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1

Airborne Process Commercial Scale Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCPI 2) CCPI 2) contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Mustang Clean Energy, LLC, a subsidiary of Peabody Energy St. Louis, MO. Airborne Process(tm) commerciAl scAle DemonstrAtion ProgrAm (withDrAwn Prior to AwArD) Project Description Mustang Clean Energy will design, construct, and operate a full scale sodium-based multi-pollutant scrubber in conjunction with a revenue-generating fertilizer by-product processing plant at Mustang Energy Company, LLC's Mustang Generating Station. Both Mustang Clean Energy and Mustang Energy Company are subsidiaries of Peabody Energy, the world's largest coal company. The 300 MW (net) station will

2

DOE/EA-1472: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Commercial Demonstration of the Low NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air Integration System Emission Reduction Technology (03/11/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPACT IMPACT COMMERCIAL DEMONSRATION OF THE LOW NOx BURNER/SEPARATED OVER- FIRE AIR (LNB/SOFA) INTEGRATON SYSTEM EMISSION REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY HOLCOMB STATION SUNFLOWER ELECTRIC POWER CORPORATION FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower's Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The Holcomb Station would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NO,

3

Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) contacts Brad tomer Acting Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O....

4

NETL: PPII - Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project Documents - Industrial Applications Demonstration Project Documents - Industrial Applications Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash - Project Brief [PDF-72KB] Universal Aggregates, LLC, King George County, VA PROJECT FACT SHEET Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash [PDF-412KB] (Feb 2008) PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Report Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Absorber Ash [PDF-4.5MB] (Nov 2007) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash: A DOE Assessment [PDF-170KB] (Mar 2008)

5

NETL: PPII - Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash - Project Brief PDF-72KB Universal Aggregates, LLC, King George County, VA...

6

Rocketdyne Gasifier Development Up to Pre-Commercial Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rocketdyne Gasifier Development Up to Pre-Commercial Demonstration Readiness FY05 FY09 FY06 FY07 FY08 Install high pressure pump Long term tests Dynamic refractory coupon tests at...

7

DOE-Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration DOE-Supported Coal Cleaning Technology Succeeds in Commercial Demonstration January 4, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A novel technology that could help release some of the currently unusable energy in an estimated 2 billion tons of U.S. coal waste has been successfully demonstrated by a Department of Energy (DOE) supported project. The full-scale test of the advanced hyperbaric centrifuge technology at a Jim Walter Resources Inc. coal-cleaning plant in Alabama resulted in the successful reduction of moisture from ultrafine coal waste. The test builds on an eight-year cooperative effort between the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Virginia

8

Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field Cameron Parish, Louisiana Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field Cameron Parish, Louisiana Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Geopressured Resources Project Description Within the Sweet Lake Oil and Gas Field, the existence of a geopressured-geothermal system was confirmed in the 1980s as part of the DOE's Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program. At the close of that program it was determined that the energy prices at the time could not support commercial production of the resource. Increased electricity prices and technological advancements over the last two decades, combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and job creation it would entail, provide the opportunity to develop thousands of megawatts of geopressured-geothermal power in the South Eastern United States.

9

EA-1472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated 472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Finnety County, Kansas EA-1472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Finnety County, Kansas SUMMARY The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower's Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas.

10

Electric G-Van demonstration and commercial assessment project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute was awarded this grant to continue the joint effort initiated by EPRI, and VE International to proceed beyond the prototype phase of the electric G-Van development. The goal of EPRI and VEHMA was to develop a market for the electric G-Van, and to distribute them to commercial fleet operators. The objective of this project was to produce G-Vans in a production facility that would be comparable to the GMC Truck internal combustion engine Vandura Van produced by General Motors in quality, reliability, durability and safety. An initial market assessment/demonstration phase of sixty (60) vehicles was to be undertaken, with the ability to expand production volume quickly to meet market demands. Brief description of each task of this grant is given and the actions taken by EPRI to complete them.

Braga, B.D. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Commercial Demonstration of Wood Recovery, Recycling, and Value Adding Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This commercial demonstration project demonstrated the technical feasibility of converting low-value, underutilized and waste stream solid wood fiber material into higher valued products. With a growing need to increase product/production yield and reduce waste in most sawmills, few recovery operations and practically no data existed to support the viability of recovery operations. Prior to our efforts, most all in the forest products industry believed that recovery was difficult, extremely labor intensive, not cost effective, and that recovered products had low value and were difficult to sell. This project provided an opportunity for many within the industry to see through demonstration that converting waste stream material into higher valued products does in fact offer a solution. Our work, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, throughout the project aimed to demonstrate a reasonable approach to reducing the millions of recoverable solid wood fiber tons that are annually treated as and converted into low value chips, mulch and fuel. Consequently sawmills continue to suffer from reduced availability of forest resources, higher raw material costs, growing waste disposal problems, increased global competition, and more pressure to operate in an Environmentally Friendly manner. It is our belief (based upon the experience of this project) that the successful mainstreaming of the recovery concept would assist in alleviating this burden as well as provide for a realistically achievable economic benefit to those who would seriously pursue the concept and tap into the rapidly growing ''GREEN'' building marketplace. Ultimately, with participation and aggressive pursuit of the recovery concept, the public would benefit in that: (1) Landfill/disposal waste volume could be reduced adding greater life to existing municipal landfill sites thereby minimizing the need to prematurely license and open added facilities. Also, there would be a cost avoidance benefit associated to what would have been the added municipal (community) management costs involved with maintaining closed landfills. (2) With greater quantities of recovered material being returned to and integrated into manufacturing and the marketplace, reduced demand upon virgin wood sources could help lead the way to promoting improved relations and environmental balance between producers and consumers further expanding the value of our natural resource without adding environmental burden.

Auburn Machinery, Inc.

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Small Commercial Customer Energy Management System Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's Energy Management Systems (EMS) serve the needs of high-end commercial building owners who can afford the high equipment and installation expense. These systems include sophisticated hardware and software for load and process control, monitoring, communications, and user interface. An EMS market also exists for the small commercial class of building with similar needs, but at a reduced cost and less technical complexity.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012, and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012, and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012, and 2013 4.6_ERI_2142_07_1001_DOE_Potential_Market_Impact_Dec2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012 and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of

14

EA-1472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472: Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox BurnerSeparated Over-Fire Air (LNBSOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power...

15

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012 and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012 and 2013 A stuy of the potential impact of commerical markets of the Department of Energy's authoriziaton of uranium transfers to fund accelerated cleanup activities at the Portsmouth Site in Piketon, Ohio ERI_2142_07_1001_DOE_Potential_Market_Impact_Dec2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of DOE's Transfer of Natural Uranium Hexaflouride During Calendar Years 2011, 2012, and 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of

16

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Uranium Inventory During Calendar Year 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of Introduction of the...

17

Commercialization strategy for the Department of Energy's Solar Buildings Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts reported include: conducting a survey of existing commercial demonstration projects, categorizing these projects, determining criteria for evaluating the feasibility of continuing/aborting demonstration projects, and applying the criteria and making recommendations for which projects to continue and abort. It is recommended to refurbish 114 of the projects examined and to abandon 41. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Final report on the energy edge impact evaluation of 28 new, low-energy commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the Energy Edge Impact Evaluation. It is the fourth and final report in a series of project impact evaluation reports. Energy Edge is a research-oriented demonstration of energy efficiency in 28 new commercial buildings. Beginning in 1985,the project, sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), was developed to evaluate the potential for electricity conservation in new commercial buildings. By focusing on the construction of new commercial buildings, Energy Edge meets the region`s goal of capturing otherwise lost opportunities to accomplish energy conservation. That is, the best time to add an energy-efficiency measure to a building is during the construction phase.

Piette, M.A.; Diamond, R.; Nordman, B. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Uranium Inventory During Calendar Year 2013 Quantification of the Potential Impact on Commercial Markets of Introduction of the Enrichment Services Component of DOE Low Enriched Uranium Inventory During Calendar Year 2013 This report presents the results of a business analysis performed by Energy Resources International, Inc. (ERI) of the potential impact on the commercial enrichment market of the transfer of the enrichment services component (Separative Work Units or SWU) contained in DOE low enriched uranium (LEU) inventory during 2013. Under this transaction, 299,000 kg SWU would be introduced into the commercial market, but no transfer of natural uranium to the commercial market would take place.

20

West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FINAL SUMMARY December 2003 Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Area Office West Valley, NY DOE/EIS - 0337F For general questions or to request a copy of this EIS, please contact: DANIEL W. SULLIVAN, DOCUMENT MANAGER DOE WEST VALLEY AREA OFFICE 10282 Rock Springs Road WEST VALLEY, NY 14171-0191 1-800-633-5280 COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Title: Final West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement, Cattaraugus County, West Valley, New York. Contact: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the Department of Energy's process for implementing the National

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MHK Projects/Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.3658,"lon":-64.4294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Title Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-53605 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Nance Matson Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the air-handler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

23

Intertechnology Corporation proposed test and evaluation plan, commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has three major parts. The first of these derives the requirements for the Test and Evaluation plan from the System Level Plan which is summarized in Section II. The second part contains the proposed plan to fill these requirements and includes hardware and software recommendations as well as procedures and management considerations. Primary emphasis has been given to the remote site because this is the area in which the commercial part of the demonstration is most unique. Finally, some pre-demonstration activities are described. The pilot program is intended to resolve a number of issues which arose in the course of the T and E plan. These relate to choice of scan frequencies, compression algorithms, etc. It is also intended to confirm performance and cost effectiveness of the site data collection package. The base line measurements of attitudes, etc. provide a reference mark against which one can measure the non-technical effectiveness of the demonstration program. (WDM)

None

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WVDP Waste Management EIS WVDP Waste Management EIS S-3 Figure S-1. Location of the West Valley Demonstration Project Not to scale Final WVDP Waste Management EIS S-23 Table S-2. Summary of Normal Operational Impacts at West Valley Impact Area Unit of Measure No Action Alternative Alternative A - Preferred Alternative B Human Health Impacts a Public Impacts from Ongoing Operations MEI LCF 3.7 × 10 -7 3.7 × 10 -7 3.7 × 10 -7 Population LCF 1.5 × 10 -3 1.5 × 10 -3 1.5 × 10 -3 Worker Impacts Involved worker MEI LCF 3.4 × 10 -4 1.3 × 10 -3 1.3 × 10 -3 Noninvolved worker MEI LCF 3.0 × 10 -4 3.0 × 10 -4 3.0 × 10 -4 Involved worker population LCF 2.1 × 10 -3 0.031 0.031 Noninvolved worker population LCF 0.075 0.075 0.075 Total worker population LCF 0.077 0.11 0.11

25

COMMERCIALIZATION DEMONSTRATION OF MID-SIZED SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR ELECTRIC UTILITYAPPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an outgrowth of the Technology Reinvestment Program of the 1990s, an Agreement was formed between BWXT and the DOE to promote the commercialization of Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) technology. Business and marketing studies showed that the performance of electric transmission lines could be improved with this SMES technology by stabilizing the line thereby allowing the reserved stability margin to be used. One main benefit sought was to double the capacity and the amount of energy flow on an existing transmission line by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin, thereby doubling revenue. Also, electrical disturbances, power swings, oscillations, cascading disturbances and brown/black-outs could be mitigated and rendered innocuous; thereby improving power quality and reliability. Additionally, construction of new transmission lines needed for increased capacity could be delayed or perhaps avoided (with significant savings) by enabling the use of the reserved stability margin of the existing lines. Two crucial technical aspects were required; first, a large, powerful, dynamic, economic and reliable superconducting magnet, capable of oscillating power flow was needed; and second, an electrical power interface and control to a transmission line for testing, demonstrating and verifying the benefits and features of the SMES system was needed. A project was formed with the goals of commercializing the technology by demonstrating SMES technology for utility applications and to establish a domestic capability for manufacturing large superconducting magnets for both commercial and defense applications. The magnet had very low AC losses to support the dynamic and oscillating nature of the stabilizing power flow. Moreover, to economically interface to the transmission line, the magnet had the largest operating voltage ever made. The manufacturing of that design was achieved by establishing a factory with newly designed and acquired equipment, tooling, methods and skilled personnel. The final magnet system measured 14 feet in diameter, 10 feet in height, and weighed about 35 tons. The superconducting magnet and design technology was successfully implemented and demonstrated. The project was not successfully concluded however; as the critical planned final demonstration was not achieved. The utilities could not understand or clarify their future business needs and the regulatory requirements, because of the deregulation policies and practices of the country. Much uncertainty existed which prevented utilities from defining business plans, including asset allocation and cost recovery. Despite the technical successes and achievements, the commercial development could not be implemented and achieved. Thus, the demonstration of this enhancement to the utilitys transmission system and to the reliability of the nations electrical grid was not achieved. The factory was ultimately discontinued and the technology, equipment and product were placed in storage.

CHARLES M. WEBER

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

26

West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMARY April 2003 Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Area Office West Valley, NY For general questions or to request a copy of this EIS, please contact: DANIEL W. SULLIVAN, DOCUMENT MANAGER DOE WEST VALLEY AREA OFFICE P.O. BOX 191 WEST VALLEY, NY 14171-0191 1-800-633-5280 COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Title: Draft West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement, Cattaraugus County, West Valley, New York. Contact: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the Department of Energy's process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Daniel W. Sullivan Document Manager DOE West Valley Area Office

27

West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 2003 Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Area Office West Valley, NY For general questions or to request a copy of this EIS, please contact: DANIEL W. SULLIVAN, DOCUMENT MANAGER DOE-WEST VALLEY AREA OFFICE P.O. BOX 191 WEST VALLEY, NY 14171-0191 1-800-633-5280 COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Title: Draft West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement, Cattaraugus County, West Valley, New York. Contact: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the Department of Energy's process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Daniel W. Sullivan Document Manager DOE-West Valley Area Office

28

Commercial-Scale Tests Demonstrate Secure CO2 Storage in Underground Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CommerCial-SCale TeSTS DemonSTraTe CommerCial-SCale TeSTS DemonSTraTe SeCure Co 2 STorage in unDergrounD FormaTionS Two industry-led commercial-scale projects, the Sleipner Project off the coast of Norway and the Weyburn Project in Ontario, Canada, have enhanced the option of sequestering carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in underground geologic formations. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) collaborated in both projects, primarily by providing rigorous monitoring of the injected CO 2 and studying CO 2 behavior to a greater extent than the project operators would have pursued on their own - creating a mutually beneficial public/private partnership. The most significant outcome from both field projects is that CO 2 leakage has not been observed, nor is there any indication that CO 2 will leak in the future.

29

Advanced commercial survey methods (COMSURV). Volume 1. Demonstration of tailored versus general questionnaires. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the results of a demonstration to assess the effects of questionnaire design on response rates, data quality, and general questionnaire performance in commercial sector surveys. With the cooperation of the Virginia Power Company (VEPCO), the concept of tailoring the questionnaire to specific types of commercial establishments was tested in a survey of food stores and office buildings. Tailoring involves the use of trade-specific language, questions about specialized equipment, and special instructions. One result of this study was the demonstration that it is possible to collect detailed trade-specific information with a tailored mail survey instrument. It was also expected that tailoring would improve both overall response rates and question-specific response rates, but this does not appear to be the case. In fact, the results indicate that tailored questionnaires may decrease overall response rates since misclassified units are less likely to respond. In view of this, some guidelines for the use of tailored survey instruments are presented. This report also contains numerous comparisons of the VEPCO survey results with results from the Nonresidential Building Energy Consumption Survey (NBECS). The comparisons reveal that the mail survey technique did provide estimates which compared reasonably with larger-scale on-site surveys.

McCarthy, P.M.; Bernstein, H.M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Preparation for commercial demonstration of biomass-to-ethanol conversion technology. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to complete the development of a commercially viable process to produce fuel ethanol from renewable cellulosic biomass. The program focused on pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation technologies where Amoco has a unique proprietary position. Assured access to low-cost feedstock is a cornerstone of attractive economics for cellulose to ethanol conversion in the 1990s. Most of Amoco`s efforts in converting cellulosic feedstocks to ethanol before 1994 focused on using paper from municipal solid waste as the feed. However, while many municipalities and MSW haulers expressed interest in Amoco`s technology, none were willing to commit funding to process development. In May, 1994 several large agricultural products companies showed interest in Amoco`s technology, particularly for application to corn fiber. Amoco`s initial work with corn fiber was encouraging. The project work plan was designed to provide sufficient data on corn fiber conversion to convince a major agriculture products company to participate in the construction of a commercial demonstration facility.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase methanol (LPMEOH) Process A DOE Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program seeks to offer the energy marketplace more efficient and environmentally benign coal utilization technology options by demonstrating them in industrial settings. This document is a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of one of the projects selected in Round III of the CCT Program, the commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process, initially described in a Report to Congress by DOE in 1992. Methanol is an important, large-volume chemical with many uses. The desire to demonstrate a new process for the production of methanol from coal, prompted Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to submit a proposal to DOE. In October 1992, DOE awarded a cooperative agreement to Air Products to conduct this project. In March 1995, this cooperative agreement was transferred to Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership), a partnership between Air Products and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman). DOE provided 43 percent of the total project funding of $213.7 million. Operation of the LPMEOH Demonstration Unit, which is sited at Eastman's chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport, Tennessee, commenced in April 1997. Although operation of the CCT project was completed in December 2002, Eastman continues to operate the LPMEOH Demonstration Unit for the production of methanol. The independent evaluation contained herein is based primarily on information from Volume 2 of the project's Final Report (Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Co., L.P. 2003), as well as other references cited.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

32

Electric G-Van demonstration and commercial assessment project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute was awarded this grant to continue the joint effort initiated by EPRI, and VE International to proceed beyond the prototype phase of the electric G-Van development. The goal of EPRI and VEHMA was to develop a market for the electric G-Van, and to distribute them to commercial fleet operators. The objective of this project was to produce G-Vans in a production facility that would be comparable to the GMC Truck internal combustion engine Vandura Van produced by General Motors in quality, reliability, durability and safety. An initial market assessment/demonstration phase of sixty (60) vehicles was to be undertaken, with the ability to expand production volume quickly to meet market demands. Brief description of each task of this grant is given and the actions taken by EPRI to complete them.

Braga, B.D. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)] [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

COMMERCIAL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF THE LIQUID PHASE METHANOL (LPMEOH) PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Clean Coal Technology Program to demonstrate the production of methanol from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), has completed the 69-month operating phase of the program. The purpose of this Final Report for the ''Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process'' is to provide the public with details on the performance and economics of the technology. The LPMEOH{trademark} Demonstration Project was a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the DOE and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership). The DOE's cost share was $92,708,370 with the remaining funds coming from the Partnership. The LPMEOH{trademark} demonstration unit is located at the Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport, Tennessee. The technology was the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOH{trademark} Process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern coal gasifiers. Originally tested at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU), a small, DOE-owned process development facility in LaPorte, Texas, the technology provides several improvements essential for the economic coproduction of methanol and electricity directly from gasified coal. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst, and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates. The LPMEOH{trademark} Demonstration Project accomplished the objectives set out in the Cooperative Agreement with DOE for this Clean Coal Technology project. Overall plant availability (defined as the percentage of time that the LPMEOH{trademark} demonstration unit was able to operate, with the exclusion of scheduled outages) was 97.5%, and the longest operating run without interruption of any kind was 94 days. Over 103.9 million gallons of methanol was produced; Eastman accepted all of the available methanol for use in the production of methyl acetate, and ultimately cellulose acetate and acetic acid.

E.C. Heydorn; B.W. Diamond; R.D. Lilly

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Over the energy edge: Results from a seven year new commercial buildings research and demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

Edge was a research oriented demonstration project that began in 1985. Twenty-eight commercial buildings were designed and constructed to use 30% less electricity than a hypothetical simulated baseline building. Average savings from the 18 buildings evaluated with post-occupancy, ``tuned`` simulation models were less, at 17%. The cost-effectiveness of the energy-efficiency measures at six of the 18 projects met the target cost-of-conserved (CCE) energy of 5.6cent/kWh for the total package of measures. The most important reason energy savings were not as great as predicted is that the actual, installed energy-efficiency measures and building characteristics changed from the design assumptions. The cost effectiveness of the measures would have been greater if the baseline was common practice rather than assumptions based on the regional building code. For example, the Energy Edge small offices use about 30% to 50% less energy than comparable new buildings. Savings also would have been greater if commissioning had been included within the program. Future projects should consider lower-cost ``hands-on`` evaluation techniques that provide direct feedback on measure performance based on functional and diagnostic testing, with annual check-ups to ensure persistence of savings.

Piette, M.A.; Nordman, B.; deBuen, O.; Diamond, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Codey, B. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(TM)) Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOHTM) Demonstration Project at Kingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership). Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) formed the Partnership to execute the Demonstration Project. The LPMEOIYM Process Demonstration Unit was built at a site located at the Eastman complex in Kingsport. During this quarter, comments from the DOE on the Topical Report "Economic Analysis - LPMEOHTM Process as an Add-on to IGCC for Coproduction" were received. A recommendation to continue with design verification testing for the coproduction of dimethyl ether (DIME) and methanol was made. DME design verification testing studies show the liquid phase DME (LPDME) process will have a significant economic advantage for the coproduction of DME for local markets. An LPDME catalyst system with reasonable long-term activity and stability is being developed. A recommendation document summarizing catalyst targets, experimental results, and the corresponding economics for a commercially successful LPDME catalyst was issued on 30 June 1997. The off-site, product-use test plan was updated in June of 1997. During this quarter, Acurex Environmental Corporation and Air Products screened proposals for this task by the likelihood of the projects to proceed and the timing for the initial methanol requirement. Eight sites from the list have met these criteria. The formal submission of the eight projects for review and concurrence by the DOE will be made during the next reporting period. The site paving and final painting were completed in May of 1997. Start-up activities were completed during the reporting period, and the initial methanol production from the demonstration unit occurred on 02 April 1997. The first extended stable operation at the nameplate capacity of 80,000 gallons per day (260 tons per day) took place on 06 April 1997. Pressure drop and resistance coefficient across the gas sparger at the bottom of the reactor increased over this initial operating period. The demonstration unit was shut down from 08 May -17 June 1997 as part of a scheduled complex outage for the Kingsport site. During this outage, the gas sparger was removed, cleaned, and reinstalled. After completion of other maintenance activities, the demonstration unit was restarted, and maintained stable operation through the remainder of the reporting period. Again, the gas sparger showed an increase in pressure drop and resistance since the restart, although not as rapidly as during the April-May operation. Fresh oil was introduced online for the first time to a new flush connection on the gas inlet line to the reactov the flush lowered the pressure drop by 1 psi. However, the effects were temporary, and the sparger resistance coefficient continued to increase. Additional flushing with both fresh oil and entrained slurry recovered in the cyclone and secondary oil knock-out drum will be attempted in order to stabilize the sparger resistance coefficient.

