Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Medicine Assistant PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medicine Medicine - Assistant PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Deparlment of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT iDafe 'Depauwerltal El.ment& iSlte June 10, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name :of,lnfonnation Systetnol"'ITiPtoJect Occupational Medicine - Assistant Exhlblt;ProJect UID Indirect funded Occupational Safety and Health NewPIA 0 Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne I e . , Phone, Email System Owner Local Privacy Act Offtcer

2

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Education Programs PIA Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Education Education Programs PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Elernent'& (Site 24/Jun/09 Idaho National Laboratory Information Operations and Research Center (IORC) Nameofll,f..,rrnatlon INL Education Programs System or IfPi'()ject Business Enclave Exhibit Proj.ctlUO NA NewPIA D Update [~] DOE PIA - INL Education Program Finallxw.doc N T "tl I Contact Information arne,

3

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL PERSONNEL SECURITY SECIMS PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PERSONNEL PERSONNEL SECURITY - SECIMS PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element;& Site Name of Infonnatlon Syetemor Ilf Project Exhibit ProJect UIO NewPIA D Update ~ June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Willow Creek Building RIOT-Center INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE 311 DOE PIA - SECIMS Finallxw.doc N T 'tl I Contact Information arne I e . , Phone, Email

4

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL INGSM2009 PIA Template Version  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL INGSM2009 PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT D.. June 16, 2009 Deparlnient~", Element &Site Idaho National Laboratory N.....,e,df'llnformatlon 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site. ,SY8tem,orIT Project exhibit Project UID Enterprise Architecture Application 10 - 223419 NewPIA D Update 0 System

5

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY-TRAIN PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IDAHO IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY-TRAIN PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-wrltten submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name of Infonnatlon SY8tem or IT Project Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) Exhibit Project UID 70 NewPIA [!J Update D N T Otl I Contact Information ame, I e Ph E " I one, mal SY8tem Owner Carla J. Drake, Manager (208) 526-0841 Systems Approach

6

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT (PIA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... No, Yes, Yes. NIST 183 06 – Application Servers and Database System, No, Yes, Yes. ... Chief, Telecommunications and CIO Support Division. ...

2012-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

7

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT (PIA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST 183 06 – Application Servers and Database System ... Bruce K. Rosen Chief, Telecommunications and CIO Support Division 301-975-3299 ...

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

8

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT (PIA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and maintenance of Continuity of Operations ... of Success Stories, specific business identifiable information is ... do individuals or businesses have to ...

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

9

PRIVACYI1vIPACT ASSESSMENT: ORG NAME-SYSTEM NAME PIA Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRIVACYI1vIPACT PRIVACYI1vIPACT ASSESSMENT: ORG NAME-SYSTEM NAME PIA Template Version 4- June, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional gUidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. \ Departmental Element & Site November 9, 2009 Bonneville Power Administration Ethics Helpline, hosted and operated by Global Compliance Charlotte. North Carolina Name of Information Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline System or IT Project Hosted and operated by Global Compliance Charlotte. North Carolina Exhibit Project UIO

10

Office of Acquisition and Financial Assessment PIA, Golden Field...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho National Laboratory iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management Occupational Medicine -...

11

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCCUPATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL SUVEILLANCE SYSTEM (OMSS) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Dllte DepartmentAll Element~&Slte 06-16-2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building Number: WCB Building Name: WCB Name of Information System!«)r IT Project Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) ExhlbllProJect UIO 72 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - OMSS Finallxw.doc

12

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Integrated Safety Management Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element&·Slte 16/Jun/09 Idaho National Laboratory Engineering Research Office Building (EROB) Name of-Information System or IT Project Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration Exhibit Project UID 207765 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - ISMS Workshop Finallxw.doc N T "tl I

13

PIA - Management and Administration (MA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Management and Administration (MA) PIA - Management and Administration (MA) PIA - Management and Administration (MA) The E-Government Act of 2002 requires Federal agencies to perform Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs), an analysis of how information is handled, in order: (i) to ensure handling conforms to applicable legal, regulatory, and policy requirements regarding privacy, (ii) to determine the risks and effects of collecting, maintaining and disseminating information in identifiable form in an electronic information system, and (iii) to examine and evaluate protections and alternative processes for handling information to mitigate potential privacy risks. The DOE PIA process helps to ensure privacy protections are considered and implemented throughout the system life cycle. Following are all PIAs that have been done for Management and

14

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextineword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site August 1, 2009 U.S. Department of Energy; Office of Science; Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) System location - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA Name of Information iPASS System for DOE Office of Science laboratory fellowship programs, including

15

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office Office of Information Resources - FOIAXpress Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Depamnf!l1tal Elel1l~nt&$ite july 23, 2009 Office of Information Resources Office of Management DOE Headquarters, Germantown, Germantown Computer Center Server Room Nameonl1fol'l11i1tion Sysleijlprl'f 'Project FOIAXpress ExhibitProj~tUID TBD NeWPIA ~ Update D Please indicate whether this is a new

16

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL E-IDR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL INL E-IDR (Invention Disclosure Record) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. I MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date O..parlmental Element & Site 6/10/09 Idaho National Laboratory Building: 654 BUilding Name: EROS Name of Information System or IT Project E-IDR (Invention Disclosure Record) Exhibit Project UID 61104 NewPIA GJ Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne, I e Ph E ' I one, mal System Owner Wendy Skinner Local Privacy Act

