR = Awida, M.; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.AUTHOR = Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Results of simulation of power loss due to excitation of longitudinal high order modes (HOMs) in the accelerating superconducting RF system of CW linac of Project X are presented. Beam structures corresponding to the various modes of Project X operation are considered: CW regime for 3 GeV physics program; pulsed mode for neutrino experiments; and pulsed regime, when Project X linac operates as a driver for Neutrino Factory/Muon Collider. Power loss and associated heat load due to resonance excitation of longitudinal HOMs are shown to be small in all modes of operation. Conclusion is made that HOM couplers can be removed from the design of superconducting RF cavities of Project X linac.

  5. Interaction-Region Design Options for a Linac-Ring LHeC (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Interaction-Region Design Options for a Linac-Ring LHeC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interaction-Region Design Options for a Linac-Ring LHeC × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this

  6. Start-2-End Simulation in FACET Linac (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Start-2-End Simulation in FACET Linac Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Start-2-End Simulation in FACET Linac × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the

  7. A Linac Simulation Code for Macro-Particles Tracking and Steering Algorithm Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    sun, yipeng

    2012-05-03

    In this paper, a linac simulation code written in Fortran90 is presented and several simulation examples are given. This code is optimized to implement linac alignment and steering algorithms, and evaluate the accelerator errors such as RF phase and acceleration gradient, quadrupole and BPM misalignment. It can track a single particle or a bunch of particles through normal linear accelerator elements such as quadrupole, RF cavity, dipole corrector and drift space. One-to-one steering algorithm and a global alignment (steering) algorithm are implemented in this code.

  8. Spontaneous Coherence and Spin Texture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spontaneous Coherence and Spin Texture - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management

  9. SU-F-BRE-09: Linac Isocenter Quality Assurance: A Stereotactic Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, B; Li, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A quantitative method was designed to independently determine the couch/collimator/gantry isocenters, as well as the overall LINAC mechanical isocenter in 3D. Methods: Performed on both a Varian TrueBeam STx and Trilogy with the gold standard front pointer positioned at 100 cm SAD, and a Radionics XKnife (RX) attached to the couch. At gantry and couch 0, the RX laser alignment attachment (RXLAA) was centered to the front pointer using the micrometers (0.1-mm precision) on the RX. The 3D coordinates of the micrometers were recorded. The collimator was rotated to 90 and 270. At each collimator rotation, the RXLAA was re-centered to the front pointer and the micrometer coordinates recorded. At collimator and gantry 0, the process was repeated for couch angles 0/90/270. Finally, at collimator and couch 0, the steps were repeated for gantry rotations 0/90/180/270. The centers/radii of the smallest bounding spheres for the collimator, couch and gantry walkout were calculated (using MatLab). The smallest bounding sphere containing the collimator, couch and gantry walkout spheres was then calculated. The center of this all-encompassing sphere is the overall mechanical isocenter of the LINAC. This position was dialed in on the RX. LINAC mechanical and radiation isocenter coincidence was determined by performing Winston- Lutz test at four cardinal gantry angles. Results: TrueBeam and Trilogy mechanical isocenters had overall walkout radii of 0.8 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively. For the TrueBeam and Trilogy 6-MV beams, the radii of radiation isocenter were 0.3 mm and 0.4 mm, respectively, with distances between LINAC mechanical and radiation isocenters of 0.5 mm and 0.9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: This efficient and simple method allows for an independent and reliable quantitative assessment of LINAC isocenter in 3D with equipment typically available in a radiation oncology clinic. It can easily be performed for LINAC commissioning and annual QA.

  10. SU-E-T-119: Dosimetric and Mechanical Characteristics of Elekta Infinity LINAC with Agility MLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J; Xu, Q; Xue, J; Zhai, Y; An, L; Chen, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Elekta Infinity is the one of the latest generation LINAC with unique features. Two Infinity LINACs are recently commissioned at our institution. The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of the machines are presented. Methods: Both Infinity LINACs with Agility MLC (160 leaves with 0.5 cm leaf width) are configured with five electron energies (6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV) and two photon energies (6 and 15 MV). One machine has additional photon energy (10 MV). The commissioning was performed by following the manufacturer's specifications and AAPM TG recommendations. Beam data of both electron and photon beams are measured with scanning ion chambers and linear diode array. Machines are adjusted to have the dosimetrically equivalent characteristics. Results: The commissioning of mechanical and imaging system meets the tolerances by TG recommendations. The PDD{sub 10} of various field sizes for 6 and 15 MV shows < 0.5% difference between two machines. For each electron beams, R{sub 80} matches with < 0.4 mm difference. The symmetry and flatness agree within 0.8% and 0.9% differences for photon beams, respectively. For electron beams, the differences of the symmetry and flatness are within 1.2% and 0.8%, respectively. The mean inline penumbras for 6, 10, and 15 MV are respectively 5.10.24, 5.60.07, and 5.90.10 mm for 10x10 cm at 10 cm depth. The crossline penumbras are larger than inline penumbras by 2.2, 1.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The MLC transmission factor with interleaf leakage is 0.5 % for all photon energies. Conclusion: The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of two Infinity LINACs show good agreements between them. Although the Elekta Infinity has been used in many institutions, the detailed characteristics of the machine have not been reported. This study provides invaluable information to understand the Infinity LINAC and to compare the quality of commissioning data for other LINACs.

  11. Apparatus for generating partially coherent radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2004-09-28

    The effective coherence of an undulator beamline can be tailored to projection lithography requirements by using a simple single moving element and a simple stationary low-cost spherical mirror. The invention is particularly suited for use in an illuminator device for an optical image processing system requiring partially coherent illumination. The illuminator includes: (i) source of coherent or partially coherent radiation which has an intrinsic coherence that is higher than the desired coherence; (ii) a reflective surface that receives incident radiation from said source; (iii) means for moving the reflective surface through a desired range of angles in two dimensions wherein the rate of the motion is fast relative to integration time of said image processing system; and (iv) a condenser optic that re-images the moving reflective surface to the entrance plane of said image processing system, thereby, making the illumination spot in said entrance plane essentially stationary.

  12. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Midttun, ystein; University of Oslo, Oslo

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup ?} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  13. Results of LEBT/MEBT reconfiguration at BNL 200 MeV LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raparia,D.; Alessi, J.; Briscoe, B.; Fite, J.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lo Destro, V.; Okamura, M.; Ritter, J.

    2009-05-04

    The low energy (35 keV) and medium energy (750 keV) transport lines for both polarized and unpolarized H{sup -} have been reconfigured to reduce the beam emittance and beam losses out of the 200 MeV Linac. The medium energy line in the original layout was 7 m long, and had ten quadrupoles, two beam choppers, and three bunchers. The bunchers were necessary to keep the beam bunched at the entrance of the Linac. About 35% beam loss occurred, and the emittance growth was several fold. In the new layout, the 750 keV line is only 0.7 m long, with three quads and one buncher. We will present the experimental result of the upgrade.

  14. A photocathode rf gun design for a mm-wave linac-based FEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassiri, A.; Berenc, T,; Foster, J.; Waldschmidt, G.; Zhou, J.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, advances in the rf gun technology have made it possible to produce small beam emittances suitable for short period microundulators which take advantage of the low emittance beam to reduce the wavelength of FELs. At the Advanced Photon Source, we are studying the design of a compact 50-MeV superconducting mm-wave linac-based FEL for the production of short wavelengths ({approximately}300 nm) to carry out FEL demonstration experiments. The electron source considered for the linac is a 30- GHz, 3 1/2-cell {pi}-mode photocathode rf gun. For cold model rf measurements a 15-GHz prototype structure was fabricated. Here we report on the design, numerical modelling and the initial cold-model rf measurement results on the 15-GHz prototype structure.

  15. Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

    2011-03-28

    In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

  16. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

    1993-06-29

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  17. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Paul (Livermore, CA); Bernhardt, Anthony (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  18. Low-Z linac targets for low-MV gold nanoparticle radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiamas, P.; Mishra, P.; Berbeco, R. I.; Marcus, K.; Zygmanski, P. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu; Cifter, F.; Sajo, E. E-mail: Erno-Sajo@uml.edu

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of low-Z/low-MV (low-Z) linac targets for gold nanoparticle radiotherapy (GNPT) and to determine the microscopic dose enhancement ratio (DER) due to GNP for the alternative beamlines. In addition, to evaluate the degradation of dose enhancement arising from the increased attenuation of x rays and larger skin dose in water for the low-MV beams compared to the standard linac. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used to compute dose and DER for various flattening-filter-free beams (2.5, 4, 6.5 MV). Target materials were beryllium, diamond, and tungsten-copper high-Z target. Target thicknesses were selected based on 20%, 60%, 70%, and 80% of the continuous slowing down approximation electron ranges for a given target material and energy. Evaluation of the microscopic DER was carried out for 100 nm GNP including the degradation factors due to beam attenuation. Results: The greatest increase in DER compared to the standard 6.5 MV linac was for a 2.5 MV Be-target (factor of ?2). Skin dose ranged from ?10% (Be, 6.5 MV-80%) to ?85% (Be, 2.5 MV-20%) depending on the target case. Attenuation of 2.5 MV beams at 22 cm was higher by ?75% compared with the standard beam. Taking into account the attenuation at 22 cm depth, the effective dose enhancement was up to ?60% above the DER of the high-Z target. For these cases the effective DER ranged between ?1.6 and 6 compared with the standard linac. Conclusions: Low-Z (2.5 MV) GNPT is possible even after accounting for greater beam attenuation for deep-seated tumors (22 cm) and the increased skin dose. Further, it can lead to significant sparing of normal tissue while simultaneously escalating the dose in the tumor cells.

  19. Energy Recovery Linac cavity at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Energy Recovery Linac cavity at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation / Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301)

  20. High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    High Current Energy Recovery Linac at BNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation / Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301)

  1. Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    parallel plates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel ...

  2. Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analytical theory...

  3. PILAC: A pion linac facility for 1-GeV pion physics at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiessen, H.A.; White, D.H.

    1991-11-22

    A design study for a Pion Linac (PILAC) at LAMPF is under way at Los Alamos. We present here a reference design for a system of pion source, linac, and high-resolution beam line and spectrometer that will provide 10{sup 9} pions per second on target and 200-keV resolution for the ({pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}) reaction at 0.92 GeV. A general-purpose beam line that delivers both positive and negative pions in the energy range 0.4-1.1 GeV is included, thus opening up the possibility of a broad experimental program as is discussed in this report. A kicker-based beam sharing system allows delivery of beam to both beam lines simultaneously with independent sign and energy control. Because the pion linac acts like an rf particle separator, all beams produced by PILAC will be free of electron (or positron) and proton contamination. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Analysis of Lifetime Data for the Linac 201 MHz Power Amplifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot McCrory and Robert C. Webber

    2002-07-09

    This document analyzes data on the lifetime of the 201-MHz triode power amplifier (PA) vacuum tube, model number 7835, used in the low-energy half of the Linac. We observe that a 7835 power amplifier vacuum tube has historically provided about one and one-third years service in the Linac. The lifetime of recently re-manufactured tubes is somewhat less, but it is not clear if this is because the manufacturer is ''loosing their touch,'' or because tubes cannot be effectively rebuilt after a certain number of times. Taking into account the expected tube lifetimes, the statistical fluctuations on this number, and the amount of time it takes for the manufacturer to make good tubes, we require about 14 tubes either operating, ready as good spares or being manufactured, in order to have sufficient spares to run the Linac. As a hedge against supplier drop out, we need to increase our inventory of good spare tubes by about three tubes per year for the next few years.

  5. Optical coherence domain reflectometry guidewire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A guidewire with optical sensing capabilities is based on a multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometer (OCDR), which allows it to sense location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions as it travels through the body during minimally invasive medical procedures. This information will be used both to direct the guidewire through the body by detecting vascular junctions and to evaluate the nearby tissue. The guidewire contains multiple optical fibers which couple light from the proximal to distal end. Light from the fibers at the distal end of the guidewire is directed onto interior cavity walls via small diameter optics such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes. Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers, which are multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The guidewire can also be used in nonmedical applications.

  6. Application of coherent 10 micron imaging lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    With the continuing progress in mid-IR array detector technology and high bandwidth fan-outs, i.f. electronics, high speed digitizers, and processing capability, true coherent imaging lidar is becoming a reality. In this paper experimental results are described using a 10 micron coherent imaging lidar.

  7. Reflective coherent spatial light modulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T. (Knoxville, TN); Richards, Roger K. (Knoxville, TN); Hutchinson, Donald P. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, Marcus L. (Knoxville, TN)

    2003-04-22

    A reflective coherent spatial light modulator (RCSLM) includes a subwavelength resonant grating structure (SWS), the SWS including at least one subwavelength resonant grating layer (SWL) have a plurality of areas defining a plurality of pixels. Each pixel represents an area capable of individual control of its reflective response. A structure for modulating the resonant reflective response of at least one pixel is provided. The structure for modulating can include at least one electro-optic layer in optical contact with the SWS. The RCSLM is scalable in both pixel size and wavelength. A method for forming a RCSLM includes the steps of selecting a waveguide material and forming a SWS in the waveguide material, the SWS formed from at least one SWL, the SWL having a plurality of areas defining a plurality of pixels.

  8. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through...

  9. First Measurements of the FACET Coherent Terahertz Radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurements of the FACET Coherent Terahertz Radiation Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: First Measurements of the FACET Coherent Terahertz Radiation Source You...

  10. Coherent behavior in Heavy Fermion materials; Understanding and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coherent behavior in Heavy Fermion materials; Understanding and controlling competing ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherent behavior in Heavy Fermion materials; ...

  11. Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in...

  12. Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular ...

  13. Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in ...

  14. Neutrino Coherent Scattering Rates at Direct Dark Matter Detectors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrino Coherent Scattering Rates at Direct Dark Matter Detectors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutrino Coherent Scattering Rates at Direct Dark Matter Detectors ...

  15. A 4 to 0.1 nm FEL Based on the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA

    2012-06-05

    The author show that using existing electron gun technology and a high energy linac like the one at SLAC, it is possible to build a Free Electron Laser operating around the 4 nm water window. A modest improvement in the gun performance would further allow to extend the FEL to the 0.1 nm region. Such a system would produce radiation with a brightness many order of magnitude above that of any synchrotron radiation source, existing or under construction, with laser power in the multigawatt region and subpicosecond pulse length.

  16. Status of the first batch of niobium resonator production for the New Delhi booster linac.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potukuchi, P. N.

    1999-03-16

    This paper reports the status and details of the costs of construction of niobium superconducting resonant cavities for a linear accelerator, presently being built as a booster for the 15 UD tandem Pelletron accelerator at the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The linear accelerator will have three cryostat modules, each holding eight quarter-wave resonators. Construction of a batch of ten resonators for the linac started at Argonne National Laboratory in May 1997. For production, all fabrication and all electron beam welding is being done through commercial vendors. Details of construction and present status of the project are presented.

  17. Managing coherence via put/get windows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    2011-01-11

    A method and apparatus for managing coherence between two processors of a two processor node of a multi-processor computer system. Generally the present invention relates to a software algorithm that simplifies and significantly speeds the management of cache coherence in a message passing parallel computer, and to hardware apparatus that assists this cache coherence algorithm. The software algorithm uses the opening and closing of put/get windows to coordinate the activated required to achieve cache coherence. The hardware apparatus may be an extension to the hardware address decode, that creates, in the physical memory address space of the node, an area of virtual memory that (a) does not actually exist, and (b) is therefore able to respond instantly to read and write requests from the processing elements.

  18. Managing coherence via put/get windows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    2012-02-21

    A method and apparatus for managing coherence between two processors of a two processor node of a multi-processor computer system. Generally the present invention relates to a software algorithm that simplifies and significantly speeds the management of cache coherence in a message passing parallel computer, and to hardware apparatus that assists this cache coherence algorithm. The software algorithm uses the opening and closing of put/get windows to coordinate the activated required to achieve cache coherence. The hardware apparatus may be an extension to the hardware address decode, that creates, in the physical memory address space of the node, an area of virtual memory that (a) does not actually exist, and (b) is therefore able to respond instantly to read and write requests from the processing elements.

  19. Coherency Does Not Equate to Stability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BES Programs Highlight Coherency Does Not Equate to Stability As-grown nanotwin (NT) copper (A) SEM image. (B) An edge-on inverse pole figure orientation mapping (IPFOM) image,...

  20. EA-1904: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1904: Draft Environmental Assessment Linac Coherent Light Source-II Draft Environmental Assessment (December 2011) This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. PDF icon EA-1904-DEA-2011.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1904: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1975: Final

  1. EA-1904: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1904: Final Environmental Assessment Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. PDF icon EA-1904-FEA-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1904: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1975: Draft

  2. EA-1087: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

  3. RF low-level control for the Linac4 H{sup ?} source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterworth, A. Grudiev, A.; Lettry, J.; Paoluzzi, M.; Schmitzer, C.; Nishida, K.

    2015-04-08

    The H{sup ?} source for the Linac4 accelerator at CERN uses an RF driven plasma for the production of H{sup ?}. The RF is supplied by a 2?MHz RF tube amplifier with a maximum power output of 100 kW and a pulse duration of up to 2?ms. The low-level RF signal generation and measurement system has been developed using standard CERN controls electronics in the VME form factor. The RF frequency and amplitude reference signals are generated using separate arbitrary waveform generator channels. The frequency and amplitude are both freely programmable over the duration of the RF pulse, which allows fine-tuning of the excitation. Measurements of the forward and reverse RF power signals are performed via directional couplers using high-speed digitizers, and permit the estimation of the plasma impedance and deposited power via an equivalent circuit model. The low-level RF hardware and software implementations are described, and experimental results obtained with the Linac4 ion sources in the test stand are presented.

  4. Insertion of coherence requests for debugging a multiprocessor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY)

    2010-02-23

    A method and system are disclosed to insert coherence events in a multiprocessor computer system, and to present those coherence events to the processors of the multiprocessor computer system for analysis and debugging purposes. The coherence events are inserted in the computer system by adding one or more special insert registers. By writing into the insert registers, coherence events are inserted in the multiprocessor system as if they were generated by the normal coherence protocol. Once these coherence events are processed, the processing of coherence events can continue in the normal operation mode.

  5. Linac Sector 21-30 'QE' Quadrupole Magnet Excitation in LCLS Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emma, P

    2010-11-24

    The existing SLAC linac quadrupole magnets, described as the 'QE' quadrupoles, are designed for excitation currents up to 200 A with length-integrated gradients up to 100 kG needed to focus up to 50-GeV electron or positron beams. The eight 'QE' magnets within a linac sector are powered in series on a single 200-A bulk power supply, and each magnet in sectors 21-29 also includes a 20-A booster supply (adds 0-20 A to each magnet) for gradient tapering within the sector. Sector 30 is different again with individual 200-A power supplies per magnet. The LCLS will use these same quadrupole magnets, mostly in their existing locations and with their present power supplies, but for an electron energy range of 0.25-14 GeV. This much lower beam energy will require good power supply regulation ({le} 0.05% rms for f > 0.5 Hz) [1] and accurate field excitation at much lower currents, as low as a few amperes. The present (pre-2006) gradient-to-current polynomials (IVBU) in the SLC database are based on magnetic measurements at excitation currents above 20 A, and are not accurate in extrapolation below about 10 A. For this reason the IVBU polynomials for all 'QE' quadrupoles in sectors 21-30 will be updated in 2007 for LCLS operation. Magnets beyond Q21601 will be updated with a new generic polynomial (with polarity considerations) based on magnetic measurements from zero current all the way up to 200 A, with additional data taken in the 0-20 A range for accuracy in LCLS mode (see Fig. 1). In addition, the first five LCLS 'QE' magnets (Q21201, Q21301, Q21401, Q21501, and Q21601), most of which run at the lowest currents of <3 A, have been individually measured and fitted with a specific polynomial to meet their special settings in LCLS mode. All changes will continue to fully support 30-50 GeV linac operations. This note describes these changes and the method used to arrive at this solution. Regulation tests have already been run on both the bulk and booster power supplies which demonstrate a regulation level below 0.05% rms [1]. Table 2 lists a summary of the gradient-to-current polynomials needed in 2007 for all 'QE' magnets from sector-21 to 30.

  6. WE-G-17A-09: Novel Magnetic Shielding Design for Inline and Perpendicular Integrated 6 MV Linac and 1.0 T MRI Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X; Ma, B; Kuang, Y; Diao, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The influence of fringe magnetic fields delivered by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the beam generation and transportation in Linac is still a major challenge for the integration of linear accelerator and MRI (Linac-MRI). In this study, we investigated an optimal magnetic shielding design for Linac-MRI and further characterized the beam trajectory in electron gun. Methods: Both inline and perpendicular configurations were analyzed in this study. The configurations, comprising a Linac-MRI with a 100cm SAD and an open 1.0 T superconductive magnet, were simulated by the 3D finite element method (FEM). The steel shielding around the Linac was included in the 3D model, the thickness of which was varied from 1mm to 20mm, and magnetic field maps were acquired with and without additional shielding. The treatment beam trajectory in electron gun was evaluated using OPERA 3d SCALA with and without shielding cases. Results: When Linac was not shielded, the uniformity of diameter sphere volume (DSV) (30cm) was about 5 parts per million (ppm) and the fringe magnetic fields in electron gun were more than 0.3 T. With shielding, the magnetic fields in electron gun were reduced to less than 0.01 T. For the inline configuration, the radial magnetic fields in the Linac were about 0.02T. A cylinder steel shield used (5mm thick) altered the uniformity of DSV to 1000 ppm. For the perpendicular configuration, the Linac transverse magnetic fields were more than 0.3T, which altered the beam trajectory significantly. A 8mm-thick cylinder steel shield surrounding the Linac was used to compensate the output losses of Linac, which shifted the magnetic fields' uniformity of DSV to 400 ppm. Conclusion: For both configurations, the Linac shielding was used to ensure normal operation of the Linac. The effect of magnetic fields on the uniformity of DSV could be modulated by the shimming technique of the MRI magnet. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  7. Global coherence of dust density waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killer, Carsten; Melzer, Andr

    2014-06-15

    The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

  8. Store-operate-coherence-on-value

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2014-11-18

    A system, method and computer program product for performing various store-operate instructions in a parallel computing environment that includes a plurality of processors and at least one cache memory device. A queue in the system receives, from a processor, a store-operate instruction that specifies under which condition a cache coherence operation is to be invoked. A hardware unit in the system runs the received store-operate instruction. The hardware unit evaluates whether a result of the running the received store-operate instruction satisfies the condition. The hardware unit invokes a cache coherence operation on a cache memory address associated with the received store-operate instruction if the result satisfies the condition. Otherwise, the hardware unit does not invoke the cache coherence operation on the cache memory device.

  9. The machine protection system for the R&D energy recovery LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altinbas, Z.; Kayran, D.; Jamilkowski, J.; Lee, R.C.; Oerter, B.

    2011-03-28

    The Machine Protection System (MPS) is a device-safety system that is designed to prevent damage to hardware by generating interlocks, based upon the state of input signals generated by selected sub-systems. It protects all the key machinery in the R&D Project called the Energy Recovery LINAC (ERL) against the high beam current. The MPS is capable of responding to a fault with an interlock signal within several microseconds. The ERL MPS is based on a National Instruments CompactRIO platform, and is programmed by utilizing National Instruments' development environment for a visual programming language. The system also transfers data (interlock status, time of fault, etc.) to the main server. Transferred data is integrated into the pre-existing software architecture which is accessible by the operators. This paper will provide an overview of the hardware used, its configuration and operation, as well as the software written both on the device and the server side.

  10. Higher-order mode analysis at the BNL Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.C.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Xu, W.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the prevalence and structure of higher-order modes (HOMs) in accelerator cavities is critical because their excitation can result in problematic single bunch and multi-bunch effects. Particularly hazardous are dipole modes, which are more easily excited due to their linear field nature near the beam center. During a recent superconducting test on the energy recovery linac (ERL) cavity at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 8 of the highest-Q HOMs were measured for the first time. In conjunction with analysis of CST Microwave Studio simulation results for the ERL model, one of these modes was further studied in the copper prototype ERL cavity. A method of identifying HOMs utilizing existing holes drilled in copper cavity cells was developed and used to conclude that the observed high-Q mode was a quadrupole.

  11. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  12. Beam-energy and laser beam-profile monitor at the BNL LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, R.; Briscoe, B.; Degen, C.; DeSanto, L.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Nayak, S.; Raparia, D.; Russo, T.

    2010-05-02

    We are developing a non-interceptive beam profile and energy monitor for H{sup -} beams in the high energy beam transport (HEBT) line at the Brookhaven National Lab linac. Electrons that are removed from the beam ions either by laser photodetachment or stripping by background gas are deflected into a Faraday cup. The beam profile is measured by stepping a narrow laser beam across the ion beam and measuring the electron charge vs. transverse laser position. There is a grid in front of the collector that can be biased up to 125kV. The beam energy spectrum is determined by measuring the electron charge vs. grid voltage. Beam electrons have the same velocity as the beam and so have an energy of 1/1836 of the beam protons. A 200MeV H{sup -} beam yields 109keV electrons. Energy measurements can be made with either laser-stripped or gas-stripped electrons.