None

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The abundance of coal in the United States makes it one of our Nation's most important strategic resources in building a secure energy future. With today's prices and technology, recoverable reserves located in the United States could supply the Nation's coal consumption for approximately 250 years at current usage rates. However, if coal is to reach its full potential as an environmentally acceptable source of energy, an expanded menu of advanced clean coal technologies must be developed to provide substantially improved options both for the consumer and private industry. Before any technology can be seriously considered for commercialization, it must be demonstrated at a sufficiently large-scale to develop industry confidence in its technical and economic feasibility. The implementation of a federal technology demonstration program is the established means of accelerating the development of technology to meet national energy strategy and environmental policy goals, to reduce the risk to human health and the environment to an acceptable level, to accelerate commercialization, and to provide the incentives required for continued activity in research and development directed at providing solutions to long-range energy problems. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

N /A

2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

37

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, U.S. DepartmentProspective Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for2. US Residential and Commercial Primary Energy Consumption

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design of retail electricity tariffs and want to understandof commercial electricity tariffs, elucidates the principlesand design of retail electricity tariffs can impact the

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Oklahoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Oklahoma September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN OKLAHOMA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN OKLAHOMA Oklahoma Summary Oklahoma has no statewide commercial code, therefore for this state comparison, DOE has selected Standard 90.1-1999 as the baseline standard for the analysis. Standard 90.1-2007 would substantially improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Oklahoma. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in

42

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Mississippi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi Mississippi September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSISSIPPI BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSISSIPPI Mississippi Summary Mississippi has no statewide commercial code, therefore for this state comparison, DOE has selected Standard 90.1-1999 as the baseline standard for the analysis. Standard 90.1-2007 would substantially improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Mississippi. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in

43

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - North Dakota  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dakota Dakota September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NORTH DAKOTA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NORTH DAKOTA North Dakota Summary North Dakota has no statewide commercial code, therefore for this state comparison, DOE has selected Standard 90.1-1999 as the baseline standard for the analysis. Standard 90.1-2007 would substantially improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in North Dakota. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007

44

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 on Commercial Buildings at State Level - Alabama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alabama Alabama September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN ALABAMA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN ALABAMA Alabama Summary Alabama has no statewide commercial code, therefore for this state comparison, DOE has selected Standard 90.1-1999 as the baseline standard for the analysis. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Alabama. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

45

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

Page, Janie; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Chiu, Albert K.; Kellow, Bashar; Koch, Ed; Lipkin, Paul

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

General Electric Company design review manual, commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual is intended to serve as a guide to the Solar Energy Division of ERDA for preparing instructions for and evaluating the proposals resulting from the issuance of Program Opportunity Notices (PON's) for Commercial Buildings. The manual is meant to amplify Program Opportunity Notice DSE-75-2, with respect to site, building, and system selection and evaluation. The manual contains two major sections, one addressing the project concept and the other the design features. The project concept section provides for a description and evaluation of the site, the commercial building, the system application, the system predicted performance, and the long term economics of the application. The projects could be screened using the information from this section alone. Projects that remain acceptable can be further evaluated through design considerations as outlined in the second section. (WDM)

None

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assessment and Demonstration of Advanced Heat Pumps for Commercial Building Water Heating Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWH) are an alternative to electric resistance or natural gas for domestic water heating. HPWHs are less common than other water heating technologies, but offer the potential for improved energy efficiency and potential for reduction of net CO2 emissions. New products, mainly for residential application, have been introduced to the American market over the last 2 years, which have been previously reviewed by EPRI. This report focuses on commercial applications and provides initi...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Roadmap for Power Quality Mitigation Technology Demonstration Projects at Commercial Customer Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power quality has emerged as an important issue for the commercial customer segment. Historically, power quality issues have been the domain of electric utilities, which focused on reducing or eliminating power outages. However, the recent proliferation in office use of electronic equipment and microprocessor-based controls has caused electric utilities to redefine power quality in terms of the quality of voltage supply rather than availability of power. This document provides a screening tool for utilit...

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cumberland County College Fish Barn: An Aquaculture Education and Commercial Demonstration Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumberland County College has developed a commercial scale aquaculture production and teaching facility. When fully operational, this facility will allow for the production of 100,000 pounds of tilapia per year and be adaptable to other fish species with some modifications. A greenhouse section of the facility will be added to provide hydroponic vegetable and aquatic plant production. This will allow the use of nutrients present in aquaculture waters and fish wastes to be utilized for improved plant prod...

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Kentucky  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Kentucky September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN KENTUCKY BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN KENTUCKY Kentucky Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Kentucky. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

51

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - New Jersey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jersey Jersey September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW JERSEY BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW JERSEY New Jersey Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, Standard 90.1- 2004. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in New Jersey. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost savings.

52

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - North Carolina  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carolina Carolina September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NORTH CAROLINA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NORTH CAROLINA North Carolina Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in North Carolina. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007

53

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Iowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iowa Iowa September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN IOWA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN IOWA Iowa Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Iowa. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost

54

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Maryland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maryland Maryland September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN MARYLAND BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN MARYLAND Maryland Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 1 . Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Maryland. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

55

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Arkansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arkansas Arkansas September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN ARKANSAS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN ARKANSAS Arkansas Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Arkansas. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

56

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Nevada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEVADA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEVADA Nevada Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Nevada. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost

57

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Montana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana Montana September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN MONTANA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN MONTANA Montana Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Montana. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

58

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - New Hampshire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Hampshire New Hampshire September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE New Hampshire Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 1 . Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in New Hampshire. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy

59

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Ohio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Ohio September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN OHIO BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN OHIO Ohio Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Ohio. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost

60

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utah Utah September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN UTAH BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN UTAH Utah Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Utah. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Rhode Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND Rhode Island Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Rhode Island. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted

62

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Colorado Colorado September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN COLORADO BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN COLORADO Colorado Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Colorado. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

63

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Connecticut  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connecticut Connecticut September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN CONNECTICUT BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN CONNECTICUT Connecticut Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 1 . Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Connecticut. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

64

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico Mexico September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW MEXICO BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW MEXICO New Mexico Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in New Mexico. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

65

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Idaho  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Idaho September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN IDAHO BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN IDAHO Idaho Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Idaho. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost

66

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN KANSAS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN KANSAS Kansas Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Kansas. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost

67

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - New York  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

York York September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW YORK BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW YORK New York Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in New York. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

68

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Nebraska  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Nebraska September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEBRASKA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN NEBRASKA Nebraska Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Nebraska. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and

69

Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash  

SciTech Connect

Universal Aggregates LLC (UA) was awarded a cost sharing Co-operative Agreement from the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Power Plant Improvement Initiative Program (PPII) to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia in October 2001. The Agreement was signed in November 2002. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the UA share is $12.3 million (63%). The original project team consists of UA, SynAggs, LLC, CONSOL Energy Inc. and P. J. Dick, Inc. Using 115,000 ton per year of spray dryer ash (SDA), a dry FGD by-product from the power station, UA will produce 167,000 tons of manufactured lightweight aggregate for use in production of concrete masonry units (CMU). Manufacturing aggregate from FGD by-products can provide an economical high-volume use and substantially expand market for FGD by-products. Most of the FGD by-products are currently disposed of in landfills. Construction of the Birchwood Aggregate Facility was completed in March 2004. Operation startup was begun in April 2004. Plant Integration was initiated in December 2004. Integration includes mixing, extrusion, curing, crushing and screening. Lightweight aggregates with proper size gradation and bulk density were produced from the manufacturing aggregate plant and loaded on a stockpile for shipment. The shipped aggregates were used in a commercial block plant for CMU production. However, most of the production was made at low capacity factors and for a relatively short time in 2005. Several areas were identified as important factors to improve plant capacity and availability. Equipment and process control modifications and curing vessel clean up were made to improve plant operation in the first half of 2006. About 3,000 tons of crushed aggregate was produced in August 2006. UA is continuing to work to improve plant availability and throughput capacity and to produce quality lightweight aggregate for use in commercial applications.

Milton Wu; Paul Yuran

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LOMEOH(TM)) Process  

SciTech Connect

The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOEP") Demonstration Project at K.ingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L, P. (the Partnership). The LPMEOHY Process Demonstration Unit is being built at a site located at the Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) complex in Kingsport. On 4 October 1994, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and signed the agreements that would form the Partnership, secure the demonstration site, and provide the financial commitment and overall project management for the project. These partnership agreements became effective on 15 March 1995, when DOE authorized the commencement of Budget Period No. 2 (Mod. AO08 to the Cooperative Agreement). The Partnership has subcontracted with Air Products to provide the overall management of the project, and to act as the primary interface with DOE. As subcontractor to the Partnership, Air Products will also provide the engineering design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of the LPMEOHTM Process Demonstration Unit, and will provide the technical and engineering supervision needed to conduct the operational testing program required as part of the project. As subcontractor to Air Products, Eastman will be responsible for operation of the LPMEOHTM Process Demonstration Unit, and for the interconnection and supply of synthesis gas, utilities, product storage, and other needed sewices. The project involves the construction of an 80,000 gallons per day (260 tons-per-day (TPD)) methanol unit utilizing coal-derived synthesis gas fi-om Eastman's integrated coal gasification facility. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression facilities, the liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation facilities, and utilities. The technology to be demonstrated is the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOHTM process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern day coal gasifiers. Originally tested at a small 3,200 gallons per day, DOE-owned experimental unit in LaPorte, Texas, the technology provides several improvements essential for the economic coproduction of methanol and electricity directly from gasified coal. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Analysis of Energy Saving Impacts of New Commercial Energy Codes for the Gulf Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Report on an analysis of the energy savings and cost impacts associated with the use of newer and more efficiently commercial building energy codes in the states of Louisiana and Mississippi.

Halverson, Mark A.; Gowri, Krishnan; Richman, Eric E.

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Estimating the Economic Impact for the Commercial Hard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Estimating the Economic Impact for the Commercial Hard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy Commercially cultured hard clams have become the single most economically important food item grown hard clams have equaled or exceeded the growth realized by the more established aquaculture sectors

Florida, University of

73

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three-month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background information regarding the work to be completed in Phase III may be found in the revised proposal submitted in response to A Request for Extension of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated May 29, 1998 and the Continuing Applications of DE-FC21-95MC32267, dated March 31, 1999 and November 19, 1999.

Siemens Westinghouse

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Arizona  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona Arizona September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN ARIZONA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN ARIZONA Arizona Summary Arizona is a "home rule" state with no mandatory state-wide commercial energy code. However, many counties and cities have adopted an energy efficiency code, most often the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), therefore the 2006 IECC was used as the base code in the analysis. Standard 90.1-

77

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Wisconsin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wisconsin Wisconsin September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN Wisconsin Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments. The Wisconsin amendments did not affect any simulation inputs. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in

78

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A-1 A-1 APPENDIX A CONSULTATION LETTERS This appendix includes consultation/approval letters between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service regarding threatened and endangered species, and between other state and Federal agencies as needed. Consultation Letters A-2 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-3 Consultation Letters A-4 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-5 Consultation Letters A-6 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement A-7 Consultation Letters A-8 Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement B-1 APPENDIX B NOTICE OF INTENT TO PREPARE AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR THE

79

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the period April--June, 1996 for the utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technical readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration program. The topics of the report include NEPA information, ATS engine design, integrated program plan, closed loop cooling, thin wall casting development, rotor air sealing development, compressor aerodynamic development, turbine aerodynamic development, phase 3 advanced air sealing development, active tip clearance control, combustion system development, ceramic ring segment, advanced thermal barrier coating development, steam cooling effects, directionally solidified blade development, single crystal blade development program, advanced vane alloy development, blade and vane life prediction, nickel based alloy rotor, and plans for the next reporting period.

NONE

1996-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Floor Sweeper-Scrubbers: Demonstration of Advanced Lead-Acid Batteries and High-Power Charging in Commercial Warehouse Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric walk-behind and riding floor scrubbers are in widespread and growing use in the commercial and industrial building sectors. This demonstration indicates that the weight, bulk, and battery capacity of existing equipment could be significantly reduced in equipment used for certain "spot-cleaning" and other limited use duty-cycles. Further, results show that for sealed lead-acid batteries, recharge rates on the same order as discharge rates are sufficient for extending peak daily run-time to 200 pe...

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - District of Columbia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2007 on Commercial Buildings in the District of Columbia September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA District of Columbia Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current code, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with an amendment to reference Standard 90.1-2007. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Connecticut. The analysis of the impact of

82

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Indiana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indiana Indiana September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN INDIANA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN INDIANA Indiana Summary Indiana has a commercial energy code based on the 1992 Model Energy Code. Since Indiana's code is an older code, DOE selected Standard 90.1-1999 as the baseline standard for the analysis. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Indiana. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-

83

Impacts of Regional Electricity Prices and Building Type on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To identify the impacts of regional electricity prices and building type on the economics of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, 207 rate structures across 77 locations and 16 commercial building types were evaluated. Results for expected solar value are reported for each location and building type. Aggregated results are also reported, showing general trends across various impact categories.

Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Clark, N.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Environmental management technology demonstration and commercialization: Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 8. Semiannual report, October 1994--March 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Environmental Management program at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize technologies that address the environmental management needs of contaminated sites, including characterization, sensors, and monitoring; low-level mixed waste processing; material disposition technology; improved waste forms; in situ containment and remediation; and efficient separation technologies for radioactive wastes. Task 2 is the extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 3, pyrolysis of plastics, has as its objectives to develop a commercial process to significantly reduce the volume of mixed-plastics-paper-resin waste contaminated with low-level radioactive material; concentrate contaminants in a collectible form; and determine the distribution and form of contaminants after pyrolysis of the mixed waste. Task 4, stabilization of vitrified wastes, has as its objectives to (1) demonstrate a waste vitrification procedure for enhanced stabilization of waste materials and (2) develop a testing protocol to understand the long-term leaching behavior of the stabilized waste form. The primary objective of Task 8, Management and reporting, is coordination of this project with other programs and opportunities. In addition, management oversight will be maintained to ensure that tasks are completed and coordinated as planned and that deliverables are submitted in a timely manner. Accomplishments to date is each task are described. 62 refs.

Hawthorne, S.B.; Ness, R.O. Jr.; Nowok, J.W.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.; Hurley, J.P.; Steadman, E.N.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Commercial Garage Lights In the Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

This U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Demonstration project studied the applicability of light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires for commercial parking garage applications. High-pressure sodium (HPS) area luminaires were replaced with new LED area luminaires. The project was supported under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solid State Lighting Program. Other participants in the demonstration project included Providence Portland Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, the Energy Trust of Oregon, and Lighting Sciences Group (LSG) Inc. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the measurements and analysis of the results. PNNL manages GATEWAY demonstrations for DOE and represents their perspective in the conduct of the work. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light and electrical power were taken at the site for both HPS and LED light sources. Economic costs were estimated and garage users responses to the new light sources were gauged with a survey. Six LED luminaires were installed in the below-ground parking level A, replacing six existing 150W HPS lamps spread out over two rows of parking spaces. Illuminance measurements were taken at floor level approximately every 4 ft on a 60-ft x 40-ft grid to measure light output of these LED luminaires which were termed the Version 1 luminaires. PNNL conducted power measurements of the circuit in the garage to which the 6 luminaires were connected and determined that they drew an average of 82 W per lamp. An improved LED luminaire, Version 2, was installed in Level B of the parking garage. Illuminance measurements were not made of this second luminaire on site due to higher traffic conditions, but photometric measurements of this lamp and Version 1 were made in an independent testing laboratory and power usage for Version 2 was also measured. Version 1 was found to produce 3600 lumens and Version 2 was found to produce 4700 lumens of light and to consume 78 Watts. Maximum and minimum light levels were measured for the HPS and LED Version 1 luminaires and projected for the Version 2 luminaires. Maximum light levels were 23.51 foot candles, 20.54 fc, and 26.7 fc respectively and minimum light levels were 1.49 fc, 1.45 fc, and 1.88 fc. These results indicate very similar or even slightly higher light levels produced by the LED lamps, despite the higher lumen output of the HPS lamp. The LED lamps provide higher luminaire efficacy because all of the light is directed down and out. None of it is lost in the fixture. Also the HPS luminaire had poorly designed optics and a plastic covering that tended to get dirty and cracked, further decreasing the realized light output.[is this an accurate way to say this?] Consumer perceptions of the Version 2 LED were collected via a written survey form given to maintenance and security personnel. More than half felt the LED luminaires provided more light than the HPS lamps and a majority expressed a preference for the new lamps when viewing the relamped area through a security camera. Respondents commented that the LED luminaires were less glary, created less shadows, had a positive impact on visibility, and improved the overall appearance of the area. PNNL conducted an economic analysis and found that the Version 1 lamp produced annual energy savings of 955 kWh and energy cost savings of $76.39 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $105.03 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL found that the Version 2 lamp produced annual energy savings of 991 kWh and energy cost savings of $79.26 per lamp at electricity rates of 6.5 cents per kWh and $108.98 at 11 cents per kWh. PNNL also calculated simple payback and found that Version 1 showed paybacks of 5.4 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 4.1 yrs at 11c/kWh while Version 2 showed paybacks of 5.2 yrs at 6.5c/kWh and 3.9 yrs at 11c/kWh.

Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

86

Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WESTERN WESTERN GREENBRIER CO-PRODUCTION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT VOLUME 1 OF 3 DOE / EIS-0361 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory NOVEMBER 2007 COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Title: Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0361) Location: Rainelle, West Virginia Contact: For further information about this Environmental Impact Statement, contact: For general information on the Department of Energy's process for implementing the National Environmental Policy Act, contact: Roy Spears, Document Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy 3610 Collins Ferry Road

87

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 U.S. Department of Energy Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement November 2002 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0318) Location: Clark County, Kentucky Contacts: For further information on this environmental For further information on the DOE National impact statement (EIS), call: Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, call: 1-800-432-8330 ext. 5460 1-800-472-2756 or contact: or contact: Mr. Roy Spears Ms. Carol Borgstrom

88

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Delaware  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Delaware September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE Delaware Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2001 IECC. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Delaware. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost savings. Main Differences Between the Current State Code and Standard 90.1-2007

89

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Louisiana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louisiana Louisiana September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN LOUISIANA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN LOUISIANA Louisiana Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, Standard 90.1- 2004. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Louisiana. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost savings. Main Differences Between the Current State Code and Standard 90.1-2007

90

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Virginia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia Virginia September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN VIRGINIA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN VIRGINIA Virginia Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. Standard 90.1-2007 would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings in Virginia. The analysis of the impact of Standard 90.1-2007 resulted in energy and cost savings. Main Differences Between the Current State Code and Standard 90.1-2007

91

Nome, Alaska, Wind Turbine Demonstration Project Finding of No Significant Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Nome, Alaska, Wind Turbine Demonstration Project FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT S U M M A R Y The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide DOE and other public agency decision makers witb tbe environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Nome, Alaska, Wind Turbine Demonstration Project (DOE/EA-1280). The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative i m p a c t s that would result from the jnstallation and operation of wind turbines in Nome, Alaska DOE'S role in the proposed action would be limited to providing ,$ding assistance for a portion of the construction and demonstration of wind energy technology in the

92

Task 38 - commercial mercury remediation demonstrations: Thermal retorting and physical separation/chemical leaching. Topical report, December 1, 1994--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented on the demonstration of two commercial technologies for the removal of mercury from soils found at natural gas metering sites. Technologies include a thermal retorting process and a combination of separation, leaching, and electrokinetic separation process.

Charlton, D.S.; Fraley, R.H.; Stepan, D.J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

InterTechnology Corporation proposed systems level plan for solar heating and cooling commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of the National Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program for non-residential buildings are embodied in the following: (1) Demonstrate the ultimate economic and technical feasibility of solar heating and combined heating and cooling. (2) Stimulate industry to produce and market solar equipment. (3) Stimulate a commercial market for solar systems. The systems level plan is designed to address the above stated goals as they relate to the building community associated with the commercial sector of the economy. (WDM)

None

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level - Georgia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Georgia Georgia September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN GEORGIA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF STANDARD 90.1-2007 FOR COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Georgia Summary Standard 90.1-2007 contains improvements in energy efficiency over the current state commercial energy code, Standard 90.1-2004 with amendments. The Georgia state-specific version of COMcheck 3.6.1 was used to identify the envelope and lighting requirements to be used in the baseline for the analysis. Standard 90.1-2007

95

Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SUMMARY S-1 SUMMARY This environmental impact statement (EIS) has been prepared by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) as amended (42 USC 4321 et seq.), to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and demonstration of a 98-megawatt (MWe) net power plant and cement manufacturing facility (the "Co- Production Facility"). The responsible organization for the federal action is the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), a multi-purpose laboratory owned and operated by DOE. Proposed Action The Proposed Action is for DOE to decide whether to provide financial assistance to Western

96

Estimating the economic and demographic impacts of solar technology commercialization on US regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to develop a framework through which these regional economic and demographic impacts of solar technology commercialization can be analyzed. Two models comprise the basis of this framework - a national input/output model and an interregional econometric model, the National-Regional Impact Evaluation System (NRIES). These models are used to convert projected sales of solar energy systems to gross output concepts, and to evaluate the impacts associated with these sales. Analysis is provided for the nine census regions and 50 states and the District of Columbia for the years 1980 through 1990. Impacts on major economic aggregates such as output, employment, income, and population are described. The methodology used in this study is described. The economic and demographic impacts of solar technology commercialization on US regions and states are presented. The major conclusions of the study are summarized, and direction is provided for further research. Detailed tables of regional and state solar energy expenditures and their impacts appear in the Appendix.

Kort, J.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project Steamboat Springs, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide the DOE and other public agency decision makers with the environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Kalina Geothermal Demonstration project. The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative impacts, possible ways to minimize effects associated with partial funding of the proposed project, and discusses alternatives to DOE actions. The DOE will use this EA as a basis for their decision to provide financial assistance to Exergy, Inc. (Exergy), the project applicant. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human or physical environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

Impact of post-event avoidance behavior on commercial facilities sector venues-literature review.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 (9/11), focused a great deal of interest and concern on how individual and social perceptions of risk change behavior and subsequently affect commercial sector venues. Argonne conducted a review of the literature to identify studies that quantify the direct and indirect economic consequences of avoidance behaviors that result from terrorist attacks. Despite a growing amount of literature addressing terrorism impacts, relatively little is known about the causal relationships between risk perception, human avoidance behaviors, and the economic effects on commercial venues. Nevertheless, the technical and academic literature does provide some evidence, both directly and by inference, of the level and duration of post-event avoidance behaviors on commercial venues. Key findings are summarized in this Executive Summary. Also included as an appendix is a more detailed summary table of literature findings reproduced from the full report.

Samsa, M. E.; Baldwin, T. E.; Berry, M. S.; Guzowski, L. B.; Martinez-Moyano, I.; Nieves, A. L.; Ramarasad, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

99

DOE/EA-1449; Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia (August 2002)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2002 Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray-dryer Ash, King George County, Virginia ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 2 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The proposed action is for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide cost- shared financial support to Universal Aggregates, LLC, for the design, construction, and operation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Mirant-Birchwood Power Plant Facility (Mirant-Birchwood Facility) in King George County, Virginia.

100

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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101

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S-1 S-1 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) on the proposed Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Project in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The National Environmental Policy Act Process NEPA is a federal law that serves as the basic national charter for protection of the environment. For major federal actions that may significantly affect the quality of the environment, NEPA requires federal agencies to prepare a detailed statement that includes the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and reasonable alternatives. A fundamental objective of NEPA is to foster better decisionmaking by ensuring that high quality environmental information is available to public officials and members of the

102

Preliminary assessment of the impact of commercial aircraft on local air quality in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the impact of aircraft emissions on local air quality by performing two analyses: an assessment of U.S. commercial aircraft contribution to county budgets of primary pollutants in nonattainment areas, ...

Ratliff, Gayle L. (Gayle Lois)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design solutions, and develop guidelines and tools for building designers so that systems are specified and used in an optimal manner. A special emphasis is placed on the daylighting performance of glazings in commercial buildings since lighting is the single largest energy end use and daylighting can improve both visual performance and the quality of the indoor space as well as saving energy. Technical Approach: This project has two major complementary elements. The first is the exploration and assessment of glazing performance in commercial buildings leading to development of design strategies that reduce unnecessary energy use. The final step is creating design guides and tools that make this design knowledge accessible to practitioners, typically carried out in partnership with others. Although the emphasis is energy impacts, e.g. annual energy use, the performance issues addressed in the guides and tools include all that impact the final glazing selection process, e.g. appearance, glare. The second element is an exploration of daylighting strategies for commercial buildings since lighting energy use is the major energy end use in most buildings. This work develops and evaluates new daylighting devices and designs, assesses performance in commercial buildings, and demonstrates system performance using test cells, test rooms and case study buildings. All energy-related aspects of the design solutions, as well as other critical performance issues, are addressed in this work. Results of this work are integrated into the guides and tools described above. Much of this work has been co-supported by utilities and has been carried on in conjunction with participants in an International Energy Agency Daylighting Task.

104

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting on Residential and Commercial Streets in Palo Alto, CA  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a GATEWAY demonstration that replaced existing HPS streetlights with two different types of LED products and one induction product. Energy savings ranged from 6% to 44%.

Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Tam, Christine

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 1 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This EIS reflects the public review of and comments offered on the draft statement. Included are descriptions of the characteristics of nuclear waste, the alternative disposal methods under consideration, and potential environmental impacts and costs of implementing these methods. Because of the programmatic nature of this document and the preliminary nature of certain design elements assumed in assessing the environmental consequences of the various alternatives, this study has been based on generic, rather than specific, systems. At such time as specific facilities are identified for particular sites, statements addressing site-specific aspects will be prepared for public review and comment.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

SciTech Connect

To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV, requiring the use of these tariffs would disadvantage some commercial PV installations. In particular, for PV systems that serve less than 25-50% of annual customer load, the characteristics of the customer's underlying load profile often determine the most favorable rate structure, and energy-focused rate structures may not be ideal for many commercial-customer load shapes. Regulators that wish to establish rates that are beneficial to a range of PV applications should therefore consider allowing customers to choose from among a number of different rate structures. {sm_bullet} Eliminating net metering can significantly degrade the economics of PV systems that serve a large percentage of building load. Under the assumptions stipulated in this report, we find that an elimination of net metering could, in some circumstances, result in more than a 25% loss in the rate-reduction value of commercial PV. As long as annual solar output is less than roughly 25% of customer load and excess PV production can be sold to the local utility at a rate above $0.05/kWh, however, elimination of net metering is found to rarely result in a financial loss of greater than 5% of the rate-reduction value of PV. More detailed conclusions on the rate-reduction value of commercial PV include: {sm_bullet} Commercial PV systems can sometimes greatly reduce demand charges. Though energy-focused retail rates often offer the greatest rate reduction value, commercial PV installations can generate significant reductions in demand charges, in some cases constituting 10-50% of the total rate savings derived from PV installations. These savings, however, depend highly on the size of the PV system relative to building load, on the customer's load shape, and on the design of the demand charge itself. {sm_bullet} The value of demand charge reductions declines with PV system size. At high levels of PV penetration, the value of PV-induced demand charge savings on a $/kWh basis can drop substantially. As a result, the rate-reduction value of PV can decline by up to one-half when a PV system m

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

SciTech Connect

To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV, requiring the use of these tariffs would disadvantage some commercial PV installations. In particular, for PV systems that serve less than 25-50% of annual customer load, the characteristics of the customer's underlying load profile often determine the most favorable rate structure, and energy-focused rate structures may not be ideal for many commercial-customer load shapes. Regulators that wish to establish rates that are beneficial to a range of PV applications should therefore consider allowing customers to choose from among a number of different rate structures. {sm_bullet} Eliminating net metering can significantly degrade the economics of PV systems that serve a large percentage of building load. Under the assumptions stipulated in this report, we find that an elimination of net metering could, in some circumstances, result in more than a 25% loss in the rate-reduction value of commercial PV. As long as annual solar output is less than roughly 25% of customer load and excess PV production can be sold to the local utility at a rate above $0.05/kWh, however, elimination of net metering is found to rarely result in a financial loss of greater than 5% of the rate-reduction value of PV. More detailed conclusions on the rate-reduction value of commercial PV include: {sm_bullet} Commercial PV systems can sometimes greatly reduce demand charges. Though energy-focused retail rates often offer the greatest rate reduction value, commercial PV installations can generate significant reductions in demand charges, in some cases constituting 10-50% of the total rate savings derived from PV installations. These savings, however, depend highly on the size of the PV system relative to building load, on the customer's load shape, and on the design of the demand charge itself. {sm_bullet} The value of demand charge reductions declines with PV system size. At high levels of PV penetration, the value of PV-induced demand charge savings on a $/kWh basis can drop substantially. As a result, the rate-reduction value of PV can decline by up to one-half when a PV system meets 75% rather

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

108

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project DEIS assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed DOE action to provide cost-shared financial support for construction and operation of an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky. Under the Proposed Action, DOE would provide financial assistance, through a Cooperative Agreement with Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, for design, construction, and operation of a 540 megawatt demonstration power station comprised of two synthesis gas-fired combined cycle units in Clark County, Kentucky. The station would also be comprised of a British Gas Lurgi (BGL) gasifier to produce synthesis gas from a co-feed of coal and refuse-derived fuel pellets and a high temperature molten carbonate fuel cell. The facility would be powered by the synthesis gas feed. The proposed project would consist of the following major components: (1) refuse-derived fuel pellets and coal receipt and storage facilities; (2) a gasification plant; (3) sulfur removal and recovery facilities; (4) an air separation plant; (5) a high-temperature molten carbonate fuel cell; and (6) two combined cycle generation units. The IGCC facility would be built to provide needed power capacity to central and eastern Kentucky. At a minimum, 50 percent of the high sulfur coal used would be from the Kentucky region. Two No Action Alternatives are analyzed in the DEIS. Under the No Action Alternative 1, DOE would not provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of the proposed facility and no new facility would be built. Under the No Action Alternative 2, DOE would not provide any funding and, instead of the proposed demonstration project, Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, a subsidiary of Global Energy, Inc., would construct and operate, a 540 megawatt natural gas-fired power station. Evaluation of impacts on land use, socioeconomics, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources, geology, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, noise, traffic and transportation, occupational and public health and safety, and environmental justice were included in the assessment.

N /A

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

109

Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comments Comments Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Clark County Public Library Winchester, KY Page 1 of 5 D-1 Comment No. 1 Issue Code: 11 Gasification is different from incineration. It is a better, more environmentally responsible approach to generating energy from the use of fossil fuels and refuse derived fuel (RDF). Incineration produces criteria pollutants, semi-volatile and volatile organic compounds and dioxin/furan compounds. Ash from hazardous waste incinerators is considered a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). In contrast, gasification, which occurs at high temperatures and pressures, produces no air emissions, only small amounts of wastewater containing salts. Synthesis gas (syngas)

110

Department of Energy finding of no significant impact, Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the DOE`s need to maintain the capability of producing tritium in support of its historic and near-term stewardship of the nation`s nuclear weapons stockpile, the agency has recently completed a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling. The Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) at Technical Area (TA) 53, LANL, Los Alamos, New Mexico (DOE-EA-1147), March 1996, analyzes the DOE proposal to design, build, and test critical prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, specifically the front-end, low-energy section of the accelerator at LANL. LEDA would be incrementally developed and tested in five separate stages over the next seven years. LEDA would be located at an existing building at TA-53; the LEDA components would be tested in order to verify equipment and prototype design and resolve related performance and production issues for future full-scale operation at Savannah River Site (SRS) in the event the APT plant is built. Production operations would not occur at LANL under the proposed action. The US DOE finds that there would be no significant impact from proceeding with its proposal to design, build, and test critical prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, specifically the front-end, low-energy section of the accelerator, at TA-53, LANL. Based on the environmental assessment that analyses the potential environmental effects that would be expected to occur if the DOE were to design, build, and test prototypical components of the accelerator system for tritium production, the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action which would significantly affect the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, no environmental impact statement is required for this proposal.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Climate Change Impacts on Residential and Commercial Loads in the Western U.S. Grid  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a multi-disciplinary modeling approach to quickly quantify climate change impacts on energy consumption, peak load, and load composition of residential and commercial buildings. This research focuses on addressing the impact of temperature changes on the building cooling load in 10 major cities across the Western United States and Canada. Our results have shown that by the mid-century, building yearly energy consumption and peak load will increase in the Southwest. Moreover, the peak load months will spread out to not only the summer months but also spring and autumn months. The Pacific Northwest will experience more hot days in the summer months. The penetration of the air conditioning (a/c) system in this area is likely to increase significantly over the years. As a result, some locations in the Pacific Northwest may be shifted from winter peaking to summer peaking. Overall, the Western U.S. grid may see more simultaneous peaks across the North and South in summer months. Increased cooling load will result in a significant increase in the motor load, which consumes more reactive power and requires stronger voltage support from the grid. This study suggests an increasing need for the industry to implement new technology to increase the efficiency of temperature-sensitive loads and apply proper protection and control to prevent possible adverse impacts of a/c motor loads.

Lu, Ning; Taylor, Zachary T.; Jiang, Wei; Xie, YuLong; Leung, Lai R.; Correia, James; Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Paget, Maria L.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

An evaluation of the Robinson M-1 commercial scale demonstration of enhanced oil recovery by micellar-polymer flood  

SciTech Connect

A commercial scale micellar-polymer project was conducted in the Robinson Sand of the M-1 project in southwestern Illinois. The project utilized a crude oil sulfonate surfactant system to flood the reservoir which, at the time of the project, was in an advanced stage of waterflood depletion. Injected fluids consisted of a 0.10 pore volume crude oil sulfonate slug, a 1.05 pore volume graded mobility slug using Dow Pusher 700, and a drive water slug to depletion. Micellar injection started in 1977. By December, 1986, overall operations in the 2.5-acre pattern area were uneconomical while polymer injection was continuing in the 5.0-acre pattern area. Depletion of the 5.0-acre pattern area is forecast for 1991 or sooner. Ultimate oil recovery is estimated at 1,397,000 barrels with cumulative oil recovery at December, 1986, of 1,299,000 barrels. Although the crude oil sulfonate system successfully mobilized and produced waterflood residual oil, the project was not economic because of both lower than anticipated recovery and higher than expected operating costs. The lower than anticipated recovery is attributed to poor volumetric sweep efficiency and salinity/hardness effects. 7 refs., 54 figs., 25 tabs.

Cole, E.L.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Environmental management technology demonstration and commercialization. Semi-annual progress report, April 1, 1995--October 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Several field-portable (e.g., gas chromatrography (GC), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)) instruments are available for the measurement of organic pollutants. However, solid samples such as soils, sludges, and sediments must first be extracted before analysis can be performed. Conventional extraction methods based on liquid solvent (e.g., Soxhlet extraction) are not practical in the field because of the large volumes fo solvents required as well as clumsy apparatus and glassware. However, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has been demonstrated in several studies by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERS) to extract a broad range of organic pollutants from soils and sediments successfully. Of the approximately 100 major organic pollutants identified as problems for the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites, our SFE laboratory has demonstrated efficient SFE recoveries for about half, and published literature has addressed an additional 40%. SFE in the off-line mode (i.e., collection of extracted organics in a small voluem of liquid solvent) has also been demonstrated to be easily performed in the field with only generator electrical power for support. Recent advances in flow restrictor design have virtually eliminated the mechanical problems previously associated with the performance of SFE in the field.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems program (ATS) technical readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. First quarterly report, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally-superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability- Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase 1 of the ATS program, Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is re-configured with closed- loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to bum coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. Future Phase IV activities consist of manufacturing, constructing,

Brushwood, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in Deep, Unmineable Coalbeds: An Integrated Researdh and Commercial-Scale Field Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal-Seq consortium is a government-industry collaborative consortium with the objective of advancing industry's understanding of complex coalbed methane and gas shale reservoir behavior in the presence of multi-component gases via laboratory experiments, theoretical model development and field validation studies. This will allow primary recovery, enhanced recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration operations to be commercially enhanced and/or economically deployed. The project was initially launched in 2000 as a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored investigation into CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams. The initial project accomplished a number of important objectives, which mainly revolved around performing baseline experimental studies, documenting and analyzing existing field projects, and establishing a global network for technology exchange. The results from that Phase have been documented in a series of reports which are publicly available. An important outcome of the initial phase was that serious limitations were uncovered in our knowledge of reservoir behavior when CO{sub 2} is injected into coal. To address these limitations, the project was extended in 2005 as a government-industry collaborative consortium. Selected accomplishments from this phase have included the identification and/or development of new models for multi-component sorption and diffusion, laboratory studies of coal geomechanical and permeability behavior with CO{sub 2} injection, additional field validation studies, and continued global technology exchange. Further continuation of the consortium is currently being considered. Some of the topics that have been identified for investigation include further model development/refinement related to multicomponent equations-of-state, sorption and diffusion behavior, geomechanical and permeability studies, technical and economic feasibility studies for major international coal basins, the extension of the work to gas shale reservoirs, and continued global technology exchange.

Scott Reeves; George Koperna

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for providing the nation with nuclear weapons and ensuring that these weapons remain safe and reliable. Tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen, is an essential component of every weapon in the current and projected U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. Unlike other materials utilized in nuclear weapons, tritium decays at a rate of 5.5 percent per year. Accordingly, as long as the nation relies on a nuclear deterrent, the tritium in each nuclear weapon must be replenished periodically. Currently the U.S. nuclear weapons complex does not have the capability to produce the amounts of tritium that will be required to continue supporting the nation's stockpile. The ''Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling'' (Final Programmatic EIS), DOE/EIS-0161, issued in October 1995, evaluated the alternatives for the siting, construction, and operation of tritium supply and recycling facilities at five DOE sites for four different production technologies. This Programmatic EIS also evaluated the impacts of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) without specifying a reactor location. In the Record of Decision for the Final Programmatic EIS (60 FR 63878), issued December 12, 1995, DOE decided to pursue a dual-track approach on the two most promising tritium supply alternatives: (1) to initiate purchase of an existing commercial reactor (operating or partially complete) or reactor irradiation services; and (2) to design, build, and test critical components of an accelerator system for tritium production. At that time, DOE announced that the final decision would be made by the Secretary of Energy at the end of 1998.

N /A

1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process. Technical progress report number 2, July 1--September 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project involves the construction of a 260 tons-per-day (TPD) or 80,000 gallon per day methanol demonstration unit utilizing an existing coal-derived synthesis gas from Eastman. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression, liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation, and utilities. The technology to be demonstrated was developed by Air Products in a DOE sponsored program that started in 1981. Originally tested at a small, DOE-owned experimental facility in LaPorte, Texas, the LPMEOH{trademark} process offers several advantages over current methods of making methanol. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The liquid dissipates heat from the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst and allowing the gas-to-methanol reaction to proceed at higher rates. The process is ideally suited to the type of gas produced by modern coal gasifiers. At the Eastman Chemical complex, the technology will be integrated with existing coal gasifiers to demonstrate the commercially important aspects of the operation of the LPMEOH{trademark} Process to produce methanol. A four-year demonstration will prove the commercial applicability of the process. An off-site product-use test program will prove the suitability of the methanol as a transportation fuel and as a fuel for stationary applications in the power industry.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Economic Impact of the CommercialEconomic Impact of the CommercialEconomic Impact of the Commercial Hard Clam Culture IndustryHard Clam Culture IndustryHard Clam Culture Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hard Clam Culture IndustryHard Clam Culture IndustryHard Clam Culture Industry on the Economy;2 Introduction Commercially cultured hard clams have become the single most economically important food item sales of cultured hard clams have equaled or exceeded the growth realized by the more established

Florida, University of

119

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol process. Technical progress report number 8, April 1--June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project involves the construction of an 80,000 gallon per day (260 tons per day (TPD)) methanol unit utilizing coal-derived synthesis gas from Eastman`s integrated coal gasification facility. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression facilities, the liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation facilities, and utilities. The technology to be demonstrated is the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOH{trademark} process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern-day coal gasifiers. Originally tested at a small (10 TPD), DOE-owned experimental unit in LaPorte, Texas, the technology provides several improvements essential for the economic coproduction of methanol and electricity directly from gasified coal. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates. At the Eastman complex, the technology is being integrated with existing coal-gasifiers. A carefully developed test plan will allow operations at Eastman to simulate electricity demand load-following in coal-based IGCC facilities. The operations will also demonstrate the enhanced stability and heat dissipation of the conversion process, its reliable on/off operation, and its ability to produce methanol as a clean liquid fuel without additional upgrading.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Impacts of Commercial Electric Utility Rate Structure Elements on the Economics of Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect

This analysis uses simulated building data, simulated solar photovoltaic (PV) data, and actual electric utility tariff data from 25 cities to understand better the impacts of different commercial rate structures on the value of solar PV systems. By analyzing and comparing 55 unique rate structures across the United States, this study seeks to identify the rate components that have the greatest effect on the value of PV systems. Understanding the beneficial components of utility tariffs can both assist decision makers in choosing appropriate rate structures and influence the development of rates that favor the deployment of PV systems. Results from this analysis show that a PV system's value decreases with increasing demand charges. Findings also indicate that time-of-use rate structures with peaks coincident with PV production and wide ranges between on- and off-peak prices most benefit the types of buildings and PV systems simulated. By analyzing a broad set of rate structures from across the United States, this analysis provides an insight into the range of impacts that current U.S. rate structures have on PV systems.

Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Doris, E.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

SciTech Connect

This study estimated energy, environmental and consumer economic impacts of U.S. Federal residential energy efficiency standards that became effective in the 1988-2006 period, and of energy efficiency standards for fluorescent lamp ballasts and distribution transformers. These standards have been the subject of in-depth analyses conducted as part of DOE's standards rulemaking process. This study drew on those analyses, but updated certain data and developed a common framework and assumptions for all of the products in order to estimate realized impacts and to update projected impacts. It also performed new analysis for the first (1990) fluorescent ballast standards, which had been introduced in the NAECA legislation without a rulemaking. We estimate that the considered standards will reduce residential/ commercial primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in 2030 by 4percent compared to the levels expected without any standards. The reduction for the residential sector is larger, at 8percent. The estimated cumulative energy savings from the standards amount to 39 quads by 2020, and 63 quads by 2030. The standards will also reduce emissions of carbon dioxide by considerable amounts.The estimated cumulative net present value of consumer benefit amounts to $241 billion by 2030, and grows to $269 billion by 2045. The overall ratio of consumer benefits to costs (in present value terms) in the 1987-2050 period is 2.7 to 1. Although the estimates made in this study are subject to a fair degree of uncertainty, we believe they provide a reasonable approximation of the national benefits resulting from Federal appliance efficiency standards.

Meyers, Stephen P.; McMahon, James; Atkinson, Barbara

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

SciTech Connect

This study estimated energy, environmental and consumer economic impacts of U.S. Federal residential energy efficiency standards that became effective in the 1988-2006 period, and of energy efficiency standards for fluorescent lamp ballasts and distribution transformers. These standards have been the subject of in-depth analyses conducted as part of DOE's standards rulemaking process. This study drew on those analyses, but updated certain data and developed a common framework and assumptions for all of the products in order to estimate realized impacts and to update projected impacts. It also performed new analysis for the first (1990) fluorescent ballast standards, which had been introduced in the NAECA legislation without a rulemaking. We estimate that the considered standards will reduce residential/ commercial primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions in 2030 by 4percent compared to the levels expected without any standards. The reduction for the residential sector is larger, at 8percent. The estimated cumulative energy savings from the standards amount to 39 quads by 2020, and 63 quads by 2030. The standards will also reduce emissions of carbon dioxide by considerable amounts.The estimated cumulative net present value of consumer benefit amounts to $241 billion by 2030, and grows to $269 billion by 2045. The overall ratio of consumer benefits to costs (in present value terms) in the 1987-2050 period is 2.7 to 1. Although the estimates made in this study are subject to a fair degree of uncertainty, we believe they provide a reasonable approximation of the national benefits resulting from Federal appliance efficiency standards.

Meyers, Stephen P.; McMahon, James; Atkinson, Barbara

2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Environmental assessment for the Waste Water Treatment Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project and finding of no significant impact  

SciTech Connect

The possible environmental impacts from the construction and operation of a waste water treatment facility for the West Valley Demonstration Project are presented. The West Valley Project is a demonstration project on the solidification of high-level radioactive wastes. The need for the facility is the result of a rise in the work force needed for the project which rendered the existing sewage treatment plant incapable of meeting the nonradioactive waste water treatment needs.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is focused on the analysis of indoor conditions for a new commercial building that will be constructed in an East-European country. Based on the initial HVAC design parameters the surface of the building was divided in thermal zones that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A dynamic variation of the PMV (Predicted Mean Vote Index) was obtained for different thermal zones of the building (retails stores, mall circulation, corridors) and in most of the cases the acceptable values of plus/minus 0.5 are exceeded. Among the most important energy efficiency measures it is mentioned a decrease of the heating set point temperature, increase of the walls and roof thermal resistance and the use of a heat recovery on the ventilation system. In this work it is demonstrated how simple measures can enhance the indoor conditions and reduce the energy consumption for this kind of construction.

Catalina, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Policy considerations for biomass commercialization and its impact on the Chariton Valley biomass project  

SciTech Connect

Growing biomass energy crops on erosive lands, then using them as a substitute fuel in coal-fired power plants can reduce air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion and water pollution. Regrettably, the current market value of biomass, which is higher relative to coal, prevents this substitution. Left out of the equation are the costs of related environmental damages and the public expenditures for their prevention. The cumulative value of the benefits derived from substituting biomass for coal likely outweighs the current market price difference, when the public costs and benefits of clean air and water are considered. Public policy to encourage substitution of biomass for coal and other fossil fuels is a vital component in the commercialization of energy crops. This is specifically demonstrated in south central Iowa where switchgrass is being considered as a coal substitute in the Chariton Valley Resource Conservation and Development (RC and D) area. Marginal land use, rural development, and soil, air and water quality concerns are all drivers for policies to increase the value of switchgrass compared to coal.

Cooper, J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design of retail electricity tariffs and want to understandof commercial electricity tariffs in the United States,the structure of retail electricity tariffs. Rate Design for

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design of retail electricity tariffs and want to understandof commercial electricity tariffs in the United States,the structure of retail electricity tariffs. Rate Design for

Mills, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thus, the industrial electricity sector prices applied to 6%commercial/industrial sector electricity price for use inassumed that industrial sector electricity prices applied to

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

say that, among commercial electricity rates in California,to optimize their electricity rate both before and after PVcompared to retail electricity rates. The importance of

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California Prepared for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado and

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charge Savings TOU Price Ratio Summary of PV Value Driversbetween PV production and wholesale market prices includesprices are found to offer greater value to commercial PV in

Mills, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charge Savings TOU Price Ratio Summary of PV Value Driversbetween PV production and wholesale market prices includesprices are found to offer greater value to commercial PV in

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the annual electricity bill savings that would bebasic results on the electricity bill-savings value ofbill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity

Mills, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the annual electricity bill savings that would bebasic results on the electricity bill-savings value ofbill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washers Clothes Dryers Dishwashers COMMERCIAL Fluorescentfor clothes washers and dishwashers. d The sections belowclothes washers, dishwashers and room air conditioners. The

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/buildings/ appliance_standards/commercial/distributio n_Standards for Residential Appliances: 2004 Update, LBNL-

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Commercial-scale demonstration of the liquid phase methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process. Technical progress report No. 4, 1 April--30 June 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) demonstration project at Kingsport, Tennessee is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L. P.(the Partnership). A facility producing 260 TPD of methanol will be designed and constructed at a site located at the Eastman Chemical complex in Kingsport, Tennessee. The Partnership will own and operate the facility for the four-year demonstration facility operational period. This project is sponsored under the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology Program, and its primary objective is to ``demonstrate the production of methanol using the LPMEOH{trademark} process in conjunction with an integrated coal gasification facility.`` The project will also demonstrate the suitability of the methanol produced for use as a chemical feedstock or as a low sulfur dioxide, low nitrogen oxides alternative fuel in stationary and transportation applications. The project may also demonstrate the production of dimethyl ether (DME) as a mixed coproduct with methanol, if laboratory- and pilot-scale research shows promising results. If implemented, the DME would be produced during the last six months of the operations phase. During this last quarter the project transitioned to the design phase. the project requires review under the National environmental Policy Act to move to the construction phase, which is scheduled to begin in August of 1995. DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment, and a Finding of No Significant Impact was issued during this quarter. The facility is scheduled to be mechanically complete in November of 1996.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE AGENCY ACTION...............................................................1-1 1.1 INTRODUCTION.....................................................................................................................1-1 1.2 FEDERAL ACTION .................................................................................................................1-1 1.3 PURPOSE AND NEED ............................................................................................................1-3 1.3.1 Purpose of Action.........................................................................................................1-3 1.3.2 Need for Action ............................................................................................................1-3

140

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

retail electricity rates currently offered in the state.electricity rates currently offered by the five largest electric utilities in the state:electricity tariffs. Rate Design for Commercial Customers in the United States

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

retail electricity rates currently offered in the state.electricity rates currently offered by the five largest electric utilities in the state:electricity tariffs. Rate Design for Commercial Customers in the United States

Mills, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Impact of money market funds on commercial paper markets in United States and South Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this study is on Commercial Paper markets which are used by financial and non financial firms to manage working capital and maturity transformation. We explore how the primary investors in CP in the US, the ...