17

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Visitor Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetexUneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 11, 2009 Deparbnental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Building 616 Willow Creek Building Name of Information Visitor Dosimeter Badge Tracking System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 217975 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title I Contact Information Phone, Email Lynn Rockhold System Owner I' 1\ I \ \ ( y P II 114 I' "I

18

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 12, 2009 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Name of Infonnatlon Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 136 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title Contact Information Phone, Email Anthony J. Kavran (208) 526-5826

19

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Human Resources Personal Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Human Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Engineering Research Office Building (EROB) Name of Information Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request System or IT Project Business Enclave Exhibit Project UID 106800 NewPIA ~ Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne,

20

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Manchester Software  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manchester Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program. Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date 06/09/09 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element &Site Building Name: lAB Name of Infonnatlon Manchester Software 1099 Reporting System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 202021 New PIA GJ Update D Name, Title I Contact Information Phone, Email Bryan Larson, System Owner 208-526-8685 Technical Lead, Manchester

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCIO HSPD-12 Physical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCIO OCIO - HSPD-12 Physical and Logical System PIA Template Version 4- June, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site August 27,2009 Office of the Chief Information Officer DOE Headquarters, Forrestal, 8H-065 Name of Information System or IT Project HSPD-12 Physical and Logical Access System Exhibit Project UID Project's Unique 10: 019-60-01-17-01-8062-04-404-140 (2010 UID) NewPIA D Update ~ HSPD-12

22

RIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: SPRO Business Operations General Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: SPRO - Business Operations General Support System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 iiiiiiiiiiiiiii Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/02061.pdf MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site July 21, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office - New Orleans, LA 70123 Name of Information System or IT Project Unclassified Business Operations General Support System (GSS) exhibit Project UID UPI Code: 019-20-01-16-02-3612-00 NewPIA 0 Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne, I e Ph E 'I one, mal System Owner Local Privacy

23

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Energy Employees' Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance Is provided In the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building 616 Willow Creek Building Name of Information Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) System or IT ProJect Tracking Database Exhibit Project

24

EI04~ PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL PeopleSoft Human Resource  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EI04~ PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT June 11, 2009 oep"rtrnental Element &Site Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Building Number: REC 608 Building Name: IORC Name 'of Infonnatlon System, or IT Project INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System exhibit ProJect UID 157044 NewPIA D Update ~ _____ i DOE PIA - Peoplesoft Final.doc

25

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Communications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessments, for reqUirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http:www.directives.doe.govpdfsdoedoetextlneword206o2061.pdf Please complete electronically:...

26

PIA - WEB iPASS System DOE PIA | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iPASS System DOE PIA PIA - WEB iPASS System DOE PIA PIA - WEB iPASS System DOE PIA PIA - WEB iPASS System DOE PIA More Documents & Publications PIA - INL Education Programs...

27

PIA - FOIAXpress | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Publications PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory PIA - INL Education Programs Business Enclave TRAIN-PIA.pdf...

28

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-. -. ., ,-- -.' * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM: ELECTRONIC RECORDS KEEPING SYSTEM PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1. Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A. Privacy Impact Assessments. for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetext/neword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Deparbnental Element & Site . June 4, 2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV :;:~:f~~r~;;:reC: LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Electronic Records Keeping System exhibit Project UID 019-10-01-31-02-1014-00

29

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL RECORDS DATABASE PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & Site June 4,2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV Name of Information LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Rocky Flats Environmental Records System or IT Project Database exhibit Project UID 019-10-01-31-02-1014-00

30

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,. - -i * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM: FERNALD HISTORICAL RECORDS SYSTEM PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written slibmisslons will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element & SIte· June 4, 2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV Name of Information System or IT Project LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Fernald Historical Records System exhIbit Project UIO 019-10-01-31-02-1014-00

31

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'" '" " * .1 * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM: FREEDOM OF INFORMAnON ACT/ PRIVACY ACT PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Oeparbn~ntal Element" Site June 4, 2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV Name of Information System or IT Project LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Freedom of Information Act/Privacy

32

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: CF GovTrip PIA Template Version  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The system will not derive meta data. None The system allows authorized DOE staff to query and produce reports on individuals or groups of individuals. The system can produce...

33

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT: RECORDS HANDLING SYSTEM: ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT PIA Template Version - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance Is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/02061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 4, 2009 Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, WV Name of Information LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness System or IT Project Compensation Program Act exhibit

34

PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive...

35

Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office...

36

Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations...

37

Impact Assessments | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact Assessments Impact Assessments Impact Assessments PIA Template with Guidance (MS Word) Management and Administration (MA) Open Gov User Voice System (3WP) (pdf) DOE Open Government Plan Comment Box (pdf) Energy Contractor Registration System (EnCoRe) (pdf) Hiring Management Enterprise Solutions (HMES) (pdf) Foreign Travel Management System (FTMS) (pdf) FOIAXpress (pdf) Electronic Document Online Correspondence and Concurrence (eDOCS) (pdf) DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Management) (pdf) FORM EIA 457-A/G Residential Energy Consumption Survey (pdf) Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Tracking System (pdf) Corporate Human Resources Information System (CHRIS) (pdf) Energy Inspector General Project Tracking System (EIGPT) (pdf) Electronic DOE Information Security System (eDISS) (pdf)

38

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCIO HSPD-12 Physical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http:www.directives.doe.govpdfsdoedoetextlneword206o2061.pdf Please complete electronically:...