  13. Note: Electronic damping of microphonics in superconducting resonators of a continuous wave linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Gopal; Sahu, Bhuban Kumar; Agarwal, Vivek; Kumar, Girish

    2014-02-15

    The paper presents an implementation technique to damp the microphonics in superconducting resonators utilizing the coupling between the electromagnetic and the mechanical modes of a resonator. In the technique used the resonant frequency variations are fed back to modulate the field amplitude through a suitable transfer function. Of the two transfer functions used in the experiments, one emulates a derivative action and is placed in a negative feedback configuration. The other transfer function is essentially a parallel combination of second order low pass filters and is used in a positive feedback configuration. Experiments with the Quarter Wave resonators of IUAC, New Delhi linac demonstrate that the damping of some of the modes increases significantly with the introduction of this feedback leading to a reduction in power required for field stabilization and quieter operation of the RF control system.

  14. Commissioning of the first drift tube linac module in the Ground Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Cole, R.; Connolly, R.; Denney, P.; Erickson, J.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Ingalls, W.B.; Kersteins, D.; Kraus, R.; Lysenko, W.P.; McMurry, D.; Mottershead, C.T.; Power, J.; Rose, C.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Schneider, J.D.; Smith, M.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1993-06-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam-dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The major components are the 35-keV H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), the intertank matching section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{lambda} drift tube linac (DTL-1) module, and the 24-MeV GTA with 10 DTL modules. Results from the DTL-1 beam experiments will be presented.

  15. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baptiste, Kenneth; Corlett, John; Kwiatkowski, Slawomir; Lidia, Steven; Qiang, Ji; Sannibale, Fernando; Sonnad, Kiran; Staples, John; Virostek, Steven; Wells, Russell

    2008-10-08

    Currently proposed energy recovery linac and high average power free electron laser projects require electron beam sources that can generate up to {approx} 1 nC bunch charges with less than 1 mmmrad normalized emittance at high repetition rates (greater than {approx} 1 MHz). Proposed sources are based around either high voltage DC or microwave RF guns, each with its particular set of technological limits and system complications. We propose an approach for a gun fully based on mature RF and mechanical technology that greatly diminishes many of such complications. The concepts for such a source as well as the present RF and mechanical design are described. Simulations that demonstrate the beam quality preservation and transport capability of an injector scheme based on such a gun are also presented.

  16. Breast dosimetry in transverse and longitudinal field MRI-Linac radiotherapy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahdavi, S. R.; Esmaeeli, A. D.; Pouladian, M.; Sardari, D.; Bagheri, S.; Monfared, A. S.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In the framework of developing the integration of a MRI-Linac system, configurations of MRI-Linac units were simulated in order to improve the dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using transverse and longitudinal magnetic field geometries of Lorentz force for both medial and lateral tangential fields. Methods: In this work, the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized to compare dose distributions in breast radiotherapy for Linac-MR systems in the transverse and longitudinal geometries within humanoid phantoms across a range of magnetic field strengths of 0.5 and 1.5 T. The dose increment due to scattering from the coils was investigated for both geometries as well. Computed tomography images of two patients were used for MC simulations. One patient had intact breast while the other was mastectomized. In the simulations, planning and methods of chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical planning. Results: In a longitudinal geometry, the magnetic field is shown to restrict the lateral spread of secondary electrons to the lung, heart, and contralateral organs, which reduced the mean dose of the ipsilateral lung and heart by means of 17.2% and 6% at 1.5 T, respectively. The transverse configuration exhibits a significant increase in tissue interface effects, which increased dose buildup in the entrance regions of the lateral and medial tangent beams to the planning target volume (PTV) and improved dose homogeneity within the PTV. The improved relative average homogeneity index for two patients to the PTV at magnetic field strength of 1.5 T with respect to no magnetic field case evaluated was 11.79% and 34.45% in the LRBP and TRBP geometries, respectively. In both geometries, the simulations show significant mean dose reductions in the contralateral breast and chest wall skin, respectively, by a mean of 16.6% and 24.9% at 0.5 T and 17.2% and 28.1% at 1.5 T in the transverse geometry, and 10.56% and 14.6% at 0.5 T and 11.3% and 16.3% at 1.5 T in the longitudinal geometry. Considering the scattered photons which reflected from the coils, the average relative dose of each voxel is slightly increased by 0.53% and 0.32% in the LRBP and TRBP geometries, respectively. Conclusions: Orienting the B0 magnetic field parallel to the photon beam axis, LRBP geometry, tends to restrict the radial spread of secondary electrons which resulted in dose reduction to the lung. Dosimetry issues observed in both Linac-MR geometries, such as changes to the lateral dose distribution, significantly exhibited dose reduction in the contralateral organs on a representative breast plan. Further, the results show sharper edge dose volume histogram curves at 1.5 T for both geometries, especially in the LRBP configuration.

  17. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

  18. Precision X-Band Linac Technologies for Nuclear Photonics Gamma-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Houck, T L; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Adolphsen, C E; Chu, T S; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, F; Wang, J W; Raubenheimer, T O; Ighigeanu, D; Toma, M; Cutoiu, D

    2011-08-31

    Nuclear photonics is an emerging field of research requiring new tools, including high spectral brightness, tunable gamma-ray sources; high photon energy, ultrahigh-resolution crystal spectrometers; and novel detectors. This presentation focuses on the precision linac technology required for Compton scattering gamma-ray light sources, and on the optimization of the laser and electron beam pulse format to achieve unprecedented spectral brightness. Within this context, high-gradient X-band technology will be shown to offer optimal performance in a compact package, when used in conjunction with the appropriate pulse format, and photocathode illumination and interaction laser technologies. The nascent field of nuclear photonics is enabled by the recent maturation of new technologies, including high-gradient X-band electron acceleration, robust fiber laser systems, and hyper-dispersion CPA. Recent work has been performed at LLNL to demonstrate isotope-specific detection of shielded materials via NRF using a tunable, quasi-monochromatic Compton scattering gamma-ray source operating between 0.2 MeV and 0.9 MeV photon energy. This technique is called Fluorescence Imaging in the Nuclear Domain with Energetic Radiation (or FINDER). This work has, among other things, demonstrated the detection of {sup 7}Li shielded by Pb, utilizing gamma rays generated by a linac-driven, laser-based Compton scattering gamma-ray source developed at LLNL. Within this context, a new facility is currently under construction at LLNL, with the goal of generating tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range, at a repetition rate of 120 Hz, and with a peak brightness in the 10{sup 20} photons/(s x mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x 0.1% bw).

  19. Coherent bremsstrahlung in a bent crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bondarenco, M. V.

    2010-05-15

    Coherent radiation spectrum from high energy e{sup {+-}}in a bent crystal with arbitrary curvature distribution along the longitudinal coordinate is evaluated, based on the stationary phase approximation. For a uniformly bent crystal a closed-form expression for the spectrum is derived. The spectrum features include a dip at its beginning and the sharp end, which may split into two breaks depending on the particle incidence angle. Estimates of nondipole radiation and multiple scattering effects are given. The value for the crystal bending angle at which the dipole coherent bremsstrahlung theory holds best appears to be {approx}10{sup -4} rad.

  20. Dental optical coherence domain reflectometry explorer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Sathyam, Ujwal S. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A hand-held, fiber optic based dental device with optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) sensing capabilities provides a profile of optical scattering as a function of depth in the tissue at the point where the tip of the dental explorer touches the tissue. This system provides information on the internal structure of the dental tissue, which is then used to detect caries and periodontal disease. A series of profiles of optical scattering or tissue microstructure are generated by moving the explorer across the tooth or other tissue. The profiles are combined to form a cross-sectional, or optical coherence tomography (OCT), image.

  1. EA-1975: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1975: Draft Environmental Assessment LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California DOE is preparing an EA on the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the existing LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The proposed LCLS-II would extend the photon energy range, increase control over photon pulses, and enable two-color pump-probe experiments. The X-ray laser

  2. EA-1975: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1975: Final Environmental Assessment Linac Coherent Light Source-IL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California DOE issued a Final EA on the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to upgrade the existing LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. PDF icon EA-1975-FEA-2014.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1975: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1904: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1975:

  3. Method of making coherent multilayer crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Falco, Charles M. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A new material consisting of a coherent multilayer crystal of two or more elements where each layer is composed of a single element. Each layer may vary in thickness from about 2 .ANG. to 2500 .ANG.. The multilayer crystals are prepared by sputter deposition under conditions which slow the sputtered atoms to near substrate temperatures before they contact the substrate.

  4. Coherent multilayer crystals and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Falco, Charles M. (Tucson, AZ)

    1984-01-01

    A new material consisting of a multilayer crystalline structure which is coherent perpendicular to the layers and where each layer is composed of a single crystalline element. The individual layers may vary from 2.ANG. to 100.ANG. or more in thickness.

  5. Coherent multilayer crystals and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuller, I.K.; Falco, C.M.

    1980-10-30

    A new material is described consisting of a coherent multilayer crystal of two or more elements where each layer is composed of a single element. Each layer may vary in thickness from about 2 A to 2500 A. The multilayer crystals are prepared by sputter deposition under conditions which slow the sputtered atoms to near substrate temperatures before they contact the substrate.

  6. Coherent Radiation Effects in the LCLS Undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiche, S.; /UCLA; Huang, Z.; /SLAC

    2010-12-14

    For X-ray Free-Electron Lasers such as LCLS and TESLA FEL, a change in the electron energy while amplifying the FEL radiation can shift the resonance condition out of the bandwidth of the FEL. The largest sources of energy loss is the emission of incoherent undulator radiation. Because the loss per electron depends only on the undulator parameters and the beam energy, which are fixed for a given resonant wavelength, the average energy loss can be compensated for by a fixed taper of the undulator. Coherent radiation has a strong enhancement proportional to the number of electrons in the bunch for frequencies comparable to or longer than the bunch dimension. If the emitted coherent energy becomes comparable to that of the incoherent emission, it has to be included in the taper as well. However, the coherent loss depends on the bunch charge and the applied compression scheme and a change of these parameters would require a change of the taper. This imposes a limitation on the practical operation of Free-Electron Lasers, where the taper can only be adjusted manually. In this presentation we analyze the coherent emission of undulator radiation and transition undulator radiation for LCLS, and estimate whether the resulting energy losses are significant for the operation of LCLS.

  7. Coherence resonance in excitable and oscillatory systems: The essential

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    role of slow and fast dynamics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Coherence resonance in excitable and oscillatory systems: The essential role of slow and fast dynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherence resonance in excitable and oscillatory systems: The essential role of slow and fast dynamics Stochastic noise of an appropriate amplitude can maximize the coherence of the dynamics of certain types of excitable systems via a phenomenon known as coherence

  8. UNIQUE FEATURES IN MAGNET DESIGNS FOR R AND D ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MENG,W.; JAIN, A.; GANETIS, G.; KAYRAN, D.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; LONGO, C.; MAHLER, G.; POZDEYEV, E.; TUOZZOLO, J.

    2007-06-25

    In this paper we describe the unique features and analysis techniques used on the magnets for a R&D Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) [1] under construction at the Collider Accelerator Department at BNL. The R&D ERL serves as a test-bed for future BNL ERLs, such as an electron-cooler-ERL at RHIC [2] and a future 20 GeV ERL electron-hadron at eRHIC [3]. Here we present select designs of various dipole and quadruple magnets which are used in Z-bend merging systems [4] and the returning loop, 3-D simulations of the fields in aforementioned magnets, particle tracking analysis, and the magnet's influence on beam parameters. We discuss an unconventional method of setting requirements on the quality of magnetic field and transferring them into measurable parameters as well as into manufacturing tolerances. We compare selected simulation with results of magnetic measurements. A 20 MeV R&D ERL (Fig. 1) is in an advanced phase of construction at the Collider-Accelerator Department at BNL, with commissioning planned for early 2009. In the R&D ERL, an electron beam is generated in a 2 MeV superconducting RF photo-gun, next is accelerated to 20 MeV in a 5 cell SRF linac, subsequently passed through a return loop, then decelerated to 2 MeV in the SRF linac, and finally is sent to a beam dump. The lattice of the R&D ERL is designed with a large degree of flexibility to enable the covering of a vast operational parameter space: from non-achromatic lattices to achromatic with positive, zero and negative R56 parameter. It also allows for large range tunability of Rlz and lattice RS4 parameters (which are important for transverse beam-break-up instability). Further details of the R&D ERL can be found elsewhere in these proceedings [5]. The return loop magnets are of traditional design with the following exceptions: (a) The bending radius of the 60{sup o} dipole magnets is 20 cm, which is rather small. We use 15{sup o} edges on both sides of the dipoles to split very strong focusing evenly between the horizontal and vertical planes (so-called chevron-magnet). (b) The requirements on field quality of the loop's quadrupoles had been determined by the requirement to preserve a very low normalized transverse slice emittance of electron beam ({var_epsilon} {approx} 1 mm-mrad). We used direct tracking of a sample electron beam to verify a high degree of the emittance preservation. (c) Each quadrupole is equipped with a dipole trim coil, which can be also used to excite a sextupole component, if required, for emittance preservation of e-beam with a large energy spread. One of the unique features of all ERLs is the necessity for merging low and high energy electron beams. In the R&D ERL, 2 MeV from the SRF gun merges with the 20 MeV electron beam coming around the return loop into the same trajectory at a position within the SRF linac. In the linac, injected bunch is accelerated to 20 MeV, while the returned or ''used'' bunch is decelerated to 2 MeV. The challenge for a merger design is to provide conditions for emittance compensation [5] and also for achromatic conditions of a low energy, space-charge dominated-e-beam [4,6]. The scheme which satisfies these requirements (called 2-bend [4]) is used on the R&D ERL. The Z-bend is approximately 4-meter long. It bends the beam trajectory in the vertical plane. It is comprised of four dipole magnets designed to be equally focusing in both planes, with bending radius {approx} 60 cm, and bending angles of: +15{sup o}, -30{sup o}, +30{sup o} and -15{sup o}. The beam dynamics in the Z-bend results in a large-size (centimeters) near-laminar electron beam [7]. The large beam size and very low slice emittance of the e-beam dictates the tolerances on the magnetic field to be very tight. The integrated nonlinear kicks should not exceed {approx} 20 micro-radian per magnet at a typical radius {approx} 1 cm. The magnets in the Z-bend are rather short (15 cm effective length for the 15{sup o} magnet) and have a rather large aperture of 6 cm. Analysis predicts that the influence of various field components on the emittance growth are complicated by the fact that the beam trajectory bends significantly in the Einge fields. Hence, we decided to use direct tracking in the calculated fields extracted from Opera3d of test beam to evaluate and to minimize influence of magnetic field on the beam emittance. In addition, we used predictions of Opera3d and compared them with results of magnetic measurements for the return loop dipole and quadrupole. One of the features of the loop magnets is that they are fabricated with a very high geometric tolerance, allowing them to be an excellent test bed for bench-marking our predictions. Agreement with the prediction provides us with sufficient confidence that Z-bend magnets will preserve beam emittance.

  9. Simulations of coherent beam-beam effects with head-on compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo. Y.

    2012-05-20

    Electron lenses are under construction for installation in RHIC in order to mitigate the head-on beam-beam effects. This would allow operation with higher bunch intensity and result in a significant increase in luminosity. We report on recent strong-strong simulations and experiments that were carried out using the RHIC upgrade parameters to assess the impact of coherent beam-beam effects in the presence of head-on compensation.

  10. Measurement of optical emission from the hydrogen plasma of the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lettry, J.; Bertolo, S.; Castel, A.; Chaudet, E.; Ecarnot, J.-F.; Favre, G.; Fayet, F.; Geisser, J.-M.; Haase, M.; Habert, A.; Hansen, J.; Joffe, S.; Kronberger, M.; Lombard, D.; Marmillon, A.; Balula, J. Marques; Mathot, S.; Midttun, O.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.

    2011-09-26

    At CERN, a non caesiated H{sup -} ion volume source derived from the DESY ion source is being commissioned. For a proposed High Power Superconducting Proton Linac (HP-SPL), a non caesiated plasma generator was designed to operate at the two orders of magnitude larger duty factor required by the SPL. The commissioning of the plasma generator test stand and the plasma generator prototype are completed and briefly described. The 2 MHz RF generators (100 kW, 50 Hz repetition rate) was successfully commissioned; its frequency and power will be controlled by arbitrary function generators during the 1 ms plasma pulse. In order to characterize the plasma, RF-coupling, optical spectrometer, rest gas analyzer and Langmuir probe measurements will be used. Optical spectrometry allows direct comparison with the currently commissioned Linac4 H{sup -} ion source plasma. The first measurements of the optical emission of the Linac4 ion source and of the SPL plasma generator plasmas are presented.

  11. Mode Selective Excitation Using Coherent Control Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ajay K.; Konradi, Jakow; Materny, Arnulf; Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2008-11-14

    Femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) gives access to ultrafast molecular dynamics. However, femtosecond laser pulses are spectrally broad and therefore coherently excite several molecular modes. While the temporal resolution is high, usually no mode-selective excitation is possible. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of selectively exciting specific molecular vibrations in solution phase with shaped fs laser excitation using a feedback-controlled optimization technique guided by an evolutionary algorithm. This approach is also used to obtain molecule-specific CARS spectra from a mixture of different substances. The optimized phase structures of the fs pulses are characterized to get insight into the control process. Possible applications of the spectrum control are discussed.

  12. Multiplex coherent raman spectroscopy detector and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Peter; Joyner, Candace C.; Patrick, Sheena T.; Guyer, Dean R.

    2004-06-08

    A multiplex coherent Raman spectrometer (10) and spectroscopy method rapidly detects and identifies individual components of a chemical mixture separated by a separation technique, such as gas chromatography. The spectrometer (10) and method accurately identify a variety of compounds because they produce the entire gas phase vibrational Raman spectrum of the unknown gas. This is accomplished by tilting a Raman cell (20) to produce a high-intensity, backward-stimulated, coherent Raman beam of 683 nm, which drives a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (28) to produce a broadband beam of 1100-1700 nm covering a range of more than 3000 wavenumber. This broadband beam is combined with a narrowband beam of 532 nm having a bandwidth of 0.003 wavenumbers and focused into a heated windowless cell (38) that receives gases separated by a gas chromatograph (40). The Raman radiation scattered from these gases is filtered and sent to a monochromator (50) with multichannel detection.

  13. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.

    1998-04-28

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time. 12 figs.

  14. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wachter, Eric A. (138 Bay Path Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Fisher, Walter G. (8514 Carl Valentine, Knoxville, TN 37931)

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time.

  15. COHERENT LASER VISION SYSTEM (CLVS) OPTION PHASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Clark

    1999-11-18

    The purpose of this research project was to develop a prototype fiber-optic based Coherent Laser Vision System (CLVS) suitable for DOE's EM Robotic program. The system provides three-dimensional (3D) vision for monitoring situations in which it is necessary to update the dimensional spatial data on the order of once per second. The system has total immunity to ambient lighting conditions.

  16. A laser-wire beam-energy and beam-profile monitor at the BNL linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, R.; Degen, C.; DeSanto, L.; Meng, W.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Nayak, S.

    2011-03-28

    In 2009 a beam-energy monitor was installed in the high energy beam transport (HEBT) line at the Brookhaven National Lab linac. This device measures the energies of electrons stripped from the 40mA H{sup -} beam by background gas. Electrons are stripped by the 2.0x10{sup -7}torr residual gas at a rate of {approx}1.5x10{sup -8}/cm. Since beam electrons have the same velocities as beam protons, the beam proton energy is deduced by multiplying the electron energy by m{sub p}/m{sub e}=1836. A 183.6MeV H{sup -} beam produces 100keV electrons. In 2010 we installed an optics plates containing a laser and scanning optics to add beam-profile measurement capability via photodetachment. Our 100mJ/pulse, Q-switched laser neutralizes 70% of the beam during its 10ns pulse. This paper describes the upgrades to the detector and gives profile and energy measurements.

  17. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Linac Coherent Light Source

  18. Coherent diffractive imaging of single layer microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinh, Khuong Ba Le, Hoang Vu; Van Vuong, Cuong; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap; Ong, Adabelle X. P.; Henderson, Clare A.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2015-04-28

    We report the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) coherent diffractive imaging of silica/polymer micro-particle samples illuminated by a table-top high harmonic generation source at the wavelength of 30?nm. We achieve images constructed from diffraction patterns acquired with 13??m 13??m samples comprising a sparse monolayer of spherical silica and polymer micro-particles. Successful reconstructed image of an aperiodic sample using this HHG source will open the path to the realization of a compact soft x-ray microscope to investigate other complex absorbing samples.

  19. Optical coherence tomography guided dental drill

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DaSilva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Colston, Jr., Bill W. (Livermore, CA); James, Dale L. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A dental drill that has one or multiple single mode fibers that can be used to image in the vicinity of the drill tip. It is valuable to image below the surface being drilled to minimize damage to vital or normal tissue. Identifying the boundary between decayed and normal enamel (or dentine) would reduce the removal of viable tissue, and identifying the nerve before getting too close with the drill could prevent nerve damage. By surrounding a drill with several optical fibers that can be used by an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) to image several millimeters ahead of the ablation surface will lead to a new and improved dental treatment device.

  20. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-03-28

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m{sup 3} storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  1. Poster Thur Eve 57: Evaluation of laryngeal mucosal dose with conventional linac and TomoTherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nusrat, H; Lekx, K; Eapen, L

    2014-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether or not underdosing occurs in the mucosal layer during treatment of glottis cancer. A larynx phantom was produced and regions at risk of recurrence due to suspected underdosing were identified and wells drilled into the phantom for flush placement of TLDs. Seven interest points were chosen. CT simulation was completed prior to the wells being drilled, and again afterwards with the TLD locations indicated using BBs. Treatment plans created for this investigation included: 3DCRT using Elekta-XiO (n=9) and VMAT created using Elekta-Monaco (n=9), both delivered on an Elekta linac; standard TomoTherapy plan (n=11) and a directionally blocked TomoTherapy plan to approximate a 3D-conformal approach (n=5). Imaging dose during TomoTherapy deliveries was accounted for. The average TLD result at each interest point was compared to the planned value using a paired t-test. There was no significant difference between the planned and measured 3DCRT dose (268.9 vs. 267.0 cGy, respectively; p>0.05). Similarly, the planned and measured TomoTherapy treatment did not show any significant differences (271.7 vs 269.7 cGy; p>0.05). In the blocked TomoTherapy plan, significant overdosing was seen (274.5 vs 294.9 cGy; p<0.05) and underdosing was not seen in the VMAT treatment (303.5 vs 321.8 cGy; p>0.05). Further investigation is ongoing to ensure appropriate normalization of results and to investigate the overdosing noted with the blocked TomoTherapy plan. Results from this study suggest that significant underdosing does not occur in the conventional treatment of early glottic cancer using 6MV photons.

  2. D-dimensional Smorodinsky-Winternitz potential: Coherent state approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uenal, Nuri

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we construct the coherent states for a particle in the D-dimensional maximally superintegrable Smorodinsky-Winternitz potential. We, first, map the system into 2D harmonic oscillators, second, construct the coherent states of them by evaluating the transition amplitudes. Third, in the Cartesian and the hyperspherical coordinates, we find the coherent states and the stationary states of the original sytem by reduction.

  3. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation through Modulation Compression In this paper, we propose a scheme to generate tunable coherent X-ray radiation for future light source applications. This scheme uses an energy chirped electron beam, a laser modulator, a laser chirper and two bunch compressors to generate a prebunched

  4. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering Monday, September 10, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron lasers there has been interest in using coherent x-rays to probe condensed matter systems. Resonant scattering with x-rays allow elemental specificity with magnetic contrast, and coherent light leads to speckle in the scattered pattern due to interference from waves exiting the sample.

  5. Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the

  6. Seeding Coherent Radiation Sources with Sawtooth Modulation (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Seeding Coherent Radiation Sources with Sawtooth Modulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Seeding Coherent Radiation Sources with Sawtooth Modulation Seed radiation sources have the ability to increase longitudinal coherence, decrease saturation lengths, and improve performance of tapering, polarization control and other FEL features. Typically, seeding schemes start with a simple sinusoidal modulation, which is manipulated to provide bunching at a high harmonic

  7. Evaluation of partial coherence correction in X-ray ptychography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burdet, Nicolas; Shi, Xiaowen; Parks, Daniel; Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Kevan, Stephen D.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-02-23

    Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CDI) and X-ray ptychography both heavily rely on the high degree of spatial coherence of the X-ray illumination for sufficient experimental data quality for reconstruction convergence. Nevertheless, the majority of the available synchrotron undulator sources have a limited degree of partial coherence, leading to reduced data quality and a lower speckle contrast in the coherent diffraction patterns. It is still an open question whether experimentalists should compromise the coherence properties of an X-ray source in exchange for a higher flux density at a sample, especially when some materials of scientific interest are relatively weak scatterers. Amoreprevious study has suggested that in CDI, the best strategy for the study of strong phase objects is to maintain a high degree of coherence of the illuminating X-rays because of the broadening of solution space resulting from the strong phase structures. In this article, we demonstrate the first systematic analysis of the effectiveness of partial coherence correction in ptychography as a function of the coherence properties, degree of complexity of illumination (degree of phase diversity of the probe) and sample phase complexity. We have also performed analysis of how well ptychographic algorithms refine X-ray probe and complex coherence functions when those variables are unknown at the start of reconstructions, for noise-free simulated data, in the case of both real-valued and highly-complex objects.less

  8. Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave diagnostic and probe of ultrafast phase transformations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherent THz...