Chandrasekaran, Abhijit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Impacts of Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings at State Level  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the requirements of Standard 90.1-2007 on commercial buildings on a state-by-state basis with a separate, stand-alone chapter for each state. Standard 90.1-2007 is compared to the current state code for most states. This is the final version of the draft previously cleared and assigned ERICA # PNNL-18544, titled "Commercial Nationwide Report."

Bartlett, Rosemarie; Halverson, Mark A.; Gowri, Krishnan

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume I. Economic impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis identifies the economic impacts associated with OTEC development and quantifies them at the national, regional, and industry levels. It focuses on the effects on the United States' economy of the domestic development and utilization of twenty-five and fifty 400 MWe OTEC power plants by the year 2000. The methodology employed was characteristic of economic impact analysis. After conducting a literature review, a likely future OTEC scenario was developed on the basis of technological, siting, and materials requirements parameters. These parameters were used to identify the industries affected by OTEC development; an economic profile was constructed for each of these industries. These profiles established an industrial baseline from which the direct, indirect, and induced economic impacts of OTEC implementation could be estimated. Each stage of this analysis is summarized; and the economic impacts are addressed. The methodology employed in estimating the impacts is described.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, photovoltaics, renewable energy, tariff design Abstract To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for...

147

The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economiccustomer retail electricity rates currently offered in thethe design of retail electricity rates, particularly for

Mills, Andrew D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economiccustomer retail electricity rates currently offered in thethe design of retail electricity rates, particularly for

Mills, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Figure S-1. Figure S-1. General Location Map U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Lab Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project DEIS November 2006 WV 20 S 12 S 63 WV 39 Proposed Co- Production Facility Anjean and Joe Knob Coal Refuse Piles U S 6 0 U S 6 0 US 219 WV 20 WV 39 AN1 AN2 AN3 DN1 DN2 GV W V 2 0 U S 6 0 C R 1 Figure 1-1. General Location Map U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Lab Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project DEIS November 2006 WV 20 S 12 S 63 WV 39 Proposed Co- Production Facility Anjean and Joe Knob Coal Refuse Piles U S 6 0 U S 6 0 US 219 WV 20 WV 39 AN1 AN2 AN3 DN1 DN2 GV W V 2 0 U S 6 0 C R 1 S 63 Rainelle Anjean Quinwood Charmco Lewisburg Savannah Quarry Greystone Quarry Boxley Quarry Anjean and Joe Knob Coal Refuse Piles Green Valley Coal Refuse Pile

150

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process. Technical progress report number 11, January 1--March 31, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this quarter, the third draft of the Topical Report on Process Economics Studies was issued for review. A recommendation to continue with design verification testing on the coproduction of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) was made. A liquid phase dimethyl ether (LPDME) catalyst system with reasonable long-term activity and stability is being developed, and a decision to proceed with a proof-of-concept test run at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) is pending the release of a memo from Air Products on the catalyst targets and corresponding economics for a commercially successful LPDME catalyst. The off-site product-use test plan is to be updated in June of 1997. During this quarter, Air Products and Acurex Environmental Corporation continued developing the listing of product-use test participants who are involved in fuel cell, transportation, and stationary power plant applications. Start-up activities (Task 3.1) began during the reporting period, and coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas) was introduced to the demonstration unit. The recycle compressor was tested successfully on syngas at line pressure of 700 psig, and the reactor loop reached 220 C for carbonyl burnout. Iron carbonyl in the balanced gas feed remained below the 10 ppbv detection limit for all samples but one. Within the reactor loop, iron carbonyl levels peaked out near 200 ppbv after about 40 hours on-stream, before decreasing to between 10--20 ppbv at 160 hours on -stream. Nickel carbonyl measurements reached a peak of about 60 ppbv, and decreased at all sampling locations to below the 10 ppbv detection limit by 70 hours on-stream. Catalyst activation of the nine 2,250 lb batches required for the initial catalyst charge began and concluded. All batches met or slightly exceeded the theoretical maximum uptake of 2.82 SCF of reducing gas/lb catalyst.

NONE

1997-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Environmental impact assessment of commercial aircraft operations in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the environmental trade-offs inherent in multi-criteria objectives of an integrated environmental policy. A probabilistic multi-attribute impact pathway analysis (MAIPA) was ...

Lukachko, Stephen P. (Stephen Paul)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

customers underlying load profile often determine the mostwith flat or inverted load profiles will often not earn muchThe shape of a customers load profile can impact the rate-

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

EIS-0288; Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

iii iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: United States Department of Energy Cooperating Agency: Tennessee Valley Authority Title: Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor Contact: For additional information on this Final Environmental Impact Statement, write or call: Jay Rose Office of Defense Programs U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Attention: CLWR EIS Telephone: (202) 586-5484 For copies of the CLWR Final EIS call: 1-800-332-0801 | For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, write or call: Carol M. Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance (EH-42) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585

154

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report  

SciTech Connect

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Assessment of the Energy Impacts of Outside Air in the Commercial Sector  

SciTech Connect

The enormous quantity of energy consumed by U.S. commercial buildings places a significant burden on the energy supply and is a potential source of economic strain. To address this, the DOE Building Technologies Program has established the goal of developing market-viable zero energy buildings by 2025. This study focuses on the effects of outside air, and considers various outside air sources, types of building construction, building subsectors, and climates. Based on the information about energy consumption attributed to outside air, it identifies topics for further research that have the greatest potential to achieve energy savings.

Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P.; Crawley, D.; Logee, T.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: Quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation).

Lebersorger, S. [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria); Beigl, P., E-mail: peter.beigl@boku.ac.at [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Impact of cool storage air-conditioning in commercial sector on power system operation in Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The results are presented from an investigation into the potential application for cool storage air-conditioning, and the resultant beneficial impact on power system operation in Thailand is discussed. Field assessment through interviews with decision makers in the identified customer groups produces results that show good potential for cool storage application. Results from a computer program used to calculate power production cost and other characteristics show that substantial benefits would also accrue to the generating utility.

Surapong, C.; Bundit, L. [Asian Inst. of Tech., Bangkok (Thailand)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Demonstration of a Piston Plug feed System for Feeding Coal/Biomass Mixtures across a Pressure Gradient for Application to a Commercial CBTL System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Producing liquid transportation fuels and power via coal and biomass to liquids (CBTL) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) processes can significantly improve the nation's energy security. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 mandates increasing renewable fuels nearly 10-fold to >2.3 million barrels per day by 2022. Coal is abundantly available and coal to liquids (CTL) plants can be deployed today, but they will not become sustainable without large scale CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Co-processing of coal and biomass in CBTL processes in a 60 to 40 ratio is an attractive option that has the potential to produce 4 million barrels of transportation fuels per day by 2020 at the same level of CO{sub 2} emission as petroleum. In this work, Southern Research Institute (Southern) has made an attempt to address one of the major barriers to the development of large scale CBTL processes - cost effective/reliable dry-feeding of coal-biomass mixtures into a high pressure vessel representative of commercial entrained-flow gasifiers. Present method for dry coal feeding involves the use of pressurized lock-hopper arrangements that are not only very expensive with large space requirements but also have not been proven for reliably feeding coal-biomass mixtures without the potential problems of segregation and bridging. The project involved the development of a pilot-scale 250 lb/h high pressure dry coal-biomass mixture feeder provided by TKEnergi and proven for feeding biomass at a scale up to 6 ton/day. The aim of this project is to demonstrate cost effective feeding of coal-biomass mixtures (50:50 to 70:30) made from a variety of coals (bituminous, lignite) and biomass (wood, corn stover, switch grass). The feeder uses a hydraulic piston-based approach to produce a series of plugs of the mixture that act as a seal against high back-pressure of the gasification vessel in to which the mixture is being fed. The plugs are then fed one by one via a plug breaker into the high pressure gasification vessel. A number of runs involving the feeding of coal and biomass mixtures containing 50 to 70 weight % coal into a high pressure gasification vessel simulator have shown that plugs of sufficient density can be formed to provide a seal against pressures up to 450 psig if homogeneity of the mixture can be maintained. However, the in-homogeneity of coal-biomass mixtures can occur during the mixing process because of density, particle size and moisture differences. Also, the much lower compressibility of coal as opposed to biomass can contribute to non-uniform plug formation which can result in weak plugs. Based on present information, the piston plug feeder offered marginal economic advantages over lock-hoppers. The results suggest a modification to the piston feeder that can potentially seal against pressure without the need for forming plugs. This modified design could result in lower power requirements and potentially better economics.

Santosh Gangwal

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Impacts of Low-NOx Regulations on Chillers: Commercial Cooling Update, Issue 15, September 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments and local air quality rules are affecting the cost and operation of all chillers. This document takes a close look at the cost and source energy use impacts of NOx regulations on chillers and provides a summary of findings. Four chiller types are examined: electric centrifugal, direct- fired absorber, engine driven with a lean-burn engine and engine driven by nonselective catalytic reduction. A table is provided that compares energy use, NOx, and first costs of low-NOx c...

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Impact of the antitrust laws on the commercialization of solar heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many energy industry observers and solar equipment producers view the commercialization of solar technologies as an opportunity to undermine the dominance now enjoyed by energy companies and electric utilities. Whether their hopes will be realized depends on Congress' posture towards interenergy diversification (which is currently permissive), DOE's spending practices (which have, in the past, been relatively insensitive to competitive consequences), and ultimately, the Supreme Court's willingness to aggressively enforce the antitrust laws (which is not unlikely, given recent holdings). Notwithstanding the legislative and administrative branches' tacit compliance with entrenched firms' involvement in the various solar energy submarkets, injured business persons and consumers (as well as the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission) have the opportunity to force the controversy onto the judiciary by bringing suit under the antitrust laws against companies allegedly displaying anti-competitive market practices. The interchangeability between end uses of renewable and nonrenewable energy resources creates opportunities and motives for market manipulation. Consequently, the potential of energy firms for facilitating solar technology development (due to technological knowledge, managerial expertise and capital resources) must be weighed against the possibility that their involvement will, in the long run, retard development. 356 references.

Gross, J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A procedure for analyzing energy and global warming impacts of foam insulation in U.S. commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to develop a procedure for evaluating the energy and global warming impacts of alternative insulation technologies for US commercial building applications. The analysis is focused on the sum of the direct contribution of greenhouse gas emissions from a system and the indirect contribution of the carbon dioxide emission resulting from the energy required to operate the system over its expected lifetime. In this paper, parametric analysis was used to calculate building related CO{sub 2} emission in two US locations. A retail mail building has been used as a model building for this analysis. For the analyzed building, minimal R-values of insulation are estimated using ASHRAE 90.1 requirements.

Kosny, J.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Desjarlais, A.O.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, U.S. Department of Energy: Award No. DE-EE0002855 "Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field - Cameron Parish, Louisiana"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of geopressured-geothermal power development by exploiting the extraordinarily high pressured hot brines know to exist at depth near the Sweet Lake oil and gas field in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The existence of a geopressured-geothermal system at Sweet Lake was confirmed in the 1970's and 1980's as part of DOE's Geopressured-Geothermal Program. That program showed that the energy prices at the time could not support commercial production of the resource. Increased electricity prices and technological advancements over the last two decades, combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and the job creation it would entail, provided the justification necessary to reevaluate the commercial feasibility of power generation from this vast resource.

Gayle, Phillip A., Jr.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

163

Assessing the impacts of future demand for saline groundwater on commercial deployment of CCS in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary assessment of the potential impact that future demand for groundwater might have on the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies within the United States. A number of regions within the U.S. have populations, agriculture and industries that are particularly dependent upon groundwater. Moreover, some key freshwater aquifers are already over-utilized or depleted, and others are likely to be moving toward depletion as demand grows. The need to meet future water demands may lead some parts of the nation to consider supplementing existing supplies with lower quality groundwater resources, including brackish waters that are currently not considered sources of drinking water but which could provide supplemental water via desalination. In some areas, these same deep saline-filled geologic formations also represent possible candidate carbon dioxide (CO2) storage reservoirs. The analysis presented here suggests that future constraints on CCS deployment due to potential needs to supplement conventional water supplies by desalinating deeper and more brackish waters are likely to be necessary only in limited regions across the country, particularly in areas that are already experiencing water stress.

Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

164

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings...

165

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process. Technical progress report number 6, October 1--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project involves the construction of an 80,000 gallons per day (260 TPD) methanol unit utilizing coal-derived synthesis gas from Eastman`s integrated coal gasification facility. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression facilities, the liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation facilities, and utilities. The technology to be demonstrated is the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOH{trademark} process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern-day coal gasifiers. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface protecting the catalyst and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates. At the Eastman complex, the technology will be integrated with existing coal-gasifiers. A carefully developed test plan will allow operations at Eastman to simulate electricity demand load-following in coal-based IGCC facilities. The operations will also demonstrate the enhanced stability and heat dissipation of the conversion process, its reliable on/off operation, and its ability to produce methanol as a clean liquid fuel without additional upgrading. An off-site product testing program will be conducted to demonstrate the suitability of the methanol product as a transportation fuel and as a fuel for stationary applications for small modular electric power generators for distributed power.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process. Technical progress report number 9, July 1--September 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Demonstration Project at Kingsport, Tennessee, is a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership). The LPMEOH{trademark} Process Demonstration Unit is being built at a site located at the Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) complex in Kingsport. The project involves the construction of an 80,000 gallons per day (260 tons per day (TPD)) methanol unit utilizing coal-derived synthesis gas from Eastman`s integrated coal gasification facility. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression facilities, the liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation facilities, and utilities. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates. At the Eastman complex, the technology is being integrated with existing coal-gasifiers.

NONE

1997-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

167

CCUS Demonstrations Making Progress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, First Quarter, 2013 9, First Quarter, 2013 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 CCUS Demonstrations Making Progress A Column from the Director of Clean Energy Sys- tems, Office of Clean Coal 4 LNG Exports DOE Releases Third Party Study on Impact of Natural Gas Exports 5 Providing Emergency Relief Petroleum Reservers Helps Out with Hurricane Relief Efforts 7 Game-Changing Membranes FE-Funded Project Develops Novel Membranes for CCUS 8 Shale Gas Projects Selected 15 Projects Will Research Technical Challenges of Shale Gas Development A project important to demonstrat- ing the commercial viability of carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technology has completed the first year of inject-

168

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process. Technical progress report number 5, July 1--September 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project involves the construction of an 80,000 gallons per day (260 TPD) methanol unit utilizing coal-derived synthesis gas from Eastman`s integrated coal gasification facility. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression facilities, the liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation facilities, and utilities. The technology to be demonstrated is the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOH{trademark} process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern-day coal gasifiers. Originally tested at a small, DOE-owned experimental unit in LaPorte, Texas, the technology provides several improvements essential for the economic coproduction of methanol and electricity directly from gasified coal. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: KCP&L Green Impact Zone Smart Grid Demonstration - Edward Hedges, Kansas City Power & Light  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program Peer Review Meeting KCP&L Green Impact Zone SmartGrid Demonstration Project Edward T. Hedges, P.E. Manager SmartGrid Technology Planning Kansas City Power & Light Company June 8, 2012 December 2008 KCP&L Green Impact Zone SmartGrid Demonstration Project Objective Life-cycle Funding ($K) 2010 - 2014 $23,940,112 Technical Scope First, Create a complete, end-to-end Smart Grid Second, Introduce new technologies, applications, protocols, communications and business models Third, Incorporates a best-in-class approach to technology integration through use of Smart Grid interoperability standards Finally, Support a targeted urban revitalization effort in Kansas City's Green Impact Zone 2 - SmartSubstation - SmartDistribution - SmartGeneration - SmartDR/DER

170

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed McIntosh Unit 4 Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project, March 25, 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 10 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 58 / Friday, March 26, 1999 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed McIntosh Unit 4 Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) NEPA regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508), and the DOE NEPA regulations (10 CFR Part 1021), to assess the potential environmental and human health impacts of a proposed project to expand the C. D. McIntosh, Jr. Power

171

Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement for Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center A Summary and Guide for Stakeholders DOE/EIS-0226-D (Revised) November 2008 The West Valley Site Availability of the Revised Draft EIS for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center For further information on this Draft EIS, or to request a copy please contact: Cathern Bohan, EIS Document Manager West Valley Demonstration Project U.S. Department of Energy Ashford Office Complex 9030 Route 219 West Valley, NY 14171 Telephone: 716-942-4159 Fax: 716-942-4703 E-mail: catherine.m.bohan@wv.doe.gov Printed with soy ink on recycled paper

172

The Impact of Advanced Nowcasting Systems on Severe Weather Warning during the Sydney 2000 Forecast Demonstration Project: 3 November 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the principal aims of the Sydney 2000 Forecast Demonstration Project was to assess the utility of advanced nowcasting systems to operational severe weather forecasters. This paper describes the application of the products of a variety of ...

Neil I. Fox; Rob Webb; John Bally; Michael W. Sleigh; Clive E. Pierce; David M. L. Sills; Paul I. Joe; James Wilson; Chris G. Collier

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

IMPACTS: Industrial Technologies Program, Summary of Program Results for CY2009, Appendix 1: ITP-Sponsored Technologies Commercially Available  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 DOE Industrial Technologies Program 15 DOE Industrial Technologies Program Appendix 1: ITP-Sponsored Technologies Commercially Available Aluminum ........................................................................................................................................... 19 u Aluminum Reclaimer for Foundry Applications .................................................................................................................................. 20 u Isothermal Melting................................................................................................................................................................................ 21 Chemicals........................................................................................................................................... 23

174

Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability (Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0361) (12/01/06))  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

62 Federal Register 62 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 231 / Friday, December 1, 2006 / Notices Route to Construct and Reconstruct Roads, Funding, NPDES Permit and U.S. Army COE Section 404 Permit, Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forests, Tonasket Ranger District, Okanogan County, WA. Summary: EPA expressed environmental concerns about water resource impacts, and requested that information about water resources be updated. EPA is also expressed concern about monitoring and mitigation issues. Rating EC2. EIS No. 20060347, ERP No. D-BLM- L70014-ID, Cottonwood Resource Management Plan, Implementation, Latah, Clearwater, Nez Perce, Lewis, Idaho and Adams Counties, ID. Summary: EPA expressed environmental concerns about water quality/source water protection impacts and monitoring/maintaining old growth

175

EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Supplemental EIS updates the environmental analyses in DOEs 1999 EIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS). The CLWR EIS addressed the production of tritium in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors in Tennessee using tritium-producing burnable absorber rods.

176

Heat transfer characteristics of porous sludge deposits and their impact on the performance of commercial steam generators  

SciTech Connect

Steam generator (SG) fouling, in the form of corrosion deposits on the secondary sides of SG tubes, has been known to occur in almost all commercial US nuclear PWR (pressurized water reactor) plants. The level of fouling, as measured by the quantity of corrosion products that form, varies widely from plant to plant. In addition, the effect of SG fouling, as measured by a decrease in effective heat-transfer coefficient, has also varied substantially among commercial US plants. While some have observed large decreases in heat transfer, others have noted little change in performance despite the presence of significant quantities of secondary corrosion layers on their SG tubes. This observation has led to considerable confusion about what role secondary deposits play in causing heat-transfer degradation in SGs. As will become clear later in this report, secondary deposits can have a wide range of effects on heat transfer, from highly resistive to slightly enhancing (reflected by negative fouling). These different behaviors are the result of differences in deposit thickness, composition, and morphology. The main focus of this report is an investigation of the effects of secondary deposits on SG thermal performance. This investigation includes compilation of detailed information on the properties of tube scale at five commercial US nuclear plants and corresponding information characterizing SG thermal performance at these plants.

Kreider, M.A.; White, G.A.; Varrin, R.D.; Ouzts, P.J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

178

Commercial Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Performance Objectives: To review the market potential for improvements in commercial building glazings, quantify the energy savings potentials, explore potential design...

179

Santa Clara Demonstration Status  

SciTech Connect

Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. The commercial product specifications have been developed by working closely with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG). FCCG members include municipal utilities, rural electric co-ops, and investor owned utilities who have expressed interest in being the initial purchasers of the first commercial DFC power plants. The utility participants in the SCDP have been drawn from the membership of FCCG. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant, and FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer for the design and construction of the plant, and also provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O' Shea, Thomas P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Santa Clara Demonstration Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is in the fourth year of a DOE Cooperative Agreement Program (private-sector cost-shared) aimed at the demonstration of ERC's direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) technology at full scale. FCE is a wholly owned subsidiary of Energy Research Corporation (ERC), which has been pursuing the development of the DFC for commercialization near the end of this decade. The DFC produces power directly from hydrocarbon fuels electrochemically, without the need for external reforming or intermediate mechanical conversion steps. As a result, the DFC has the potential to achieve very high efficiency with very low levels of environmental emissions. Modular DFC power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed generation, cogeneration, industrial, and defense applications. This project is an integral part of the ERC effort to commercialize the technology to serve these applications. Potential users of the commercial DFC power plant under development at ERC will require that the technology be demonstrated at or near the full scale of the commercial products. The objective of the Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) is to provide the first such demonstration of the technology. The approach ERC has taken in the commercialization of the DFC is described in detail elsewhere [1]. Briefly, an aggressive core technology development program is in place which is focused by ongoing contact with customers and vendors to optimize the design of the commercial power plant. ERC has selected a 2.85 MW power plant unit for initial market entry. Two ERC subsidiaries are supporting the commercialization effort: The Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) and the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE). FCMC manufactures carbonate stacks and multi-stack modules, currently from its manufacturing facility in Torrington, CT. FCE is responsible for power plant design, integration of all subsystems, sales/marketing, and client services. The commercial product specifications have been developed by working closely with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG). FCCG members include municipal utilities, rural electric co-ops, and investor owned utilities who have expressed interest in being the initial purchasers of the first commercial DFC power plants. The utility participants in the SCDP have been drawn from the membership of FCCG. FCE is serving as the prime contractor for the design, construction, and testing of the SCDP Plant, and FCMC has manufactured the multi-stack submodules used in the DC power section of the plant. Fluor Daniel Inc. (FDI) served as the architect-engineer for the design and construction of the plant, and also provided support to the design of the multi-stack submodules. FDI is also assisting the ERC companies in commercial power plant design.

Leo, Anthony J.; Skok, Andrew J.; O'Shea, Thomas P.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The 2013 NCMS Nanotechnology Commercialization Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, The 2013 NCMS Nanotechnology Commercialization Study ... the last decade to study the impact of the National Nanotechnology Initiative.

182

An analysis of the impacts of economic incentive programs on commercial nuclear power plant operations and maintenance costs  

SciTech Connect

Operations and Maintenance (O and M) expenditures by nuclear power plant owner/operators possess a very logical and vital link in considerations relating to plant safety and reliability. Since the determinants of O and M outlays are considerable and varied, the potential linkages to plant safety, both directly and indirectly, can likewise be substantial. One significant issue before the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is the impact, if any, on O and M spending from state programs that attempt to improve plant operating performance, and how and to what extent these programs may affect plant safety and pose public health risks. The purpose of this study is to examine the role and degree of impacts from state promulgated economic incentive programs (EIPs) on plant O and M spending. A multivariate regression framework is specified, and the model is estimated on industry data over a five-year period, 1986--1990. Explanatory variables for the O and M spending model include plant characteristics, regulatory effects, financial strength factors, replacement power costs, and the performance incentive programs. EIPs are found to have statistically significant effects on plant O and M outlays, albeit small in relation to other factors. Moreover, the results indicate that the relatively financially weaker firms are more sensitive in their O and M spending to the presence of such programs. Formulations for linking spending behavior and EIPs with plant safety performance remains for future analysis.