39

PIA - Weapons Data Control Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weapons Data Control Systems PIA - Weapons Data Control Systems PIA - Weapons Data Control Systems PIA PIA - Weapons Data Control Systems...

40

TRAIN-PIA.pdf | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRAIN-PIA.pdf TRAIN-PIA.pdf TRAIN-PIA.pdf More Documents & Publications PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE PIA - INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

PIA - Plateau Training System | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plateau Training System PIA - Plateau Training System PIA - Plateau Training System PIA - Plateau Training System More Documents & Publications Integrated Safety Management...

42

PIA - FBI Billing System | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications PIA - Security Clearance Work Tracking and Budget System Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Billing System PIA, Office of Health, Safety and Security TRAIN-PIA.pdf...

43

PIA - Richland Personal Security Clearance Record | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009...

44

PIA - Radioactive Airborne Contamination Survey | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009...

45

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Shaw Areva MOX Services, LLC MOX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . ,-) ')7 73?ÂĄi5": )~"'f"YC-:;'~dt?f(~"'f9'FrrZ , . PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Shaw Areva MOX Services, LLC MOX Services Unclassified Information System Template - January 30, 2009, Version 2 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (pIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: hltp:llwww.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. (803) 819-22700 Dstlnson@moxprolect.com Dave Stinson, President and Chief Executive Officer, Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC NNSA Shaw AREVA MOX Services Savannah River Site, Aiken SC .. .. . ": .' . ' .... .- ...: ......

46

PIA - Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home PIA - Environmental Management Consolidated Business Center (EMCBC) PIA - Environmental Management Consolidated...

47

Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Integrated...

48

PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory More Documents & Publications PIA - Human Resources Information...

49

PIA - Richland Health Services Scheduling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Health Services Scheduling PIA - Richland Health Services Scheduling PIA - Richland Health Services Scheduling PIA - Richland Health Services Scheduling More Documents &...

50

PIA - DOE Savannah River Operations Office PRISM System | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

51

PIA - HS Web Services (HSWS) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web Services (HSWS) PIA - HS Web Services (HSWS) PIA - HS Web Services (HSWS) PIA - HS Web Services (HSWS) More Documents & Publications PIA - INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource...

52

RIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: SPRO Business Operations General Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http:www.directives.doe.govpdfsdoedoetextlneword20602061.pdf MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS...

53

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: SPRO Physical Security Major Application  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessments, for requirements and additional gUidance for conducting a PIA: http:www.directives.doe.govpdfsdoedoetexUneword206o2061.pdf MODULE I - PRIVACY NEEDS...

54

iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATION - STRIPES * Template - January 30,2009, Version 2 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. Module I - Privacy Needs Assessment Date Departmental Element & Site Name of Information System or IT Project Exhibit Project UIO April 21, 2009 Office of the Chief Financial Officer, Office of Corporate Information Systems, CF-40 Germantown, U.S. Department of Energy, DOE Headquarters, Germantown, hosted in the OCIO's Application Hosting Environment (AHE) in the CA-007 server

55

PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) User System (ESU) PIA - Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory...

56

PIA - Sunflower (BPA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethics Helpline Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009...

57

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record...

58

PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) More Documents & Publications Thursday, February 14, 2008...

59

PIA - Historical Data for Legal Organizations | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Historical Data for Legal Organizations PIA - Historical Data for Legal Organizations PIA - Historical Data for Legal Organizations PIA - Historical Data for Legal Organizations...

60

PIA - AMWTP Information Systems Enclave | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AMWTP Information Systems Enclave PIA - AMWTP Information Systems Enclave PIA - AMWTP Information Systems Enclave PIA - AMWTP Information Systems Enclave More Documents &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Employee Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Employee Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Employee Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel...

62

PIA - HS Correspondence Tracking System (HSCT) | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Correspondence Tracking System (HSCT) PIA - HS Correspondence Tracking System (HSCT) PIA - HS Correspondence Tracking System (HSCT) PIA - HS Correspondence Tracking System (HSCT)...

63

PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central...

64

PIA - Security Clearance Tracking System | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security Clearance Tracking System PIA - Security Clearance Tracking System PIA - Security Clearance Tracking System PIA - Security Clearance Tracking System More Documents &...

65

PIA - Energy Inspector General Project Tracking System (EIGPT...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspector General Project Tracking System (EIGPT) PIA - Energy Inspector General Project Tracking System (EIGPT) PIA - Energy Inspector General Project Tracking System (EIGPT) PIA...

66

PIA - Correspondence and Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Correspondence and Action Tracking System (CATS) PIA - Correspondence and Action Tracking System (CATS) PIA - Correspondence and Action Tracking System (CATS) PIA - Correspondence...

67

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah...

68

PIA - iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA - iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA - iManage Strategic...

69

PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application PIA - WEB Physical Security Major Application More...

70

PIA - Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) PIA - Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) PIA - Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) PIA - Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) More Documents & Publications...