  9. Neutrino Coherent Scattering Rates at Direct Dark Matter Detectors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrino Coherent Scattering Rates at Direct Dark Matter Detectors Citation Details ... Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);Laboratory Directed Research and ...

  10. Coherent behavior in Heavy Fermion materials; Understanding and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Heavy Fermion materials; Understanding and controlling competing interactions in complex oxide heterostructures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherent behavior...

  11. Use of off-axis injection as an alternative to geometrically merging beams in an energy-recovering linac

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Douglas, David R.

    2012-01-10

    A method of using off-axis particle beam injection in energy-recovering linear accelerators that increases operational efficiency while eliminating the need to merge the high energy re-circulating beam with an injected low energy beam. In this arrangement, the high energy re-circulating beam and the low energy beam are manipulated such that they are within a predetermined distance from one another and then the two immerged beams are injected into the linac and propagated through the system. The configuration permits injection without geometric beam merging as well as decelerated beam extraction without the use of typical beamline elements.

  12. Catheter guided by optical coherence domain reflectometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis (Moss Beach, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A guidance and viewing system based on multiplexed optical coherence domain reflectometry is incorporated into a catheter, endoscope, or other medical device to measure the location, thickness, and structure of the arterial walls or other intra-cavity regions at discrete points on the medical device during minimally invasive medical procedures. The information will be used both to guide the device through the body and to evaluate the tissue through which the device is being passed. Multiple optical fibers are situated along the circumference of the device. Light from the distal end of each fiber is directed onto the interior cavity walls via small diameter optics (such as gradient index lenses and mirrored corner cubes). Both forward viewing and side viewing fibers can be included. The light reflected or scattered from the cavity walls is then collected by the fibers and multiplexed at the proximal end to the sample arm of an optical low coherence reflectometer. The system may also be implemented in a nonmedical inspection device.

  13. Coherent behavior in Heavy Fermion materials; Understanding and controlling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    competing interactions in complex oxide heterostructures (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Coherent behavior in Heavy Fermion materials; Understanding and controlling competing interactions in complex oxide heterostructures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherent behavior in Heavy Fermion materials; Understanding and controlling competing interactions in complex oxide heterostructures Authors: Yarotski, Dmitry Anatolievitch [1] ; Sandberg, Richard L. [1] + Show Author

  14. Beam Line Design and Beam Physics Study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser at Peking University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimei Wang

    2011-12-31

    Energy recovering linac (ERL) offers an attractive alternative for generating intense beams of charged particles by approaching the operational efficiency of a storage ring while maintaining the superior beam quality typical of a linear accelerator. In ERLs, the decelerated beam cancels the beam loading effects of the accelerated beam with high repetition rate. Therefore, ERLs can, in principle, accelerate very high average currents with only modest amounts of RF power. So the efficiency of RF power to beam is much higher. Furthermore, the energy of beam to dump is lower, so it will reduce dump radiation. With the successful experiments in large maximum-to-injection energy ratio up to 51:1 and high power FEL up to 14kW, the use of ERL, especially combining with superconducting RF technology, provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in MW FEL, synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices and so on. The 3+1/2 DC-SC photo injector and two 9cell TESLA superconducting cavity for IR SASE FEL in PKU provides a good platform to achieve high average FEL with Energy Recovery. The work of this thesis is on Beam line design and Beam dynamics study of Energy Recovery Linac Free Electron Laser for Peking University. It is the upgrade of PKU facility, which is under construction. With ERL, this facility can work in CW mode, so it can operate high average beam current without RF power constraint in main linac and generate high average FEL power. Moreover, it provides a test facility to study the key technology in ERL. System parameters are optimized for PKU ERL-FEL. The oscillation FEL output power is studied with different bunch charge, transverse emittance, bunch length and energy spread. The theory of optimal RF power and Q{sub ext} with ERL and without ERL is analyzed and applied to PKU injector and linac including microphonic effect. pace charge effect in the injector and merger is studied for beam energy at ~5MeV. Simulation shows that in the 3+1/2 DC- C injector, there is a region the beam could be over focused by RF electromagnetic field and the transverse emittance in the transport line up to linac will increase instantly due to over focusing. In order to eliminate this effect on beam emittance, several solutions are investigated to avoid over focusing. This result is very important for beam loading experiment for low bunch charge operation. Meanwhile, different merger structures are compared in terms of error sensitivity and emittance increase with space charge effect. In recirculation beam line, a new symmetric 180{degree} arc structure is designed. It fulfills the achromatic condition and adjustable bunch compression. These two parameters are controlled by different Quads knob. With this novel structure, the recirculation lattice can achieve path length adjustment, bunch compression and decompression in a large range. With beamline error, the beam central orbit will deviate from the designed trajectory. An orbit correction system is optimized, which balances between cost and performance of orbit after correction at design level. Different methods are used to estimate its robustness. The BBU instability, especially multi-pass BBU imposed a potentially severe limitation to the average current that can be accelerated in an ERL. Simulation gives the harmful HOMs and predicts that the threshold average current in this machine is much higher than the possible operation current. This work is based on the existing facility in PKU, so it provides guidelines for the facility operation and upgrade in the future. The theoretical analysis of ERL requirement and FEL requirement on beam transport line and beam property paves the way for future ERL research.

  15. Birefringence insensitive optical coherence domain reflectometry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Matthew J. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Joseph G. (Lafayette, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A birefringence insensitive fiber optic optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) system is provided containing non-polarization maintaining (non-PM) fiber in the sample arm and the reference arm without suffering from signal degradation caused by birefringence. The use of non-PM fiber significantly reduces the cost of the OCDR system and provides a disposable or multiplexed section of the sample arm. The dispersion in the reference arm and sample arm of the OCDR system are matched to achieve high resolution imaging. This system is useful in medical applications or for non-medical in situ probes. The disposable section of non-PM fiber in the sample arm can be conveniently replaced when contaminated by a sample or a patient.

  16. Coherence area profiling in multi-spatial-mode squeezed states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.; Otterstrom, Nils T.

    2015-09-12

    The presence of multiple bipartite entangled modes in squeezed states generated by four-wave mixing enables ultra-trace sensing, imaging, and metrology applications that are impossible to achieve with single-spatial-mode squeezed states. For Gaussian seed beams, the spatial distribution of these bipartite entangled modes, or coherence areas, across each beam is largely dependent on the spatial modes present in the pump beam, but it has proven difficult to map the distribution of these coherence areas in frequency and space. We demonstrate an accessible method to map the distribution of the coherence areas within these twin beams. In addition, we also show thatmore »the pump shape can impart different noise properties to each coherence area, and that it is possible to select and detect coherence areas with optimal squeezing with this approach.« less

  17. Coherence area profiling in multi-spatial-mode squeezed states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Pooser, Raphael C.; Otterstrom, Nils T.

    2015-09-12

    The presence of multiple bipartite entangled modes in squeezed states generated by four-wave mixing enables ultra-trace sensing, imaging, and metrology applications that are impossible to achieve with single-spatial-mode squeezed states. For Gaussian seed beams, the spatial distribution of these bipartite entangled modes, or coherence areas, across each beam is largely dependent on the spatial modes present in the pump beam, but it has proven difficult to map the distribution of these coherence areas in frequency and space. We demonstrate an accessible method to map the distribution of the coherence areas within these twin beams. In addition, we also show that the pump shape can impart different noise properties to each coherence area, and that it is possible to select and detect coherence areas with optimal squeezing with this approach.

  18. Simulation of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier for broadband radiation production using a superconducting linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halavanau, A.; Piot, P.

    2015-10-02

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) effects are generally considered as harmful in free-electron lasers as they can seed unfavorable energy modulations that can result in density modulations with associated emittance dilution. It was pointed out, however, that such \\micro-bunching instabilities" could be potentially useful to support the generation of broadband coherent radiation. Therefore there has been an increasing interest in devising accelerator beam lines capable of controlling LSC induced density modulations. In the present paper we augment these previous investigations by combining a grid-less space charge algorithm with the popular particle-tracking program elegant. This high-fidelity model of the space charge is used to benchmark conventional LSC models. We then employ the developed model to optimize the performance of a cascaded longitudinal space charge amplifier using beam parameters comparable to the ones achievable at Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility currently under commissioning at Fermilab

  19. Coherent structures in compressible free-shear-layer flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Baty, R.S.; Kennedy, C.A.; Chen, J.H.

    1997-08-01

    Large scale coherent structures are intrinsic fluid mechanical characteristics of all free-shear flows, from incompressible to compressible, and laminar to fully turbulent. These quasi-periodic fluid structures, eddies of size comparable to the thickness of the shear layer, dominate the mixing process at the free-shear interface. As a result, large scale coherent structures greatly influence the operation and efficiency of many important commercial and defense technologies. Large scale coherent structures have been studied here in a research program that combines a synergistic blend of experiment, direct numerical simulation, and analysis. This report summarizes the work completed for this Sandia Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project.

  20. Some features of photolithography image formation in partially coherent light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitsak, M A; Kitsak, A I

    2010-12-09

    The coherent-noise level in projection images of an opaque-screen sharp edge, formed in the model scheme of photolithography system at different degrees of spatial coherence of screen-illuminating light is studied experimentally. The spatial coherence of laser radiation was reduced by applying a specially developed device, used as a separate functional unit in the system model. The smoothing of the spatial fluctuations of radiation intensity caused by the random spatial inhomogeneity of the initial beam intensity in the obtained images is shown to be highly efficient. (imaging and image processing. holography)

  1. Effects of phase and coupling between the vibrational modes on selective excitation in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Vishesha; Malinovsky, Vladimir S.; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2010-06-15

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has been a major tool of investigation of biological structures as it contains the vibrational signature of molecules. A quantum control method based on chirped pulse adiabatic passage was recently proposed for selective excitation of a predetermined vibrational mode in CARS microscopy [Malinovskaya and Malinovsky, Opt. Lett. 32, 707 (2007)]. The method utilizes the chirp sign variation at the peak pulse amplitude and gives a robust adiabatic excitation of the desired vibrational mode. Using this method, we investigate the impact of coupling between vibrational modes in molecules on controllability of excitation of the CARS signal. We analyze two models of two coupled two-level systems (TLSs) having slightly different transitional frequencies. The first model, featuring degenerate ground states of the TLSs, gives robust adiabatic excitation and maximum coherence in the resonant TLS for positive value of the chirp. In the second model, implying nondegenerate ground states in the TLSs, a population distribution is observed in both TLSs, resulting in a lack of selectivity of excitation and low coherence. It is shown that the relative phase and coupling between the TLSs play an important role in optimizing coherence in the desired vibrational mode and suppressing unwanted transitions in CARS microscopy.

  2. SU-E-T-506: Dosimetric Verification of Photon MLC Delivered Electron Fields for Implementing MERT On An Artiste Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Wang, L; Ma, C; Fan, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify the dose accuracy of photon MLC delivered electron fields for implementing energy-intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) on an Artiste linac. Methods: It was proposed to deliver MERT on an Artiste linac at a short SSD (60 cm) to reduce beam penumbra caused by electron scatters. An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning code was used for treatment planning. Our previous study showed that the measured dose distribution of a breast plan showed good agreement with the calculations in low-medium dose regions while the differences in high dose regions were outstanding. A continuous work found that the discrepancy is mainly caused by improper modeling in MC for the single focused MLC in the Artiste which was simplified as double focused in the previous MC simulations. With this remodeled MLC in the calculations, an energy-intensity modulated electron plan using 6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV was generated for a breast treatment on a breast phantom at a 60 cm SSD and recalculated regarding a solid water phantom. For a test study, four of MLC segments (each with a different energy) generated in the plan were delivered to the phantom and a film measurement was performed at the depth of 2 cm. The measured 2D dose distribution was then compared with calculations. Results: For composite doses of the four segments, measured 2D dose distributions overall agree well with the calculations (3mm/3%) in most area. The separate measurement for a single MLC segment for each of energies also showed the consistence with the calculations. Conclusion: After remodeling MLC in the MC calculations, the measured dose distribution for a subset of MLC segments from a MERT plan showed good agreement. Further detailed verification for the full plan will be the work in the next step.

  3. Coherent rho 0 photoproduction in bulk matter at high energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couderc, Elsa; Klein, Spencer

    2009-01-09

    The momentum transfer {Delta}k required for a photon to scatter from a target and emerge as a {rho}{sup 0} decreases as the photon energy k rises. For k > 3 x 10{sup 14} eV, {Delta}k is small enough that the interaction cannot be localized to a single nucleus. At still higher energies, photons may coherently scatter elastically from bulk matter and emerge as a {rho}{sup 0}, in a manner akin to kaon regeneration. Constructive interference from the different nuclei coherently raises the cross section and the interaction probability rises linearly with energy. At energies above 10{sup 23} eV, coherent conversion is the dominant process; photons interact predominantly as {rho}{sup 0}. We compute the coherent scattering probabilities in slabs of lead, water and rock, and discuss the implications of the increased hadronic interaction probabilities for photons on ultra-high energy shower development.

  4. Coherence time effects on J/{psi} production and suppression...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We find that coherence time effects are large enough to affect the measured Jpsi--to--Drell-Yan ratio. The S+U data at 200AGeVc measured by NA38 are reproduced quantitatively ...

  5. First Measurements of the FACET Coherent Terahertz Radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: First Measurements of the FACET Coherent Terahertz Radiation Source Authors: Adli, E. ; Fisher, A.S. ; Hogan, M.J. ; Wu, Z. ; SLAC ; Loos, H. ; SLAC ; Publication Date: ...

  6. Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Wednesday, 30 July 2008 00:00 Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an

  7. Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications for a Solar Pumped Laser Array - Energy Innovation Portal Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Resonator for Coherent Addition of Semiconductor Laser Arrays and Applications for a Solar Pumped Laser Array Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryORNL inventors designed a scalable V-shaped resonator for coherent addition of semiconductor laser arrays. A V-shaped external Talbot

  8. Experimental observation of incoherent-coherent crossover and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    orbital-dependent band renormalization in iron chalcogenide superconductors (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Experimental observation of incoherent-coherent crossover and orbital-dependent band renormalization in iron chalcogenide superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on December 21, 2016 Title: Experimental observation of incoherent-coherent crossover and orbital-dependent band renormalization in iron chalcogenide superconductors

  9. First Measurements of the FACET Coherent Terahertz Radiation Source

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Measurements of the FACET Coherent Terahertz Radiation Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: First Measurements of the FACET Coherent Terahertz Radiation Source Authors: Adli, E. ; Fisher, A.S. ; Hogan, M.J. ; Wu, Z. ; /SLAC ; Loos, H. ; /SLAC ; Publication Date: 2013-10-11 OSTI Identifier: 1096202 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15781 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name:

  10. Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates Authors: Stupakov, Gennady ; /SLAC ; Zhou, Demin ; /KEK, Tsukuba Publication Date: 2016-01-22 OSTI Identifier: 1236428 Report

  11. Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave diagnostic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and probe of ultrafast phase transformations (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave diagnostic and probe of ultrafast phase transformations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherent THz electromagnetic radiation emission as a shock wave diagnostic and probe of ultrafast phase transformations We present the first experimental observations of terahertz frequency radiation emitted when a terahertz frequency acoustic

  12. Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the researchers reported the first observation of seeding an instability of the electron beam by the

  13. Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the researchers reported the first observation of seeding an instability of the electron beam by the

  14. Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the researchers reported the first observation of seeding an instability of the electron beam by the

  15. Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the researchers reported the first observation of seeding an instability of the electron beam by the

  16. Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in electron storage rings when femtosecond lasers are used to carve out ultrafast x-ray pulses by femtoslicing (see "Tailored Terahertz Pulses from a Laser-Modulated Electron Beam"). In their most recent work, the researchers reported the first observation of seeding an instability of the electron beam by the

  17. Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling Law of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in a Rectangular Chamber Authors: Cai, Yunhai ; /SLAC ; , Publication Date: 2014-01-06 OSTI Identifier: 1114162 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15875 Journal ID: ISSN 1098--4402 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical

  18. Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scaling law of coherent synchrotron radiation in a rectangular chamber Authors: Cai, Yunhai Publication Date: 2014-02-12 OSTI Identifier: 1180843 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue:

  19. Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spin Coherence at the Nanoscale: Polymer Surfaces and Interfaces Breakthrough results were achieved during the reporting period in the areas of organic spintronics. (A) For the first time the giant magnetic resistance (GMR) was observed in spin valve with an organic spacer. Thus we demonstrated the ability of organic semiconductors to transport spin in GMR

  20. Observing a coherent superposition of an atom and a molecule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowling, Mark R. [School of Physical Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Bartlett, Stephen D. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Rudolph, Terry [Optics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Spekkens, Robert W. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    We demonstrate that it is possible, in principle, to perform a Ramsey-type interference experiment to exhibit a coherent superposition of a single atom and a diatomic molecule. This gedanken experiment, based on the techniques of Aharonov and Susskind [Phys. Rev. 155, 1428 (1967)], explicitly violates the commonly accepted superselection rule that forbids coherent superpositions of eigenstates of differing atom number. A Bose-Einstein condensate plays the role of a reference frame that allows for coherent operations analogous to Ramsey pulses. We also investigate an analogous gedanken experiment to exhibit a coherent superposition of a single boson and a fermion, violating the commonly accepted superselection rule forbidding coherent superpositions of states of differing particle statistics. In this case, the reference frame is realized by a multimode state of many fermions. This latter case reproduces all of the relevant features of Ramsey interferometry, including Ramsey fringes over many repetitions of the experiment. However, the apparent inability of this proposed experiment to produce well-defined relative phases between two distinct systems each described by a coherent superposition of a boson and a fermion demonstrates that there are additional, outstanding requirements to fully 'lift' the univalence superselection rule.

  1. Comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF (Inertial-Confinement-Fusion) driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, C.H.

    1987-04-01

    This report compares two physics designs of the low energy end of an induction linac-ICF driver: one using electric quadrupole focusing of many parallel beams followed by transverse combining; the other using magnetic quadrupole focusing of fewer beams without beam combining. Because of larger head-to-tail velocity spread and a consequent rapid current amplification in a magnetic focusing channel, the overall accelerator size of the design using magnetic focusing is comparable to that using electric focusing.

  2. Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1998-05-12

    A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera`s two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera`s integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting. 8 figs.

  3. Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Donald P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera's two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera's integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting.

  4. Transverse Coherence of the LCLS X-Ray Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    Self-amplifying spontaneous radiation free-electron lasers, such as the LCLS or the European X-FEL, rely on the incoherent, spontaneous radiation as the seed for the amplifying process. Though this method overcomes the need for an external seed source one drawback is the incoherence of the effective seed signal. The FEL process allows for a natural growth of the coherence because the radiation phase information is spread out within the bunch due to slippage and diffraction of the radiation field. However, at short wavelengths this spreading is not sufficient to achieve complete coherence. In this presentation we report on the results of numerical simulations of the LCLS X-ray FEL. From the obtained radiation field distribution the coherence properties are extracted to help to characterize the FEL as a light source.

  5. The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Steven Ray

    2015-09-30

    The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino- nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. The CEvNS cross section is cleanly predicted in the standard model; hence its measurement provides a standard model test. It is relevant for supernova physics and supernova-neutrino detection, and enables validation of dark-matter detector background and detector-response models. In the long term, precision measurement of CEvNS will address questions of nuclear structure. COHERENT will deploy multiple detector technologies in a phased approach: a 14-kg CsI[Na] scintillating crystal, 15 kg of p-type point-contact germanium detectors, and 100 kg of liquid xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Following an extensive background measurement campaign, a location in the SNS basement has proven to be neutron-quiet and suitable for deployment of the COHERENT detector suite. The simultaneous deployment of the three COHERENT detector subsystems will test the N=2 dependence of the cross section and ensure an unambiguous discovery of CEvNS. This document describes concisely the COHERENT physics motivations, sensitivity and plans for measurements at the SNS to be accomplished on a four-year timescale.

  6. Neutrino Coherent Scattering Rates at Direct Dark Matter Detectors (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Neutrino Coherent Scattering Rates at Direct Dark Matter Detectors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutrino Coherent Scattering Rates at Direct Dark Matter Detectors Authors: Strigari, Louis E. ; /KIPAC, Menlo Park ; , Publication Date: 2013-10-24 OSTI Identifier: 1097427 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15817 arXiv:0903.3630 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: New J.Phys.11:105011,2009 Research

  7. Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhanced coherent oscillations in the superconducting state of underdoped YB a 2 C u 3 O 6 + x induced via ultrafast terahertz excitation Authors: Dakovski, Georgi L. ; Lee, Wei-Sheng ; Hawthorn, David G. ; Garner,

  8. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  9. A new scheme to accumulate positrons in a Penning-Malmberg trap with a linac-based positron pulsed source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupre, P.

    2013-03-19

    The Gravitational Behaviour of Antimatter at Rest experiment (GBAR) is designed to perform a direct measurement of the weak equivalence principle on antimatter by measuring the acceleration of anti-hydrogen atoms in the gravitational field of the Earth. The experimental scheme requires a high density positronium (Ps) cloud as a target for antiprotons, provided by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility at CERN. The Ps target will be produced by a pulse of few 10{sup 10} positrons injected onto a positron-positronium converter. For this purpose, a slow positron source using an electron Linac has been constructed at Saclay. The present flux is comparable with that of {sup 22}Na-based sources using solid neon moderator. A new positron accumulation scheme with a Penning-Malmberg trap has been proposed taking advantage of the pulsed time structure of the beam. In the trap, the positrons are cooled by interaction with a dense electron plasma. The overall trapping efficiency has been estimated to be {approx}70% by numerical simulations.

  10. Numerical and experimental study of atomic transport and Balmer line intensity in Linac4 negative ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibata, T. Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.

    2015-04-08

    Time structure of Balmer H{sub ?} line intensity in Linac4 RF plasma has been analyzed by the combined simulation model of atomic transport and Collisional-Radiative models. As a preliminary result, time variation of the line intensity in the ignition phase of RF plasma is calculated and compared with the experimental results by photometry. For the comparison, spatial distribution of the local H{sub ?} photon emission rate at each time is calculated from the numerical model. The contribution of the local photon emission rates to the observed line intensity via optical viewing port is also investigated by application of the mock-up of the optical viewing port and the known light source. It has been clarified from the analyses that the higher and the lower peaks of the H{sub ?} line intensity observed during 1 RF cycle is mainly due to the different spatial distributions in the electron energy distribution function and the resultant local photon emission rate. These results support previous suggestion that the existence of the capacitive electric field in axial direction leads to the higher/lower peaks of the line intensity.

  11. Application of coherent lidar to ion measurements in plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.; Simpson, M.L.

    1997-03-01

    A coherent lidar system has been constructed for the measurement of alpha particles in a burning plasma. The lidar system consists of a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser transmitter and a heterodyne receiver. The receiver local oscillator is a cw, sequence-band CO{sub 2} laser operating with a 63.23 GHz offset from the transmitter.

  12. Phased laser array with tailored spectral and coherence properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Messerly, Michael J; Dawson, Jay W; Beach, Raymond J

    2014-05-20

    Architectures for coherently combining an array of fiber-based lasers are provided. By matching their lengths to within a few integer multiples of a wavelength, the spatial and temporal properties of a single large laser are replicated, while extending the average or peak pulsed power limit.

  13. Phased laser array with tailored spectral and coherence properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Messerly, Michael J (Danville, CA); Dawson, Jay W (Livermore, CA); Beach, Raymond J (Livermore, CA)

    2011-03-29

    Architectures for coherently combining an array of fiber-based lasers are provided. By matching their lengths to within a few integer multiples of a wavelength, the spatial and temporal properties of a single large laser are replicated, while extending the average or peak pulsed power limit.

  14. Quantum coherent switch utilizing commensurate nanoelectrode and charge density periodicities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrison; Neil , Singleton; John , Migliori; Albert

    2008-08-05

    A quantum coherent switch having a substrate formed from a density wave (DW) material capable of having a periodic electron density modulation or spin density modulation, a dielectric layer formed onto a surface of the substrate that is orthogonal to an intrinsic wave vector of the DW material; and structure for applying an external spatially periodic electrostatic potential over the dielectric layer.

  15. Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSeSrTiO3 films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin ...