Kavanaugh, D.C.; Monroe, W.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wood, R.S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCustomer-Sited PV: A Study of Commercial Installations inCalifornia  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the impact of retail rate design on the economics of grid-connected commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems in California. The analysis is based on 15-minute interval building load and PV production data for 24 commercial PV installations in California, spanning a diverse set of building load shapes and geographic locations. We derive the annual bill savings per kWh generated for each PV system, under each of 21 distinct retail rates currently offered by the five largest utilities in California. We identify and explain variation in the value of bill savings attributable to differences in the structure of demand and energy charges across rates, as well as variation attributable to other factors, such as the size of the PV system relative to building load, the specific shape of the PV production profile, and the customer load profile. We also identify the optimal rate for each customer, among those rates offered as alternatives to one another, and show how the decision is driven in large measure by the size of the PV system relative to building load. The findings reported here may be of value to regulators and utilities responsible for designing retail rates, as well as to customers and PV retailers who have a need to estimate the prospective bill savings of PV systems.

Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EA-1506: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1506: Finding of No Significant Impact Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant, Weld County, Colorado This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental impacts of the Department of Energy's decision to support the Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process project in unincorporated Weld County, Colorado, including construction and operation of the plant, as well as a No Action Alternative. Finding of No Significant Impact for Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant, Weld County, Colorado, DOE/EA-1506 (November 2004) More Documents & Publications EA-1506: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1597: Finding of No Significant Impact

185

Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part 2: Case Demonstration for a Typical Climate System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Part 1 of this paper, the theoretical models, integrating the fan airflow, fan head, air leakage factors, are developed to analyze the impacts of the static pressure reset on both pressure dependent and pressure independent terminal boxes. In this part, a simulated air handling unit (AHU) system in Omaha NE is used to demonstrate the energy savings performance in one typical climate year. This AHU system has a static pressure reset system and two constant static pressure systems, one having pressure dependent terminal boxes and one having pressure independent terminal boxes. These simulated systems were compared mainly on the basis of fan power energy consumption and thermal energy consumption in totally a year. The example presents a good agreement with the theoretical model and simulation results. It was also shown that static pressure reset provides a promising and challenging way for the energy performance in VAV system.

Liu, M.; Zheng, K.; Wu, L.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

187

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Title Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51860 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Diamond, Richard C., Craig P. Wray, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang Start Page Chapter Abstract Previous research suggests that HVAC thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings suffer from thermal losses, such as those caused by duct air leakage and poor duct location. Due to a lack of metrics and data showing the potentially large energy savings from reducing these losses, the California building industry has mostly overlooked energy efficiency improvements in this area. The purpose of this project is to obtain the technical knowledge needed to properly measure and understand the energy efficiency of these systems. This project has three specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for determining system efficiencies, to develop design and retrofit information that the building industry can use to improve these systems, and to determine the energy impacts associated with duct leakage airflows in an existing large commercial building. The primary outcome of this project is the confirmation that duct leakage airflows can significantly impact energy use in large commercial buildings: our measurements indicate that adding 15% duct leakage at operating conditions leads to an increase in fan power of about 25 to 35%. This finding is consistent with impacts of increased duct leakage airflows on fan power that have been predicted by previous simulations. Other project outcomes include the definition of a new metric for distribution system efficiency, the demonstration of a reliable test for determining duct leakage airflows, and the development of new techniques for duct sealing. We expect that the project outcomes will lead to new requirements for commercial thermal distribution system efficiency in future revisions of California's Title 24.

188

West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Supplement Analysis (DOE/EIS-0337-SA-01) (06/07/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 7-SA-O1 West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Supplement Analysis Revised Final U.S. Department of Energy West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley, New York June 7, 2006 WVDP Waste Management US - Supplement Analysis Table of Contents 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 1 2.0 PROPOSED ACTIONS 1 3.0 WASTE TYPE DEFINITIONS 2 4.0 EXISTING NEPA ANALYSIS 3 5.0 NEW INFORMATION 3 6.0 IS A SUPPLEMENTAL EIS NEEDED~ 5 6.1 Glass Melter, CFMT, and MFHT 5 6.2 Increased LLW Volumes 11 7.0 CONCLUSION 17 8.0 DETERMINATION 177 9.0 REFERENCES 17 List of Tables Table 1. Radiation Doses for Involved and Noninvolved Workers Under Alternative A, Including the Glass Melter, CFMT, and MFHT 8 Table 2. Radiological Consequences of Accidents Using 50-Percent Atmospheric Conditions ...9 Table 3. Radiological Consequences of Accidents Using 95-Percent

189

Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief T he Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology in Tennessee to demonstrate, test, evaluation, and showcase innovative commercial motor vehicle (CMV) safety

190

Impact of Nighttime Shut Down on the Prediction Accuracy of Monthly Regression Models for Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regression models of measured energy use in buildings are widely used as baseline models to determine retrofit savings from measured energy consumption. It is less expensive to determine savings from monthly utility bills when they are available than to install hourly metering equipment. However, little is known about the impact of nighttime shut off on the accuracy of savings determined from monthly data. This paper reports a preliminary investigation of this question by comparing the heating and cooling energy use predicted by regression models based on monthly data against the predictions of calibrated hourly simulation models when applied to a medium-sized university building in Texas with (i) DDCAV system operating 24 hours per day, (ii) DDCAV system with nighttime shut down, (iii) DDVAV system operating 24 hours per day, and (iv) DDVAV system with nighttime shut down. The results of the four cases studied indicate : 1) when the AHUs are operated 24 hours/day, the annual prediction error of the cooling regression models is less than 0.5% of the annual cooling energy consumption; however, 2) when the AHUs are operated with nighttime shut down, the annual prediction error of the cooling models becomes as high as 6% of annual energy consumption. It should be noted that the cases considered here include only single end-uses of energy and have not investigated energy-use data which includes multiple end-uses. Modified regression models are therefore recommended when AHUs are not operated 24 hours per day and the temperature pattern is significantly different between pre and post retrofit years.

Wang, J.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Carbon-in-Ash Monitor Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the lack of publicly available performance and operational data for the current carbon-in-ash monitor (CIAM) commercial offerings, EPRI and Southern Company initiated a demonstration of several commercial technologies on Southern Company's coal-fired units.

2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

192

Impacts of Multileaf Collimators Leaf Width on Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Analysis of Two Commercial Elekta Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compared the impacts of multileaf collimator (MLC) widths (standard MLC width of 10 mm [SMLC] and micro-MLC width of 4 mm [MMLC]) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten patients with NPC were recruited in this study. In each patient's case, plans were generated with the same machine setup parameter and optimizing methods in a treatment planning system according to 2 commercial Elekta MLC devices. All of the parameters were collected from dose-volume histograms of paired plans and evaluated. The average conformity index (CI) and homogeneous index (HI) for the planning gross target volume in IMRT plans with MMLC were 0.790 {+-} 0.036 and 1.062 {+-} 0.011, respectively. Data in plans with SMLC were 0.754 {+-} 0.038 and 1.070 {+-} 0.010, respectively. The differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Compared with CI and HI for planning target volume in paired plans, data with MMLC obviously were better than those with SMLC (CI: 0.858 {+-} 0.026 vs. 0.850 {+-} 0.021, p < 0.05; and HI: 1.185 {+-} 0.011 vs. 1.195 {+-} 0.011, p < 0.05). However, there was no statistical significance between evaluated parameters (Dmean, Dmax, D{sub 5}, gEUD, or NTCP) for organs at risk (OARs) in the 2 paired IMRT plans. According to these two kinds of Elekta MLC devices, IMRT plans with the MMLC have significant advantages in dose coverage for the targets, with more efficiency in treatment for NPC but fail to improve dose sparing of the OARs.

Wang Shichao [Radiation and Physics Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Gong Youling, E-mail: gongyouling@gmail.co [Department of Thoracic Oncology and Radiation Oncology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Xu Qingfeng; Bai Sen [Radiation and Physics Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Lu You [Department of Thoracic Oncology and Radiation Oncology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Jiang Qingfeng [Radiation and Physics Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China); Chen Nianyong [Department of Head and Neck Oncology and Radiation Oncology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province (China)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Societal, Social, and Economic Impacts of the World Weather Research Programme Sydney 2000 Forecast Demonstration Project (WWRP S2000 FDP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sydney 2000 (S2000) Forecast Demonstration Project (FDP) was initiated by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) World Weather Research Programme (WWRP) to enable the world meteorological community to cooperatively demonstrate advanced ...

Linda Anderson-Berry; Tom Keenan; John Bally; Roger Pielke Jr.; Roy Leigh; David King

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

TRUEX hot demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Northwest Open Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

morning and summer afternoon peak electricity demand in commercial buildings the Seattle area. LBNL performed this demonstration for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)...

196

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Offsite Transportation of Certain Low-Level and Mixed Radioactive Waste from Savannah River Site for Treatment and Disposal at Commercial and Government Facilities, DOE/EA-1308 (02/15/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact for the Offsite Transportation of Certain Low-level and Mixed Radioactive Waste from the Savannah River Site for Treatment and Disposal at Commercial and Government Facilities Agency: U. S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1308) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed offsite transportation of certain low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed (i.e., hazardous and radioactive) low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) from the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting

197

Highly Efficient, 5-kW CHP Fuel Cells Demonstrating Durability and Economic Value in Residential and Light Commercial Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Petrecky Plug Power 968 Albany Shaker Road Latham, NY 12110 Phone: (518) 782-7700 ext: 1977 Email: james_petrecky@plugpower.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Vendor: ClearEdge Power, Hillsboro, OR Project Start Date: October 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 15, 2013 Objectives Quantify the durability of proton exchange membrane * (PEM) fuel cell systems in residential and light commercial combined heat and power (CHP) applications in California. Optimize system performance though testing of multiple * high-temperature units through collection of field data.

198

EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric 750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas Summary This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology to facilitate the development and demonstration of a multi-faceted, synergistic approach to managing fluctuations in wind power within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas transmission grid. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

199

Department of Energy's solar update. Four regional conferences highlighting the objectives, plans, and experience of the National Commercial Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program and the National Solar Data Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the entire proceedings of the solar update. All papers presented by DOE officials, DOE contractors, and demonstration site representatives are presented, as well as summaries of all workshops, comments from questionnaires, and a listing of all participants. Twenty-eight papers are included. Two were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-six. (MHR)

None

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Impacts of Historical Land Use on Soil Nitrogen Cycles in Falmouth, MA and the Threat of Chronic N Amendment Demonstrated at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amendment Demonstrated at the Harvard Forest LTER, Petersham, MA Brook Brouwer1 Advisor: Christopher Neill2, in Petersham, MA. At each site I measured: pH, C:N ratios, extractable inorganic nitrogen pools, net N Amendment Demonstrated at the Harvard Forest LTER, Petersham, MA" Brook Brouwer Introduction

Vallino, Joseph J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Status of load management storage demonstrations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE is funding a nationwide demonstration of electric load management through the use of utility-controlled, customer-side thermal energy storage for residential space conditioning. The general concept of the projects was developed with the assistance of a broadly based working group drawn from the utility industry. This paper presents the current status of these demonstrations. Ten demonstrations are underway - five heat storage and five cool storage - using between 30 and 50 near-commercial thermal storage devices. The installations and experimental program are designed to: (1) collect reliable load research data for assessing the impact on the utility system; (2) delineate and solve installation problems; (3) establish maintainability; (4) illuminate customer and utility acceptance; and (5) generate cost data. The results obtained are expected to assist utilities in making local load-management decisions, to assist DOE in establishing priorities for R and D efforts in load management, and to provide objective information related to the electric system impact, energy conservation, and cost-effectiveness of this form of load management.

Long, H M; Mohre, D L

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Operational Demonstration Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Demonstration Program Operational Demonstration Program Operational Demonstration Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate $500,000 Program Info Funding Source CEFIA Start Date 2005 State Connecticut Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount $150,000 - $500,000 Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority This program is currently closed. Applications were due in February 2012.

204

Notice of Availability for the Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (12/13/02)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

740 740 Federal Register / Vol. 67, No. 240 / Friday, December 13, 2002 / Notices [FR Doc. 02-31431 Filed 12-12-02; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6450-01-C ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-6635-7] Environmental Impact Statments; Notice of Availability Responsible Agency: Office of Federal Activities, General Information (202) 564-7167 or http://www.epa.gov/ compliance/nepa/. Weekly receipt of Environmental Impact Statements filed December 2, 2002, through December 6, 2002. Pursuant to 40 CFR 1506.9. EIS No. 020498, Draft EIS, SFW, WA, Daybreak Mine Expansion and Habitat Enhancement Project, Habitat Conservation Plan, Issuance of a Multiple Species Permit for Incidental Take, Implementation, Clark County, WA , Comment Period Ends: February 21, 2003. Contact: Tim Romanski

205

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center (3/13/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 49 / Thursday, March 13, 2003 / Notices Dated: March 6, 2003. Gerald A. Reynolds, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights. [FR Doc. 03-5999 Filed 3-12-03; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-M DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Intent. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) are announcing their intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and

206

Commercializing solar architecture  

SciTech Connect

The seminar discussions on attitudinal, technical, and institutional issues and the suggestions related to information development, acquisition, and dissemination; education and training; demonstrations and design competitions; and other actions are documented. Information on SERI's overall mission and a paper titled, The Architectural Role of SERI, and a matrix of barriers and actions from this assessment, related to the commercialization profile for passive solar heating, are attached as appendices.

Franta, G.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, WV and Notice of Floodplain/Wetlands Involvement (6/3/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 11 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 106 / Tuesday, June 3, 2003 / Notices Dated: May 27, 2003. Judge Eric Andell, Deputy Under Secretary for Safe and Drug- Free Schools. [FR Doc. 03-13836 Filed 6-2-03; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, WV and Notice of Floodplain/Wetlands Involvement AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Floodplain/Wetlands Involvement. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the

208

Engineering Methods for Estimating the Impacts of Demand-Side Management Programs: Volume 1: Fundamentals of Engineering Simulations for Residential and Commercial End Uses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This handbook focuses on the use of building energy computer simulations for planning and evaluating demand-side management (DSM) measures. It presents techniques for estimating energy and demand savings for a list of common residential and commercial DSM technologies using widely available public-domain and EPRI computer programs.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Energy Efficiency Demonstration: Executive Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Efficiency Demonstration was a field-performance assessment of emerging, efficient end-use technologies, deployed with extensive measurement instrumentation at multiple sites throughout the United States. EPRI collaborated with fourteen utilities spread throughout the United States. The selected technologies were known to have the potential to significantly reduce energy consumption in residential and commercial applications. The technologies demonstrated were: light emitting diode (LED) ...

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

210

Energy Efficiency Demonstration Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Efficiency Demonstration was a field-performance assessment of emerging, efficient end-use technologies, deployed with extensive measurement instrumentation at multiple sites throughout the United States. EPRI collaborated with fourteen utilities spread throughout the United States. The selected technologies were known to have the potential to significantly reduce energy consumption in residential and commercial applications. The technologies demonstrated were: light emitting diode (LED) ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fuel Cell Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

Gerald Brun

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Compliance Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial Energy Codes Conformity assessment is a term used to describe the processes followed to demonstrate that a product, service,...

213

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Hydrothermal electric and direct heat. Commercialization Phase III planning  

SciTech Connect

Nine environmental concerns have been identified: airborne effluents, waterborne effluents, noise, subsidence, enhanced seismicity, water use conflicts, land use, socioeconomic impacts, and system safety and occupational health. Resolution of these issues is expected to occur at staggered intervals over the next 8 to 10 years. Of these concerns, airborne emissions and water use conflicts are judged to have a medium likelihood of having research findings adverse to commercialization. Waterborne effluents and subsidence are also judged to have a medium likelihood. The other concerns--noise, enhanced seismicity, land use, socioeconomic impacts and system safety and occupational health--are judged to have a low likelihood of adverse findings. The overall environmental research and development plan related to hydrothermal electric and direct heat includes funds to assess the adequacy of candidate control technology options. However, it does not include the resource requirements to fully develop and demonstrate commercial control hardware, process modifications, and for strategies. The conclusions, stated as probabilities, are given.

Clusen, R.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Performance Metrics for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial building owners and operators have requested a standard set of key performance metrics to provide a systematic way to evaluate the performance of their buildings. The performance metrics included in this document provide standard metrics for the energy, water, operations and maintenance, indoor environmental quality, purchasing, waste and recycling and transportation impact of their building. The metrics can be used for comparative performance analysis between existing buildings and industry standards to clarify the impact of sustainably designed and operated buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Wang, Na; Romero, Rachel L.; Deru, Michael P.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | BNL  

Brookhaven National Laboratory's Office of Technology Commercialization and Partnerships manages and advances the commercialization of cutting-edge discoveries ...

217

Large Scale Testing, Demonstration and Commercialization of the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficient components such as aluminum radiators (instead of stainless steel) and brass heat exchangers. FY 2012 Accomplishments Following are the accomplishments from...

218

Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and job creation it would entail, provide the opportunity to develop thousands of megawatts of...

219

SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION TREATMENT TRAIN: COMMERCIAL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Development, Cincinnati. The research work that followed led to the design of a two-stage process efficiencies). - The blended cement product readily passes TCLP test for priority metals. - The blended cement during the TCLP tests. Fiberglass and raw glass for glass tile production were successfully produced

Brookhaven National Laboratory

220

Results of charpy V-notch impact testing of structural steel specimens irradiated at {approximately}30{degrees}C to 1 x 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} in a commercial reactor cavity  

SciTech Connect

A capsule containing Charpy V-notch (CVN) and mini-tensile specimens was irradiated at {approximately} 30{degrees}C ({approximately} 85{degrees}F) in the cavity of a commercial nuclear power plant to a fluence of 1 x 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1MeV). The capsule included six CVN impact specimens of archival High Flux Isotope Reactor A212 grade B ferritic steel and five CVN impact specimens of a well-studied A36 structural steel. This irradiation was part of the ongoing study of neutron-induced damage effects at the low temperature and flux experienced by reactor supports. The plant operators shut down the plant before the planned exposure was reached. The exposure of these specimens produced no significant irradiation-induced embrittlement. Of interest were the data on unirradiated specimens in the L-T orientation machined from a single plate of A36 structural steel, which is the same specification for the structural steel used in some reactor supports. The average CVN energy of five unirradiated specimens obtained from one region of the plate and tested at room temperature was {approximately} 99 J, while the energy of 11 unirradiated specimens from other locations of the same plate was 45 J, a difference of {approximately} 220%. The CVN impact energies for all 18 specimens ranged from a low of 32 J to a high of 111 J. Moreover, it appears that the University of Kansas CVN impact energy data of the unirradiated specimens at the 100-J level are shifted toward higher temperatures by about 20 K. The results were an example of the extent of scatter possible in CVN impact testing. Generic values for the CVN impact energy of A36 should be used with caution in critical applications.

Iskander, S.K.; Stoller, R.E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

PFBC Utility Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Offsite demonstrations for MWLID technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Offsite Demonstration Project for Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID)-developed environmental site characterization and remediation technologies is to facilitate the transfer, use, and commercialization of these technologies to the public and private sector. The meet this goal, the project identified environmental restoration needs of mixed waste and/or hazardous waste landfill owners (Native American, municipal, DOE, and DoD); documenting potential demonstration sites and the contaminants present at each site; assessing the environmental regulations that would effect demonstration activities; and evaluating site suitability for demonstrating MWLID technologies at the tribal and municipal sites identified. Eighteen landfill sites within a 40.2-km radius of Sandia National Laboratories are listed on the CERCLIS Site/Event Listing for the state of New Mexico. Seventeen are not located within DOE or DoD facilities and are potential offsite MWLID technology demonstration sites. Two of the seventeen CERCLIS sites, one on Native American land and one on municipal land, were evaluated and identified as potential candidates for off-site demonstrations of MWLID-developed technologies. Contaminants potentially present on site include chromium waste, household/commercial hazardous waste, volatile organic compounds, and petroleum products. MWLID characterization technologies applicable to these sites include Magnetometer Towed Array, Cross-borehole Electromagnetic Imaging, SitePlanner {trademark}/PLUME, Hybrid Directional Drilling, Seamist{trademark}/Vadose Zone Monitoring, Stripping Analyses, and x-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Heavy Metals.

Williams, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gruebel, R. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Economic impact of energy shortages on commercial air transportation and aviation manufacture. Volume 2. Aviation industries profiles and energy usage characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the economic impact of energy scarcity on the air transportation industry. Volume II provides a data base on the characteristics and operating performances of the air transportation industry and the aircraft, engines, and parts manufacturing industries, including energy usage characteristics and efficiency. (BYB)

Gorham, J.E.; Gross, D.; Snipes, J.C.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC and other industry partners have assisted directly in this effort

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Major Demonstrations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations Major Demonstrations A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. A state-of-the-art integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant, Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station produces enough electricity to serve 75,000 homes. The Office of Fossil Energy is co-funding large-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies to hasten their adoption into the commercial marketplace. Through the year 2030, electricity consumption in the United States is expected to grow by about 1 percent per year. The ability of coal-fired generation to help meet this demand could be limited by concerns over greenhouse gas emissions. While the Major Demonstrations performed to date

227

Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach, assess the impacts of duct system improvements in California large commercial buildings, over a range of building vintages and climates. This assessment will provide a solid foundation for future efforts that address the energy efficiency of large commercial duct systems in Title 24. This report describes our work to address Objective 1, which includes a review of past modeling efforts related to duct thermal performance, and recommends near- and long-term modeling approaches for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings.

Wray, Craig P.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project, A DOE Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program is a government and industry co-funded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes. One goal of the program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a variety of energy efficient, environmentally superior coal-based technologies. Demonstration projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising coal technologies that have proceeded beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This report is a post-project assessment of the DOE CCT Demonstration Program, the Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project. A major objective of the CCT Program is to provide the technical data necessary for the private sector to proceed confidently with the commercial replication of the demonstrated technologies. An essential element of meeting this goal is the dissemination of results from the demonstration projects. This post-project assessment (PPA) report is an independent DOE appraisal of the successes that the completed project had in achieving its objectives and aiding in the commercialization of the demonstrated technology. The report also provides an assessment of the expected technical, environmental, and economic performance of the commercial version of the technology, as well as an analysis of the commercial market.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Environmental Assessment for the Warren Station externally fired combined cycle demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Penelec project is one of 5 projects for potential funding under the fifth solicitation under the Clean Coal Technology program. In Penelec, two existing boilers would be replaced at Warren Station, PA; the new unit would produce 73 MW(e) in a combined cycle mode (using both gas-fired and steam turbines). The project would fill the need for a full utility-size demonstration of externally fire combined cycle (EFCC) technology as the next step toward commercialization. This environmental assessment was prepared for compliance with NEPA; its purpose is to provide sufficient basis for determining whether to prepare an environmental impact statement or to issue a finding of no significant impact. It is divided into the sections: purpose and need for proposed action; alternatives; brief description of affected environment; environmental consequences, including discussion of commercial operation beyond the demonstration period.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial. Since most of commercial energy consumption occurs in buildings, the commercial module relies on the data from the EIA

231

Commercial Sector Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Business Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimated market potential for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in the commercial sector could be about 4 billion MWh from 2001 through 2015. This market, however, is highly sensitive to impacts deregulation will have on commercial retail rates.

1996-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

232

EA-1001: Commercialization of the Mound Plant, Golden, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to commercialize surplus facilities such as the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio. Commercialization will make...

233

Milestone Demonstrates Impact of Scientific Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

be needed for hydrogen-based cars. The figure shows the organic isophthalate anions with green, blue and red spheres and their Cu cations linkers as cyan tetrahedra. The large...

234

Demand Subsidies versus R&D: Comparing the Uncertain Impacts of Policy on a Pre-Commercial Low-Carbon Energy Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine an expert elicitation and a bottom-up manufacturing cost model to compare the effects of R&D and demand subsidies. We model their effects on the future costs of a low-carbon energy technology that is not currently commercially available, purely organic photovoltaics (PV). We find that: (1) successful R&D enables PV to achieve a cost target of 4c/kWh, (2) the cost of PV does not reach the target when only subsidies, and not R&D, are implemented, and (3) production-related effects on technological advancelearning-by-doing and economies of scaleare not as critical to the long-term potential for cost reduction in organic PV than is the investment in and success of R&D. These results are insensitive to two levels of policy intensity, the level of a carbon price, the availability of storage technology, and uncertainty in the main parameters used in the model. However, a case can still be made for subsidies: comparisons of stochastic dominance show that subsidies provide a hedge against failure in the R&D program. 1.