71

Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) PIA, Richland Operations Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Job Task Analysis (EJTA) PIA, Richland Operations Office Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) PIA, Richland Operations Office Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) PIA, Richland...

72

PIA - Firehouse Staff Activity and Training System, Bechtel Jacobs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jacobs Company LLC More Documents & Publications PIA - Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA - eTrack, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC PIA - INL PeopleSoft -...

73

PIA - Golden Field Office LAN Environment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home PIA - Golden Field Office LAN Environment PIA - Golden Field Office LAN Environment PIA - Golden Field Office LAN Environment...

74

Industry InteractiveProcurement System PIA, Office of Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry InteractiveProcurement System PIA, Office of Management Industry InteractiveProcurement System PIA, Office of Management Industry InteractiveProcurement System PIA, Office...

75

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA...

76

MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration More Documents & Publications TRAIN-PIA.pdf Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Manchester...

77

PIA - Security Clearance Work Tracking and Budget System | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Publications Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Database PIA, Idaho Operations Office Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory TRAIN-PIA.pdf...

78

Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Database PIA, Idaho Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications PIA - Security Clearance Work Tracking and Budget System Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory TRAIN-PIA.pdf...

79

PIA - EERE Infrastructure-EERE Reviewer Management System | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EERE Infrastructure-EERE Reviewer Management System PIA - EERE Infrastructure-EERE Reviewer Management System PIA - EERE Infrastructure-EERE Reviewer Management System PIA - EERE...

80

Intergrated Drug Testing System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs C ompany...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intergrated Drug Testing System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs C ompany, LLC Intergrated Drug Testing System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs C ompany, LLC Intergrated Drug Testing System, PIA, Bechtel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

PIA - Richland FOIA Folder Within Integrated Data Management...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland FOIA Folder Within Integrated Data Management PIA - Richland FOIA Folder Within Integrated Data Management PIA - Richland FOIA Folder Within Integrated Data Management PIA...

82

E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory E-IDR (Inventory Disclosure Record) PIA, Idaho...

83

PIA - EMRC Livelink Records Management System | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009...

84

PIA - Energy Contractor Registration System (EnCoRe) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists...

85

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

86

Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People...

87

Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford...

88

Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office...

89

Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance...

90

PIA - Human Resources System/Payroll System | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System PIA - Human Resources - Personal Information Change Request - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE...

91

Carlsbad Industrial Safety and Health PIA, Carlsbad Field Offce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services...

92

eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

93

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office File and Print Services...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

94

PIA - DOE OCIO, Open Government Plan Comment Box | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE OCIO, Open Government Plan Comment Box PIA - DOE OCIO, Open Government Plan Comment Box PIA - DOE OCIO, Open Government Plan Comment Box PIA - DOE OCIO, Open Government Plan...

95

PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Historical Records System, Office of Legacy Management iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management...

96

ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office ORO...

97

PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive...

98

PIA - PAGE (Performance and Accountability for Grants in Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Corporate Planning System (CPS) PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management...

99

PIA - iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA - iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA - iManage Strategic Integrated...

100

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS ProRad Environment Management...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th...

102

PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support System PIA - WEB Unclassified Business Operations General Support...

103

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

104

PIA - HSS Electronic Visitor Management System (HSEVMS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home PIA - HSS Electronic Visitor Management System (HSEVMS) PIA - HSS Electronic Visitor Management...

105

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Informatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Training Records and Information Network (TRAIN) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions...

106

PIA - INL Education Programs Business Enclave | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enclave PIA - INL Education Programs Business Enclave More Documents & Publications PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE Integrated Safety Management...

107

PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM...

108

EERE Project Management Center Database PIA, The Office of Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Center Database PIA, The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) EERE Project Management Center Database PIA, The Office of Energy Efficiency and...

109

EERE Information Center Contact, PIA, The Office of Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Center Contact, PIA, The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) EERE Information Center Contact, PIA, The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable...

110

Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) PIA, Office of Fossil Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) PIA, Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB) PIA, Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Fossil Energy Web System (FEWEB)...

111

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy Headquaters Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System Heating Oil, PIA Office of Fossil Energy...

112

PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009 PIA - Advanced Test Reactor...

113

Commercialization and Project Management PIA, Golden Field Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Database PIA, Idaho Operations Office MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

114

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Badge Request and Site...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site MOX Services Unclassified Information System PIA, National Nuclear Services Administration...

115

PIA - eTrack, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Company LLC PIA - eTrack, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC More Documents & Publications PIA - INL SECURITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM BUSINESS ENCLAVE PIA - Firehouse Staff Activity...

116

PIA - OpenGov UserVoice System | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline PIA - Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Users Week 2009...

117

PIA - Form EIA-475 A/G Residential Energy Consumption Survey...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA - Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA - Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA...

118

Electronic DOE Information Security System (eDISS) PIA, Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Information Security System (eDISS) PIA, Office of Health Safety and Security Electronic DOE Information Security System (eDISS) PIA, Office of Health Safety and Security...

119

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

120

PIA - ORO Web 2.0 Social Media Third-Party System (Facebook)...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORO Web 2.0 Social Media Third-Party System (Facebook) PIA - ORO Web 2.0 Social Media Third-Party System (Facebook) PIA - ORO Web 2.0 Social Media Third-Party System (Facebook) PIA...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Corporate Human Resources Information Services (CHIRS) PIA, Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Administration iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management Integrated Safety Management...