  16. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-12-07

    Final report on the project "High resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays"

  17. Commissioning the neutron production of a Linac: Development of a simple tool for second cancer risk estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero-Expsito, M.; Snchez-Nieto, B.; Terrn, J. A.; Lopes, M. C.; Ferreira, B. C.; Grishchuk, D.; Sandn, C.; Moral-Snchez, S.; Melchor, M.; Domingo, C.; and others

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Knowing the contribution of neutron to collateral effects in treatments is both a complex and a mandatory task. This work aims to present an operative procedure for neutron estimates in any facility using a neutron digital detector. Methods: The authors previous work established a linear relationship between the total second cancer risk due to neutrons (TR{sup n}) and the number of MU of the treatment. Given that the digital detector also presents linearity with MU, its response can be used to determine the TR{sup n} per unit MU, denoted as m, normally associated to a generic Linac model and radiotherapy facility. Thus, from the number of MU of each patient treatment, the associated risk can be estimated. The feasibility of the procedure was tested by applying it in eight facilities; patients were evaluated as well. Results: From the reading of the detector under selected irradiation conditions, m values were obtained for different machines, ranging from 0.25 10{sup ?4}% per MU for an Elekta Axesse at 10 MV to 6.5 10{sup ?4}% per MU for a Varian Clinac at 18 MV. Using these values, TR{sup n} of patients was estimated in each facility and compared to that from the individual evaluation. Differences were within the range of uncertainty of the authors methodology of equivalent dose and risk estimations. Conclusions: The procedure presented here allows an easy estimation of the second cancer risk due to neutrons for any patient, given the number of MU of the treatment. It will enable the consideration of this information when selecting the optimal treatment for a patient by its implementation in the treatment planning system.

  18. Improvement of dose distribution in breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field Linac-MR unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esmaeeli, A. D.; Mahdavi, S. R.; Pouladian, M.; Bagheri, S.; Monfared, A. S.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate the improvement in dose distribution in tangential breast radiotherapy using a reversible transverse magnetic field that maintains the same direction of Lorentz force between two fields. The investigation has a potential application in future Linac-MR units. Methods: Computed tomography images of four patients and magnetic fields of 0.251.5 Tesla (T) were used for Monte Carlo simulation. Two patients had intact breast while the other two had mastectomy. Simulations of planning and chest wall irradiation were similar to the actual clinical process. The direction of superior-inferior magnetic field for the medial treatment beam was reversed for the lateral beam. Results: For the ipsilateral lung and heart mean doses were reduced by a mean (range) of 45.8% (27.6%58.6%) and 26.0% (20.2%38.9%), respectively, depending on various treatment plan setups. The mean V{sub 20} for ipsilateral lung was reduced by 55.0% (43.6%77.3%). In addition acceptable results were shown after simulation of 0.25 T magnetic field demonstrated in dose-volume reductions of the heart, ipsilateral lung, and noninvolved skin. Conclusions: Applying a reversible magnetic field during breast radiotherapy, not only reduces the dose to the lung and heart but also produces a sharp drop dose volume histogram for planning target volume, because of bending of the path of secondary charged particles toward the chest wall by the Lorentz force. The simulations have shown that use of the magnetic field at 1.5 T is not feasible for clinical applications due to the increase of ipsilateral chest wall skin dose in comparison to the conventional planning while 0.25 T is suitable for all patients due to dose reduction to the chest wall skin.

  19. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linac Coherent Light Source (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by

  20. SU-E-T-125: Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Robotic Versus Traditional Linac Platform in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, T; Rella, J; Yang, J; Sims, C; Fung, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recent development of an MLC for robotic external beam radiotherapy has the potential of new clinical application in conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. This study offers a dosimetric comparison of IMRT plans using Cyberknife with MLC versus conventional linac plans. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients treated on a traditional linac with IMRT to 7920cGy at 180cGy/fraction were randomly selected. GTVs were defined as prostate plus proximal seminal vesicles. PTVs were defined as GTV+8mm in all directions except 5mm posteriorly. Conventional IMRT planning was performed on Philips Pinnacle and delivered on a standard linac with CBCT and 10mm collimator leaf width. For each case a Cyberknife plan was created using Accuray Multiplan with same CT data set, contours, and dose constraints. All dosimetric data was transferred to third party software for independent computation of contour volumes and DVH. Delivery efficiency was evaluated using total MU, treatment time, number of beams, and number of segments. Results: Evaluation criteria including percent target coverage, homogeneity index, and conformity index were found to be comparable. All dose constraints from QUANTEC were found to be statistically similar except rectum V50Gy and bladder V65Gy. Average rectum V50Gy was lower for robotic IMRT (30.07%±6.57) versus traditional (34.73%±3.62, p=0.0130). Average bladder V65Gy was lower for robotic (17.87%±12.74) versus traditional (21.03%±11.93, p=0.0405). Linac plans utilized 9 coplanar beams, 48.9±3.8 segments, and 19381±2399MU. Robotic plans utilized 38.4±9.0 non-coplanar beams, 85.5±21.0 segments and 42554.71±16381.54 MU. The average treatment was 15.02±0.60 minutes for traditional versus 20.90±2.51 for robotic. Conclusion: The robotic IMRT plans were comparable to the traditional IMRT plans in meeting the target volume dose objectives. Critical structure dose constraints were largely comparable although statistically significant differences were found in favor of the robotic platform in terms of rectum V50Gy and bladder V65Gy at a cost of 25% longer treatment time.

  1. SU-E-T-569: Evaluation of VMAT Plans Generated with HD120 and Millennium 120 MLC Between Two Matched Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, G; Ballas, L; Chang, E; Chung, E; Chiu, R; Cummings, D; Shiu, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate VMAT treatment plans generated with HD120 MLC and Millennium 120 MLC between two matched linacs and to determine if one can back up the other. Methods: The 6x photon beams are matched for our Varian TrueBeam STx and Trilogy linacs, which are equipped with HD120 MLC and Millennium 120 MLC, respectively. Three prostate and three brain VMAT plans were used for the evaluation. Five plans (three prostate and two brain plans) were originally generated with the TrueBeam STx and re-computed with the Trilogy. One brain plan was evaluated the other way around. For each plan, the PTV coverage of V95 was made the same between two linacs. The dosimetric differences associated with the plans were compared using: 1) Percentage mean dose differences to the PTV, 2) Homogeneity index, HI = (Dmax − Dmin)/Dmean for the PTV. For prostate plans, the mean dose differences to the rectum were evaluated. While for brain plans, the percentage max dose differences to the lenses (left and right lens) were evaluated. Results: For three prostate plans, the average of the percentage mean dose differences to the PTV was 0.5 ± 0.1% and the HI was 0.1 ± 0.0%. The average of the percentage mean dose difference to the rectum was 3.5 ± 0.5%. For three brain plans, the average of the percentage mean dose differences to the PTV was 0.2 ± 1.1% and the HI was 0.2 ± 0.1%. The average of the percentage max dose differences to the lenses was 22.9 ± 4.0%. Conclusion: For prostate VMAT plans, changing the treatment from the TrueBeam STx to the Trilogy does not necessarily need re-optimization. But for brain plans, in order to minimize dose to the lenses, it is recommended to re-optimize the plan if changing the treatment between these two linacs.

  2. Development of coherent Raman measurements of temperature in condensed phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Bolme, Cindy A; Moore, David S

    2010-12-08

    We report theoretical considerations and preliminary data on various forms of coherent Raman spectroscopy that have been considered as candidates for measurement of temperature in condensed phase experiments with picosecond time resolution. Due to the inherent broadness and congestion of vibrational features in condensed phase solids, particularly at high temperatures and pressures, only approaches that rely on the ratio of anti-Stokes to Stokes spectral features are considered. Methods that rely on resolution of vibrational progressions, calibration of frequency shifts with temperature and pressure in reference experiments, or detailed comparison to calculation are inappropriate or impossible for our applications. In particular, we consider femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), femtosecond/picosecond hybrid coherent Raman spectroscopy (multiplex CARS), and optical heterodyne detected femtosecond Raman induced Kerr Effect spectroscopy (OHD-FRIKES). We show that only FSRS has the ability to measure temperature via an anti-Stokes to Stokes ratio of peaks.

  3. Quantum Coherence between Two Atoms beyond Q=10{sup 15}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, C. W.; Hume, D. B.; Thorpe, M. J.; Wineland, D. J.; Rosenband, T. [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2011-04-22

    We place two atoms in quantum superposition states and observe coherent phase evolution for 3.4x10{sup 15} cycles. Correlation signals from the two atoms yield information about their relative phase even after the probe radiation has decohered. This technique allowed a frequency comparison of two {sup 27}Al{sup +} ions with fractional uncertainty 3.7{sub -0.8}{sup +1.0}x10{sup -16}/{radical}({tau}/s). Two measures of the Q factor are reported: The Q factor derived from quantum coherence is 3.4{sub -1.1}{sup +2.4}x10{sup 16}, and the spectroscopic Q factor for a Ramsey time of 3 s is 6.7x10{sup 15}. We demonstrate a method to detect the individual quantum states of two Al{sup +} ions in a Mg{sup +}-Al{sup +}-Al{sup +} linear ion chain without spatially resolving the ions.

  4. Apparatus for generating coherent infrared energy of selected wavelength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Charles G. (Danville, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A tunable source (11) of coherent infrared energy includes a heat pipe (12) having an intermediate region (24) at which cesium (22) is heated to vaporizing temperature and end regions (27, 28) at which the vapor is condensed and returned to the intermediate region (24) for reheating and recirculation. Optical pumping light (43) is directed along the axis of the heat pipe (12) through a first end window (17) to stimulate emission of coherent infrared energy which is transmitted out through an opposite end window (18). A porous walled tubulation (44) extends along the axis of the heat pipe (12) and defines a region (46) in which cesium vapor is further heated to a temperature sufficient to dissociate cesium dimers which would decrease efficiency by absorbing pump light (43). Efficient generation of any desired infrared wavelength is realized by varying the wavelength of the pump light (43).

  5. Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an international team led by researchers from Stanford University and the ALS provide the first direct

  6. Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an international team led by researchers from Stanford University and the ALS provide the first direct

  7. Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an international team led by researchers from Stanford University and the ALS provide the first direct

  8. Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an international team led by researchers from Stanford University and the ALS provide the first direct

  9. Novel Phase-Coherent Programmable Clock - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Novel Phase-Coherent Programmable Clock Enabling Higher Precision Arbitrary Waveform Generator Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Direct digital synthesis (DDS) technology permits the generation of high frequency-resolved waveforms that can be changed on the nanosecond time scale (4 ns minimum). However when the DDS switches frequency, it occurs at any point in

  10. Coherence revivals in two-photon frequency combs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres-Company, Victor; Lancis, Jesus; Lajunen, Hanna; Friberg, Ari T.

    2011-09-15

    We describe and theoretically analyze the self-imaging Talbot effect of entangled photon pairs in the time domain. Rich phenomena are observed in coherence propagation along dispersive media of mode-locked two-photon states with frequency entanglement exhibiting a comblike correlation function. Our results can be used to remotely transfer frequency standards through optical fiber networks with two-photon light, avoiding the requirement of dispersion compensation.

  11. Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polaron Coherence Condensation in Layered Colossal Resistive Manganites Print Novel quantum phenomena, such as high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), arise in certain materials where the interactions between electrons are very strong, but the mechanism driving their appearance remains a major puzzle. Now, angle-resolved photoemission findings from an international team led by researchers from Stanford University and the ALS provide the first direct

  12. Energy dissipation in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: coherent structures or 'nanoflares'?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Perez, Jean Carlos; Tobias, Steven M.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the intermittency of energy dissipation in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence by identifying dissipative structures and measuring their characteristic scales. We find that the probability distribution of energy dissipation rates exhibits a power-law tail with an index very close to the critical value of 2.0, which indicates that structures of all intensities contribute equally to energy dissipation. We find that energy dissipation is uniformly spread among coherent structures with lengths and widths in the inertial range. At the same time, these structures have thicknesses deep within the dissipative regime. As the Reynolds number is increased, structures become thinner and more numerous, while the energy dissipation continues to occur mainly in large-scale coherent structures. This implies that in the limit of high Reynolds number, energy dissipation occurs in thin, tightly packed current sheets which nevertheless span a continuum of scales up to the system size, exhibiting features of both coherent structures and nanoflares previously conjectured as a coronal heating mechanism.

  13. Multi-center airborne coherent atmospheric wind sensor (MACAWS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothermel, J.; Menzies, R.T.; Tratt, D.M.

    1996-11-01

    The Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) is an airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar designed to acquire remote multi-dimensional measurements of winds and absolute aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. These measurements enable study of atmospheric dynamic processes and features at scales of motion that may be undersampled by, or may be beyond the capability of, existing or planned sensors. MACAWS capabilities enable more realistic assessments of concepts in global tropospheric wind measurement with satellite Doppler lidar, as well as a unique capability to validate the NASA Scatterometer currently scheduled for launch in late 1996. MACAWS consists of a Joule-class CO{sub 2} coherent Doppler lidar on a ruggedized optical table, a programmable scanner to direct the lidar beam in the desired direction, and a dedicated inertial navigation system to account for variable aircraft attitude and speed. MACAWS was flown for the first time in September 1995, over the eastern Pacific Ocean and western US. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  14. 500 MW X-Band RF System of a 0.25 GeV Electron LINAC for Advanced Compton Scattering Source Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Tak Sum; Anderson, Scott; Barty, Christopher; Gibson, David; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; Siders, Craig; Adolphsen, Chris; Jongewaard, Erik; Raubenheimer, Tor; Tantawi, Sami; Vlieks, Arnold; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    A Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source is being developed at LLNL in collaboration with the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The electron beam for the Compton scattering interaction will be generated by a X-band RF gun and a X-band LINAC at the frequency of 11.424 GHz. High power RF in excess of 500 MW is needed to accelerate the electrons to energy of 250 MeV or greater for the interaction. Two high power klystron amplifiers, each capable of generating 50 MW, 1.5 msec pulses, will be the main high power RF sources for the system. These klystrons will be powered by state of the art solid-state high voltage modulators. A RF pulse compressor, similar to the SLED II pulse compressor, will compress the klystron output pulse with a power gain factor of five. For compactness consideration, we are looking at a folded waveguide setup. This will give us 500 MW at output of the compressor. The compressed pulse will then be distributed to the RF gun and to six traveling wave accelerator sections. Phase and amplitude control are located at the RF gun input and additional control points along the LINAC to allow for parameter control during operation. This high power RF system is being designed and constructed. In this paper, we will present the design, layout, and status of this RF system.

  15. Impact Statements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reading Room / Final Environment Impact Statements Record of Decision on Bonneville Power Administrations Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project (DOE/EIS-3790, November 2008). February 2009.

  16. Pulse power linac

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A linear acceleration for charged particles is constructed of a plurality of transmission line sections that extend between a power injection region and an accelerating region. Each line section is constructed of spaced plate-like conductors and is coupled to an accelerating gap located at the accelerating region. Each gap is formed between a pair of apertured electrodes, with all of the electrode apertures being aligned along a particle accelerating path. The accelerating gaps are arranged in series, and at the injection region the line sections are connected in parallel. At the injection region a power pulse is applied simultaneously to all line sections. The line sections are graduated in length so that the pulse reaches the gaps in a coordinated sequence whereby pulse energy is applied to particles as they reach each of the gaps along the accelerating path.

  17. Klystron-linac combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stein, W.E.

    1980-04-24

    A combination klystron-linear accelerator which utilizes anti-bunch electrons generated in the klystron section as a source of electrons to be accelerated in the accelerator section. Electron beam current is controlled by second harmonic bunching, constrictor aperture size and magnetic focusing. Rf coupling is achieved by internal and external coupling.

  18. Alternating phase focused linacs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A heavy particle linear accelerator employing rf fields for transverse and ongitudinal focusing as well as acceleration. Drift tube length and gap positions in a standing wave drift tube loaded structure are arranged so that particles are subject to acceleration and succession of focusing and defocusing forces which contain the beam without additional magnetic or electric focusing fields.

  19. Detection of Coherent Structures in Extreme-Scale Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, C; Iverson, J; Kirk, R; Karypis, G

    2012-03-24

    The analysis of coherent structures is a common problem in many scientific domains ranging from astrophysics to combustion, fusion, and materials science. The data from three-dimensional simulations are analyzed to detect the structures, extract statistics on them, and track them over time to gain insights into the phenomenon being modeled. This analysis is typically done off-line, using data that have been written out by the simulations. However, the move towards extreme scale architectures, with multi-core processors and graphical processing units, will affect how such analysis is done as it is unlikely that the systems will support the I/O bandwidth required for off-line analysis. Moving the analysis in-situ is a solution only if we know a priori what analysis will be done, as well as the algorithms used and their parameter settings. Even then, we need to ensure that this will not substantially increase the memory requirements or the data movement as the former will be limited and the latter will be expensive. In the Exa-DM project, a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and University of Minnesota, we are exploring ways in which we can address the conflicting demands of coherent structure analysis of simulation data and the architecture of modern parallel systems, while enabling scientific discovery at the exascale. In this paper, we describe our work in two areas: the in situ implementation of an existing algorithm for coherent structure analysis and the use of graph-based techniques to efficiently compress the data.

  20. A new maximum-likelihood change estimator for two-pass SAR coherent change detection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Jr., Charles V.; Simonson, Katherine Mary

    2016-01-11

    In past research, two-pass repeat-geometry synthetic aperture radar (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD) predominantly utilized the sample degree of coherence as a measure of the temporal change occurring between two complex-valued image collects. Previous coherence-based CCD approaches tend to show temporal change when there is none in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio. Instead of employing the sample coherence magnitude as a change metric, in this paper, we derive a new maximum-likelihood (ML) temporal change estimate—the complex reflectance change detection (CRCD) metric to be used for SAR coherent temporal change detection. The new CRCD estimatormore » is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and optimal in the ML sense. As a result, this new estimate produces improved results in the coherent pair collects that we have tested.« less

  1. Efficient Energy Transport in Photosynthesis: Roles of Coherence and Entanglement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Apoorva D.

    2011-09-23

    Recently it has been discovered - contrary to expectations of physicists as well as biologists - that the energy transport during photosynthesis, from the chlorophyll pigment that captures the photon to the reaction centre where glucose is synthesised from carbon dioxide and water, is highly coherent even at ambient temperature and in the cellular environment. This process and the key molecular ingredients that it depends on are described. By looking at the process from the computer science view-point, we can study what has been optimised and how. A spatial search algorithmic model based on robust features of wave dynamics is presented.

  2. Coherent electron cooling proof of principle instrumentation design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gassner D. M.; Litvinenko, V.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T.; Minty, M.; Pinayev, I.

    2012-04-15

    The goal of the Coherent Electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment being designed at RHIC is to demonstrate longitudinal (energy spread) cooling before the expected CD-2 for eRHIC. The scope of the experiment is to longitudinally cool a single bunch of 40 GeV/u gold ions in RHIC. This paper will describe the instrumentation systems proposed to meet the diagnostics challenges. These include measurements of beam intensity, emittance, energy spread, bunch length, position, orbit stability, and transverse and temporal alignment of electron and ion beams.

  3. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  4. Methods of quantum mechanics applied to partially coherent light beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gase, R.

    1994-07-01

    Whenever the natural modes of the modal expansion of the cross-spectral density have a common waist, the wave equation in the waist plane has the form of a two-dimensional Schroedinger equation. Thus the results of quantum mechanics and quantum statistics, including the quantized Schroedinger field, can be transferred to partially coherent light. Such conceptions as temperature, entropy, and energy are used advantageously. A subclass of radiation, radiation in thermal equilibrium, is introduced, and, as examples, the Gaussian Schell-model beam and the quasi-rectangle model beam are investigated. The M{sup 2} factor is strongly related to the mean value of energy. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Coherence time effects on J/{psi} production and suppression in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    relativistic heavy ion collisions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Coherence time effects on J/{psi} production and suppression in relativistic heavy ion collisions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherence time effects on J/{psi} production and suppression in relativistic heavy ion collisions Using a coherence time extracted from high precision proton-nucleus Drell-Yan measurements and a nuclear absorption cross section extracted from pA charmonium production experiments, we

  6. Method and apparatus for single-stepping coherence events in a multiprocessor system under software control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY)

    2010-11-02

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for single-stepping coherence events in a multiprocessor system under software control in order to monitor the behavior of a memory coherence mechanism. Single-stepping coherence events in a multiprocessor system is made possible by adding one or more step registers. By accessing these step registers, one or more coherence requests are processed by the multiprocessor system. The step registers determine if the snoop unit will operate by proceeding in a normal execution mode, or operate in a single-step mode.

  7. Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy for Thermometry and Species Concentration in Flames. Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  8. EA-1087: Proposed Induction Linac System Experiments in Building 51B at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct experiments...

  9. Towards a coherent European approach for taxation of combustible waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubois, Maarten

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: Current European waste taxes do not constitute a level playing field. Integrating waste incineration in EU ETS avoids regional tax competition. A differentiated incineration tax is a second-best instrument for NO{sub x} emissions. A tax on landfilled incineration residues stimulates ash treatment. - Abstract: Although intra-European trade of combustible waste has grown strongly in the last decade, incineration and landfill taxes remain disparate within Europe. The paper proposes a more coherent taxation approach for Europe that is based on the principle of Pigovian taxation, i.e. the internalization of environmental damage costs. The approach aims to create a level playing field between European regions while reinforcing incentives for sustainable management of combustible waste. Three important policy recommendations emerge. First, integrating waste incineration into the European Emissions Trading System for greenhouse gases (EU ETS) reduces the risk of tax competition between regions. Second, because taxation of every single air pollutant from waste incineration is cumbersome, a differentiated waste incineration tax based on NO{sub x} emissions can serve as a second-best instrument. Finally, in order to strengthen incentives for ash treatment, a landfill tax should apply for landfilled incineration residues. An example illustrates the coherence of the policy recommendations for incineration technologies with diverse environmental effects.

  10. Emergence of coherence in the charge-density wave state of 2H-NbSe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatterjee, U.; Zhao, J.; Iavarone, M.; Di Capua, R.; Castellan, J. P.; Karapetrov, G.; Malliakas, C. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Claus, H.; Ruff, J. P. C.; et al

    2015-02-17

    A charge-density wave (CDW) state has a broken symmetry described by a complex order parameter with an amplitude and a phase. The conventional view, based on clean, weak-coupling systems, is that a finite amplitude and long-range phase coherence set in simultaneously at the CDW transition temperature Tcdw. Here we investigate, using photoemission, X-ray scattering and scanning tunnelling microscopy, the canonical CDW compound 2H-NbSe2 intercalated with Mn and Co, and show that the conventional view is untenable. We find that, either at high temperature or at large intercalation, CDW order becomes short-ranged with a well-defined amplitude, which has impacts on themore »electronic dispersion, giving rise to an energy gap. The phase transition at Tcdw marks the onset of long-range order with global phase coherence, leading to sharp electronic excitations. As a result, our observations emphasize the importance of phase fluctuations in strongly coupled CDW systems and provide insights into the significance of phase incoherence in ‘pseudogap’ states.« less

  11. Emergence of coherence in the charge-density wave state of 2H-NbSe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatterjee, U.; Zhao, J.; Iavarone, M.; Di Capua, R.; Castellan, J. P.; Karapetrov, G.; Malliakas, C. D.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Claus, H.; Ruff, J. P. C.; et al

    2015-02-17

    A charge-density wave (CDW) state has a broken symmetry described by a complex order parameter with an amplitude and a phase. The conventional view, based on clean, weak-coupling systems, is that a finite amplitude and long-range phase coherence set in simultaneously at the CDW transition temperature Tcdw. Here we investigate, using photoemission, X-ray scattering and scanning tunnelling microscopy, the canonical CDW compound 2H-NbSe2 intercalated with Mn and Co, and show that the conventional view is untenable. We find that, either at high temperature or at large intercalation, CDW order becomes short-ranged with a well-defined amplitude, which has impacts on themoreelectronic dispersion, giving rise to an energy gap. The phase transition at Tcdw marks the onset of long-range order with global phase coherence, leading to sharp electronic excitations. Our observations emphasize the importance of phase fluctuations in strongly coupled CDW systems and provide insights into the significance of phase incoherence in pseudogap states.less

  12. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  13. Manipulation of Zeeman coherence in solids at room temperature: Ramsey interference in the coherent-population-trapping spectrum of ruby

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolesov, Roman; Scully, Marlan O.; Kocharovskaya, Olga [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) in a three-level atomic medium pumped by two subsequent short optical pulses is considered under the condition of negligible population decay from the excited optical state. It is shown that the amount of atomic population transferred to the excited state by the combined action of the pulses strongly depends on the phase of the ground-state coherence excited by the first pulse at the arrival time of the second pulse. Oscillatory behavior of optical excitation efficiency on the time delay between the pulses is predicted. It is also shown that saturating optical pulses can produce population inversion in a resonantly pumped quasi-two-level system. A class of solid materials in which the predicted phenomena can be observed at room temperature is found. It includes some rare-earth and transition-metal doped dielectric crystals where Orbach relaxation between ground-state Zeeman states is suppressed: ruby, alexandrite, and several others. On the basis of the theoretical predictions, experimental observation of Ramsey fringes in CPT spectrum of ruby is reported.

  14. Coherent ?(2S) photo-production in ultra-peripheral PbPb collisions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Coherent (2S) photo-production in ultra-peripheral PbPb collisions at sNN2.76 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Coherent (2S) photo-production in ultra-peripheral...