Gregory F. Nemet; Erin Baker

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Energy Efficiency Demonstration Update, February 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the February 2012 issue of the Energy Efficiency Demonstration Update, a monthly newsletter for utility members of the EPRI Energy Efficiency Demonstration. The Energy Efficiency Demonstration is a three-year endeavor to demonstrate residential hyper-efficient appliances, domestic heat pump water heaters, and residential ductless heat pumps. Commercial-sector technologies that are part of the test are variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump air conditioning systems; LED street and area lighting; and ...

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy Efficiency Demonstration Update, May 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the May 2009 issue of the Energy Efficiency Demonstration Update, a monthly newsletter for utility members of the EPRI Energy Efficiency Demonstration. The Energy Efficiency Demonstration is a three-year endeavor to demonstrate residential "hyper-efficient" appliances, domestic heat pump water heaters, and residential ductless heat pumps. Commercial-sector technologies that are part of the test are variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump air conditioning systems; LED street and area lighting; and eff...

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Energy Efficiency Demonstration Update, August 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the August 2011 issue of the Energy Efficiency Demonstration Update, a monthly newsletter for utility members of the EPRI Energy Efficiency Demonstration. The Energy Efficiency Demonstration is a three-year endeavor to demonstrate residential "hyper-efficient" appliances, domestic heat pump water heaters, and residential ductless heat pumps. Commercial-sector technologies that are part of the test are variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump air conditioning systems; LED street and area lighting; and ...

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

EERE: Commercialization & Deployment  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

marketplace. Commercialization Commercialization initiatives help bridge the gap between technology R&D and venture capital funding and marketing. Energy Innovation Portal...

239

DOE/EA-1643: Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Commercial Refrigeration Equipment (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR 10 CFR Part 431 Energy Conservation Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Ice-Cream Freezers; Self-Contained Commercial Refrigerators, Commercial Freezers, and Commercial Refrigerator- Freezers without Doors; and Remote Condensing Commercial Refrigerators, Commercial Freezers, and Commercial Refrigerator-Freezers December 2008 CHAPTER 16. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS TABLE OF CONTENTS 16.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................ 16-1 16.2 AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS ............................................................................................ 16-1

240

TRUEX hot demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In FY 1987, a program was initiated to demonstrate technology for recovering transuranic (TRU) elements from defense wastes. This hot demonstration was to be carried out with solution from the dissolution of irradiated fuels. This recovery would be accomplished with both PUREX and TRUEX solvent extraction processes. Work planned for this program included preparation of a shielded-cell facility for the receipt and storage of spent fuel from commercial power reactors, dissolution of this fuel, operation of a PUREX process to produce specific feeds for the TRUEX process, operation of a TRUEX process to remove residual actinide elements from PUREX process raffinates, and processing and disposal of waste and product streams. This report documents the work completed in planning and starting up this program. It is meant to serve as a guide for anyone planning similar demonstrations of TRUEX or other solvent extraction processing in a shielded-cell facility.

Chamberlain, D.B.; Leonard, R.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Gay, E.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NETL: CCPI - Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Energy California Project: Commercial Demonstration of Advanced IGCC with Full Carbon Capture Greenfield Site, Kern County, California PROJECT FACT SHEET Hydrogen Energy...

242

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development ...

243

Commercialization Home Page - EERE Commercialization Office  

The Commercialization Team of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works to bridge the gap between research and development (R&D), and venture ...

244

Summary of the Special Analysis of Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide Demonstrating the Before and After Impacts on the DOE Order 435.1 Performance Objective and the Peak Dose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the special analysis (SA) of the Savannah River Depleted Uranium Trioxide waste stream (SVRSURANIUM03, Revision 1) demonstrating the before and after impacts of the waste stream to the DOE Order 435.1 performance objective at the disposal facility, and the peak dose. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) requested this SA and asked the Nevada Site Office (NSO) to run the SA deterministically and assume that all the model conditions remain the same regardless of the length of time to the peak dose. Although the NDEP accepts that DOE Order 435.1 requires a compliance period of 1,000 years, it also requested to know what year, if any, the specific DOE performance objectives will be exceeded. Given the NDEPs requested model conditions, the SA demonstrates the Rn-222 peak dose will occur in about 2 million years and will exceed the performance objective in about 6,000 years. The 0.25 mSv y-1 all-pathway performance objective was not exceeded for the resident scenario after reaching the 4 million year peak dose.

Shott, G.J.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Energy Efficiency Demonstration: An Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Efficiency Demonstration is a field-performance assessment of emerging, efficient end-use technologies, deployed with extensive measurement instrumentation at multiple sites throughout the United States. The selected technologies have the potential to significantly reduce energy consumption in residential and commercial applications. This Demonstration is one of EPRI's Industry Technology Demonstrations, which put into action the recommendations of the Prism Merge Analysis, which quantified th...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Waste immobilization demonstration program for the Hanford Site`s Mixed Waste Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility, Module 2A> waste immobilization demonstration program, focusing on the cooperation between Hanford Site, commercial, and international participants. Important highlights of the development and demonstration activities is discussed from the standpoint of findings that have had significant from the standpoint of findings that have had significant impact on the evolution of the facility design. A brief description of the future direction of the program is presented, with emphasis on the key aspects of the technologies that call for further detailed investigation.

Burbank, D.A.; Weingardt, K.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Not Available

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

248

Civilian applications and policy implications of commercial unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As UAV capabilities continue to improve the technology will spill out of the military sector and into commercial and civil applications. Already, UAVs have demonstrated commercial marketability in such diverse areas as ...

Sprague, Kara Lynn, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Commercial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

250

Commercialization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization Commercialization Commercialization See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. See an example of these steps in the commercialization process of Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries. Commercialization is the process by which technologies and innovations developed in the lab make their way to market. By licensing patents or using Energy Department facilities, researchers from the private sector and academia are able to take advantage of federal investments into basic science research, while researchers are able to ensure that their discoveries have a life beyond the lab. The Energy Department also helps entrepreneurs, small business owners and

251

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO sub x Cell trademark Burner retrofit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objectives of the full-Scale Low-NOx Cell{trademark} Burner (LNCB{trademark}) Retrofit project is to demonstrate the cost-effective reduction of NOx generated by a large, base-loaded (70% capacity factor or greater), coal-fired utility boiler. Specific objectives include: (1) At least 50% NOx reduction over standard two-nozzle cell burners, without degradation of boiler performance or life; (2) acquire and evaluate emission and boiler performance data before and after the retrofit to determine NOx reduction and impact on overall boiler performance; (3) demonstrate that the LNCB{trademark} retrofits are the most cost-effective alternative to emerging, or commercially-available NOx control technology for units equipped with cell burners. The focus of this demonstration is to determine maximum NOx reduction capabilities without adversely impacting plant performance, operation and maintenance.

Not Available

1992-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

252

International Stationary Fuel Cell Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STATIONARY FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION STATIONARY FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION John Vogel, Plug Power Inc. Yu-Min Tsou, PEMEAS E-TEK 14 February, 2007 Clean, Reliable On-site Energy SAFE HARBOR STATEMENT This presentation contains forward-looking statements, including statements regarding the company's future plans and expectations regarding the development and commercialization of fuel cell technology. All forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected. The forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this presentation. The company expressly disclaims any obligation or undertaking to release publicly any updates or revisions to any such statements to reflect any change in the company's expectations or any change in

253

CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; (4) conducting a blast furnace test to demonstrate the compatibility of the coke produced; and (5) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Detailed studies of LTV's site for the installation of the commercial Demonstration Unit with site specific layouts; Environmental Work; Firm commitments for funding from the private sector; and Federal funding to complement the private contribution.

Albert Calderon

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

Novel Composite Materials Demonstrate Ultra-sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, Issue 25 2, Issue 25 Novel Composite Materials Demonstrate Ultra-sensitivity Gold nanowires on graphite templates used in gas sensing application page 2 Coronary Stent Wins Technology Transfer Award page 4 University of Oregon Team Wins Competition for Commercializing NETL Technology page 5 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 2 Novel Composite Materials Demonstrate Ultra-sensitivity-Gold nanowires on graphite templates used in gas sensing applications ____________________2 Coronary Stent Wins Technology Transfer Award ________4 University of Oregon Team Wins Competition for Commercializing NETL Technology __________________5 NETL & WVU Researchers Design New Catalysts for CO 2 Management ___________________________________6 Structurally Dynamic MOF Sorbent Selectively Adsorbs

255

EA-1643: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

43: Finding of No Significant Impact 43: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1643: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Ice-Cream Freezers; Self-Contained Commercial Refrigerators, Commerical Freezers, and Commercial Refrigerator-Freezers without Doors; and Remote Condensing Commercial Refrigerators, Commercial Freezers, and Commercial Refrigerator-Freezers The proposed action is the establishment of new energy conservation standards for commerical refrigeration equipment. DOE is adopting Trial Standard Level 4 for CRE. Energy Conservation Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Ice-Cream Freezers; Self-Contained Commercial Refrigerators, Commerical Freezers, and Commercial

256

EA-1643: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Finding of No Significant Impact 3: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1643: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Ice-Cream Freezers; Self-Contained Commercial Refrigerators, Commerical Freezers, and Commercial Refrigerator-Freezers without Doors; and Remote Condensing Commercial Refrigerators, Commercial Freezers, and Commercial Refrigerator-Freezers The proposed action is the establishment of new energy conservation standards for commerical refrigeration equipment. DOE is adopting Trial Standard Level 4 for CRE. Energy Conservation Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Ice-Cream Freezers; Self-Contained Commercial Refrigerators, Commerical Freezers, and Commercial

257

EA-1080: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

80: Finding of No Significant Impact 80: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1080: Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration of the NOXSO SO2/NOX Removal Flue Gas Cleanup System, IN and TN The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for a project proposed by NOXSO Corporation for the cost-shared design, construction, and operation of the NOXSO SO2/NOX Removal Flue Gas Cleanup System. DOE has determined that the proposed Federal action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Commercial Demonstration of the NOXSO SO2/NOX Removal Flue Gas Cleanup System, DOE/EA-1080 (June 1995) More Documents & Publications

258

EA-1472: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1472: Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Finnety County, Kansas The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower's Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The Holcomb Station would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NOx control technologies.

259

EA-1449: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1449: Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash, King George County, Virgina The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment to analyze the potential environmental consequences of participating in a cooperative agreement with Universal Aggregates, LLC, for the design, construction, and operation of a plant to manufacture lightweight aggregates. Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing Technology Utilizing Spray Dryer Ash More Documents & Publications EA-1449: Final Environmental Assessment Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating

260

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Price Average Commercial Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships |  

Staff Directory; BNL People Technology Commercialization & Partnerships. Home; For BNL Inventors; ... a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. ...

262

Contacts - EERE Commercialization Office  

Contacts. For more information about the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition, or about other commercialization initiatives, please contact ...

263

Environmental assessment for commercialization of the Mound Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In November 1993 US DOE decided to phase out operations at the Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, with the goal of releasing the site for commercial use. The broad concept is to transform the plant into an advanced manufacturing center with the main focus on commercializing products and other technology. DOE proposes to lease portions of the Mound Plant to commercial enterprises. This Environmental Impact statement has a finding of no significant impact in reference to such action.

Not Available

1994-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

264

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

266

Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grant Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project Description: Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants The Propane Vehicle Demonstration Grants was established to demonstrate the benefits of new propane equipment. The US Department of Energy, the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) and the Propane Vehicle Council (PVC) partnered in this program. The project impacted ten different states, 179 vehicles, and 15 new propane fueling facilities. Based on estimates provided, this project generated a minimum of 1,441,000 new gallons of propane sold for the vehicle market annually. Additionally, two new off-road engines were brought to the market. Projects originally funded under this project were the City of Portland, Colorado, Kansas City, Impco Technologies, Jasper Engines, Maricopa County, New Jersey State, Port of Houston, Salt Lake City Newspaper, Suburban Propane, Mutual Liquid Propane and Ted Johnson.

Jack Mallinger

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

267

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 39 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Commercial Demand Module The NEMS Commercial Sector Demand Module generates projections of commercial sector energy demand through 2035. The definition of the commercial sector is consistent with EIA's State Energy Data System (SEDS). That is, the commercial sector includes business establishments that are not engaged in transportation or in manufacturing or other types of industrial activity (e.g., agriculture, mining or construction). The bulk of commercial sector energy is consumed within buildings; however, street lights, pumps, bridges, and public services are also included if the establishment operating them is considered commercial.

268

Category:Smart Grid Projects - Regional Demonstrations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demonstrations Demonstrations Jump to: navigation, search Smart Grid Regional Demonstrations Projects category. Pages in category "Smart Grid Projects - Regional Demonstrations" The following 16 pages are in this category, out of 16 total. B Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project C Center for the Commercialization of Electric Technologies Smart Grid Demonstration Project Columbus Southern Power Company (doing business as AEP Ohio) Smart Grid Demonstration Project Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project K Kansas City Power & Light Company Smart Grid Demonstration Project L Long Island Power Authority Smart Grid Demonstration Project L cont. Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Smart Grid Demonstration Project

269

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Large HVAC Energy Impact Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Large HVAC Energy Impact Report Statewide Energy Impact Report are part of the Integrated Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems research project. The reports: Productivity and Interior Environments Integrated Design of Large Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design

270

Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home  

SciTech Connect

This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Solar energy commercialization and the labor market  

SciTech Connect

The success of a new technology does not depend only on its technical and economic feasibility. Evidence from the diffusion of non-solar technologies suggests that unless the product can be accepted and integrated into existing institutional processes and practices and can meet specific user and technology delivery system requirements, acceptance and diffusion of the technology will be slow. This paper discusses the potential impacts of solar energy commercialization on labor demand, and conversely, the potential impacts of the labor supply system on solar energy commercialization. Various participants in manpower training programs are examined, and alternative implementation channels to meet the labor needs of an emerging technology are discussed.

Mason, B.; Ferris, G.; Burns, B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

THE REQUIREMENTS OF A FUSION DEMONSTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, that are predicted by theory but are not yet well established experimentally. The two reactors will have the same of the commercial nuclear power business or construction of a new production reactor based on HTGR technology#12;THE REQUIREMENTS OF A FUSION DEMONSTRATION REACTOR AND THE STARLITE STUDY Robert W. Conn

Najmabadi, Farrokh

273

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings Lighting in Commercial Buildings --1986 Overview Full Report and Tables Detailed analysis of energy consumption for lighting for U.S. commercial...

274

Living Laboratory Demonstration Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current market is populated with technologies designed for demand-side management applications by targeting power at the load. Automated panelboards bring a unique opportunity to the realm of demand-side management because they are specifically designed to manage loads at the branch circuit. This report investigates the applications and use of automated panelboards in commercial and industrial applications. The report also includes the results of a test performed on an automated panel designed for re...

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Radiation Emergencies Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstrations Procedure Demonstrations Note: RealPlayer is needed for listening to the narration that accompany these demonstrations. Real Player Dressing To Prevent the Spread of Radioactive Contamination This demonstration shows how your team can dress to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Click to begin presentation on dressing to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Preparing The Area This demonstration shows basic steps you can take to gather equipment and prepare a room to receive a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material. Click to begin presentation on preparing a room to receive a radioactive contaminated patient. Removing Contaminated Clothing This demonstration shows the procedure for removing clothing from a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material.

276

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

277

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

278

NETL: Major Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstrations performed to date have made significant contributions related to environmental performance and efficiency, the greatest challenges may lie ahead from...

279

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2005/1217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2005 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

280

Navy fuel cell demonstration project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

282

Commercial New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Vermont offers support to encourage energy efficient design for new construction. Efficiency Vermont will provide support for new commercial buildings, including technical assistance at...

283

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and...

284

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

285

Commercialization Info 080611  

sponsors of the research that led to the Invention; the inventors of the Licensed Patents; and their ... of funding for the development and commercialization:

286

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the uptake of energy efficiency technologies and techniques in both existing and new commercial buildings. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the commercial building sector by at least 1,600 TBtu. Key Tools and Resources Use the guides, case studies, and other tools developed by the DOE

287

Application of the SELECS methodology to evaluate socioeconomic and environmental impacts of commercial-scale coal liquefaction plants at six potential sites in Kentucky. Final report from the study on development of environmental guidelines for the selection of sites for fossil energy conversion facilities  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and socioeconomic impacts likely to occur during the operational phase of two coal liquefaction processes have been evaluated with SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) for each of six potential sites in Kentucky for commercial scale facilities capable of processing about 26,000 tons of coal per stream day. The processes considered in this evaluation are SRC-I, a direct liquefaction route with solid boiler fuel as the principal product, and Coal-to-Methanol-to-Gasoline, an indirect liquefaction route with transportation fuel as the primary product. For comparative purposes, the impacts of a 2-gigawatt coal-fired steam-electric power plant (with coal requirements comparable to the liquefaction facilities) and an automobile parts manufacturing plant (with employment requirements of 849, comparable to the liquefaction facilities) have also been evaluated at each site. At each site, impacts have been evaluated for one or two nearby cities or towns and four to six counties where significant impacts might be expected. The SELECS methodology affords a well-organized and efficient approach to collecting and assessing a large volume of data needed to comprehensively determine the potential socioeconomic and environmental impacts resulting from the implementation of commercial scale synfuel and other energy conversion facilities. This study has also shown that SELECS is equally applicable to determine the impacts of other facilities, such as automobile parts manufacturing. In brief, the SELECS methodology serves the purpose of objectively screening sites in order to choose one at which adverse impacts will be least, and/or to determine what aspect of a proposed facility might be modified to lessen impacts at a specific site.

Northrop, G.M.; D' Ambra, C.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact Services » NEPA Documents » Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Findings of No Significant Impact are public documents issued by a Federal agency briefly presenting the reasons why an action for which the agency has prepared an environmental assessment will not have a significant effect on the human environment and, therefore, will not require preparation of an environmental impact statement. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 9, 2002 EA-1434: Finding of No Significant Impact Sunrise II Water Supply Line, Kern County, California October 2, 2002 EA-1449: Finding of No Significant Impact Commercial Demonstration of the Manufactured Aggregate Processing

289

CAES Demonstration Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

290

CAES Demonstration Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Commercial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6

292

Demonstration plant for IGCC using the U-GAS process  

SciTech Connect

Tampella, Ltd., in cooperation with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is developing the gasification technology for U-GAS{reg_sign} to produce electricity from coal using the integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC). The concept of IGCC is to join the clean burning gasification island with a more efficient gas and stream turbine island to produce electric power with minimal environmental impact. IGT has developed the U-GAS process to produce a low- or medium-Btu gas from different types of coal feedstocks. The process uses a combination of fluidized=bed gasification and ash agglomeration in a single-stage reactor. A 30-tons/day-capacity pilot plant located in Chicago has been used to develop the process. Feedstocks ranging from relatively unreactive metallurgical coke to highly reactive peat have been gasified successfully in the this pilot plant, indicating its ability to handle a feedstock with widely varying properties. A new 10 megawatt pilot plant has been designed and is under construction in Tampere, Finland, as the first step toward the commercialization of this technology. Tampella is planning to design and deliver a commercial-scale IGCC demonstration plant by 1994. 7 refs., 5 figs.

Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Salo, K. [Tampella Power, Tampere (Finland)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Solar energy demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The solar heating demonstration system at the DOE cafeteria at Grand Junction, Colorado, is briefly described. The system will supply an estimated 40 percent of the energy required for domestic hot water and building heat. (WHK)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Montana ICTL Demonstration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana ICTL Demonstration Program Montana ICTL Demonstration Program Background The Department of Energy (DOE) funds basic and applied research toward the development of technologies that will allow the U.S. to depend to a greater extent on renewable fuels, especially those derived from domestic sources of energy. Coal is one of the nation's most abundant domestic energy resources; however, conventional technologies using coal release large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO

295

successfully demonstrated the separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent successfully demonstrated the separation and capture of 90 percent of the c arbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a pulve rized coal plant. In t he ARRA-funded project, Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR) and its partners tested the Polaris(tm) membrane system, which uses a CO 2 -selective polymeric membrane material and module to capture CO 2 from a plant's flue gas. Since the Polaris(tm) membranes

296

Switchgrass Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Develop a pilot study that establishes up to 120 acres of cropland in switchgrass and 20 acres on a TN Experiment Station Farm. This subtask would assess production of switchgrass within the state of Tennessee under a variety of conditions and topography through on-farm production totaling 120 acres. Farms would be selected to participate through a bid process. Costs of establishment and maintenance of the switchgrass would be covered. In addition, allowances would be made for covering land rent and providing a yield incentive. An information and education program would be provided to producers prior to the bid process to assist producers in their bid decision. Agronomic, logistic, energy conversion and farming system issues associated with commercialization of a biomass energy industry are evaluated. Information on the opportunities for producing switchgrass as an energy feedstock are extended

Burton C. English and Daniel De La Torre Ugarte

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

297

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) October 11, 2013 - 9:44am Addthis The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) is a collabora-tive manufacturing community that shares a common RD&D infrastructure. This shared infrastructure provides affordable access to advanced physical and virtual tools for rapidly demonstrating new manufacturing technologies and optimizing critical processes. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is home to AMO's MDF focused on Additive Manufacturing and Low-cost Carbon Fiber. Fostering Collaboration to Accelerate Progress Work conducted by MDF partners and users provides real data that is used to reduce the technical risk associated with full commercialization of promising foundational manufacturing process and materials innovations. The

298

Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Strategy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. Long and short term strategies of the BWID are provided. Processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for BWID applicability, researching technical issues, field demonstrating technologies, evaluating demonstration results to determine each technology`s threshold of capability, and commercializing successfully demonstrated technologies for implementation for environmental restoration also are presented in this report.

Kostelnik, K.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Strategy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. Long and short term strategies of the BWID are provided. Processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for BWID applicability, researching technical issues, field demonstrating technologies, evaluating demonstration results to determine each technology's threshold of capability, and commercializing successfully demonstrated technologies for implementation for environmental restoration also are presented in this report.

Kostelnik, K.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Biological assessments for the low energy demonstration accelerator, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the biological impact to the area around the Los Alamos National Laboratory of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator. In particular the impact to the soils, water quality, vegetation, and wildlife are discussed.

Cross, S.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Computers in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

has risen as well. The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 forecasts that commercial energy demand will grow at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, with the most rapid increases in...

302

OpenEI - Commercial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

are given by a location defined by the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) for which the weather data was collected. Commercial load data is sorted by the (TMY) site as a...

303

Commercial Grade Dedication RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this Standard Review Plan (SRP) on Commercial Grade Dedication (CGD) is to provide guidance for a uniform review of the CGD activities for office of Environmental Management...

304

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

305

Regional hydrothermal commercialization plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan for the Rocky Mountain Basin and Range Region articulates the complete range of initiatives (federal, state, local, and industrial) required for the early commercialization of the regions geothermal resources. (MHR)

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial 13: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration EA-0513: Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal for DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to use several diverse approaches to purchase or acquire energy savings from commercial sector buildings region wide. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 25, 1991 EA-0513: Final Environmental Assessment Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings, Bonneville Power Administration September 25, 1991 EA-0513: Finding of No Significant Impact Approaches for Acquiring Energy Savings in Commercial Sector Buildings,

307

Commercial Buildings Communications protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many automation and control protocols in use in commercial building and residential sectors today. For both commercial building and residential sectors there are several thousand manufacturers throughout the world that supply end-use electrical appliances and other building fixtures that communicate using these automation and control protocols. Some of these protocols are based on open standards (for example, BACnet, DALI) while others are semi-proprietary (for example, Zigbee, LonWorks, Modbus...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Technology Commercialization Program 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Integrated Agricultural Technologies Demonstrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major challenges currently face California's agricultural community. Increasingly stringent environmental and regulatory controls mandate changes in the use and disposal of agricultural chemicals, require the more aggressive management of farm wastes, and impose new responsibilities for water use. This program demonstrated a number of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies designed to address these issues.