122

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution SRNS Electronic Document...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing...

123

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate...

124

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Procurement Cycle...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management System (HRMS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing...

125

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Procurement Cycle System (PCS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing...

126

PIA - Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Program Applicant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home PIA - Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Program Applicant and Participant Status...

127

Oak Ridge Office Document Management Ststem(HummingbirdDM) PIA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Oak Ridge Office Document Management Ststem(HummingbirdDM) PIA, Oak Ridge Operations...

128

DOE GovTrip PIA, Office of Corporate Information Systems | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance...

129

OHA Case Tracking System PIA,Office of Hearings and Appeals ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management...

130

Health impact assessment in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Health Impact Assessment has gained great attention in Korea. First, the Ministry of Environment introduced HIA within existing Environment Impact Assessment. Second, the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs began an HIA program in 2008 in alliance with Healthy Cities. In this short report, these two different efforts are introduced and their opportunities and challenges discussed. We believe these two approaches complement each other and both need to be strengthened. We also believe that both can contribute to the development of health in policy and project development and ultimately to improvements in the Korean population's health.

Kang, Eunjeong, E-mail: marchej@kihasa.re.r [Division for Health Promotion Research, Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs, 268 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngsoo, E-mail: leeys@kei.re.k [Centre for Environmental Impact Assessment Review, Korea Environment Institute, 290 Jinheung-ro, Bulgwang-dong, Eunpyeong-gu (Korea, Republic of); Harris, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, part of the UNSW, Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1981 (Australia); Koh, Kwangwook, E-mail: kwkoh@hanafos.co [Department of Preventive Medicine, Kosin University, 149-1 Dongsam-1-dong, Youngdo-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keonyeop, E-mail: pmkky@knu.ac.k [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine and Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Public Health, KyungPook National University, 101 Dongin 2 , Jung-gu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Environmental Impact Assessment (Prince Edward Island, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Province of PEI has established an environmental impact assessment process for projects that could have an impact on the environment. The Province and the Federal Government cooperate in the...

132

Environmental impact assessment Geopressure Subprogram  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This environmental impact assessment (EIA) addresses the expected programmatic activities of the Geopressure Subprogram of the Division of Geothermal Energy. The goal of the Geopressure Subprogram is to stimulate development of geopressured resources as an economic, reliable, operationally safe, and environmentally acceptable energy source. The subprogram includes activities in the areas of engineering research and development; resource exploration, assessment, and development; resource utilization including pilot and demonstration facilities; and environmental research and control technology development. It should be recognized that most of the subprogram activities extend over several years and are in their early stages of implementation at this time. The zones of potential geopressure development are in the region located along the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coasts extending up to 200 miles (300 km) inland. Geopressured zones are sedimentary basins where water is trapped at high pressures within or below thick, nearly impermeable shale sequences. The confined water supports most or all of the weight of the overburden. This inhibits sediment compaction and causes formation pore pressure to exceed hydrostatic pressure. in sedimentary basins that are underlain by thin oceanic crust, upward thermal conduction from the mantle heats geopressured fluids and sediments to abnormally high temperatures, often in excess of 260 C (500 F).

None

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan...

134

Manager's Signature Log Privacy Impact Assessment, Office of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documents & Publications iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management Integrated Safety Management...

135

Social Theory, Impact Assessment and Northern Native Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

provides a useful list of 21 social impact categories in ''Issues in Social Impact Assessment, "' Plan Canada, 18 (Junen d S. Rittenberg, . . Social Impact Assessment: A State of

Weaver, Clyde; Cunningham, Alain M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

3D Simulations in Environmental Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase of petrol cost and the failure of Kyoto agreement generated huge investments in renewable energy sources. In recent times a lot of local authorities allowed wind farm location. In many cases, environmental impact assessments do not take ... Keywords: 3D CAD models, 3D GIS analysis, Multimedia techniques, Viewshed, Visual impact assessment, Wind farm

Maria Danese; Giuseppe Las Casas; Beniamino Murgante

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Assessment Toolkit Impact Assessment Toolkit (Redirected from Gateway:International/Economic and Environmental Impacts) Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

138

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact Assessment Toolkit Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

139

LLNL MSP-GSS-001 PIA, Office of the Chief Information Officer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documents & Publications iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management MOX Services Unclassified...

140

Oak Ridge Office SharePoint( MicrosoftSHarePointServer) PIA,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management Occupational Injury & Illness...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

moveLINQ PIA, Office of the Chief Financial Officer | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho National Laboratory iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management MOX Services Unclassified...

142

LLNL MSP-GSS-001 PIA, Office of the Chief Information Officer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management Integrated Safety Management...

143

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

high-impact-assessment-bulletins high-impact-assessment-bulletins Office of the Chief Information Officer 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202-586-0166 en V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities http://energy.gov/cio/articles/v-215-networkminer-directory-traversal-and-insecure-library-loading-vulnerabilities V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities

144

JC3 Low Impact Assessment Bulletins  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

low-impact-assessment-bulletins low-impact-assessment-bulletins Office of the Chief Information Officer 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202-586-0166 en V-207: Wireshark Multiple Denial of Service Vulnerabilities http://energy.gov/cio/articles/v-207-wireshark-multiple-denial-service-vulnerabilities V-207: Wireshark Multiple Denial of Service Vulnerabilities

145

Comparing Two Approaches for Assessing Observation Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Langland and Baker introduced an approach to assess the impact of observations on the forecasts. In that approach, a state-space aspect of the forecast is defined and a procedure is derived ultimately relating changes in the aspect with changes in ...