  15. Cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kireev, Vassili [Sunnyvale, CA; Liu, Yun; Protopopescu, Vladimir [Knoxville, TN; Braiman, Yehuda [Oak Ridge, TN

    2008-10-21

    The invention provides a cascaded injection resonator for coherent beam combining of laser arrays. The resonator comprises a plurality of laser emitters arranged along at least one plane and a beam sampler for reflecting at least a portion of each laser beam that impinges on the beam sampler, the portion of each laser beam from one of the laser emitters being reflected back to another one of the laser emitters to cause a beam to be generated from the other one of the laser emitters to the beam reflector. The beam sampler also transmits a portion of each laser beam to produce a laser output beam such that a plurality of laser output beams of the same frequency are produced. An injection laser beam is directed to a first laser emitter to begin a process of generating and reflecting a laser beam from one laser emitter to another laser emitter in the plurality. A method of practicing the invention is also disclosed.

  16. Coherent structures in ion temperature gradient turbulence-zonal flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rameswar; Singh, R.; Kaw, P.; Grcan, . D.; Diamond, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear stationary structure formation in the coupled ion temperature gradient (ITG)-zonal flow system is investigated. The ITG turbulence is described by a wave-kinetic equation for the action density of the ITG mode, and the longer scale zonal mode is described by a dynamic equation for the m?=?n?=?0 component of the potential. Two populations of trapped and untrapped drift wave trajectories are shown to exist in a moving frame of reference. This novel effect leads to the formation of nonlinear stationary structures. It is shown that the ITG turbulence can self-consistently sustain coherent, radially propagating modulation envelope structures such as solitons, shocks, and nonlinear wave trains.

  17. Preservation of coherence for a two-level atom tunneling through a squeezed vacuum with finite bandwidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, Samyadeb Roy, Sisir

    2014-09-15

    Tunneling of a two-state particle through a squeezed vacuum is considered. It has been shown that repetitive measurement or interaction with the external field can preserve the coherence. Moreover, the coherence time in terms of the squeezing parameters has been calculated. A specific condition is derived, under which the coherence is sustainable.

  18. Coherent beam-beam effects observation and mitigation at the RHIC collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2012-05-20

    In polarized proton operation in RHIC coherent beam-beam modes are routinely observed with beam transfer function measurements in the vertical plane. With the existence of coherent modes a larger space is required in the tune diagram than without them and stable conditions can be compromised for operation with high intensity beams as foreseen for future luminosity upgrades. We report on experiments and simulations carried out to understand the existence of coherent modes in the vertical plane and their absence in the horizontal plane, and investigate possible mitigation strategies.

  19. ECONOMIC IMPACT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ECONOMIC IMPACT 2015 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES National Security Sandia's primary mission is ensuring the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable, and can fully support our nation's deterrence policy. NUCLEAR WEAPONS DEFENSE SYSTEMS & ASSESSMENTS We provide technical solutions for global security by engineering and integrating advanced science and technology to help defend and protect the United States. Jill Hruby President and Laboratories Director "Qualified, diverse

  20. Lab Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  1. Scientific Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Impact Since its inception over twenty years ago, CAMS has achieved noteworthy scientific progress by developing new capabilities and by combining state-of-the-art tools and expertise to address important scientific challenges. Scientific Leadership CAMS scientists are recognized as scientific leaders in the field of AMS and the disciplines that it supports. Many CAMS staff participate on federal agency (NIH, NSF, NOAA and DOE) scientific review panels as well as giving a multitude

  2. Phase coherence and Andreev reflection in topological insulator devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finck, A. D. K.; Kurter, C.; Hor, Y. S.; Van Harlingen, D. J.

    2014-11-04

    Topological insulators (TIs) have attracted immense interest because they host helical surface states. Protected by time-reversal symmetry, they are robust to nonmagnetic disorder. When superconductivity is induced in these helical states, they are predicted to emulate p-wave pairing symmetry, with Majorana states bound to vortices. Majorana bound states possess non-Abelian exchange statistics that can be probed through interferometry. Here, we take a significant step towards Majorana interferometry by observing pronounced Fabry-Prot oscillations in a TI sandwiched between a superconducting and a normal lead. For energies below the superconducting gap, we observe a doubling in the frequency of the oscillations, arising from an additional phase from Andreev reflection. When a magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the TI surface, a number of very sharp and gate-tunable conductance peaks appear at or near zero energy, which has consequences for interpreting spectroscopic probes of Majorana fermions. Our results show that TIs are a promising platform for exploring phase-coherent transport in a solid-state system.

  3. Phase coherence and Andreev reflection in topological insulator devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Finck, A. D. K.; Kurter, C.; Hor, Y. S.; Van Harlingen, D. J.

    2014-11-04

    Topological insulators (TIs) have attracted immense interest because they host helical surface states. Protected by time-reversal symmetry, they are robust to nonmagnetic disorder. When superconductivity is induced in these helical states, they are predicted to emulate p-wave pairing symmetry, with Majorana states bound to vortices. Majorana bound states possess non-Abelian exchange statistics that can be probed through interferometry. Here, we take a significant step towards Majorana interferometry by observing pronounced Fabry-Pérot oscillations in a TI sandwiched between a superconducting and a normal lead. For energies below the superconducting gap, we observe a doubling in the frequency of the oscillations, arisingmore » from an additional phase from Andreev reflection. When a magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the TI surface, a number of very sharp and gate-tunable conductance peaks appear at or near zero energy, which has consequences for interpreting spectroscopic probes of Majorana fermions. Our results show that TIs are a promising platform for exploring phase-coherent transport in a solid-state system.« less

  4. Coherent neutron scattering and collective dynamics on mesoscale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novikov, Vladimir [ORNL; Schweizer, Kenneth S [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    By combining, and modestly extending, a variety of theoretical concepts for the dynamics of liquids in the supercooled regime, we formulate a simple analytic model for the temperature and wavevector dependent collective density fluctuation relaxation time that is measurable using coherent dynamic neutron scattering. Comparison with experiments on the ionic glass-forming liquid Ca K NO3 in the lightly supercooled regime suggests the model captures the key physics in both the local cage and mesoscopic regimes, including the unusual wavevector dependence of the collective structural relaxation time. The model is consistent with the idea that the decoupling between diffusion and viscosity is reflected in a different temperature dependence of the collective relaxation time at intermediate wavevectors and near the main (cage) peak of the static structure factor. More generally, our analysis provides support for the ideas that decoupling information and growing dynamic length scales can be at least qualitatively deduced by analyzing the collective relaxation time as a function of temperature and wavevector, and that there is a strong link between dynamic heterogeneity phenomena at the single and many particle level. Though very simple, the model can be applied to other systems, such as molecular liquids.

  5. Heterodyne coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by the phase control of its intrinsic background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xi; Wang Kai; Welch, George R.; Sokolov, Alexei V.

    2011-08-15

    We demonstrate the use of femtosecond laser pulse shaping for precise control of the interference between the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signal and the coherent nonresonant background generated within the same sample volume. Our technique is similar to heterodyne detection with the coherent background playing the role of the local oscillator field. In our experiment, we first apply two ultrashort (near-transform-limited) femtosecond pump and Stokes laser pulses to excite coherent molecular oscillations within a sample. After a short and controllable delay, we then apply a laser pulse that scatters off of these oscillations to produce the CARS signal. By making fine adjustments to the probe field spectral profile, we vary the relative phase between the Raman-resonant signal and the nonresonant background, and we observe a varying spectral interference pattern. These controlled variations of the measured pattern reveal the phase information within the Raman spectrum.

  6. Localized collapse and revival of coherence in an ultracold Bose gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuirk, J. M.; Zajiczek, L. F. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    We study the collapse and revival of coherence induced by dipolar spin waves in a trapped gas of {sup 87}Rb atoms. In particular, we observe spatially localized collapse and revival of Ramsey fringe contrast and show how the pattern of coherence depends on the strength of the spin-wave excitation. We find that the spatial character of the coherence dynamics is incompatible with a simple model based only on position-space overlap of wave functions. We show that this phenomenon requires a full phase-space description of the atomic spin using a quantum Boltzmann transport equation, which highlights spin-wave-induced coherent spin currents and the ensuing dynamics they drive.

  7. Simplifying and speeding the management of intra-node cache coherence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Phillip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Ohmacht, Martin (Yorktown Heights, NY)

    2012-04-17

    A method and apparatus for managing coherence between two processors of a two processor node of a multi-processor computer system. Generally the present invention relates to a software algorithm that simplifies and significantly speeds the management of cache coherence in a message passing parallel computer, and to hardware apparatus that assists this cache coherence algorithm. The software algorithm uses the opening and closing of put/get windows to coordinate the activated required to achieve cache coherence. The hardware apparatus may be an extension to the hardware address decode, that creates, in the physical memory address space of the node, an area of virtual memory that (a) does not actually exist, and (b) is therefore able to respond instantly to read and write requests from the processing elements.

  8. Initial Results in Using a Self-Coherence Method for Detecting Sustained Oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a self-coherence method for detecting sustained oscillations using phasor measurement unit (PMU) data. Sustained oscillations decrease system performance and introduce potential reliability issues. Timely detection of the oscillations at an early stage provides the opportunity for taking remedial reaction. Using high-speed time-synchronized PMU data, this paper details a self-coherence method for detecting sustained oscillation, even when the oscillation amplitude is lower than ambient noise. Simulation and field measurement data are used to evaluate the proposed methods performance. It is shown that the proposed method can detect sustained oscillations and estimate oscillation frequencies with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Comparison with a power spectral density method also shows that the proposed self-coherence method performs better. Index Termscoherence, power spectral density, phasor measurement unit (PMU), oscillations, power system dynamics

  9. Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Two-dimensional gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (2D-CARS): simultaneous planar imaging and multiplex spectroscopy in a single laser shot. Citation Details...

  10. Coherent Electron Cooling: JLab Effort Helps to Cool Particle Beams and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Increase Collision Rates at RHIC (Lab Manager Magazine) | Jefferson Lab labmanager.com/?articles.view/articleNo/7392/title/Coherent-Electron-Cooling--Combining-Methods-to-Cool-Parti... Submitted: Friday, April 13

  11. Toward a Single Mode Free Electron Laser for Coherent Hard X...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Toward a Single Mode Free Electron Laser for Coherent Hard X-Ray Experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward a Single Mode Free Electron Laser...

  12. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent scattering and speckle analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Focus characterization at an X-ray...

  13. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on ...

  14. Comments on the model for coherent deuteron-deuteron fusion in crystalline Pd-D lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaidya, S.N. )

    1993-08-01

    The enhancement of the deuteron-deuteron fusion rate is estimated for a coherent interaction mechanism under realistic experimental conditions. The extension of this mechanism to (n,[gamma]) reactions is outlined. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Measuring short electron bunch lengths using coherent smith-purcell radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A method is provided for directly determining the length of sub-picosecond electron bunches. A metallic grating is formed with a groove spacing greater than a length expected for the electron bunches. The electron bunches are passed over the metallic grating to generate coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. The angular distribution of the coherent Smith-Purcell radiation is then mapped to directly deduce the length of the electron bunches.

  16. Apparatus and method for improving radiation coherence and reducing beam emittance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Csonka, P.L.

    1992-05-12

    A method and apparatus for increasing the coherence and reducing the emittance of a beam-shaped pulse operates by splitting the pulse into multiple sub-beams, delaying the propagation of the various sub-beams by varying amounts, and then recombining the sub-beams by means of a rotating optical element to form a pulse of longer duration with improved transverse coherence. 16 figs.

  17. Measuring short electron bunch lengths using coherent Smith-Purcell radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, D.C.

    1999-03-30

    A method is provided for directly determining the length of sub-picosecond electron bunches. A metallic grating is formed with a groove spacing greater than a length expected for the electron bunches. The electron bunches are passed over the metallic grating to generate coherent and incoherent Smith-Purcell radiation. The angular distribution of the coherent Smith-Purcell radiation is then mapped to directly deduce the length of the electron bunches. 8 figs.

  18. LDRD final report on using chaos for ultrasensitive coherent signal detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, Weng Wah Dr. (; .); Wieczorek, Sebastian Maciej; Torrington, Geoffrey Kenneth

    2006-11-01

    A quantum optical approach is proposed and analyzed as a solution to the problem of detecting weak coherent radiation in the presence of a strong incoherent background. The approach is based on the extreme sensitivity of laser dynamical nonlinearities to the coherence of external perturbation. This sensitivity leads to dynamical phase transitions that may be employed for detecting the presence of external coherent radiation. Of particular interest are the transitions between stable and chaotic states of laser operation. Using a baseline scheme consisting of a detector laser operating with a Fabry-Perot cavity, we demonstrated significant qualitative and quantitative differences in the response of the detector laser to the intensity and coherence of the external signal. Bifurcation analysis revealed that considerable modification to the extension of chaotic regions is possible by tailoring active medium and optical resonator configurations. Our calculations showed that with semiconductor lasers, destabilization can occur with a coherent external signal intensity that is over six orders of magnitude smaller than the detector laser's intracavity intensity. Discrimination between coherent and incoherent external signal also looks promising because of the over four orders of magnitude difference in intensity required for inducing chaos-like behavior. These results suggest that the proposed approach may be useful in laser sensor applications, such as satellite Laser Threat Warning Receivers (LTWR).

  19. Apparatus and method for generating partially coherent illumination for photolithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1999-07-06

    The present invention relates an apparatus and method for creating a bright, uniform source of partially coherent radiation for illuminating a pattern, in order to replicate an image of said pattern with a high degree of acuity. The present invention introduces a novel scatter plate into the optical path of source light used for illuminating a replicated object. The scatter plate has been designed to interrupt a focused, incoming light beam by introducing between about 8 to 24 diffraction zones blazed onto the surface of the scatter plate which intercept the light and redirect it to a like number of different positions in the condenser entrance pupil each of which is determined by the relative orientation and the spatial frequency of the diffraction grating in each of the several zones. Light falling onto the scatter plate, therefore, generates a plurality of unphased sources of illumination as seen by the back half of the optical system. The system includes a high brightness source, such as a laser, creating light which is taken up by a beam forming optic which focuses the incoming light into a condenser which in turn, focuses light into a field lens creating Kohler illumination image of the source in a camera entrance pupil. The light passing through the field lens illuminates a mask which interrupts the source light as either a positive or negative image of the object to be replicated. Light passing by the mask is focused into the entrance pupil of the lithographic camera creating an image of the mask onto a receptive media. 7 figs.

  20. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Varian EDGE machine is a new stereotactic platform, combining Calypso and VisionRT localization systems with a stereotactic linac. The system includes TrueBeam DeveloperMode, making possible the use of XML-scripting for automation of linac-related tasks. This study details the use of DeveloperMode to automate commissioning tasks for Varian EDGE, thereby improving efficiency and measurement consistency. Methods: XML-scripting was used for various commissioning tasks,including couch model verification,beam-scanning,and isocenter verification. For couch measurements, point measurements were acquired for several field sizes (22,44,1010cm{sup 2}) at 42 gantry angles for two couch-models. Measurements were acquired with variations in couch position(rails in/out,couch shifted in each of motion axes) compared to treatment planning system(TPS)-calculated values,which were logged automatically through advanced planning interface(API) scripting functionality. For beam scanning, XML-scripts were used to create custom MLC-apertures. For isocenter verification, XML-scripts were used to automate various Winston-Lutz-type tests. Results: For couch measurements, the time required for each set of angles was approximately 9 minutes. Without scripting, each set required approximately 12 minutes. Automated measurements required only one physicist, while manual measurements required at least two physicists to handle linac positions/beams and data recording. MLC apertures were generated outside of the TPS,and with the .xml file format, double-checking without use of TPS/operator console was possible. Similar time efficiency gains were found for isocenter verification measurements Conclusion: The use of XML scripting in TrueBeam DeveloperMode allows for efficient and accurate data acquisition during commissioning. The efficiency improvement is most pronounced for iterative measurements, exemplified by the time savings for couch modeling measurements(approximately 10 hours). The scripting also allowed for creation of the files in advance without requiring access to TPS. The API scripting functionality enabled efficient creation/mining of TPS data. Finally, automation reduces the potential for human error in entering linac values at the machine console,and the script provides a log of measurements acquired for each session. This research was supported in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.

  1. Detecting multiple moving objects in crowded environments with coherent motion regions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheriyadat, Anil M.; Radke, Richard J.

    2013-06-11

    Coherent motion regions extend in time as well as space, enforcing consistency in detected objects over long time periods and making the algorithm robust to noisy or short point tracks. As a result of enforcing the constraint that selected coherent motion regions contain disjoint sets of tracks defined in a three-dimensional space including a time dimension. An algorithm operates directly on raw, unconditioned low-level feature point tracks, and minimizes a global measure of the coherent motion regions. At least one discrete moving object is identified in a time series of video images based on the trajectory similarity factors, which is a measure of a maximum distance between a pair of feature point tracks.

  2. Coherent imaging with two-dimensional focal-plane arrays: design and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, M.L.; Bennett, C.A.; Emery, M.S.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Miller, G.H.; Richards, R.K.; Sitter, D.N.

    1997-09-01

    Scanned, single-channel optical heterodyne detection has been used in a variety of lidar applications from ranging and velocity measurements to differential absorption spectroscopy. We describe the design of a coherent camera system that is based on a two-dimensional staring array of heterodyne receivers for coherent imaging applications. Experimental results with a single HgCdTe detector translated in the image plane to form a synthetic two-dimensional array demonstrate the ability to obtain passive heterodyne images of chemical vapor plumes that are invisible to normal video infrared cameras. We describe active heterodyne imaging experiments with use of focal-plane arrays that yield hard-body Doppler lidar images and also demonstrate spatial averaging to reduce speckle effects in static coherent images. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  3. Probing color coherence effects in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-06-11

    A study of color coherence effects in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The data used in the analysis were collected in 2010 with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. Events are selected that contain at least three jets and where the two jets with the largest transverse momentum exhibit a back-to-back topology. The measured angular correlation between the second- and third-leading jet is shown to be sensitive to color coherence effects, and is compared to the predictions of Monte Carlo models with various implementationsmore » of color coherence. None of the models describe the data satisfactorily.« less

  4. Probing color coherence effects in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\,\\text {TeV} $

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-11-22

    A study of color coherence effects in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The data used in the analysis were collected in 2010 with the CMS detector at the LHC and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. Events are selected that contain at least three jets and where the two jets with the largest transverse momentum exhibit a back-to-back topology. The measured angular correlation between the second- and third-leading jet is shown to be sensitive to color coherence effects, and is compared to the predictions of Monte Carlo models with various implementationsmoreof color coherence. None of the models describe the data satisfactorily.less

  5. Coherent spin control of a nanocavity-enhanced qubit in diamond

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Luozhou; Lu, Ming; Schroder, Tim; Chen, Edward H.; Walsh, Michael; Bayn, Igal; Goldstein, Jordan; Gaathon, Ophir; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Mower, Jacob; et al

    2015-01-28

    A central aim of quantum information processing is the efficient entanglement of multiple stationary quantum memories via photons. Among solid-state systems, the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond has emerged as an excellent optically addressable memory with second-scale electron spin coherence times. Recently, quantum entanglement and teleportation have been shown between two nitrogen-vacancy memories, but scaling to larger networks requires more efficient spin-photon interfaces such as optical resonators. Here we report such nitrogen-vacancy nanocavity systems in strong Purcell regime with optical quality factors approaching 10,000 and electron spin coherence times exceeding 200 µs using a silicon hard-mask fabrication process. This spin-photon interfacemore » is integrated with on-chip microwave striplines for coherent spin control, providing an efficient quantum memory for quantum networks.« less

  6. Modified magnetism within the coherence volume of superconducting Fe1+delta

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SexTe1-x (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Modified magnetism within the coherence volume of superconducting Fe1+delta SexTe1-x Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modified magnetism within the coherence volume of superconducting Fe1+delta SexTe1-x Authors: Leiner J. ; Thampy V. ; Christianson, A. D. ; Abernathy, D. L. ; Stone, M. B. ; Lumsden, M. D. ; Sefat, A. S. ; Sales, B. C. ; Hu, Jin ; Mao, Zhiqiang ; Bao, Wei ; Broholm, C. Publication Date: 2014-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1174093

  7. Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    monolayer MoS2 and WS2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 3, 2016 Title: Long-lived nanosecond spin relaxation and spin coherence of electrons in monolayer MoS2 and WS2 The recently discovered monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) provide a fertile playground to explore new coupled spin-valley

  8. Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations in a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Muon Collider (Conference) | SciTech Connect Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations in a Muon Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Beam-Beam Interactions on Stability of Coherent Oscillations in a Muon Collider In order to achieve peak luminosity of a muon collider in the 10{sup 34}/cm{sup 2}/s range the number of muons per bunch should be of the order of a few units of 10{sup 12} rendering the beam-beam parameter as high as 0.1 per

  9. Confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography using a ring ultrasonic transducer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Rui; Ma, Teng; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-03-24

    We designed and developed a confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography system. A ring ultrasound transducer was used to achieve reflection mode excitation and generate an oscillating acoustic radiation force in order to generate displacements within the tissue, which were detected using the phase-resolved optical coherence elastography method. Both phantom and human tissue tests indicate that this system is able to sense the stiffness difference of samples and quantitatively map the elastic property of materials. Our confocal setup promises a great potential for point by point elastic imaging in vivo and differentiation of diseased tissues from normal tissue.

  10. Matrix Methods for Estimating the Coherence Functions from Estimates of the Cross-Spectral Density Matrix

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smallwood, D. O.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the usual method for estimating the coherence functions (ordinary, partial, and multiple) for a general multiple-input! multiple-output problem can be expressed as a modified form of Cholesky decomposition of the cross-spectral density matrix of the input and output records. The results can be equivalently obtained using singular value decomposition (SVD) of the cross-spectral density matrix. Using SVD suggests a new form of fractional coherence. The formulation as a SVD problem also suggests a way to order the inputs when a natural physical order of the inputs is absent.

  11. Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thickness-dependent coherent phonon frequency in ultrathin FeSe/SrTiO3 films Ultrathin FeSe films grown on SrTiO3 substrates are a recent milestone in atomic material engineering due to their important role in understanding unconventional superconductivity in Fe-based materials. By using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved

  12. Electron beam energy chirp control with a rectangular corrugated structure

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    at the Linac Coherent Light Source (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electron beam energy chirp control with a rectangular corrugated structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron beam energy chirp control with a rectangular corrugated structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source Authors: Zhang, Zhen ; Bane, Karl ; Ding, Yuantao ; Huang, Zhirong ; Iverson, Richard ; Maxwell, Timothy ; Stupakov, Gennady ; Wang, Lanfa Publication Date:

  13. Generation of femtosecond to sub-femtosecond x-ray pulses in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contributing Orgs: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Linac Coherent Light Source an Office of Science User Facility Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word ...

  14. Unlocking Life's Mysteries (One Atom at a Time)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LSCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will allow us to make "molecular movies" and answer many questions surrounding atoms.

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The X-ray correlation spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source Alonso-Mori, Roberto ; Caronna, Chiara ; Chollet, Matthieu ; Curtis, Robin ; Damiani, Daniel S. ; ...

  16. Multi-facility Workflow Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workflow Case Study For one experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Lab, scientists needed to process their raw data to analyze catalytic...

  17. User Portal: Registration and Proposal Scheduling Tool for SLAC...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Relationship * Indicate the facilities you plan to use Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) * Indicate the purpose of your...

  18. The LCLS Design Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R-593 April 2002 UC-414 Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conceptual Design Report Published April 2002 Prepared for the Department of Energy under contract number...

  19. EA-1975: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Supplement Analysis EA-1975: Supplement Analysis LINAC Coherent Light Source-Il, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California This document provides an analysis...

  20. Electron beam energy chirp control with a rectangular corrugated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    control with a rectangular corrugated structure at the Linac Coherent Light Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electron beam energy chirp control with a ...

  1. Coherent States and Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking in Light Front Scalar Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vary, J.P.; Chakrabarti, D.; Harindranath, A.; Lloyd, R.; Martinovic, L.; Spence, J.R.; /Iowa State U.

    2005-12-14

    Recently developed nuclear many-body techniques provide novel results when applied to constituent quark models and to light-front scalar field theory. We show how spontaneous symmetry breaking arises and is consistent with a coherent state ansatz in a variational treatment. The kink and the kink-antikink topological features are identified and the onset of symmetry restoration is demonstrated.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  3. Coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy system for point temperature and major species concentration measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, J.P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    1993-10-01

    The Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy system (CARS) has been developed as a laser-based, advanced, combustion-diagnostic technique to measure temperature and major species concentration. Principles of operation, description of the system and its capabilities, and operational details of this instrument are presented in this report.