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

310

Building Mashups by Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The latest generation of WWW tools and services enables Web users to generate applications that combine content from multiple sources. This type of Web application is referred to as a mashup. Many of the tools for constructing mashups rely on a widget ... Keywords: Mashups, information integration, programming by demonstration

Rattapoom Tuchinda; Craig A. Knoblock; Pedro Szekely

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

ERC commercialization activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ERC family of companies is anticipating market entry of their first commercial product, a 2.8-MR power plant, in the second quarter of 1999. The present Cooperative Agreement provides for: (1) Commercialization planning and organizational development, (2) Completion of the pre-commercial DFC technology development, (3) Systems and plant design, (4) Manufacturing processes` scale-up to full- sized stack components and assemblies, (5) Upgrades to ERC`s test facility for full-sized stack testing, and (6) Sub-scale testing of a DFC Stack and BOP fueled with landfill gas. This paper discusses the first item, that of preparing for commercialization. ERC`s formal commercialization program began in 1990 with the selection of the 2-MR Direct Fuel Cell power plant by the American Public Power Association (APPA) for promotion to the over 2000 municipal utilities comprising APPA`s segment of the utility sector. Since that beginning, the APPA core group expanded to become the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group (FCCG) which includes representation from all markets - utilities and other power generation equipment buyers.

Maru, H.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Commercializing the H-Coal Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The H-Coal Process is being demonstrated in commercial equipment at the Catlettsburg, Kentucky plant. A program is being developed for further operations including several tests for specific commercial projects and a long-term test. Over the last year, technical feasibility has been clearly demonstrated, but the economic matrix has been greatly altered. However, because of this alteration and because many countries outside the United States are more concerned about security of supply, Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) has observed a decided swing in interest in commercial coal liquefaction. Project owners can select one of two paths for commercial coal liquefaction using H-Coal technology. The quantum strategy involves the construction of a large, independent facility and requires a very high initial capital investment. The incremental approach deals with stepwise additions of coal to a hydrogenation unit, may involve association with an existing facility, and will result in a substantially smaller initial investment. HRI's unique and commercially proven Liquid Phase Hydrogenation systems permit the owner to select the strategy most suited to his needs. The ultimate goals of commercial coal liquefaction can be reached by either route. The H-Coal program supports this goal.

DeVaux, G. R.; Dutkiewicz, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

Not Available

1988-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full-scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO and NO emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

Not Available

1988-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

AVNG system demonstration  

SciTech Connect

An attribute measurement system (AMS) measures a number of unclassified attributes of potentially classified material. By only displaying these unclassified results as red or green lights, the AMS protects potentially classified information while still generating confidence in the measurement result. The AVNG implementation that we describe is an AMS built by RFNC - VNIIEF in Sarov, Russia. To provide additional confidence, the AVNG was designed with two modes of operation. In the secure mode, potentially classified measurements can be made with only the simple red light/green light display. In the open mode, known unclassified material can be measured with complete display of the information collected from the radiation detectors. The AVNG demonstration, which occurred in Sarov, Russia in June 2009 for a joint US/Russian audience, included exercising both modes of AVNG operation using a number of multi-kg plutonium sources. In addition to describing the demonstration, we will show photographs and/or video taken of AVNG operation.

Thron, Jonathan Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mac Arthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kondratov, Sergey [VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [VNIIEF; Razinkov, Sergey [VNIIEF

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Automatic lighting controls demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate, in a real building situation, the energy and peak demand reduction capabilities of an electronically ballasted lighting control system that can utilize all types of control strategies to efficiently manage lighting. The project has demonstrated that a state-of-the-art electronically ballasted dimmable lighting system can reduce energy and lighting demand by as least 50% using various combinations of control strategies. By reducing light levels over circulation areas (tuning) and reducing after hours light levels to accommodate the less stringent lighting demands of the cleaning crew (scheduling), lighting energy consumption on weekdays was reduced an average of 54% relative to the initial condition. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nucla CFB Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

SunShot Initiative: Deployable Commercial Rooftop Solar Electric System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployable Commercial Rooftop Deployable Commercial Rooftop Solar Electric System to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Deployable Commercial Rooftop Solar Electric System on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Deployable Commercial Rooftop Solar Electric System on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Deployable Commercial Rooftop Solar Electric System on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Deployable Commercial Rooftop Solar Electric System on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Deployable Commercial Rooftop Solar Electric System on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Deployable Commercial Rooftop Solar Electric System on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Systems Integration Research, Development, & Demonstration Competitive Awards Solar Utility Networks: Replicable Innovations in Solar Energy

319

JEA successfully completes world's largest CFB demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) has successfully completed an eighth year landmark demonstration project that continues in baseload commercial operation. It scales up atmospheric fluidized-bed technology demonstration to the near-300-MW size, providing important data on a technology that can achieve > 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% NOx reduction at relatively high efficiencies and at costs comparable to those of conventional pulverized coal plants. The article recounts the history of the project. Performance tests showed a blend of coal and petcoke were most efficient as a feedstock. 3 figs.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

commercial buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 Registration, Force Protection Equipment Demonstration - May 2009 May 2009 Demonstrating commercially availale physical security/force protection soultions around the world The bombing of Khobar Towers in Saudi Arabia on 25 June 1996 revealed the need for continal vigilance and protection againist terrorist forces intent on harming US personnel and interests. The Chairman if the Joint Chiefs of Staff directed the Services to investigate COTS equipments solutions for physical security/force protection needs. The Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquistion, Technology, and Logistics (OUSD {at&l}) tasked the Office of the US Army Product Manager, force Protection Systems (PM-FPS), to coordiante and facilitate a Force Protection Equipment

322

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water...

323

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that are used for space conditioning of commercial and industrial buildings. The standards implemented in 2010 for small and large, air-cooled commercial package air...

324

Jennifer Caldwell Senior Commercialization Manager  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Caldwell, 865-574-4180, caldwelljt@ornl.gov Jennifer Caldwell Senior Commercialization Manager Jennifer Caldwell is a Senior Commercialization Manager for the Partnerships...

325

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water solution of soap,...

326

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of interest to businesses, including incen- tives for distributed generation and hybrid fuel fleet vehicles. Tax Deductions for Commercial Building Owners Commercial building...

327

Productive commercialization of university technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Productive commercialization of university technology is a concern for the many stakeholders of the commercialization system. Do more total university research expenditures and more university (more)

Winder, Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NAVAJO ELECTRIFICATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year project which addresses the electricity needs of the unserved and underserved Navajo Nation, the largest American Indian tribe in the United States. The program serves to cumulatively provide off-grid electricty for families living away from the electricty infrastructure, line extensions for unserved families living nearby (less than 1/2 mile away from) the electricity, and, under the current project called NEDP-4, the construction of a substation to increase the capacity and improve the quality of service into the central core region of the Navajo Nation.

Terry W. Battiest

2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

329

Project materials [Commercial High Performance Buildings Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium for High Performance Buildings (ChiPB) is an outgrowth of DOE'S Commercial Whole Buildings Roadmapping initiatives. It is a team-driven public/private partnership that seeks to enable and demonstrate the benefit of buildings that are designed, built and operated to be energy efficient, environmentally sustainable, superior quality, and cost effective.

None

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

331

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

332

Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Technology Collaborations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

advanced manufacturing and materials technologies for commercial applications related to additive manufacturing or carbon fiber and composites will have the highest likelihood of...

333

A Success Path from Process R&D to Commercial Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The path from process conception to commercial ... Energy Recovery from High Temperature Steel, Copper and Nickel Smelter Slags Impact of...

334

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

335

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) IID Energy - Commercial Rebate Program (Commercial Check Me) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate General: $100,000 per customer per year; may not exceed 50% of the total installed cost of measures New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Owner): $150,000 per year New Construction (Whole Building Approach - Design Team): $30,000 per year New Construction (Systems Approach): $50,000 per year Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostats: $50/unit

336

Pathways to commercial success  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE HYDROGEN, FUEL CELLS & INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNOLOGIES (HFCIT) PROGRAM Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program August 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program iii Table of Contents Summary .................................................................................................................................................................................................................. v 1.0 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................................................................................1-1

337

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Commercial Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Kevin Jarzomski

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

339

New Mexico Geothermal Commercialization Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The New Mexico Geothermal Commercialization Program was developed as a mission-oriented program aimed at accelerating the commercial utilization of geothermal resources. The program provided the US Department of Energy, the State of New Mexico, and the citizens of the state a technical and economic guide for geothermal applications and implementation. This was accomplished by developing market strategies, cultivating public outreach, serving as a broker where appropriate and by providing limited economic and engineering evaluation of specific resource applications. The State of New Mexico used the Commercialization Program as a means to organize, focus and direct all of the state geothermal research, development and demonstration. This action enhanced geothermal development and was strategic to securing $1.8 million from the legislature for geothermal demonstrations. The Commercialization Team identified electrical and direct-use prospects throughout the State. A total of ten sites were classified as inferred electrical grade sites; four sites were classified as potential electrical grade sites; and one site was classified as a proven electrical grade site. Thirty-one sites were classified as direct-use sites: (ten proven, eleven potential and ten inferred). The Commercialization Team defined one geographical area for which the development and utilization of geothermal energy prospects are likely by the year 2020. The Team developed an Area Development Plan for the Rio Grande Rift throughout its entire length within the state.

Scudella, G.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric) - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs Eligibility Commercial Industrial...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Commercial Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Program Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Commercial Program Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential...

342

Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Coldwater Board of Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Lighting Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local...

343

Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State...

344

Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Midstate Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial...

345

Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential...

346

Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Coast Electric Power Association - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Heating & Cooling...

347

Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Golden Valley Electric Association - Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Savings For Appliances &...

348

Site Map - EERE Commercialization Office  

Quick Links. Energy Innovation Portal; Site Map Commercialization Home Page. About. Success Stories; Legacy Initiatives

349

EIS-0288: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Statement EIS-0288: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor The Department of Energy (DOE)...

350

Commercial Building Design Pathways Using Optimization Analysis: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Whole-building simulation and analysis has demonstrated a significant energy savings potential in a wide variety of design projects. Commercial building design, however, traditionally integrates simulation and modeling analyses too late in the design process to make a substantial impact on energy use. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) commercial building group created an optimization platform called Opt-E-Plus that uses multivariate and multi-objective optimization theory to navigate a large parameter space and find economically valid, energy-saving solutions. The analysis results provide designers and engineers valuable information that influences the design. The pathways are not full 'construction ready' design alternatives; rather, they offer guidance about performance and cost criteria to reach a range of energy and economic goals. Having this knowledge early in the design phase helps designers establish project goals and direct the design pathway before they make important decisions. Opt-E-Plus has been deployed on several projects, including a retrofit mixed-use building, a new NREL office building, and several nationwide design guides. Each of these projects had different design criteria, goals, and audiences. In each case the analysis results provided pathways that helped inform the design process.

Long, N.; Hirsch, A.; Lobato, C.; Macumber, D.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Operational results of National Solar Demonstration Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Included in the National Solar Demonstration Program are examples of earth-sheltered, passive solar designs. The data obtained from these sites presents an interesting look at what is both technically and economically feasible. Data from four demonstration sites that are members of the National Solar Data Network are utilized to present an economic and technical analyses of a group of four sites. Three of these sites are earth sheltered residential structures, the fourth is a commercial passive structure. This sample of four demonstration sites is not intended to provide a statistical representation of passive earth sheltered structures, but rather, an example of the type of information available through the National Solar Data Program and how this information may be utilized.

Waite, E.V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Coke gasification costs, economics, and commercial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposition of petroleum coke remains a problem for modern high conversion refineries. Market uncertainty and the price for coke can prevent the implementation of otherwise attractive projects. The commercially proven Texaco Gasification Process remains an excellent option for clean, cost effective coke disposition as demonstrated by the new coke gasification units coming on-line and under design. Previous papers, have discussed the coke market and general economics of coke gasification. This paper updates the current market situation and economics, and provide more details on cost and performance based on recent studies for commercial plants.

Jahnke, F.C.; Falsetti, J.S.; Wilson, R.F. [Texaco, Inc., White Plains, NY (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

354

Commercial Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development » Commercial Development » Commercial Site Map Printable Version Development Commercial Residential Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) evaluates published model codes and standards to help states and local jurisdictions better understand the impacts of updating commercial building energy codes and standards. A methodology was used for evaluating the energy and economic performance of commercial energy codes and standards and proposed changes thereto. This method serves to ensure DOE proposals are both energy efficient and cost-effective. The DOE methodology contains two primary assessments: Energy savings Cost-effectiveness Energy and economic calculations are performed through a comparison of

355

West Penn Power SEF Commercial Loan Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Penn Power SEF Commercial Loan Program Penn Power SEF Commercial Loan Program West Penn Power SEF Commercial Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Energy Sources Solar Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount Varies according to project Provider The EMS Energy Institute The West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund (WPPSEF) promotes the use of renewable energy and clean energy among commercial, industrial, institutional and residential customers in the West Penn market region. Eligible technologies include solar, wind, low-impact hydro, and sustainable biomass such as closed-loop biomass and biomass gasification,

356

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

357

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57: Final Environmental Impact Statement 57: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

358

Security Technology Demonstration and Validation Sustainability Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the process of creating continuity and sustainability for demonstration and validation (DEMVAL) assets at the National Security Technology Incubator (NSTI). The DEMVAL asset program is being developed as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The mission of the NSTI program is to identify, incubate, and accelerate technologies with national security applications at various stages of development by providing hands-on mentoring and business assistance to small businesses and emerging or growing companies. Part of this support is envisioned to be research and development of companies technology initiatives, at the same time providing robust test and evaluation of actual development activities. This program assists companies in developing technologies under the NSTI program through demonstration and validation of technologies applicable to national security created by incubators and other sources. The NSPP also will support the creation of an integrated demonstration and validation environment. Development of the commercial potential for national security technologies is a significant NSTI focus. As part of the process of commercialization, a comprehensive DEMVAL program has been recognized as an essential part of the overall incubator mission. A number of resources have been integrated into the NSTI program to support such a DEMVAL program.

None

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

South Dakota Geothermal Commercialization Project. Final report, July 1979-October 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the South Dakota Energy Office in providing technical assistance, planning, and commercialization projects for geothermal energy. Projects included geothermal prospect identification, area development plans, and active demonstration/commercialization projects. (ACR)

Wegman, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Photonic integration in a commercial scaled bulk-CMOS process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the first photonic chip designed for a commercial bulk CMOS process (65 nm-node) using standard process layers combined with post-processing, enabling dense photonic integration with high-performance ...

Kaertner, Franz X.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Guidance manual for conducting technology demonstration activities  

SciTech Connect

This demonstration guidance manual has been prepared to assist Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), staff in conducting demonstrations. It is prepared in checklist style to facilitate its use and assumes that Energy Systems personnel have project management responsibility. In addition to a detailed step-by-step listing of procedural considerations, a general checklist, logic flow diagram, and several examples of necessary plans are included to assist the user in developing an understanding of the many complex activities required to manage technology demonstrations. Demonstrations are pilot-scale applications of often innovative technologies to determine the commercial viability of the technologies to perform their designed function. Demonstrations are generally conducted on well-defined problems for which existing technologies or processes are less than satisfactory in terms of effectiveness, cost, and/or regulatory compliance. Critically important issues in demonstration management include, but are not limited to, such factors as communications with line and matrix management and with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Systems staff responsible for management oversight, budgetary and schedule requirements, regulatory compliance, and safety.

Jolley, R.L.; Morris, M.I.; Singh, S.P.N.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Title Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4982E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Page, Janie, Sila Kiliccote, Junqiao Han Dudley, Mary Ann Piette, Albert K. Chiu, Bashar Kellow, Edward Koch, and Paul Lipkin Date Published 07/2011 Publisher CEC/LBNL Keywords demand response, emerging technologies, market sectors, medium commercial business, openadr, small commercial, small commercial business, technologies Abstract Small and medium commercial customers in California make up about 20-25% of electric peak load in California. With the roll out of smart meters to this customer group, which enable granular measurement of electricity consumption, the investor-owned utilities will offer dynamic prices as default tariffs by the end of 2011. Pacific Gas and Electric Company, which successfully deployed Automated Demand Response (AutoDR) Programs to its large commercial and industrial customers, started investigating the same infrastructures application to the small and medium commercial customers. This project aims to identify available technologies suitable for automating demand response for small-medium commercial buildings; to validate the extent to which that technology does what it claims to be able to do; and determine the extent to which customers find the technology useful for DR purpose. Ten sites, enabled by eight vendors, participated in at least four test AutoDR events per site in the summer of 2010. The results showed that while existing technology can reliably receive OpenADR signals and translate them into pre-programmed response strategies, it is likely that better levels of load sheds could be obtained than what is reported here if better understanding of the building systems were developed and the DR response strategies had been carefully designed and optimized for each site.

363

Commercial Building Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Partnerships Building Partnerships Commercial Building Partnerships Image shows a well-lit, warehouse-like produce section of a Whole Foods store. Much of the lighting in the photo eminates from windows along the left side of the photo. The Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) initiative is demonstrating dramatic energy savings in commercial buildings. Through this cost-shared initiative, partner organizations team with Building Technologies Office (BTO) representatives and others to improve energy efficiency in new and existing buildings. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory staff and private-sector technical experts provide energy analysis support and engineering expertise to explore energy-saving ideas and strategies. Organizations not involved with CBP will benefit from the lessons learned,

364

Calderon Cokemaking Process/Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During this reporting period an agreement was entered into with Bechtel Corporation for design and construction of Calderon cokemaking facilities (see enclosed letter of February 28, 1997). A second agreement with Bechtel Enterprises to commercialize the Calderon technology as a worldwide business has progressed; during the forthcoming quarter, it is expected to have in place an agreement with Bechtel Enterprises (see attached letter of February 20, 1997). Thyssen Still Otto Anlagentechnik (TSOA), the world's largest builder of conventional cokemaking facilities indicated that it would be please to join Bechtel and Calderon in the demonstration and implementation of Calderon's cokemaking technology (see attached letter of January, 1997).

None

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project deals with the demonstration of a coking reactor (Process Development Unit-- PDU-11) using Calderon's proprietary technology for making commercially acceptable coke. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: 1. Testing and Designing of the Submerged Quenching Closed System for the Process; 2. Usage of the Cracked Desulfurized Gas as a Reducing Gas to Make Directly Reduced Iron (DRI) in Order to Make the Process Economics Viable; 3. Changes in the Ceramic Liners for Supporting Them in the Coking Reactor; 4. Work Towards Testing of U.S. Steel's Coal in the Existing Process Development Unit in Alliance (PDU-1); 5. Permitting.

Albert Calderon

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

366

NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Report on Colorado-Ute Electric Association's NUCLA Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Demonstration Program covers the period from February 1987 through December 1988. The outline for presentation in this report includes a summary of unit operations along with individual sections covering progress in study plan areas that commenced during this reporting period. These include cold-mode shakedown and calibration, plant commercial performance statistics, unit start-up (cold), coal and limestone preparation and handling, ash handling system performance and operating experience, tubular air heater, baghouse operation and performance, materials monitoring, and reliability monitoring. During this reporting period, the coal-mode shakedown and calibration plan was completed. (VC)

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy

368

Proceedings: Commercial Refrigeration Research Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving refrigeration systems for commercial use can enhance both utility load factors and supermarket profits. This workshop has pinpointed research needs in commercial refrigeration and systems integration for a supermarket environment.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Technology Commercialization Showcase - Home - Energy ...  

Small Business and Clean Energy Alliance (CEA) Partnership; ... The Department Of Energy Technology Commercialization Showcase provides effective ...

370

Information Resources - EERE Commercialization Office  

Information Resources. Here you will find various informational resources related to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. Hawaiian ...

371

Success Stories - EERE Commercialization Office  

Success Stories. As new energy efficient and renewable energy technologies emerge, so do potential business opportunities. These commercialization success stories ...

372

Information Resources - EERE Commercialization Office  

Information Resources. Here you will find various informational resources related to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. Hawaiian Renewable Energy ...

373

Inventor Resources | Technology Commercialization and ...  

Search Technologies; Patents; Contacts. TCP Director Connie Cleary. Tech Commercialization Christine Brakel Cyrena Condemi Kimberley Elcess Poornima ...

374

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indirect Liquefaction Indirect Liquefaction Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid-Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(tm)) Process - Project Brief [PDF-282KB] Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P., Kingsport, TN PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(tm)) Process, Final Report [PDF-3.5MB] (June 2003) Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH(tm)) Process, Technical Progress Reports No. 34, October - December 2002 [PDF-448KB] No. 33, July - September 2002 [PDF-116KB] No. 32, April - June 2002 [PDF-148KB] No. 31, January - March 2002 [PDF-156KB] No. 30, October - December 2001 [PDF-141KB] No. 29, July - September 2001 [PDF-129KB] No. 28, April - June 2001 [PDF-154KB]

375

Full-scale demonstration Low-NO{sub x} Cell{trademark} Burner retrofit. Quarterly report No. 4, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of the full-Scale Low-NOx Cell{trademark} Burner (LNCB{trademark}) Retrofit project is to demonstrate the cost-effective reduction of NOx generated by a large, base-loaded (70% capacity factor or greater), coal-fired utility boiler. Specific objectives include: (1) At least 50% NOx reduction over standard two-nozzle cell burners, without degradation of boiler performance or life; (2) acquire and evaluate emission and boiler performance data before and after the retrofit to determine NOx reduction and impact on overall boiler performance; (3) demonstrate that the LNCB{trademark} retrofits are the most cost-effective alternative to emerging, or commercially-available NOx control technology for units equipped with cell burners. The focus of this demonstration is to determine maximum NOx reduction capabilities without adversely impacting plant performance, operation and maintenance.

Not Available

1992-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

376

Development and Demonstration of Ultrafiltration Simulants  

SciTech Connect

According to Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-06-006, Rev 0, Simulant Development to Support the Development and Demonstration of Leaching and Ultrafiltration Pretreatment Processes, simulants for boehmite, gibbsite, and filtration are to be developed that can be used in subsequent bench and integrated testing of the leaching/filtration processes for the waste treatment plant (WTP). These simulants will then be used to demonstrate the leaching process and to help refine processing conditions which may impact safety basis considerations (Smith 2006). This report documents the results of the filtration simulant development.

Russell, Renee L.; Billing, Justin M.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Smith, Harry D.

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

377

Commercialization of coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate the technological bases for economically attractive, commercial, coal- fired gas turbine systems. Objectives to accomplish this goal include these: identify candidate technical approaches to meet the challenges of using coal as a turbine fuel, screen the candidate technical approaches by testing their relative performance and evaluating their effects on the economic attractiveness of commercial coal-fueled systems, demonstrate the most promising technologies and associated components in proof-of-concept system tests leading up to commercialization. This paper presents background information on the project, and results on cogeneration systems, combined cycle power plants to include performance and cost.

Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Commercialization of coal-fueled gas turbine systems  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate the technological bases for economically attractive, commercial, coal- fired gas turbine systems. Objectives to accomplish this goal include these: identify candidate technical approaches to meet the challenges of using coal as a turbine fuel, screen the candidate technical approaches by testing their relative performance and evaluating their effects on the economic attractiveness of commercial coal-fueled systems, demonstrate the most promising technologies and associated components in proof-of-concept system tests leading up to commercialization. This paper presents background information on the project, and results on cogeneration systems, combined cycle power plants to include performance and cost.

Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Commercial nuclear power 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

Not Available

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

Aerocapacitor commercialization plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Power-One Aerocapacitor Commercialization Plan is to communicate to members of management and to all employees the overall objectives of the corporation. Power-One, Inc., has participated in a US Federal Government Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), entitled {open_quotes}Advanced Power Conversion based on the Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}: the project is a group effort, with Lawrence Livermore National Labs, GenCorp/Aerojet, PolyStor Corp. (a start-up company), and Power-One forming the consortium. The expected resulting technology is the {open_quotes}Aerocapacitor{close_quotes}, which possesses much higher performance levels than the usual capacitors on the market today. Power-One hopes to incorporate the Aerocapacitor into some of its products, hence enhancing their performance, as well as market privately-labeled aerocapacitors through its distribution channels. This document describes the details of Power-One`s plan to bring to market and commercialize the Aerocapacitor and Aerocapacitor-based products. This plan was formulated while Power-One was part of the Oerocap project. It has since pulled out of this project. What is presented in this plan is the work which was developed prior to the business decision to terminate this work.