Ricardo Todling

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Berkeley ReadyMade Impact Assessment: Developing an Effective and Efficient Assessment Template for Social Enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

work lead to broader social impact. For example, a nonprofitand Resources for Assessing Social Impact (TRASI). 3 2.need to evaluate broad social impact of proposed programs

Brown, Clair; Chait, Ariel; Freeman, Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet - Potential Impacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE has prepared a draft Environmental Assessment for Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site. It examines the potential environmental consequences from conducting particular types of scientific experiments in an area of the WIPP underground called the experiment gallery. The environmental assessment also looks at the potential cumulative impacts of conducting experiments and operating the WIPP as a transuranic waste repository. This fact sheet presents questions and answers about potential impacts to human health and the environment and proposed protections and mitigations, based on the draft environmental assessment. The deep geologic repository at the WIPP could be the most favorable U.S. environment currently available for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astro-

148

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MedGate Occupational MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) More Documents & Publications PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Procurement Cycle System (PCS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management

149

JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

medium-impact-assessment-bulletins medium-impact-assessment-bulletins Office of the Chief Information Officer 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 202-586-0166 en V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities http://energy.gov/cio/articles/v-237-typo3-security-bypass-vulnerabilities V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities

150

Assessing the Economic Impact of LLNL’s Additive Manufacturing ...  

Assessing the Economic Impact of LLNL’s Additive Manufacturing Technology Danny Katz / Hannah Farqquar Market Intelligence Industrial Partnerships Office

151

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Agency/Company /Organization: DG Joint Research Centre, European Commission, University of Heidelberg Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Other Website: iatools.jrc.ec.europa.eu/docs/ecol_econ_2006.pdf Computable General Equilibrium Models for Sustainability Impact Assessment: Status quo and prospects Screenshot References: Computable general equilibrium models[1] Abstract "Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) of economic, environmental, and

152

Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada) Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada) Environmental Impact Assessment (New Brunswick, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Environmental Regulations Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a process through which the environmental impacts potentially resulting from a proposed project are identified and assessed early in the planning process. EIA identifies steps

153

Practitioners, professional cultures, and perceptions of impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The very nature of impact assessment (IA) means that it often involves practitioners from a very wide range of disciplinary and professional backgrounds, which open the possibility that how IA is perceived and practised may vary according to the professional background of the practitioner. The purpose of this study is to investigate the extent to which a practitioner's professional background influences their perceptions of the adequacy of impact assessment in New Zealand under the Resource Management Act (RMA). Information gathered concerned professional affiliations, training, understanding of impact assessment practise, and perceptions of adequacy in relation to impact assessment. The results showed a dominance of a legalistic, operational perspective of impact assessment under the Resource Management Act, across all the main professions represented in the study. However, among preparers of impact assessments there was clear evidence of differences between the four main professional groups - surveyors, planners, engineers and natural scientists - in the way they see the nature and purpose of impact assessment, the practical steps involved, and what constitutes adequacy. Similarly, impact assessment reviewers - predominantly planners and lawyers - showed variations in their expectations of impact assessment depending on their respective professional affiliation. Although in many cases the differences seem to be more of a matter of emphasis, rather than major disputes on what constitutes a good process, even those differences can add up to rather distinct professional cultures of impact assessment. The following factors are seen as leading to the emergence of such professional cultures: different professions often contribute in different ways to an impact assessment, affecting their perception of the nature and purpose of the process; impact assessment training will usually be a secondary concern, compared with the core professional training, which will be reflected in the depth and length of such training; and any impact assessment training provided within a profession will often have the 'cultural' imprint of that profession.

Morgan, Richard K., E-mail: rkm@geography.otago.ac.nz [Centre for Impact Assessment Research and Training, Department of Geography, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Hart, Andrew [Centre for Impact Assessment Research and Training, Department of Geography, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Freeman, Claire, E-mail: cf@geography.otago.ac.nz [Department of Geography, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Coutts, Brian, E-mail: bcoutts@surveying.otago.ac.nz [School of Surveying, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand); Colwill, David; Hughes, Andrew [Centre for Impact Assessment Research and Training, Department of Geography, University of Otago, P.O. Box 56, Dunedin (New Zealand)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

155

Catalysis-by-design impacts assessment  

SciTech Connect

Catalyst researchers have always recognized the need to develop a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of catalytic processes, and have hoped that it would lead to developing a theoretical predictive base to guide the search for new catalysts. This understanding allows one to develop a set of hierarchical models, from fundamental atomic-level ab-initio models to detailed engineering simulations of reactor systems, to direct the search for optimized, efficient catalyst systems. During the last two decades, the explosions of advanced surface analysis techniques have helped considerably to develop the building blocks for understanding various catalytic reactions. An effort to couple these theoretical and experimental advances to develop a set of hierarchical models to predict the nature of catalytic materials is a program entitled Catalysis-by-Design (CRD).'' In assessing the potential impacts of CBD on US industry, the key point to remember is that the value of the program lies in developing a novel methodology to search for new catalyst systems. Industrial researchers can then use this methodology to develop proprietary catalysts. Most companies involved in catalyst R D have two types of ongoing projects. The first type, what we call market-driven R D,'' are projects that support and improve upon a company's existing product lines. Project of the second type, technology-driven R D,'' are longer term, involve the development of totally new catalysts, and are initiated through scientists' research ideas. The CBD approach will impact both types of projects. However, this analysis indicates that the near-term impacts will be on market-driven'' projects. The conclusions and recommendations presented in this report were obtained by the authors through personal interviews with individuals involved in a variety of industrial catalyst development programs and through the three CBD workshops held in the summer of 1989. 34 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs.