  4. From coherent to incoherent mismatched interfaces. A generalized continuum formulation of surface stresses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dingreville, Rémi; Hallil, Abdelmalek; Berbenni, Stéphane

    2014-08-19

    The equilibrium of coherent and incoherent mismatched interfaces is reformulated in the context of continuum mechanics based on the Gibbs dividing surface concept. Two surface stresses are introduced: a coherent surface stress and an incoherent surface stress, as well as a transverse excess strain. Additionally, the coherent surface stress and the transverse excess strain represent the thermodynamic driving forces of stretching the interface while the incoherent surface stress represents the driving force of stretching one crystal while holding the other fixed and thereby altering the structure of the interface. These three quantities fully characterize the elastic behavior of coherent andmore » incoherent interfaces as a function of the in-plane strain, the transverse stress and the mismatch strain. The isotropic case is developed in detail and particular attention is paid to the case of interfacial thermo-elasticity. This exercise provides an insight on the physical significance of the interfacial elastic constants introduced in the formulation and illustrates the obvious coupling between the interface structure and its associated thermodynamics quantities. Finally, an example based on atomistic simulations of Cu/Cu2O interfaces is given to demonstrate the relevance of the generalized interfacial formulation and to emphasize the dependence of the interfacial thermodynamic quantities on the incoherency strain with an actual material system.« less

  5. Detecting and Analyzing Multiple Moving Objects in Crowded Environments with Coherent Motion Regions

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-01-04

    Understanding the world around us from large-scale video data requires vision systems that can perform automatic interpretation. While human eyes can unconsciously perceive independent objects in crowded scenes and other challenging operating environments, automated systems have difficulty detecting, counting, and understanding their behavior in similar scenes. Computer scientists at ORNL have a developed a technology termed as "Coherent Motion Region Detection" that invloves identifying multiple indepedent moving objects in crowded scenes by aggregating low-level motionmore » cues extracted from moving objects. Humans and other species exploit such low-level motion cues seamlessely to perform perceptual grouping for visual understanding. The algorithm detects and tracks feature points on moving objects resulting in partial trajectories that span coherent 3D region in the space-time volume defined by the video. In the case of multi-object motion, many possible coherent motion regions can be constructed around the set of trajectories. The unique approach in the algorithm is to identify all possible coherent motion regions, then extract a subset of motion regions based on an innovative measure to automatically locate moving objects in crowded environments.The software reports snapshot of the object, count, and derived statistics ( count over time) from input video streams. The software can directly process videos streamed over the internet or directly from a hardware device (camera).« less

  6. Nanometer resolution optical coherence tomography using broad bandwidth XUV and soft x-ray radiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fuchs, Silvio; Rödel, Christian; Blinne, Alexander; Zastrau, Ulf; Wünsche, Martin; Hilbert, Vinzenz; Glaser, Leif; Viefhaus, Jens; Frumker, Eugene; Corkum, Paul; et al

    2016-02-10

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive technique for cross-sectional imaging. It is particularly advantageous for applications where conventional microscopy is not able to image deeper layers of samples in a reasonable time, e.g. in fast moving, deeper lying structures. However, at infrared and optical wavelengths, which are commonly used, the axial resolution of OCT is limited to about 1 μm, even if the bandwidth of the light covers a wide spectral range. Here, we present extreme ultraviolet coherence tomography (XCT) and thus introduce a new technique for non-invasive cross-sectional imaging of nanometer structures. XCT exploits the nanometerscale coherence lengthsmore » corresponding to the spectral transmission windows of, e.g., silicon samples. The axial resolution of coherence tomography is thus improved from micrometers to a few nanometers. Tomographic imaging with an axial resolution better than 18 nm is demonstrated for layer-type nanostructures buried in a silicon substrate. Using wavelengths in the water transmission window, nanometer-scale layers of platinum are retrieved with a resolution better than 8 nm. As a result, XCT as a nondestructive method for sub-surface tomographic imaging holds promise for several applications in semiconductor metrology and imaging in the water window.« less

  7. Terahertz spectroscopy with a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer plus array detector using coherent synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolay I. Agladz, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Albert J. Sievers

    2010-06-01

    By use of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation, we experimentally tested a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer coupled to an array detector to determine its viability as a spectral device. Somewhat surprisingly, the overall performance strongly depends on the absorptivity of the birefringent lithium tantalate pixels in the array detector.

  8. Original Impact Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Original Impact Calculations, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  9. Preliminary Impact Evaluation BBNP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Preliminary Impact Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, 2013.

  10. Cryogenic Plants for SRF Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenius, Dana M.

    2014-12-01

    Review of the types of considerations that go into cryoplant design. Arenius is a world expert on this topic and has led the completion of the upgraded cryoplant at Jefferson Lab, and has recently provided substantial input on this question to the new LCLS II project.

  11. Wind Energy Impacts: Slides

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    help to alleviate common misconceptions about wind energy. Wind Energy Impacts Photo from Invenergy LLC, NREL 14371 Wildlife impacts vary by location,* and new developments have helped to reduce these effects. Photo from LuRay Parker, NREL 17429 Wind Energy Impacts Pre- and post-development studies, educated siting, and curtailment during high-activity periods have decreased wildlife impacts.** Additional strategies are being researched to better understand and further decrease impacts.

  12. Full counting statistics as a probe of quantum coherence in a side-coupled double quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Hai-Bin

    2013-12-15

    We study theoretically the full counting statistics of electron transport through side-coupled double quantum dot (QD) based on an efficient particle-number-resolved master equation. It is demonstrated that the high-order cumulants of transport current are more sensitive to the quantum coherence than the average current, which can be used to probe the quantum coherence of the considered double QD system. Especially, quantum coherence plays a crucial role in determining whether the super-Poissonian noise occurs in the weak inter-dot hopping coupling regime depending on the corresponding QD-lead coupling, and the corresponding values of super-Poissonian noise can be relatively enhanced when considering the spins of conduction electrons. Moreover, this super-Poissonian noise bias range depends on the singly-occupied eigenstates of the system, which thus suggests a tunable super-Poissonian noise device. The occurrence-mechanism of super-Poissonian noise can be understood in terms of the interplay of quantum coherence and effective competition between fast-and-slow transport channels. -- Highlights: The FCS can be used to probe the quantum coherence of side-coupled double QD system. Probing quantum coherence using FCS may permit experimental tests in the near future. The current noise characteristics depend on the quantum coherence of this QD system. The super-Poissonian noise can be enhanced when considering conduction electron spin. The side-coupled double QD system suggests a tunable super-Poissonian noise device.

  13. Measurement of groove features and dimensions of the vertical test cathode and the choke joint of the superconducting electron gun cavity of the Energy Recovery LINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammons, L.; Ke, M.

    2011-10-13

    A testing program for the superconducting electron gun cavity that has been designed for the Energy Recovery LINAC is being planned. The goal of the testing program is to characterize the RF properties of the gun cavity at superconducting temperatures and, in particular, to study multipacting that is suspected to be occurring in the choke joint of the cavity where the vertical test cathode is inserted. The testing program will seek to understand the nature and cause of this multipacting and attempt to eliminate it, if possible, by supplying sufficient voltage to the cavity. These efforts are motivated by the multipacting issues that have been observed in the processing of the fine-grain niobium gun cavity. This cavity, which is being processed at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory for Brookhaven, has encountered multipacting at a gradient of approximately 3 MV/m and, to date, has resisted efforts at elimination. Because of this problem, a testing program is being established here in C-AD that will use the large-grain niobium gun cavity that currently resides at Brookhaven and has been used for room-temperature measurements. The large-grain and fine-cavities are identical in every aspect of construction and only differ in niobium grain size. Thus, it is believed that testing and conditioning of the large-grain cavity should yield important insights about the fine-grain cavity. One element of this testing program involves characterizing the physical features of the choke joint of the cavity where the multipacting is believed to be occurring and, in particular the grooves of the joint. The configuration of the cavity and the vertical test cathode is shown in Figure 1. In addition, it is important to characterize the groove of the vertical test cathode. The grooved nature of these two components was specifically designed to prevent multipacting. However, it is suspected that, because of the chemical processing that the fine-grain gun cavity underwent along with the vertical test cathode, the geometry of these grooves was altered, presenting the possibility that multipacting may, in fact, be occurring in this area and contributing to the low gradients that have been observed in the fine-grain cavity. Therefore, the Survey and Alignment group in C-AD engaged in measurements of the cavity joint, shown in Figure 2 and the cathode weldment, shown in Figure 3 for the purpose of characterizing the grooves in both the cavity and the vertical test cathode and comparing the dimensions of the cathode with those of the prints supplied by Advanced Energy Systems (AES), the original designer and manufacturer of both the test cathode and the electron gun cavity, in preparation to have a new one manufactured. The goal was to ensure that the articles as built matched the design prints in preparation for manufacturing a new vertical test cathode. This report describes the data collected by the Survey group in these efforts. The endeavor was challenging for the group given the millimeter-scale dimensions of the grooves and the requirement for high precision.

  14. Extraordinary Tools for Extraordinary Science: The Impact ofSciDAC on Accelerator Science&Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-08-10

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook''. Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects.

  15. Coherence penalty functional: A simple method for adding decoherence in Ehrenfest dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akimov, Alexey V. E-mail: oleg.prezhdo@rochester.edu; Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg V. E-mail: oleg.prezhdo@rochester.edu

    2014-05-21

    We present a new semiclassical approach for description of decoherence in electronically non-adiabatic molecular dynamics. The method is formulated on the grounds of the Ehrenfest dynamics and the Meyer-Miller-Thoss-Stock mapping of the time-dependent Schrdinger equation onto a fully classical Hamiltonian representation. We introduce a coherence penalty functional (CPF) that accounts for decoherence effects by randomizing the wavefunction phase and penalizing development of coherences in regions of strong non-adiabatic coupling. The performance of the method is demonstrated with several model and realistic systems. Compared to other semiclassical methods tested, the CPF method eliminates artificial interference and improves agreement with the fully quantum calculations on the models. When applied to study electron transfer dynamics in the nanoscale systems, the method shows an improved accuracy of the predicted time scales. The simplicity and high computational efficiency of the CPF approach make it a perfect practical candidate for applications in realistic systems.

  16. Long-lived periodic revivals of coherence in an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, M.; Ivannikov, V.; Opanchuk, B.; Drummond, P.; Hall, B. V.; Sidorov, A. I. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics and Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia); Anderson, R. P. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics and Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia); School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    We observe the coherence of an interacting two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) surviving for seconds in a trapped Ramsey interferometer. Mean-field-driven collective oscillations of two components lead to periodic dephasing and rephasing of condensate wave functions with a slow decay of the interference fringe visibility. We apply spin echo synchronous with the self-rephasing of the condensate to reduce the influence of state-dependent atom losses, significantly enhancing the visibility up to 0.75 at the evolution time of 1.5 s. Mean-field theory consistently predicts higher visibility than experimentally observed values. We quantify the effects of classical and quantum noise and infer a coherence time of 2.8 s for a trapped condensate of 5.5x10{sup 4} interacting atoms.

  17. Method and system to measure temperature of gases using coherent anti-stokes doppler spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Mark

    2013-12-17

    A method of measuring a temperature of a noble gas in a chamber includes providing the noble gas in the chamber. The noble gas is characterized by a pressure and a temperature. The method also includes directing a first laser beam into the chamber and directing a second laser beam into the chamber. The first laser beam is characterized by a first frequency and the second laser beam is characterized by a second frequency. The method further includes converting at least a portion of the first laser beam and the second laser beam into a coherent anti-Stokes beam, measuring a Doppler broadening of the coherent anti-Stokes beam, and computing the temperature using the Doppler broadening.

  18. Coherent states, 6j symbols and properties of the next to leading order asymptotic expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kami?ski, Wojciech; Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5; Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Am Mhlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam ; Steinhaus, Sebastian; Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Am Mhlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam

    2013-12-15

    We present the first complete derivation of the well-known asymptotic expansion of the SU(2) 6j symbol using a coherent state approach, in particular we succeed in computing the determinant of the Hessian matrix. To do so, we smear the coherent states and perform a partial stationary point analysis with respect to the smearing parameters. This allows us to transform the variables from group elements to dihedral angles of a tetrahedron resulting in an effective action, which coincides with the action of first order Regge calculus associated to a tetrahedron. To perform the remaining stationary point analysis, we compute its Hessian matrix and obtain the correct measure factor. Furthermore, we expand the discussion of the asymptotic formula to next to leading order terms, prove some of their properties and derive a recursion relation for the full 6j symbol.

  19. Coherent detection of metal-metal terahertz quantum cascade lasers with improved emission characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, Anthony; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A. [Semiconductor Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Freeman, Joshua R., E-mail: j.r.freeman@leeds.ac.uk; Cavali, Pierrick; Maysonnave, Jean; Tignon, Jrme; Dhillon, Sukhdeep S. [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Suprieure, CNRS (UMR 8551), Universit P. et M. Curie, Universit D. Diderot, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2014-02-24

    Coherent detection of emission from quantum cascade lasers with metal-metal waveguides is demonstrated through free-space coupling of a THz pulse to the sub-wavelength waveguide. We implement a simple, monolithic planar horn antenna design on the metal-metal waveguide that reduces the impedance mis-match to the waveguide. The resulting devices show up to 10 times more directed output power than conventional metal-metal waveguides. This enhanced coupling to free-space allows a more efficient injection of broad-band THz pulses into the waveguide. Through this, we are able to seed the laser emission and coherently detect the laser emission by electro-optic sampling.

  20. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigmentparticles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu Y. S.; Chen B.; Zhang F.; Berenguer F.; Bean R.; Kewish C.; Vila-Comamala J.; Rodenburg J.; Robinson I.

    2011-10-19

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  1. Programmable partitioning for high-performance coherence domains in a multiprocessor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich, Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Salapura, Valentina (Chappaqua, NY)

    2011-01-25

    A multiprocessor computing system and a method of logically partitioning a multiprocessor computing system are disclosed. The multiprocessor computing system comprises a multitude of processing units, and a multitude of snoop units. Each of the processing units includes a local cache, and the snoop units are provided for supporting cache coherency in the multiprocessor system. Each of the snoop units is connected to a respective one of the processing units and to all of the other snoop units. The multiprocessor computing system further includes a partitioning system for using the snoop units to partition the multitude of processing units into a plurality of independent, memory-consistent, adjustable-size processing groups. Preferably, when the processor units are partitioned into these processing groups, the partitioning system also configures the snoop units to maintain cache coherency within each of said groups.

  2. Vibrational Imaging with High Sensitivity via Epidetected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkmer, Andreas; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Sunney Xie, X.

    2001-07-09

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a novel epidetection scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy that significantly improves the detection sensitivity. Calculations show that epidetected CARS (E-CARS) signals are present for scatterers smaller than the wavelength of light, whereas the large background signals from the surrounding bulk solvent are suppressed by destructive interference. E-CARS microscopy is capable of revealing small intracellular features that are otherwise buried by the strong water CARS signal.

  3. Registering coherent change detection products associated with large image sets and long capture intervals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, David Nikolaus; Gonzales, Antonio I

    2014-04-08

    A set of co-registered coherent change detection (CCD) products is produced from a set of temporally separated synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of a target scene. A plurality of transformations are determined, which transformations are respectively for transforming a plurality of the SAR images to a predetermined image coordinate system. The transformations are used to create, from a set of CCD products produced from the set of SAR images, a corresponding set of co-registered CCD products.

  4. Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spectroscopy for Thermometry and Species Concentration in Combustion Environments. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Combustion Environments. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy for Thermometry and Species Concentration in Combustion Environments. Abstract not provided. Authors: Kliewer, Christopher Jesse ; Settersten, Thomas B. ; Patterson, Brian D. ; Seeger, Thomas ; Kiefer, Johannes ; Leipertz, Alfred

  5. Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spectroscopy for Thermometry and Species Concentration in Flames. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Flames. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-Resolved Picosecond Pure-Rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy for Thermometry and Species Concentration in Flames. Abstract not provided. Authors: Kliewer, Christopher Jesse ; Farrow, Roger L. ; Settersten, Thomas B. ; Patterson, Brian D. ; Kiefer, Johannes ; Seeger, Thomas ; Gao, Yi Publication Date: 2009-12-01 OSTI

  6. Coherent manipulation of an NV center and one carbon nuclear spin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scharfenberger, Burkhard; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J.

    2014-12-04

    We study a three-qubit system formed by the NV centers electronic and nuclear spin plus an adjacent spin 1/2 carbon {sup 13}C. Specifically, we propose a manipulation scheme utilizing the hyperfine coupling of the effective S=1 degree of freedom of the vacancy electrons to the two adjacent nuclear spins to achieve accurate coherent control of all three qubits.

  7. The Impact of Weatherization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weatherization Assistance Program under the Recovery Act is making a serious impact in savings this summer.

  8. Generation of excited coherent states for a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mojaveri, B.; Dehghani, A. E-mail: alireza.dehghani@gmail.com

    2015-04-15

    We introduce excited coherent states, |?,?;nгЂ?a{sup n}|?,?гЂ, where n is an integer and states |?,?гЂ denote the coherent states of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. States |?,?гЂ minimize the Schrdinger-Robertson uncertainty relation while having the nonclassical properties. It has been shown that the resolution of identity condition is realized with respect to an appropriate measure on the complex plane. Some of the nonclassical features such as sub-Poissonian statistics and quadrature squeezing of these states are investigated. Our results are compared with similar Agarwals type photon added coherent states (PACSs) and it is shown that, while photon-counting statistics of |?,?,nгЂ are the same as PACSs, their squeezing properties are different. It is also shown that for large values of |?|, while they are squeezed, they minimize the uncertainty condition. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that by changing the magnitude of the external magnetic field, B{sub ext}, the squeezing effect is transferred from one component to another. Finally, a new scheme is proposed to generate states |?,?;nгЂ in cavities.?.

  9. Vibrational coherence and energy transfer in two-dimensional spectra with the optimized mean-trajectory approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alemi, Mallory; Loring, Roger F.

    2015-06-07

    The optimized mean-trajectory (OMT) approximation is a semiclassical method for computing vibrational response functions from action-quantized classical trajectories connected by discrete transitions that represent radiation-matter interactions. Here, we extend the OMT to include additional vibrational coherence and energy transfer processes. This generalized approximation is applied to a pair of anharmonic chromophores coupled to a bath. The resulting 2D spectra are shown to reflect coherence transfer between normal modes.

  10. Community impact documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community impact documents Community impact documents Fact sheets, program summaries, and other documents provide insight into the Laboratory's community efforts and impact in Northern New Mexico. Contacts Kathy Keith Community Relations & Partnerships (505) 665-4400 Email Making a difference in Northern New Mexico Fact sheets by county Los Alamos (pdf) Rio Arriba (pdf) San Miguel and Mora (pdf) Santa Fe (pdf) Taos (pdf) General Community Commitment Plan (pdf) | Archive Community Leaders

  11. Infrastructure Impacts | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NISACInfrastructure Impacts content top National Population, Economic, and Infrastructure Impacts of Pandemic Influenza with Strategic Recommendations Posted by Admin on Mar 2, 2012 in | Comments 0 comments Results of NISAC's two-year study on the potential impacts of pandemic influenza in the United States were published in October 2007 and released to the public in 2008. The summary report and supplemental analysis reports can be downloaded from the column to the right. Pandemic Influenza

  12. Environmental Impact Statement Explained

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for all major Federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of...

  13. National Laboratory Impact Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Laboratory Impact Initiative supports the relationship between the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the national laboratory enterprise.  The national laboratories...

  14. NREL: Innovation Impact - Bioenergy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and catalytic conversion, for development to the pilot scale. Learn More Learn more Close Learn more about NREL's bioenergy innovation impacts. Photo and composite photo...

  15. Nonlinear-optical spectral interferometry of nanostructures using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Mitrokhin, V P; Fedotov, Andrei B; Zheltikov, Aleksei M; Smirnova, I V; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A

    2005-01-31

    The spectrum of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from Raman-active vibrations of gas-phase nitrogen molecules in a mesoporous silica aerogel host is experimentally studied. The CARS spectral profile under these conditions is a result of interference of the resonant part of nonlinear susceptibility, originating from nitrogen molecules in aerogel pores, and the nonresonant contribution, related to the mesoporous host. Raman-active modes of gas-phase molecular nitrogen give rise to intense resonances in the CARS spectrum, serving as reference spectral profiles for probing local parameters of a nanocomposite material (nanoCARS). (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Single-pulse phase-control interferometric coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, S.-H.; Caster, Allison G.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2005-10-15

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy experiments, usually the amplitude of the signal is measured and the phase information is lost. With a polarization- and phase-controlled pulse shaping technique, the relative phase between the resonant and nonresonant CARS signals is controlled, and spectral interferometry is performed without an interferometer. Both the real and imaginary parts of the background-free resonant CARS spectrum are measured via spectral interferometry between the resonant and nonresonant signals from the same sample. The resonant signal is amplified significantly by homodyne mixing with the nonresonant signal as a local oscillator, greatly improving the detection limit.

  17. Single pulse phase-control interferometric coherent anti-StokesRaman scattering spectroscopy (CARS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Sang-Hyun; Caster, Allison G.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2005-09-28

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS) experiments, usually the amplitude of the signal is measured and the phase information is lost. With a polarization- and phase-controlled pulse shaping technique, the relative phase between the resonant and non-resonant CARS signals is controlled, and spectral interferometry is performed without an interferometer. Both the real and imaginary parts of the background-free resonant CARS spectrum are measured via spectral interferometry between the resonant and non-resonant signals from the same sample. The resonant signal is amplified significantly by homodyne mixing with the non-resonant signal as a local oscillator, greatly improving the detection limit.

  18. Resonant Coherent Excitation of Fast Hydrogen Atoms in Front of a LiF(001) Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auth, C.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.; Borisov, A.G.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    We have scattered protons and hydrogen atoms with energies of some keV from a LiF(001) surface under a grazing angle of incidence. From the intensity of Lyman-{alpha} radiation (transition from n=2 to n=1, {lambda}=121.6 nm ) as a function of projectile energy for different azimuthal orientations of the crystal surface, we find clear evidence for a resonant coherent excitation of n=2 states of hydrogen atoms in the oscillating electric field in front of the insulator surface. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. ); Ponce, V.H. ); Echenique, P.M. )

    1992-10-19

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He{sup +} ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the {l angle}100{r angle} direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1.

  20. Large scale magnetic fields and coherent structures in nonuniform unmagnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jucker, Martin; Andrushchenko, Zhanna N.; Pavlenko, Vladimir P.

    2006-07-15

    The properties of streamers and zonal magnetic structures in magnetic electron drift mode turbulence are investigated. The stability of such large scale structures is investigated in the kinetic and the hydrodynamic regime, for which an instability criterion similar to the Lighthill criterion for modulational instability is found. Furthermore, these large scale flows can undergo further nonlinear evolution after initial linear growth, which can lead to the formation of long-lived coherent structures consisting of self-bound wave packets between the surfaces of two different flow velocities with an expected modification of the anomalous electron transport properties.

  1. Nanometer-scale ablation using focused, coherent extreme ultraviolet/soft x-ray light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menoni, Carmen S. (Fort Collins, CO); Rocca, Jorge J. (Fort Collins, CO); Vaschenko, Georgiy (San Diego, CA); Bloom, Scott (Encinitas, CA); Anderson, Erik H. (El Cerrito, CA); Chao, Weilun (El Cerrito, CA); Hemberg, Oscar (Stockholm, SE)

    2011-04-26

    Ablation of holes having diameters as small as 82 nm and having clean walls was obtained in a poly(methyl methacrylate) on a silicon substrate by focusing pulses from a Ne-like Ar, 46.9 nm wavelength, capillary-discharge laser using a freestanding Fresnel zone plate diffracting into third order is described. Spectroscopic analysis of light from the ablation has also been performed. These results demonstrate the use of focused coherent EUV/SXR light for the direct nanoscale patterning of materials.

  2. Coherent manipulation of spin-wave vector for polarization of photons in an atomic ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Shujing; Xu Zhongxiao; Zheng Haiyan; Zhao Xingbo; Wu Yuelong; Wang Hai; Xie Changde; Peng Kunchi [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Opto-Electronics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2011-10-15

    We experimentally demonstrate the manipulation of two orthogonal components of a spin wave in an atomic ensemble. Based on Raman two-photon transition and Larmor spin precession induced by magnetic field pulses, the coherent rotations between the two components of the spin wave are controllably achieved. Successively, the two manipulated spin-wave components are mapped into two orthogonal polarized optical emissions. By measuring Ramsey fringes of the retrieved optical signals, the {pi}/2-pulse fidelity of {approx}96% is obtained. The presented manipulation scheme can be used to build an arbitrary rotation for qubit operations in quantum information processing based on atomic ensembles.

  3. Visco-elastic fluid simulations of coherent structures in strongly coupled dusty plasma medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh Dharodi, Vikram; Kumar Tiwari, Sanat; Das, Amita, E-mail: amita@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-07-15

    A generalized hydrodynamic model depicting the behaviour of visco-elastic fluids has often been invoked to explore the behaviour of a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium below their crystallization limit. The model has been successful in describing the collective normal modes of the strongly coupled dusty plasma medium observed experimentally. The paper focuses on the study of nonlinear dynamical characteristic features of this model. Specifically, the evolution of coherent vorticity patches is being investigated here within the framework of this model. A comparison with Newtonian fluids and molecular dynamics simulations treating the dust species interacting through the Yukawa potential has also been presented.