NONE

1995-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Brad tomer Director Office of Major Demonstrations National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4692 brad.tomer@netl.doe.gov nelson Rekos Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4066 nelson.rekos@netl.doe.gov PaRtIcIPant Western Greenbrier Co-Generation, LLC Lewisburg, WV Western Greenbrier Co-ProduCtion demonstration ProjeCt (disContinued) Project Description The Western Greenbrier Co-Production (WGC) project will generate about 100 megawatts of electricity and commercial quantities of salable ash by-products by burning waste coal presently contained in numerous coal refuse dumps in the vicinity of the plant. These refuse dumps, created by coal cleaning operations over

382

Commercial Building Partnerships Replication and Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered quantitative and qualitative data relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organizations building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States.

Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Dillon, Heather E.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

383

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Title Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-3636e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Yin, Rongxin, Sila Kiliccote, Mary Ann Piette, and Kristen Parrish Conference Name 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT Abstract This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30% using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

384

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Clothes Washers Commercial Clothes Washers Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's (DOE) energy conservation standards for commercial clothes washers since 2007. Commercial clothes washers use a water solution of soap, detergent, or both and mechanical movement to clean clothes. Commercial clothes washers are used in commercial settings, multi-family housing, or laundromats. There are two classes of commercial clothes washers: front-loading and top-loading clothes washers. The current standard will save approximately 0.12 quads of energy and result in approximately $1.1 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2007-2036. The standard will avoid about 6.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 1.3 million automobiles.

385

Commercial Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 The commercial module forecasts consumption by fuel 15 at the Census division level using prices from the NEMS energy supply modules, and macroeconomic variables from the NEMS Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM), as well as external data sources (technology characterizations, for example). Energy demands are forecast for ten end-use services 16 for eleven building categories 17 in each of the nine Census divisions (see Figure 5). The model begins by developing forecasts of floorspace for the 99 building category and Census division combinations. Next, the ten end-use service demands required for the projected floorspace are developed. The electricity generation and water and space heating supplied by distributed generation and combined heat and power technologies are projected. Technologies are then

386

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(92) (92) Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 April 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepared this publication under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202-586-1617). The project was directed by Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202-586-1112) and Nancy L. Leach, Chief

387

Energy Efficient Commercial Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Technologies April 11th, 2012 Presented by: Warren Willits Energy Solutions Center (202) 824-7150 www.ESCenter.org Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Spring 2012 Jekyll Island, GA Todays Energy Efficient Technologies  Water Heating  Heating  Air Conditioning  Humidity Control  CHP / Cogeneration Atmospheric Direct Vent High Efficiency .7 EF Atmospheric water heaters now available 97 % efficient tank water heaters now available Traditional Tank Style Water Heating  Tankless Water Heaters  EF = .82 Standard Unit  EF = .97 Condensing  Solar Water Heaters  With H.E. gas back up systems Newer Water Heaters Water Heater Life Cycle Cost Life Cycle Costs Electric Tank Water Heater Gas Water Heater

388

DOE/EA-1643: Finding of No Significant Impact for 10 CFR Part 431 Commerical Refrigeration Equipment (12/31/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR 10 CFR Part 431 Energy Conservation Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Ice-Cream Freezers; Self-Contained Commercial Refrigerators, Commercial Freezers, and Commercial Refrigerator- Freezers without Doors; and Remote Condensing Commercial Refrigerators, Commercial Freezers, and Commercial Refrigerator-Freezers December 31, 2008 [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 431 [Docket Number: EERE-2006-STD-OI26] RIN 1904-AB59 Energy Conservation Program for Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial Ice-Cream Freezers; Self-Contained Commercial Refrigerators, Commercial Freezers, and Commercial Refrigerator- . Freezers without

389

Technology Demonstrations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstrations Demonstrations Technology Demonstrations Efficient new building technologies can help meet our country's energy goals, stimulate U.S. manufacturing, create jobs, and improve the environment. However, many high-performing technologies are not readily adopted in the marketplace due to lack of information about their real-world performance. To address this gap in information, the DOE frequently supports demonstrations to assess technologies' energy performance, installation procedures, operations, and maintenance characteristics. The information from these demonstrations helps consumers make more informed decisions and helps U.S. manufacturers validate the performance of their products. Frequently Asked Questions How does DOE prioritize demonstration projects?

390

DEMONSTRATION wcec.ucdavis.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to eval- uate system performance of conventional air conditioners in commercial facilities. Through for rooftop packaged air conditioners. The ultimate intention is to quantify performance improvement observed · Supply air flow adjustment · Evaporator or condenser coil cleaning · Refrigerant valve cap replacement

California at Davis, University of

391

Xcel Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (New Mexico) Xcel Energy (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (New Mexico) Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings...

392

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor

393

EA-1207: Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

207: Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental 207: Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Assessment and Research and Development Activities EA-1207: Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Assessment and Research and Development Activities SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with a proposal to test an integrated pit disassembly and conversion process on a relatively small sample of pits and plutonium metal at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 14, 1998 EA-1207: Finding of No Significant Impact Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration Environmental Assessment and Research and Development Activities August 14, 1998

394

Residential/commercial market for energy technologies  

SciTech Connect

The residential/commercial market sector, particularly as it relates to energy technologies, is described. Buildings account for about 25% of the total energy consumed in the US. Market response to energy technologies is influenced by several considerations. Some considerations discussed are: industry characteristics; market sectors; energy-consumption characeristics; industry forecasts; and market influences. Market acceptance may be slow or nonexistent, the technology may have little impact on energy consumption, and redesign or modification may be necessary to overcome belatedly perceived market barriers. 7 figures, 20 tables.

Glesk, M.M.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Commercial and Industrial Pumps Energy Conservation Standards Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering developing test procedures, labels, and energy conservation standards for commercial and industrial pumps. Pumps exist in numerous applications, including agriculture, oil and gas production, water and wastewater, manufacturing, mining, and commercial building systems. There are currently no federal standards or test procedures for commercial and industrial pumps. Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of public meeting and availability of the framework document regarding commercial and industrial pumps. 78 FR 7304 (February 1, 2013).

396

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) has regulated the energy efficiency level of commercial warm air furnaces since 1994. Commercial warm air furnaces are self-contained oil-fired or gas-fired furnaces that are designed to supply heated air through ducts to spaces that require it. Commercial warm air furnaces are industrial equipment and have a maximum rated input capacity of 225,000 British thermal units (Btu) an hour or more. Recent Updates | Standards | Test Procedures | Waiver, Exception, and Exemption Information | Statutory Authority | Historical Information | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a request for information regarding energy conservation standards for commercial warm air furnaces. 78 FR 25627 (May 2, 2013). For more information, please see the rulemaking webpage.

397

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

398

Data handbook for the National Solar Energy Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary document provides information in a matrix format which lists technical and programmatic data concerning the various project sites selected for the National Solar Energy Demonstration Program. It incorporates into one handbook the commercial, residential, and other demonstration projects which are now a part of the national program. It can be used as a reference source for technical and research purposes on a state-by-state basis.

Christensen, D.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Commercial Weatherization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Commercial Weatherization When high energy bills and a dwindling customer base threatened the Athenian Corner's well-being, the restaurant turned to energy efficiency upgrades to help operating costs and improve its bottom line. Learn how energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Athenian Corner be a viable business. When high energy bills and a dwindling customer base threatened the Athenian Corner's well-being, the restaurant turned to energy efficiency upgrades to help operating costs and improve its bottom line. Learn how energy efficiency upgrades are helping the Athenian Corner be a viable business. Commercial buildings consume 19 percent of the energy used in the U.S.

400

Commercial Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Lighting Commercial Lighting At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and algorithms, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Lab developed an occupancy sensor can recognize the presence of human occupants more than 90 percent of the time -- an advancement that could lead to enormous energy savings in commercial buildings. At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. By combining an inexpensive camera with a high-speed microprocessor and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

updates on regulations for this and other products There are currently no energy conservation standards for commercial and industrial fans and blowers. Fans and blowers are...

402

Technology Commercialization Fund - Home - Energy ...  

How the Technology Commercialization Fund Works. When awarded, fund dollars must be spent on prototype advancement and cannot be used for scientific ...

403

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

subpart W. Statutory Authority The current energy conservation standards for commercial refrigeration equipment are mandated by Part A-1, the "Certain Industrial Equipment" of...

404

OpenEI - commercial building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4040 en Commercial Reference Building: Quick Service Restaurant http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode441

405

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of ...

406

Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Prior to 2007, wind energy devices generating electricity for commercial sale were assessed differently depending on where they were located. Some counties valued the entire turbine structure ...

407

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products...

408

Available Technologies: Superinsulated Commercial Window ...  

Superinsulated Commercial Window Framing System. IB-3155. APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Window and faade framing systems for non-residential building c ...

409

SF 6432-CI Commercial Items  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or alcoholic beverages while on the premises; Control : SF 6432-CI Title: Standard Terms and Conditions for Commercial Items Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Release...

410

National Laboratories - EERE Commercialization Office  

National Laboratories. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) national laboratories play an important role in the development and commercialization of new energy ...

411

Contacts - EERE Commercialization Office - Energy  

Commercialization Contacts. Here you'll find contact information for any questions or comments you may have about the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ...

412

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amendments and Correction to Petitions for Waiver and Interim Waiver for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for...

413

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Standard Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering amending energy...

414

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Collection on Commercial Equipment Labeling Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy is seeking information...

415

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Commercialization & Partnerships Technology Commercialization & Partnerships Home For BNL Inventors For Industry For Entrepreneurs Sponsored Research Search Technologies Patents Contacts TCP Director Connie Cleary Tech Commercialization Christine Brakel Cyrena Condemi Kimberley Elcess Poornima Upadhya Partnerships Mike Furey, Manager Ginny Coccorese Alison Schwarz Intellectual Property Legal Group (Legal Dept.) Dorene Price, Chief Intellectual Property Counsel Lars Husebo, Attorney Maria Pacella, Sr. Staff Specialist William Russell, Asst. Staff Specialist INNOVATION MEETS BUSINESS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. WE GRANT LICENSES for our intellectual property to existing and start up companies. WE SEEK FUNDING from experienced investors to develop our intellectual assets. Tech Commercialization News

416

NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercialization Programs Commercialization Programs Through our commercialization programs, we help accelerate the transfer of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies into the marketplace. Clean Energy Alliance The Clean Energy Alliance is an alliance of the nation's top business incubators that provide business services to nascent clean energy entrepreneurs. NREL partners with these elite business incubators to help foster the growth of robust clean energy businesses and commercialize their technologies. Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development Formerly the Colorado Cleantech Initiative program, the Colorado Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED) is a joint effort between NREL, the State of Colorado, and affiliated stakeholders to provide

417

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for small electric motors beginning 2015. A small commercial or industrial electric motor converts electrical energy to rotating mechanical energy. When operating, the...

418

DMEC-1 Pressurized Circulating Fluidized-Bed Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The DMEC-1 project will demonstrate the use of Pyropower`s PYROFLOW pressurized circulating fluidized bed technology to repower an existing coal fired generating station. This will be the first commercial application of this technology in the world. The project is now in budget period 1, the preliminary design phase.

Kruempel, G.E.; Ambrose, S.J. [Midwest Power, Des Moines, IA (United States); Provol, S.J. [Pyropower Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Measured energy savings of light colored roofs: Results from three California demonstration sites  

SciTech Connect

Measured data and computer simulations have demonstrated the impact of roof albedo in reducing cooling energy use in buildings. Savings are a function of both climate and the amount of roof insulation. The cooling energy savings for reflective roofs are highest in hot climates. A reflective roof may also lead to higher heating energy use. Reflective coatings are also used in commercial buildings to protect the roofing membrane, and hence, maintain and prolong the useful life of the roof. Reflectivity of coatings changes with weathering and aging which in turn could have an effect on building cooling-energy savings. For that reason, reflective roof coatings are not primarily marketed for their energy savings potential. To monitor the field performance of reflective coatings, the authors initiated a demonstration project where three commercial buildings in California were painted with light-colored roof coatings. The buildings are two medical care centers and one drug store. At all sites, the roof reflectance, both fresh and aged, and cooling energy use were monitored. In addition, they measured temperature throughout the roof systems and inside the conditioned space. In the monitored buildings, increasing the roof reflectance from an initial value of about 20% to 60%, dropped the roof temperature on hot summer afternoons by about 45 F. Summertime standard-weekday average daily air-conditioning savings were 18% (198 kWh) in the first medical office building, 13% (86 kWh) in the second medical office building, and 2% (13 kWh) in the drug store. The overall u-value of the roofs had dictated the impact of roof reflectance.

Akbari, H.; Gartland, L.; Konopacki, S.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Post-Project (DOE) Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Assessments DOE Assessments Clean Coal Demonstrations DOE Post-Project Assessments DOE Assessment of the Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project [PDF-590KB] DOE Assessment of the JEA Large-Scale CFB Combustion Demonstration Project [PDF-177KB] DOE Assessment of the Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration [PDF-649KB] DOE Assessment of the Tampa Electric Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle Demonstration Project [PDF-550KB] 500-MW Demonstration of Advanced Wall-Fired Combustion Techniques for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Emissions from Coal- Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment [PDF-921KB] Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH™) Process [PDF-382KB] Healy Clean Coal Project: A DOE Assessment [PDF-713KB] Pulse Combustor Design: A DOE Assessment [PDF-569KB]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake Assessment Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Motor Vehicle Brake Assessment Tools Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor #12;Overview · Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) Air Brake System · North American Standard Level-1

422

Demonstration Project 111, ITS/CVO Technology Truck, Final Project Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1995, the planning and building processes began to design and develop a mobile demonstration unit that could travel across the nation and be used as an effective outreach tool. In 1997, the unit was completed; and from June 1997 until December 2000, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)/Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) mobilized the Technology Truck, also known as Demonstration Project No. 111, ''Advanced Motor Carrier Operations and Safety Technologies.'' The project featured the latest available state-of-the-practice intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies designed to improve both the efficiency and safety of commercial vehicle operations (CVO). The Technology Truck was designed to inform and educate the motor carrier community and other stakeholders regarding ITS technologies, thus gaining support and buy-in for participation in the ITS program. The primary objective of the project was to demonstrate new and emerging ITS/CVO technologies and programs, showing their impact on motor carrier safety and productivity. In order to meet the objectives of the Technology Truck project, the FHWA/FMCSA formed public/private partnerships with industry and with Oak Ridge National Laboratory to demonstrate and display available ITS/CVO technologies in a cooperative effort. The mobile demonstration unit was showcased at national and regional conferences, symposiums, universities, truck shows and other venues, in an effort to reach as many potential users and decision makers as possible. By the end of the touring phase, the ITS/CVO Technology Truck had been demonstrated in 38 states, 4 Canadian provinces, 88 cities, and 114 events; been toured by 18,099 people; and traveled 115,233 miles. The market penetration for the Technology Truck exceeded 4,000,000, and the website received more than 25,000 hits. In addition to the Truck's visits, the portable ITS/CVO kiosk was demonstrated at 31 events in 23 cites in 15 states.

Gambrell, KP

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

423

Ceramic vane demonstration in an industrial turbine  

SciTech Connect

A DOE program with Allison Engine Co. will demonstrate ceramic vanes in an industrial turbine. First-stage ceramic vanes and metallic mounts are to be designed, fabricated, and operated in a short-term engine test (up to 50 hr). The vanes and mounts will then be retrofitted into an existing turbine for operation at a commercial site for up to 8000 hr. They have been designed. Thermal and stress analyses of the vanes have calculated acceptable fast fracture stress levels and probabilities of survival > 99.99% for turbine continuous power and emergency shutdown (thermal shock) conditions. Max calculated steady-state stress is 169 MPa at 1182 C, so currently available ceramics appear to provide acceptable fast fracture strengths for use in industrial turbines. Long-term materials test will evaluate the lifetimes and retained strength of ceramics at stress and temperature levels in the range calculated from the ceramic vane analyses. Results of these tests will support on which vane material will be used in the long duration turbine demonstration. A successful demonstration could provide a basis for incorporating first-stage ceramic vanes into current generation industrial turbines and also the introduction of ceramic airfoils into downstream rows of future high temperature Advanced Turbine System (ATS) engines.

Wenglarz, R.A.; Calcuttawala, S.M.; Pope, J.E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

3129 Commercial Analysis 20130205 LBNL - Home - Energy ...  

Commercialization-Analysis-&Roadmap-- ... theenergycontentofthegasand ... commercialized, it must meet a market demanda demand ...

425

Northern Municipal Power Agency - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category...

426

Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedarburg Light & Water Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local...

427

Longmont Power & Communications - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are here Home Savings Longmont Power & Communications - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Longmont Power & Communications - Commercial and...

428

Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home Savings Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burlington Electric Department - Commercial Energy...

429

NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Assistance Program  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Commercialization Assistance Program. The NREL Commercialization Assistance Program (NCAP) helps emerging ...

430

NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing ...  

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technology Transfer Agreements for Commercializing Technology. NREL uses Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) when a ...

431

Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps...

432

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

433

Events - EERE Commercialization Office - Home - Energy ...  

Bookmark Events - EERE Commercialization Office on Google; Bookmark Events - EERE Commercialization Office on Delicious; Rank Events - EERE ...

434

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Delicious...

435

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Incentives Program Avista Utilities (Electric) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Incentives Program Eligibility Commercial Industrial InstallerContractor Savings...

436

EIA Energy Kids - In Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Using & Saving Energy In Commercial Buildings. How do commercial buildings like offices, hospitals, schools, places of worship, warehouses, hotels, ...

437

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, October 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping.This is a critical technology demonstration ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOENETL-20051217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy...

440

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether the number of customers on the distribution feedera function of the number of customers participating in thesufficient numbers of customers for the demonstration so

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact commercial demonstration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Innovation Demonstration Fund (Ontario, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Innovation Demonstration Fund (IDF) is a discretionary, non-entitlement funding program administered by the Ministry of Economic Development and Innovation. The program focuses on emerging...

442

Commercialization of fuel-cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an abbreviated version of the ''Report of the DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Commercialization Working Group (AFC2WG),'' released January 1995. We describe fuel-cell commercialization for stationary power applications of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

Penner, S.S.; Appleby, A.J.; Baker, B.S.; Bates, J.L.; Buss, L.B.; Dollard, W.J.; Farris, P.J.; Gillis, E.A.; Gunsher, J.A.; Khandkar, A.; Krumpelt, M.; O'Sullivan, J.B.; Runte, G.; Savinell, R.F.; Selman, J.R.; Shores, D.A.; Tarman, P.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Commercial Development Business Development 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Technology Commercialization www.techtransfer.umd.edu #12;OVERVIEWOVERVIEW · Opening remarks www.techtransfer.umd.edu #12;Types of Intellectual Property: PatentsTypes of Intellectual Property of Technology Commercialization www.techtransfer.umd.edu #12;Types of Intellectual Property: Copyright

Davies, Christopher

444

Use of commercial manipulator to handle a nuclear weapon component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed a manipulator workcell to load and unload nuclear weapon pit assemblies from a cart. To develop this workcell, PNL procured a commercially available manipulator, equipped it with force-sensing and vision equipment, and developed manipulator control software. Manipulator workcell development demonstrated that commercially available manipulator systems can successfully perform this task if the appropriate manipulator is selected and the manipulator workcell tooling and software are carefully designed.

Baker, C.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Poland petroleum refinery sludge lagoon demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Area have been working together to develop mutually beneficial, cost-effective environmental remediation technologies such as the demonstration of bioremediation techniques for the clean up of acidic petroleum sludge impacted soils at an oil refinery in southern Poland. After an expedited site characterization, treatability study, and a risk assessment study, a remediation strategy was devised. The waste material was composed primarily of high molecular weight paraffinic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. A biopile design which employed a combination of passive and active aeration in conjunction with nutrient and surfactant application as used to increase the biodegradation of the contaminants of concern.

Altman, D.J.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

446

Nome, Alaska, Wind Turbine Demonstration Project Final Environmental Assessment and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment and Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact November 2000 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Prepared by: Battelle Memorial Institute 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 Nome, Alaska, Wind Turbine Demonstration Project Finding of No Significant Impact Nome, Alaska, Wind Turbine Demonstration Project FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT S U M M A R Y The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide DOE and other public agency decision makers witb tbe environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Nome, Alaska, Wind Turbine Demonstration Project (DOE/EA-1280). The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative i

447

Automated Demand Response Technology Demonstration Project for Small and Medium Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010AssessmentofDemandResponseand AdvancedMetering:DevelopmentforDemandResponse Calculation?FindingsandEnergy Efficiencyand DemandResponsewithCommunicating

Page, Janie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Commercial Prototype Building Models | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototype Building Models Prototype Building Models The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of commercial building energy codes and standards by participating in review processes and providing analyses that are available for public review and use. To calculate the impact of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) created a suite of 16 prototype buildings covering 80% of the commercial building floor area in the United States for new construction, including both commercial buildings and mid- to high-rise buildings. These prototype buildings-derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models-cover all the reference building types except supermarkets, and also add a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings. As ASHRAE Standard 90.1

451

Commercial integration and partnering at Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS), particularly the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with the experience from the first successful Integrated Technology Demonstration, can provide an excellent foundation for meeting DOE-EM`s objectives with the new DOE-EM five focus area approach. With this in mind, SRTC established an activity to pursue full commercialization of environmental technologies. This report is an assessment of the status of commercialization at SRS and provides recommendations for enhancement as well as some tools critical to implementation. A review was made of the current situation at SRS with regards to taking technology development to commercial fruition. This was done from the perspective of comparing it to known commercialization models and processes. It was found that SRTC already works through many of the steps in these processes. With integration and action-oriented efforts of the inclusion of business and market factors, SRTC could become an aggressive, successful developer of commercialized technologies. Commercial success criteria tools were developed with regards to integrating them with SRTC selection criteria to ensure that all critical factors are covered in technology commercialization project evaluations. Private investors are very clear that their interest lies in funding commercial enterprises, not merely technologies. Mobilizing private capital is critical to real job growth and long-term economic development. Also, potential industry partners were identified that are willing to be involved with SRS` technology applications and regional development efforts. As another important component to success, regional support organizations were reviewed and evaluated.

Steele, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Babione, R.A.; Shikashio, L.A.; Wacaster, A.J.; Paterson, A.D. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: West Valley Demonstration Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Valley Demonstration West Valley Demonstration Project Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley Demonstration Project The Seneca Nation of Indians has interests and concerns regarding the West Valley Demonstration Project Site. Like at Hanford, DOE environmental cleanup activities have the potential to impact natural and cultural resources and to interfere with American Indian religious practices. Through a cooperative agreement, tribal staff is engaged on a frequent basis with DOE and its contractors. The principle activities engaged by tribes include reviewing and commenting on plans and documents, participating in meetings at the request of DOE, monitoring cultural resource sites, participating in site surveys, and identifying issues that

453

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small, Large, and Very Large Commercial Package Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Small, Large, and Very Large Commercial Package Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) regulates the energy efficiency of small, large, and very large commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps. Commercial air conditioners and heat pumps are air-cooled, water-cooled, evaporatively-cooled, or water source unitary air conditioners or heat pumps that are used for space conditioning of commercial and industrial buildings. The standards implemented in 2010 for small and large, air-cooled commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps, and SPVUs, will save approximately 1.7 quads of energy and result in approximately $28.9 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. These standards will avoid about 90.3 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 31.1 million automobiles. The standard implemented in 2010 for very large, air-cooled commercial package air conditioners and heat pumps will save approximately 0.43 quads of energy and result in approximately $4.3 billion in energy bill savings for products shipped from 2010-2034. The standard will avoid about 22.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions, equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions of 4.4 million automobiles.

454

ISOTOPIC MODEL FOR COMMERCIAL SNF BURNUP CREDIT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to demonstrate a process for selecting bounding depletion parameters, show that they are conservative for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and establish the range of burnup for which the parameters are conservative. The general range of applicability is for commercial light water reactor (LWR) SNF with initial enrichments between 2.0 and 5.0 weight percent {sup 235}U and burnups between 10 and 50 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU).

A.H. Wells

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

455

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, October 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

456

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, July 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

CAES Demonstration Newsletter, January 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. Th