Fassbender, L L; Young, J K [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Sen, R K [Sen (R.K.) and Associates, Washington, DC (USA)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

White Paper Series Using Health Impact Assessments to Evaluate Bicycle and Pedestrian Plans January to conduct HIAs in the Gothenburg Consensus Paper [8] (see http

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

158

Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-3562E Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Annoyance: A Preliminary Analysis in Vinalhaven, Maine Ben Hoen, Haftan Eckholdt, and Ryan...

159

Second National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Impacts By...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment: Climate Change Impacts By Sector Print E-mail alt An affiliated website was created specifically for the 2009 National Climate Assessment so that the report would be...

160

Screening assessment and requirements for a comprehensive assessment: Volume 1, Draft. Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the impact to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site-derived contaminants, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, tribal, stockholder, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. The Team agreed to conduct CRCIA using a phased approach. The initial phase, includes two components: 1) a screening assessment to evaluate the potential impact to the river, resulting from current levels of Hanford-derived contaminants in order to support decisions on Interim Remedial Measures, and 2) a definition of the essential work remaining to provide an acceptable comprehensive river impact assessment. The screening assessment is described in Part I of this report. The essential work remaining is Part II of this report. The objective of the screening assessment is to identify areas where the greatest potential exists for adverse effects on humans or the environment. Part I of this report discusses the scope, technical approach, and results of the screening assessment. Part II defines a new paradigm for predecisional participation by those affected by Hanford cleanup decisions.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Environmental Impact Statement and to Conduct Scoping Meetings Hualapai Valley Solar Interconnection Project in Mohave County, Arizona July 30, 2009 EIS-0425: Notice of...

162

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17, 2010 EIS-0455: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA December 17, 2010 EIS-0403: EPA Notice of...

163

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement Nuclear Facility Portion of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico...

164

Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Jump to: navigation, search Name Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type Publications Website http://www.worldagroforestry.o Country Philippines UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed[1] Assessing Climate Change Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation: The Case of Pantabangan-Carranglan Watershed Screenshot This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

165

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart This chart represents anticipated activity and is not a commitment for documentation or dates. October 21, 2011 EIS-0426: Notice of Extension of Public Comment Period for the Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Continued Operation of the Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada September 26, 2011 EA-1792: Finding of No Significant Impact University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine September 26, 2011 EA-1792: Final Environmental Assessment University of Maine's DeepWater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and

166

European Commission Impact Assessment Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

European Commission Impact Assessment Tools European Commission Impact Assessment Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IPTS-IA Tools Agency/Company /Organization: European Commission Joint Research Centre Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Other Website: iatools.jrc.ec.europa.eu/bin/view/IQTool/WebHome.html IPTS-IA Tools Screenshot References: IPTS-IA Tools[1] Overview "IA TOOLS is an online platform that provides Commission policy actors and impact assessment practitioners throughout Europe with a repository of guidance, information and best practices for the impact assessment of new policies and legislative measures. At one click, the IA TOOLS website provides expert and non-expert with guidance on the main steps to be

167

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodiversity impacts . Bioethanol . Evenness . Geographicto produce a liter of bioethanol depends on where thethen assessed for three bioethanol feedstocks at different

Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low LEDSGP/analysis/impacts/DIAWebinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development < LEDSGP‎ | analysis/impacts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate

169

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 1996 EIS-0240: Final Environmental Impact Statement Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 next Energy.gov Careers & Internships...

170

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Project, Ector, Texas August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California...

171

An Initial Assessment of Hanford Impact Performed with the System Assessment Capability  

SciTech Connect

The System Assessment Capability is an integrated system of computer models and databases to assess the impact of waste remaining at Hanford. This tool will help decision makers and the public evaluate the cumulative effects of contamination from Hanford. This report describes the results of an initial assessment performed with the System Assessment Capability tools.

Bryce, Robert W.; Kincaid, Charles T.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Morasch, Launa F.

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Nepal-Sectoral Climate Impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

173

Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits Jump to: navigation, search Development Impacts Assessment Tools help country, regional, and local policymakers find tools and online resources to assess the impacts of low-emission development strategies (LEDS). These tools equip decision makers with information to explore policy options and build consensus with stakeholders to acheive low-emission development. LEDSGP/DIA-Toolkit Pages in category "LEDSGP Development Impacts Assessment Toolkits" The following 65 pages are in this category, out of 65 total.