  4. A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

  5. Imaging of hard- and soft-tissue structure in the oral cavity by optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colston, Bill W.; Everett, Mathew J.; Da Silva, Luiz B. Otis, Linda L. Stroeve, Pieter Nathel, Howard

    1998-06-01

    We have developed a prototype optical coherent tomography (OCT) system for the imaging of hard and soft tissue in the oral cavity. High-resolution images of {ital in vitro} porcine periodontal tissues have been obtained with this system. The images clearly show the enamel{endash}cementum and the gingiva{endash}tooth interfaces, indicating OCT is a potentially useful technique for diagnosis of periodontal diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first application of OCT for imaging biologic hard tissue. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  6. Application of Coherent Tune Shift Measurements to the Characterization of Electron Cloud Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreinick, D.L.; Crittenden, J.A.; Dugan, G.; Holtzapple, R.L.; Randazzo, M.; Furman, M.A.; Venturini, M.; Palmer, M.A.; Ramirez, G.

    2011-03-28

    Measurements of coherent tune shifts at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) have been made for electron and positron beams under a wide variety of beam energies, bunch charge, and bunch train configurations. Comparing the observed tunes with the predictions of several electron cloud simulation programs allows the evaluation of important parameters in these models. These simulations will be used to predict the behavior of the electron cloud in damping rings for future linear colliders. We outline recent improvements to the analysis techniques that should improve the fidelity of the modeling.

  7. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olivier, Scot S.; Werner, John S.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Laut, Sophie P.; Jones, Steven M.

    2010-09-07

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  8. Evaluating the coherence and time-domain profile of quantum cascade laser frequency combs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burghoff, David; Yang, Yang; Hayton, Darren J.; Gao, Jian -Rong; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on the generation of optical frequency combs from quantum cascade lasers. We discuss how fast detectors can be used to demonstrate the mutual coherence of such combs, and present an inequality that can be used to quantitatively evaluate their performance. We discuss several technical issues related to shifted wave interference Fourier Transform spectroscopy (SWIFTS), and show how such measurements can be used to elucidate the time-domain properties of such combs, showing that they can possess signatures of both frequency-modulation and amplitude-modulation.

  9. Quantifying electron-phonon coupling in CdTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} nanocrystals via coherent phonon manipulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spann, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2014-08-25

    We employ ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy with temporal pulse shaping to manipulate coherent phonon excitation and quantify the strength of electron-phonon coupling in CdTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} nanocrystals (NCs). Raman active CdSe and CdTe longitudinal optical phonon (LO) modes are excited and probed in the time domain. By temporally controlling pump pulse pairs to coherently excite and cancel coherent phonons in the CdTe{sub 1−x}Se{sub x} NCs, we estimate the relative amount of optical energy that is coupled to the coherent CdSe LO mode.

  10. Continuous motion scan ptychography: Characterization for increased speed in coherent x-ray imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Junjing; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Chen, Si; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris; Vine, David J.

    2015-02-23

    Ptychography is a coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) method for extended objects in which diffraction patterns are acquired sequentially from overlapping coherent illumination spots. The objects complex transmission function can be reconstructed from those diffraction patterns at a spatial resolution limited only by the scattering strength of the object and the detector geometry. Most experiments to date have positioned the illumination spots on the sample using a move-settle-measure sequence in which the move and settle steps can take longer to complete than the measure step. We describe here the use of a continuous fly-scan mode for ptychographic data collection in whichmorethe sample is moved continuously, so that the experiment resembles one of integrating the diffraction patterns from multiple probe positions. This allows one to use multiple probe mode reconstruction methods to obtain an image of the object and also of the illumination function. We show in simulations, and in x-ray imaging experiments, some of the characteristics of fly-scan ptychography, including a factor of 25 reduction in the data acquisition time. This approach will become increasingly important as brighter x-ray sources are developed, such as diffraction limited storage rings.less

  11. Discovering and validating biological hypotheses from coherent patterns in functional genomics data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joachimiak, Marcin Pawel

    2008-08-12

    The area of transcriptomics analysis is among the more established in computational biology, having evolved in both technology and experimental design. Transcriptomics has a strong impetus to develop sophisticated computational methods due to the large amounts of available whole-genome datasets for many species and because of powerful applications in regulatory network reconstruction as well as elucidation and modeling of cellular transcriptional responses. While gene expression microarray data can be noisy and comparisons across experiments challenging, there are a number of sophisticated methods that aid in arriving at statistically and biologically significant conclusions. As such, computational transcriptomics analysis can provide guidance for analysis of results from newer experimental technologies. More recently, search methods have been developed to identify modules of genes, which exhibit coherent expression patterns in only a subset of experimental conditions. The latest advances in these methods allow to integrate multiple data types anddatasets, both experimental and computational, within a single statistical framework accounting for data confidence and relevance to specific biological questions. Such frameworks provide a unified environment for the exploration of specific biological hypothesis and for the discovery of coherent data patterns along with the evidence supporting them.

  12. Measurement of coherent production of $\\pi^\\pm$ in neutrino and antineutrino beams on carbon from $E_\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Higuera, A.

    2014-12-23

    Neutrino-induced coherent charged pion production on nuclei ?()?A ? ???A is a rare, inelastic interaction in which a small squared four-momentum |t| is transferred to the recoil nucleus, leaving it intact in the reaction. In the scintillator tracker of MINERvA, we remove events with evidence of particles from nuclear breakup and reconstruct |t| from the final-state pion and muon. In addition, we select low |t| events to isolate a sample rich in coherent candidates. By selecting low |t| events, we produce a model-independent measurement of the differential cross section for coherent scattering of neutrinos and antineutrinos on carbon. We findmorepoor agreement with the predicted kinematics in neutrino generators used by current oscillation experiments.less

  13. Enhancement of the resolution of full-field optical coherence tomography by using a colour image sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyanov, A L; Lychagov, V V; Smirnov, I V; Ryabukho, V P [N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31

    The influence of white balance in a colour image detector on the resolution of a full-field optical coherence tomograph (FFOCT) is studied. The change in the interference pulse width depending on the white balance tuning is estimated in the cases of a thermal radiation source (incandescent lamp) and a white light emitting diode. It is shown that by tuning white balance of the detector in a certain range, the FFOCT resolution can be increased by 20 % as compared to the resolution, attained with the use of a monochrome detector. (optical coherence tomography)

  14. Environmental impact report (draft)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The three projects as proposed by Pacific Gas and Electric Company and the environmental analysis of the projects are discussed. Sections on the natural and social environments of the proposed projects and their surrounding areas consist of descriptions of the setting, discussions of the adverse and beneficial consequences of the project, and potential mitigation measures to reduce the effects of adverse impacts. The Environmental Impact Report includes discussions of unavoidable adverse effects, irreversible changes, long-term and cumulative impacts, growth-inducing effects, and feasible alternatives to the project. (MHR)

  15. Bioenergy Impact Posters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On October 1, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Bioenergy Technologies Office kicked off Energy Action Month by displaying bioenergy impacts posters in the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, D.C.

  16. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Information Resources - FOIAXpress Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY

  17. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextineword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE

  18. Innovation Impact Publications | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Impact Publications NREL has a rich history of scientific innovation and partnering with industry in research and development across our primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: analysis, bioenergy, buildings, manufacturing, solar, transportation, and wind technologies. Learn more about NREL's Innovation Impact by viewing the fact sheets below on our key breakthrough results. Analysis NREL Case Study Leads to International Partnership In 2012, NREL analysts

  19. SRS Economic Impact Study - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the SRSCRO commissioned an Economic Impact Study to examine both SRS's value to the economy, as well as its overall impact on five SRSCRO counties, Aiken, Allendale, and...

  20. A fast coherent synchrotron radiation monitor for the bunch length of the short CEBAF bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, D.X.; Krafft, G.A.; Price, E.; Wood, P.; Porterfield, D.; Crowe, T.

    1996-04-01

    A novel bunch length monitor for short (down to subpicosecond) electron bunches has been developed in a collaboration between CEBAF and the University of Virginia (UVA), using coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) detection techniques. The monitor employs a state of the art {open_quote}{open_quote}narrowband{close_quote}{close_quote} GaAs Schottky whisker diode developed by the UVA group, and has the following features: it is non-invasive, compact, and low cost, it has fast rise time, low noise, high sensitivity, and it operates at room temperature. In this paper, the design parameters and performance of the monitor and selected measurement results will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Spatial coherence measurements of non-resonant and resonant high harmonics generated in laser ablation plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Abdelrahman, Z. Frank, F.; Witting, T.; Okell, W. A.; Fabris, D.; Hutchison, C.; Marangos, J. P.; Tisch, J. W. G.

    2014-01-13

    We present measurements of the spatial coherence of the high-order harmonics generated in laser-produced ablation plumes. Harmonics were generated using 4 fs, 775 nm pulses with peak intensity 3 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2}. Double-slit fringe visibilities in the range of ≈0.6–0.75 were measured for non-resonant harmonics in carbon and resonantly enhanced harmonics in zinc and indium. These are somewhat higher than the visibility obtained for harmonics generated in argon gas under similar conditions. This is attributed to lower time-dependent ionization of the plasma ablation targets compared to argon during the high harmonics generation process.

  2. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Acciarri, R.

    2015-01-20

    In this study, we report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6 +1.2-1.0 (stat)+0.3-0.4(syst) x 10-38 cm2/Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5+2.6-2.1(stat)+0.6-0.7(syst) x 10-39 cm2/Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV.

  3. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) As Next Generation Nonlinear LIDAR Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2009-07-10

    Nonlinear spectroscopy using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and femtosecond laser pulses has been successfully developed as powerful tools for chemical analysis and biological imaging. Recent developments show promising possibilities of incorporating CARS into LIDAR system for remote detection of molecular species in airborne particles. The corresponding theory is being developed to describe nonlinear scattering of a mesoscopic particle composed of complex molecules by laser pulses with arbitrary shape and spectral content. Microscopic many-body transform theory is used to compute the third order susceptibility for CARS in molecules with known absorption spectrum and vibrational modes. The theory is combined with an integral scattering formula and Mie-Lorentz formulae, giving a rigorous formalism which provides powerful numerical experimentation of CARS spectra, particularly on the variations with the laser parameters and the direction of detection.

  4. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging and characterization of strain in silicon-on-insulator nanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, Gang; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Reiche, Manfred; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2014-12-06

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) has emerged in the last decade as a promising high resolution lens-less imaging approach for the characterization of various samples. It has made significant technical progress through developments in source, algorithm and imaging methodologies thus enabling important scientific breakthroughs in a broad range of disciplines. In this report, we will introduce the principles of forward scattering CDI and Bragg geometry CDI (BCDI), with an emphasis on the latter. BCDI exploits the ultra-high sensitivity of the diffraction pattern to the distortions of crystalline lattice. Its ability of imaging strain on the nanometer scale in three dimensionsmore » is highly novel. We will present the latest progress on the application of BCDI in investigating the strain relaxation behavior in nanoscale patterned strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) materials, aiming to understand and engineer strain for the design and implementation of new generation semiconductor devices.« less

  5. Beyond the random phase approximation: Stimulated Brillouin backscatter for finite laser coherence times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korotkevich, Alexander O.; Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Rose, Harvey A.

    2015-01-15

    We developed a linear theory of backward stimulated Brillouin scatter (BSBS) of a spatially and temporally random laser beam relevant for laser fusion. Our analysis reveals a new collective regime of BSBS (CBSBS). Its intensity threshold is controlled by diffraction, once cT{sub c} exceeds a laser speckle length, with T{sub c} the laser coherence time. The BSBS spatial gain rate is approximately the sum of that due to CBSBS, and a part which is independent of diffraction and varies linearly with T{sub c}. The CBSBS spatial gain rate may be reduced significantly by the temporal bandwidth of KrF-based laser systems compared to the bandwidth currently available to temporally smoothed glass-based laser systems.

  6. Quantum-projection-noise-limited interferometry with coherent atoms in a Ramsey-type setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doering, D.; McDonald, G.; Debs, J. E.; Figl, C.; Altin, P. A.; Bachor, H.-A.; Robins, N. P.; Close, J. D. [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia); Department of Quantum Science, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia)

    2010-04-15

    Every measurement of the population in an uncorrelated ensemble of two-level systems is limited by what is known as the quantum projection noise limit. Here, we present quantum-projection-noise-limited performance of a Ramsey-type interferometer using freely propagating coherent atoms. The experimental setup is based on an electro-optic modulator in an inherently stable Sagnac interferometer, optically coupling the two interfering atomic states via a two-photon Raman transition. Going beyond the quantum projection noise limit requires the use of reduced quantum uncertainty (squeezed) states. The experiment described demonstrates atom interferometry at the fundamental noise level and allows the observation of possible squeezing effects in an atom laser, potentially leading to improved sensitivity in atom interferometers.

  7. High Contrast Ramsey Fringes with Coherent-Population-Trapping Pulses in a Double Lambda Atomic System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanon, T.; Guerandel, S.; Clercq, E. de; Holleville, D.; Dimarcq, N.; Clairon, A. [SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Avenue de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France)

    2005-05-20

    We report the observation of Raman-Ramsey fringes using a double lambda scheme creating coherent population trapping in an atomic ensemble combined with pulsed optical radiations. The observation was made in a Cs vapor mixed with N{sub 2} buffer gas in a closed cell. The double lambda scheme is created with lin perpendicular lin polarized laser beams leading to higher contrast than the usual simple lambda scheme. The pulsed trapping technique leads to narrow fringe widths scaling as 1/(2T) with high contrasts which are no longer limited by the saturation effect. This technique operates in a different way from the classical Ramsey sequence: the signal is done by applying a long trapping pulse to prepare the atomic state superposition, and fringe detection is accomplished by optical transmission during a short second trapping pulse without any perturbation of the dark state.

  8. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging and characterization of strain in silicon-on-insulator nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Gang; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Reiche, Manfred; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2014-12-06

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) has emerged in the last decade as a promising high resolution lens-less imaging approach for the characterization of various samples. It has made significant technical progress through developments in source, algorithm and imaging methodologies thus enabling important scientific breakthroughs in a broad range of disciplines. In this report, we will introduce the principles of forward scattering CDI and Bragg geometry CDI (BCDI), with an emphasis on the latter. BCDI exploits the ultra-high sensitivity of the diffraction pattern to the distortions of crystalline lattice. Its ability of imaging strain on the nanometer scale in three dimensions is highly novel. We will present the latest progress on the application of BCDI in investigating the strain relaxation behavior in nanoscale patterned strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) materials, aiming to understand and engineer strain for the design and implementation of new generation semiconductor devices.

  9. Birefringence imaging in biological tissue using polarization sensitive optical coherent tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Boer, Johannes F. (Irvine, CA); Milner, Thomas E. (Austin, TX); Nelson, J. Stuart (Laguna Niguel, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Employing a low coherence Michelson interferometer, two dimensional images of optical birefringence in turbid samples as a function of depth are measured. Polarization sensitive detection of the signal formed by interference of backscattered light from the sample and a mirror or reference plane in the reference arm which defines a reference optical path length, give the optical phase delay between light propagating along the fast and slow axes of the birefringence sample. Images showing the change in birefringence in response to irradiation of the sample are produced as an example of the detection apparatus and methodology. The technique allow rapid, noncontact investigation of tissue or sample diagnostic imaging for various medical or materials procedures.

  10. Bose-Einstein condensates on tilted lattices: Coherent, chaotic, and subdiffusive dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolovsky, Andrey R.; Gomez, Edgar A.; Korsch, Hans Juergen

    2010-02-15

    The dynamics of a (quasi-) one-dimensional interacting atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in a tilted optical lattice is studied in a discrete mean-field approximation, i.e., in terms of the discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation. If the static field is varied, the system shows a plethora of dynamical phenomena. In the strong field limit, we demonstrate the existence of (almost) nonspreading states which remain localized on the lattice region populated initially and show coherent Bloch oscillations with fractional revivals in the momentum space (so-called quantum carpets). With decreasing field, the dynamics becomes irregular, however, still confined in configuration space. For even weaker fields, we find subdiffusive dynamics with a wave-packet width growing as t{sup 1/4}.

  11. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acciarri, R.; Adams, C.; Asaadi, J.; Baller, B.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Church, E.; Edmunds, D.; Ereditato, A.; Farooq, S.; Fleming, B.; Greenlee, H.; Hatcher, R.; Horton-Smith, G.; James, C.; Klein, E.; Lang, K.; Laurens, P.; Mehdiyev, R.; Page, B.; Palamara, O.; Partyka, K.; Rameika, G.; Rebel, B.; Santos, E.; Schukraft, A.; Soderberg, M.; Spitz, J.; Szelc, A.? M.; Weber, M.; Yang, T.; Zeller, G. P.

    2014-12-23

    We report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6 +1.2-1.0 (stat)+0.3-0.4(syst) 10??cm / Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5+2.6-2.1(stat)+0.6-0.7(syst) 10?? cm / Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV.

  12. First measurement of neutrino and antineutrino coherent charged pion production on argon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Acciarri, R.; Adams, C.; Asaadi, J.; Baller, B.; Bolton, T.; Bromberg, C.; Cavanna, F.; Church, E.; Edmunds, D.; Ereditato, A.; et al

    2014-12-23

    We report on the first cross section measurements for charged current coherent pion production by neutrinos and antineutrinos on argon. These measurements are performed using the ArgoNeuT detector exposed to the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The cross sections are measured to be 2.6 +1.2-1.0 (stat)+0.3-0.4(syst) × 10⁻³⁸cm² / Ar for neutrinos at a mean energy of 9.6 GeV and 5.5+2.6-2.1(stat)+0.6-0.7(syst) × 10⁻³⁹ cm² / Ar for antineutrinos at a mean energy of 3.6 GeV.

  13. Direct extraction of coherent mode properties from imaging measurements in a linear plasma column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Light, A. D.; Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Department of Physics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 ; Thakur, S. C.; Brandt, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093

    2013-08-15

    Spectral properties of coherent waves in an argon plasma column are examined using fluctuation data from fast imaging. Visible light from ArII line emission is collected at high frame rates using a high-speed digital camera. A cross-spectral phase technique allows direct visualization of dominant phase structures as a function of frequency, as well as identification of azimuthal asymmetries present in the system. Experimental dispersion estimates are constructed from imaging data alone. Drift-like waves are identified by comparison with theoretical dispersion curves, and a tentative match of a low-frequency spectral feature to Kelvin-Helmholtz-driven waves is presented. Imaging measurements are consistent with previous results, and provide non-invasive, single-shot measurements across the entire plasma cross-section. Implications of the measured spectral properties for imaging measurements of mode dynamics are explored.

  14. The coherent acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays and the galactic dynamo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1995-05-01

    In order to accelerate cosmic rays to ultra high energy, >10{sup 18} ev, requires that the step size in energy in a diffusive process be very much larger than occurs in galactic or extra galactic hydrodynamic mechanisms where {Delta}E/F {approximately} v/c{approximately}1/300 per step. This step size requires >10{sup 5} scatterings per doubling in energy (the shock mechanism) and therefore <10{sup {minus}5} energy loss per scattering. Coherent acceleration (CA), on the other hand, is proposed in which the energy gained, {Delta}E per particle in the CA region is very much larger so that only one or several scatterings are required to reach the final energy. The power law spectrum is created by the probability of loss from the CA region where this probability is inversely proportional to the particle`s rigidity, E. Therefore the fractional loss in number per fractional gain in energy, dN/N {approximately} {minus}{Gamma} dE/E, results in a power law spectrum. CA depends upon the electric field, E = {eta}J, J, the current density, in a force free field, where magnetic helicity, J={alpha}B, arises universally in all evolving mass condensations due to twisting of magnetic flux by the large number of turns before pressure support. The acceleration process is E*v, where universe beam instabilities enhance {eta} leading to phased coherent acceleration (PCA). The result of the energy transfer from field energy to matter energy is the relaxation of the field helicity, or reconnection but with J{parallel}B rather than J{perpendicular}B.

  15. Precarious Rock Methodology for Seismic Hazard: Physical Testing, Numerical Modeling and Coherence Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anooshehpoor, Rasool; Purvance, Matthew D.; Brune, James N.; Preston, Leiph A.; Anderson, John G.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the following projects: Shake table tests of precarious rock methodology, field tests of precarious rocks at Yucca Mountain and comparison of the results with PSHA predictions, study of the coherence of the wave field in the ESF, and a limited survey of precarious rocks south of the proposed repository footprint. A series of shake table experiments have been carried out at the University of Nevada, Reno Large Scale Structures Laboratory. The bulk of the experiments involved scaling acceleration time histories (uniaxial forcing) from 0.1g to the point where the objects on the shake table overturned a specified number of times. The results of these experiments have been compared with numerical overturning predictions. Numerical predictions for toppling of large objects with simple contact conditions (e.g., I-beams with sharp basal edges) agree well with shake-table results. The numerical model slightly underpredicts the overturning of small rectangular blocks. It overpredicts the overturning PGA for asymmetric granite boulders with complex basal contact conditions. In general the results confirm the approximate predictions of previous studies. Field testing of several rocks at Yucca Mountain has approximately confirmed the preliminary results from previous studies, suggesting that he PSHA predictions are too high, possibly because the uncertainty in the mean of the attenuation relations. Study of the coherence of wavefields in the ESF has provided results which will be very important in design of the canisters distribution, in particular a preliminary estimate of the wavelengths at which the wavefields become incoherent. No evidence was found for extreme focusing by lens-like inhomogeneities. A limited survey for precarious rocks confirmed that they extend south of the repository, and one of these has been field tested.

  16. Economic Impact | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab's Hall A Jefferson Lab generates many economic benefits for the nation and Virginia, providing many well-paying jobs for highly skilled and well-educated workers. A D D I T I O N A L L I N K S: Brochures Fact Sheets JLab Video 12 GeV Construction Economic Impact top-right bottom-left-corner bottom-right-corner economic impact Jefferson Lab generates many economic benefits. For the nation, Jefferson Lab generates $679.1 million in economic output and 4,422 jobs. The economic output

  17. High Impact Technology Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High Impact Technology Hub is a one stop shop for information associated with technology demonstrations in occupied, operational buildings. Resources posted to Hub should accelerate the selection and evaluation of technology demonstration projects and enable transparency into DOEs market stimulation and tech to market activities.

  18. Non-uniform solute segregation at semi-coherent metal/oxide interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Choudhury, Samrat; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Fluss, Michael J.; Hsiung, Luke L.; Misra, Amit; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2015-08-26

    The properties and performance of metal/oxide nanocomposites are governed by the structure and chemistry of the metal/oxide interfaces. Here we report an integrated theoretical and experimental study examining the role of interfacial structure, particularly misfit dislocations, on solute segregation at a metal/oxide interface. We find that the local oxygen environment, which varies significantly between the misfit dislocations and the coherent terraces, dictates the segregation tendency of solutes to the interface. Depending on the nature of the solute and local oxygen content, segregation to misfit dislocations can change from attraction to repulsion, revealing the complex interplay between chemistry and structure atmore » metal/oxide interfaces. These findings indicate that the solute chemistry at misfit dislocations is controlled by the dislocation density and oxygen content. As a result, fundamental thermodynamic concepts – the Hume-Rothery rules and the Ellingham diagram – qualitatively predict the segregation behavior of solutes to such interfaces, providing design rules for novel interfacial chemistries.« less

  19. Image Formation by Incoherent and Coherent Transition Radiation from Flat and Rough Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we derive equations for the image formation of transverse profile of a relativistic beam obtained by means of optical transition radiation (OTR) from flat and rough metal surfaces. The motivation behind this study lies in the desire to suppress coherent transition radiation (COTR) observed in experiments at modern free electron lasers. The physical mechanism behind the problem of COTR is that the OTR is predominantly radiated at small angles of order of 1/{gamma} where {gamma} is the relativistic factor of the beam. This means that the transverse formation size of the image is of order of {bar {lambda}}{gamma} where {bar {lambda}} = {lambda}/2{pi} with {lambda} the radiation wavelength. For relativistic beams this can be comparable or even exceed the transverse size of the beam, which would mean that the image of the beam has very little to do with its transverse profile. It is fortuitous, however, that the incoherent image is formed by adding radiation energy of electrons and results in the transverse formation size being of order of {bar {lambda}}/{theta}{sub a}, with {theta}{sub a} is the aperture angle of the optical system. The COTR image, in contrast, is formed by adding electromagnetic field of electrons, and leads to the formation size {bar {lambda}}{gamma}. In situations when the COTR intensity exceeds that of OTR the COTR imaging makes the diagnostic incapable of measuring the beam profile.

  20. Resonantly enhanced method for generation of tunable, coherent vacuum-ultraviolet radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glownia, J.H.; Sander, R.K.

    1982-06-29

    Carbon Monoxide vapor is used to generate coherent, tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation by third-harmonic generation using a single tunable dye laser. The presence of a nearby electronic level resonantly enhances the nonlinear susceptibility of this molecule allowing efficient generation of the vuv light at modest pump laser intensities, thereby reducing the importance of a six-photon multiple-photon ionization process which is also resonantly enhanced by the same electronic level but no higher order. By choosing the pump radiation wavelength to be of shorter wavelength than individual vibronic levels used to extend tunability stepwise from 154.4 to 124.6 nm, and the intensity to be low enough, multiple-photon ionization can be eliminated. Excitation spectra of the third-harmonic emission output exhibit shifts to shorter wavelength and broadening with increasing CO pressure due to phase matching effects. Increasing the carbon monoxide pressure, therefore, allows the substantial filling in of gaps arising from the stepwise tuning thereby providing almost continuous tunability over the quoted range of wavelength emitted.

  1. Coherent population trapping resonances at lower atomic levels of Doppler broadened optical lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ahin, E; Hamid, R; elik, M; zen, G; Izmailov, A Ch

    2014-11-30

    We have detected and analysed narrow high-contrast coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances, which are induced in absorption of a weak monochromatic probe light beam by counterpropagating two-frequency pump radiation in a cell with rarefied caesium vapour. The experimental investigations have been performed by the example of nonclosed three level ?-systems formed by spectral components of the D{sub 2} line of caesium atoms. The applied method allows one to analyse features of the CPT phenomenon directly at a given low long-lived level of the selected ?-system even in sufficiently complicated spectra of atomic gases with large Doppler broadening. We have established that CPT resonances in transmission of the probe beam exhibit not only a higher contrast but also a much lesser width in comparison with well- known CPT resonances in transmission of the corresponding two-frequency pump radiation. The results obtained can be used in selective photophysics, photochemistry and ultra-high resolution atomic (molecular) spectroscopy. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Analysis of organic pollutant degradation in pulsed plasma by coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratescu, Maria Antoneta; Hieda, Junko; Umemura, Tomonari; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2011-05-15

    The degradation of p-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in water was investigated by the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method, in which the change of the anti-Stokes signal intensity corresponding to the vibrational transitions of the molecule is monitored during and after solution plasma processing (SPP). In the beginning of SPP treatment, the CARS signal intensity of the ring vibrational molecular transitions at 1233 and 1660 cm{sup -1} increases under the influence of the electric field of the plasma, depending on the delay time between the plasma pulse and the laser firing pulse. At the same time, the plasma contributes to the degradation of p-BQ molecules by generating hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals, which decompose p-BQ into different carboxylic acids. After SPP, the CARS signal intensity of the vibrational bands of p-BQ ceased and the degradation of p-BQ was confirmed by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and liquid chromatography analysis.

  3. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; et al

    2016-02-29

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields andmore » the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. In conclusion, we benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution.« less

  4. The influence of longitudinal space charge fields on the modulation process of coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2014-05-21

    Initial modulation in Coherent electron cooling (CeC) scheme relies on ion charge screening by electrons. In a CeC system with bunched electron beam, the long-range longitudinal space charge force is inevitably induced. For a relatively dense electron beam, it can be comparable or even greater than the attractive force from the ion. Hence, space-charge field influence to the modulation process could be important. If the longitudinal Debye length is much smaller than the electron bunch length, the modulation induced by the ion happens locally. In this case, the long-range longitudinal space charge field can be approximated as a uniform electric field across the region. In this paper we developed an analytical model to study the dynamics of ion shielding in the presence of a uniform electric field. We are solving the coupled Vlasov-Poisson equation system for infinite anisotropic electron plasma and estimate the influences of the longitudinal space charge field to the modulation process. We present numerical estimates for a case of the proof of CeC principle experiment at RHIC.

  5. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. ); Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M. )

    1994-01-15

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He[sup +] ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the [l angle]100[r angle] direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., [approx]0.9 for 53 MeV B[sup 4+] and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces.

  6. Resonantly enhanced method for generation of tunable, coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glownia, James H. (Los Alamos, NM); Sander, Robert K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    Carbon Monoxide vapor is used to generate coherent, tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation by third-harmonic generation using a single tunable dye laser. The presence of a nearby electronic level resonantly enhances the nonlinear susceptibility of this molecule allowing efficient generation of the vuv light at modest pump laser intensities, thereby reducing the importance of a six-photon multiple-photon ionization process which is also resonantly enhanced by the same electronic level but to higher order. By choosing the pump radiation wavelength to be of shorter wavelength than individual vibronic levels used to extend tunability stepwise from 154.4 to 124.6 nm, and the intensity to be low enough, multiple-photon ionization can be eliminated. Excitation spectra of the third-harmonic emission output exhibit shifts to shorter wavelength and broadening with increasing CO pressure due to phase matching effects. Increasing the carbon monoxide pressure, therefore, allows the substantial filling in of gaps arising from the stepwise tuning thereby providing almost continuous tunability over the quoted range of wavelength emitted.

  7. Coherent ?{sup 0}-photoproduction on the deuteron near the ?-production threshold including polarization observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darwish, Eed M.; Al-Thoyaib, Suleiman S.

    2014-12-15

    Coherent ?{sup 0}-photoproduction on the deuteron including polarization observables is studied in the energy region near the ?-production threshold at backward center-of-mass angles of the outgoing pion. This work is motivated by the measurements of the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Lab, where a cusp-like structure in the energy dependence of the differential cross section has been observed at extremely backward pion angles. The present approach is based on the impulse approximation and first-order rescattering diagrams with intermediate production of both ?- and ?-mesons. Numerical results for unpolarized cross sections, the linear photon asymmetry (?), the vector (T{sub 11}) and tensor (T{sub 2M}, M=0, 1, 2) deuteron target asymmetries, and the double polarization E-asymmetry are predicted and compared with available experimental data and other theoretical models. The effect of first-order rescattering is found to be much larger in spin asymmetries than in the unpolarized cross sections. It reaches on average about 40% in the tensor target and E asymmetries. Compared to the experimental data from CLAS Collaboration, sizable discrepancies are found. This is not the case for the linear photon asymmetry, for which a better comparison with the data from YerPhI Collaboration is obtained.

  8. Exploring Ramsey-coherent population trapping atomic clock realized with pulsed microwave modulated laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jing; Yun, Peter [Key Laboratory of Atomic Frequency Standards, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tian, Yuan; Tan, Bozhong [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gu, Sihong, E-mail: shgu@wipm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Atomic Frequency Standards, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-03-07

    A scheme for a Ramsey-coherent population trapping (CPT) atomic clock that eliminates the acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is proposed and experimentally studied. Driven by a periodically microwave modulated current, the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser emits a continuous beam that switches between monochromatic and multichromatic modes. Ramsey-CPT interference has been studied with this mode-switching beam. In eliminating the AOM, which is used to generate pulsed laser in conventional Ramsey-CPT atomic clock, the physics package of the proposed scheme is virtually the same as that of a conventional compact CPT atomic clock, although the resource budget for the electronics will slightly increase as a microwave switch should be added. By evaluating and comparing experimentally recorded signals from the two Ramsey-CPT schemes, the short-term frequency stability of the proposed scheme was found to be 46% better than the scheme with AOM. The experimental results suggest that the implementation of a compact Ramsey-CPT atomic clock promises better frequency stability.

  9. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto

    2014-01-29

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  10. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yiteng; Kais, Sabre; Berman, Gennady Petrovich

    2015-02-02

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on 1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and 2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence of product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects of noise. We believe that the quantum avian compass can play an important role in avian navigation and can also provide the foundation for a new generation of sensitive and selective magnetic-sensing nano-devices.

  11. Biexciton formation and exciton coherent coupling in layered GaSe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, P.; Paul, J.; Stevens, C. E.; Glikin, N.; Karaiskaj, D.; Moody, G.; Kovalyuk, Z. D.; Kudrynskyi, Z. R.; Romero, A. H.; Cantarero, A.; Hilton, D. J.

    2015-06-07

    Nonlinear two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) and linear absorption spectroscopy are used to study the electronic structure and optical properties of excitons in the layered semiconductor GaSe. At the 1s exciton resonance, two peaks are identified in the absorption spectra, which are assigned to splitting of the exciton ground state into the triplet and singlet states. 2DFT spectra acquired for co-linear polarization of the excitation pulses feature an additional peak originating from coherent energy transfer between the singlet and triplet. At cross-linear polarization of the excitation pulses, the 2DFT spectra expose a new peak likely originating from bound biexcitons. The polarization dependent 2DFT spectra are well reproduced by simulations using the optical Bloch equations for a four level system, where many-body effects are included phenomenologically. Although biexciton effects are thought to be strong in this material, only moderate contributions from bound biexciton creation can be observed. The biexciton binding energy of ?2 meV was estimated from the separation of the peaks in the 2DFT spectra. Temperature dependent absorption and 2DFT measurements, combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the phonon spectra, indicate strong interaction with the A{sub 1}{sup ?} phonon mode. Excitation density dependent 2DFT measurements reveal excitation induced dephasing and provide a lower limit for the homogeneous linewidth of the excitons in the present GaSe crystal.

  12. Superimposed coherent terahertz wave radiation from mono-energetically bunched multi-beam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shin, Young -Min; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.

    2012-06-27

    Intense coherent radiation is obtained from multiple electron beams monochromatically bunched over the wide higher-order-mode (HOM) spectral band in the THz regime. The overmoded waveguide corrugated by dielectric-implanted staggered gratings superimposes evanescent waves emitted from the low energy electron beams. The dispersion and transmission simulations of the three-beam slow wave structure show that the first two fundamental modes (more » $$TE_{10}$$ and $$TE_{20}$$) are considerably suppressed ($$\\sim-50$$ dB) below the multi-beam resonating mode ($$TE_{30}$$) at the THz regime (0.8–1.24 THz). The theoretical calculations and particle-in-cell simulations show that with significantly higher interaction impedance and power growth rate radiation of the $$TE_{30}$$ mode is $$\\sim$$23 dBm and $$\\sim$$50 dBm stronger than the $$TE_{10}$$ and $$TE_{20}$$ modes around 1 THz, respectively. As a result, this highly selective HOM multi-beam interaction has potential applications for power THz sources and high intensity accelerators.« less

  13. Remarkably robust and correlated coherence and antiferromagnetism in (Ce1-x Lax)Cu?Ge?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hodovanets, H.; Budko, S.? L.; Straszheim, W.? E.; Taufour, V.; Mun, E.? D.; Kim, H.; Flint, R.; Canfield, P.? C.

    2015-06-08

    We present magnetic susceptibility, resistivity, specific heat, and thermoelectric power measurements on (Ce1-x Lax)Cu?Ge? single crystals (0 ? x ? 1). With La substitution, the antiferromagnetic temperature TN is suppressed in an almost linear fashion and moves below 0.36 K, the base temperature of our measurements for x > 0.8. Surprisingly, in addition to robust antiferromagnetism, the system also shows low temperature coherent scattering below Tcoh up to ~ 0.9 of La, indicating a small percolation limit ~ 9% of Ce. Tcoh as a function of magnetic field was found to have different behavior for x more> 0.9. Remarkably, (Tcoh) at H = 0 was found to be linearly proportional to TN. The jump in the magnetic specific heat ?Cm at TN as a function of TK/TN for (Ce1-x Lax)Cu?Ge? follows the theoretical prediction based on the molecular field calculation for the S = 1/2 resonant level model.less

  14. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang; Gerry, Christopher C.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  15. Single-shot hyperspectral coherent Raman planar imaging in the range 0–4200 cm⁻¹

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2014-10-20

    We propose a technique for ultrabroadband planar coherent Raman spectroscopy that enables wideband chemically selective mapping of molecular partition functions in the gas-phase within a single-laser-shot. A spectral region spanning 0–4200 cm⁻¹ is excited simultaneously, in principle allowing for coherent planar imaging of most all fundamental Raman-active modes. This unique instantaneous and spatially correlated assessment enables multiplexed studies of transient dynamical systems in a two-dimensional (2D) field. Here, we demonstrate single-laser-shot high temperature diagnostics of H₂, with spatially resolved 2D measurement of transitions of both the pure-rotational H₂ S-branch and the vibrational H₂ Q-branch, analyzing the temperature contour of amore » reacting fuel-species as it evolves at a flame-front.« less

  16. Highly coherent red-shifted dispersive wave generation around 1.3??m for efficient wavelength conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xia; Bi, Wanjun; Chen, Wei; Xue, Tianfeng; Hu, Lili; Liao, Meisong; Gao, Weiqing

    2015-03-14

    This research investigates the mechanism of the optical dispersive wave (DW) and proposes a scheme that can realize an efficient wavelength conversion. In an elaborately designed photonic crystal fiber, a readily available ytterbium laser operating at ?1??m can be transferred to the valuable 1.3??m wavelength range. A low-order soliton is produced to concentrate the energy of the DW into the target wavelength range and improve the degree of coherence. The input chirp is demonstrated to be a factor that enhances the wavelength conversion efficiency. With a positive initial chirp, 76.6% of the pump energy in the fiber can be transferred into a spectral range between 1.24 and 1.4??m. With the use of a grating compressor, it is possible to compress the generated coherent DW of several picoseconds into less than 90?fs.

  17. Ultra-short longitudinal spatial coherence length of laser light with the combined effect of spatial, angular, and temporal diversity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad, Azeem E-mail: mehtads@physics.iitd.ac.in; Dubey, Vishesh; Mehta, D. S. E-mail: mehtads@physics.iitd.ac.in; Srivastava, Vishal

    2015-03-02

    We demonstrate ultra-high axial-resolution topography and tomography of multilayered objects using pseudo thermal light source, i.e., laser. The longitudinal spatial coherence (LSC) length of light was significantly reduced by synthesizing a pseudo thermal source with the combined effect of spatial, angular, and temporal diversity. Thus, generating a low spatially coherent (i.e., broad angular frequency spectrum) light source having narrow temporal frequency spectrum. The LSC length was reduced less than 10??m using a very low magnification lens. Experimental results of optical sectioning of multilayer objects with high axial-resolution of the order of 4??m was achieved which is comparable to broadband light source. The present system does not require any dispersion compensation optical system for biological samples as a highly monochromatic light source is used.

  18. Report: Strategic Planning Impacts

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strategic Planning Impacts September 30, 2009 Submitted by the EMAB ARRA Implementation and Oversight Subcommittee Background: EM plans to use the influx of stimulus funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to fulfill compliance agreements, complete construction projects, and address the program's lower-tier activities such as decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) and soil and groundwater remediation. Using the ARRA funds to reduce the physical size of the EM

  19. Impacts | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impacts At the MPC we provide research and developmental quantities of crucial materials that have changed the face of science. Our materials have paved the way for sonar technology used in the depths of the oceans and enabled critical scientific instruments to function in the most distant reaches of space. [EXTEND] The extensive bibliography of publications that cite the MPC (or more generically, the Ames Laboratory) as the source for the pure metals, alloys, or single crystals can provide you

  20. CBI Technology Impact Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CBI Technology Impact Framework 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL Amy Jiron, amy.jiron@go.doe.gov U.S. Department of Energy Dan Chwastyk, dan.chwastyk@navigant.com Navigant Consulting Project Summary Timeline: Start date: December 2013 Planned end date: TBD (annual go/no-go) Key Milestones 1. Initial tech sweep completed; Feb 2014 2. Release of RFI; Mar

  1. Nonradiative coherent carrier captures and defect reaction at deep-level defects via phonon-kick mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakita, Masaki; Suzuki, Kei; Shinozuka, Yuzo

    2014-02-21

    We simulated the time evolution of electron-lattice coupling mode, and a series of nonradiative carrier captures by a deep-level defect in a semiconductor. For lattice relaxation energy of the order of the band gap, a series of coherent (athermal) electron and hole captures by a defect is possible for high carrier densities, which results in an inflation in the induced lattice vibration, which in turn enhances a defect reaction.

  2. Narrowing of the coherent population trapping resonance under zone pumping in cells with different characteristics of the wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazakov, G A; Litvinov, A N; Matisov, B G [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-28

    It is shown that when coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance is excited by a narrow laser beam, the presence of elastic collisions with the cell wall significantly affects the line shape of the CPT-resonance. We have constructed a theoretical model, which is based on averaging over the random Ramsey sequences of the atom dwell time in the beam and dark zones and takes into account the probability of elastic bounce of an atom from the wall.

  3. Technology's Impact on Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

    2009-06-30

    As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

  4. Coherent orbital waves during an Ultrafast Photo-induced Isulator-metal Transition in a magnetoresistive manganite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ULTRAS-INFM-CNR Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Italy; Department of Physics - Cavalleri Group, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, U.K.; Correlated Electron Research Center, Tsukuba, Japan; Schoenlein, Robert William; Polli, D.; Rini, M.; Wall, S.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Cerullo, G.; Cavalleri, A.

    2007-06-01

    Photo-excitation can drive strongly correlated electron insulators into competing conducting phases1,2, resulting in giant and ultrafast changes of their electronic and magnetic properties. The underlying non-equilibrium dynamics involve many degrees of freedom at once, whereby sufficiently short optical pulses can trigger the corresponding collective modes of the solid along temporally coherent pathways. The characteristic frequencies of these modes range between the few GHz of acoustic vibrations3 to the tens or even hundreds of THz for purely electronic excitations. Virtually all experiments so far have used 100 fs or longer pulses, detecting only comparatively slow lattice dynamics4,5. Here, we use sub-10-fs optical pulses to study the photo-induced insulator-metal transition in the magneto-resistive manganite Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3. At room temperature, we find that the time-dependent pathway towards the metallic phase is accompanied by coherent 31 THz oscillations of the optical reflectivity, significantly faster than all lattice vibrations. These high-frequency oscillations are suggestive of coherent orbital waves6,7, crystal-field excitations triggered here by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. Orbital waves are likely to be initially localized to the small polarons of this room-temperature manganite, coupling to other degrees of freedom at longer times, as photo-domains coalesce into a metallic phase.

  5. Economic Impact Analysis for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: To conduct an economic impact study for EGS and to develop a Geothermal Economics Calculator (GEC) tool to quantify (in economic terms) the potential job, energy and environmental impacts associated with electric power production from geothermal resources.

  6. Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact 2 June 2001 This page intentionally left blank. U.S. Department of Energy Finding of No Significant Impact 12 June 2001 This page intentionally left blank.

  7. Environmental Impact of Smart Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of Smart Grid January 10, 2011 2 Agenda * Review of Paper - Introduction - Key Areas of Impact - Findings - Conclusions - Recommended Topics for Further Research 3 3 Introduction Provide background for the current state of environmental impact of Smart Grid * Summarize key components of criteria pollutants from electricity and transportation sectors * Define the Smart Grid and how it can be used to reduce pollutants * Evaluate impact from Smart Grid on reducing pollutants through: -

  8. NREL: Innovation Impact Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy Bioenergy Buildings Buildings Transportation Transportation Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Systems Integration Energy Systems Integration Innovation Impact NREL...

  9. Soft x-ray self-seeding simulation methods and their application for the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linac Coherent Light Source (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Soft x-ray self-seeding simulation methods and their application for the Linac Coherent Light Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Soft x-ray self-seeding simulation methods and their application for the Linac Coherent Light Source Authors: Serkez, Svitozar ; Krzywinski, Jacek ; Ding, Yuantao ; Huang, Zhirong Publication Date: 2015-03-13 OSTI Identifier: 1180929 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-76SF0051 Type: Published

  10. Coherent structure in solar wind C{sup 6+}/C{sup 4+} ionic composition data during the quiet-sun conditions of 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Lynch, B. J.

    2013-11-20

    This analysis offers evidence of characteristic scale sizes in solar wind charge state data measured in situ for 13 quiet-Sun Carrington rotations in 2008. Using a previously established novel methodology, we analyze the wavelet power spectrum of the charge state ratio C{sup 6+}/C{sup 4+} measured in situ by ACE/SWICS for 2 hr and 12 minute cadence. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data to a resolution of 24 minutes. We analyze each wavelet power spectrum for transient coherency and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. From the significant wavelet power spectra, we find evidence for a general upper limit on individual transient coherency of ?10 days. We find evidence for a set of global periodicities between 4-5 hr and 35-45 days. We find evidence for the distribution of individual transient coherency scales consisting of two distinct populations. Below the ?2 day timescale, the distribution is reasonably approximated by an inverse power law, whereas for scales ?2 days, the distribution levels off, showing discrete peaks at common coherency scales. In addition, by organizing the transient coherency scale distributions by wind type, we find that these larger, common coherency scales are more prevalent and well defined in coronal hole wind. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field.

  11. WE-G-17A-07: Investigation of the Influence of the Electron Return Effect (ERE) On the Dose Distribution in Rectal Cancer Patients On a 1.5T MR-Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uilkema, S; Heide, U; Nijkamp, J; Sonke, J; Moreau, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this planning study is to investigate the influence of the ERE on the day-to-day dose distribution in rectal cancer patients, where changes in gas-pockets frequently occur. Methods: Daily CT scans of 5 patients treated neo-adjuvant with 5x5Gy for rectal cancer were used. We optimized two plans on the planning CT (Monaco, 1 mm3 dosegrid), a conventional 7-field 6MV IMRT plan (Dconv) and a plan in the presence of a 1.5T field (Dmrl). We recalculated the plans on all repeat-CT scans and evaluated under/over-dosage of the daily CTVs. Changes of more than 1% were considered significant. In the bowel area, we investigated the relative dose changes due to the ERE, where the contribution of the ERE was separated from other effects such as attenuation. Results: Both plans were comparable and compliant with ICRU 62 for all patients. For 2 fractions in one patient under-dosage in the CTV was significant, due to a disappearing gas-pocket. Here the V95 was 96.82 and 97.36% in in Dmrl compared to 98.85 and 98.66% in Dconv, respectively. For 3 fractions in another patient appearing gas-pockets resulted in significant over-dosage of the CTV. In these fractions the V107 was 1.882.68% in Dmrl compared to 0.331.27% in Dconv. In the bowel area the dose changes attributable to the ERE were approximately 5% in 1cc, at low dose levels. Conclusion: We were able to calculate acceptable treatment plans with and without a magnetic field. The ERE was present in the Dmrl, but the volumetric effect within the CTV was limited. Outside the CTV relative dose differences were similar, but on small volumes at lower, less relevant dose levels. This suggests that there is no clinical relevant ERE on dose distributions in rectal cancer patients on a 1.5T MR-Linac.

  12. Impact assisted segmented cutterhead

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Larson, David A. (Minneapolis, MN); Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, MN)

    1992-01-01

    An impact assisted segmented cutterhead device is provided for cutting various surfaces from coal to granite. The device comprises a plurality of cutting bit segments deployed in side by side relationship to form a continuous cutting face and a plurality of impactors individually associated with respective cutting bit segments. An impactor rod of each impactor connects that impactor to the corresponding cutting bit segment. A plurality of shock mounts dampening the vibration from the associated impactor. Mounting brackets are used in mounting the cutterhead to a base machine.

  13. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor (Idaho Falls, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  14. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  15. FUEL CASK IMPACT LIMITER VULNERABILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leduc, D; Jeffery England, J; Roy Rothermel, R

    2009-02-09

    Cylindrical fuel casks often have impact limiters surrounding just the ends of the cask shaft in a typical 'dumbbell' arrangement. The primary purpose of these impact limiters is to absorb energy to reduce loads on the cask structure during impacts associated with a severe accident. Impact limiters are also credited in many packages with protecting closure seals and maintaining lower peak temperatures during fire events. For this credit to be taken in safety analyses, the impact limiter attachment system must be shown to retain the impact limiter following Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) impacts. Large casks are often certified by analysis only because of the costs associated with testing. Therefore, some cask impact limiter attachment systems have not been tested in real impacts. A recent structural analysis of the T-3 Spent Fuel Containment Cask found problems with the design of the impact limiter attachment system. Assumptions in the original Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) concerning the loading in the attachment bolts were found to be inaccurate in certain drop orientations. This paper documents the lessons learned and their applicability to impact limiter attachment system designs.

  16. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Secretary of Energy Advisory Board June 17, 2015 By Sharlene Weatherwax Associate Director of Science for Biological and Environmental Research The Department of Energy's Activities Supporting the Life and Medical Sciences 1 Office of Science By the numbers Shown is a portion of SLAC's two-mile-long linear accelerator (or linac), which provides the electron beam for the new Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) - the world's first hard x-ray, free-electron laser. For nearly 50 years, SLAC's linac

  17. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Uranium Leasing...

  18. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact Technology Catalyst: ...

  19. High intensity SRF proton linac workshop (vugraphs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rusnak, B.A.

    1995-11-01

    The meeting is divided into four sections. The first section is the general introduction and included opening remarks and an overview of APT (accelerator product of tritium). The second section contains vugraphs from the cavity-structures working group. The third section is comprised of vugraphs from the couplers and rf working group. And the fourth section contains vugraphs of the system integration group.

  20. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular imaging based on endogenous contrast of haemoglobin. For all these applications, sensitivity is orders of magnitude higher than for spontaneous emission or absorption contrast, permitting nonfluorescent reporters for molecular imaging. Although we did not accomplish the original goal of detecting single-molecule by CARS, our quest for high sensitivity of nonlinear optical microscopy paid off in providing the two brand new enabling technologies. Both techniques were greatly benefited from the use of high frequency modulation for microscopy, which led to orders of magnitude increase in sensitivity. Extensive efforts have been made on optics and electronics to accomplish these breakthroughs.