174

Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Ministry of Environment for Government of Nepal Sector Climate Focus Area Agriculture, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Water Conservation Topics Low emission development planning Website http://cdkn.org/2011/11/call-f Country Nepal Southern Asia References Nepal Sectoral Climate impacts Economic Assessment[1] CDKN is providing support to the GoN through a number of projects to design and deliver climate compatible development (CCD) plans and policies. To

175

Climate change impact assessment of air pollution levels in bulgaria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presented work is aiming at climate change impacts and vulnerability assessment in Bulgaria Climate change may affect exposures to air pollutants by affecting weather and thereby local and regional pollution concentrations Local weather patterns ...

D. Syrakov; M. Prodanova; N. Miloshev; K. Ganev; G. Jordanov; V. Spiridonov; A. Bogatchev; E. Katragkou; D. Melas; A. Poupkou; K. Markakis

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Integrated Economic and Climate Projections for Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We designed scenarios for impact assessment that explicitly address policy choices and uncertainty in climate response. Economic projections and the resulting greenhouse gas emissions for the “no climate policy” scenario ...

Paltsev, Sergey

177

Second National Climate Assessment: Climate Change Impacts By...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Impacts By Region Print E-mail alt An affiliated website was created specifically for the 2009 National Climate Assessment so that the report would be more...

178

JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medium Impact Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS December 4, 2012 V-039: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access Vulnerability Samsung has issued a security advisory and an optional firmware update for all current Samsung networked laser printers and multifunction devices to enhance Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) security. November 30, 2012 V-037: Wireshark Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service Several vulnerabilities were reported in Wireshark. November 29, 2012 V-036: EMC Smarts Network Configuration Manager Database Authentication Bypass Vulnerability Two vulnerabilities were reported in EMC Smarts Network Configuration Manager. November 27, 2012 V-034: RSA Adaptive Authentication (On-Premise) Input Validation Flaws

179

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds  

SciTech Connect

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Double Bottom Line Project Report:Assessing Social Impact In Double Bottom Line Ventures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ongoing Assessment of Social Impact (OASIS) rubicon programsHall, 1996). poverty and social impact analysis (psia) Datas Guide to Poverty and Social Impact Analysis” (World Bank,

Rosenzweig, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

182

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar on Development Impact Assessment for Low Emissions Development Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Joint Implementation Network, German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy Phase: Bring the Right People Together Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Training materials, Webinar Cost: Free Language: English Webinar Summary Constructing a LEDS requires a tool that enables governments to evaluate and prioritize policies across an economy and clearly explain the process

183

ADOPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT;  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADOPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT; ADOPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT; DETERMINATION OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT DOE/EA-1868: MANHATTAN PROJECT SITES Los Alamos, New Mexico; Hanford, Washington; Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Dayton, Ohio BACKGROUND: 'The National Park Service (NPS) issued an Environmental Assessment (September 2010) in consultation with DOE for a proposed action of recommending that Congress authorize an innovative Manhattan Project National Historical Park. The Park Service selected an alternative for the proposed park that includes publicly and privately owned facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Los Alamos, New Mexico; and the Hanford, Washington area. 'The boundaries of the national historical park would be defined by enabling legislation and refined by the general management planning

184

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart The Status Chart provides the status of ongoing NEPA documents at the Department of Energy, including the dates of important milestones in the NEPA process and references to more information (updated monthly). This chart represents anticipated activity and is not a commitment for documentation or date. Last Revised: 12/19/2013 StatusChart_December2013revised.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Western Area Power Administration 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Western Area Power Administration 2011 ANNUAL PLANNING SUMMARY FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH AND PROJECTS AGENCY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION

185

Assessment of Current Knowledge of Hybrid Vehicle Characteristics and Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has taken a leadership role in bringing together representatives from the utility and automotive industries, along with those of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other regulatory agencies to participate in a study: Assessment of Current Knowledge of Hybrid Vehicle Characteristics and Impacts. This study focused on key attribute areas of HEV energy efficiency, emissions, life cycle, and customer acceptance and HEV's potential impacts on private and public stakeholders.

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

Risk Impact Assessment of Extended Integrated Leak Rate Testing Intervals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a risk impact assessment for extending integrated leak rate test (ILRT) surveillance intervals to 15 years. The assessment demonstrates that on an industry-wide basis there is small risk associated with the extension, provided that the performance bases and defense-in-depth are maintained. There is an obvious benefit in not performing costly, critical-path, time-consuming tests that provide a limited benefit from a risk perspective.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Finding of No Significant Impact Issued on Environmental Assessment for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Finding of No Significant Impact Issued on Environmental Assessment for Remote-handled Waste Disposition Project at DOE�s Idaho Site Finding of No Significant Impact Issued on Environmental Assessment for Remote-handled Waste Disposition Project at DOE�s Idaho Site The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on the Final Environmental Assessment for the Remote-handled Waste Disposition Project. The environmental assessment analyzed potential environmental impacts of processing for disposition approximately 322 cubic meters of remote-handled waste currently stored at the department�s Idaho Site near Idaho Falls, Idaho. An additional five cubic meters of waste stored at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington was also evaluated, since it is possible that waste may come to Idaho for treatment. Under the Department�s preferred alternative, workers will use sealed rooms called hot cells at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) to process the waste, treat it as necessary and repackage it so that it is ready for disposal. The document includes a description of modifications necessary to the hot cells to perform the work.

188

Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i LBNL-3562E Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Annoyance: A Preliminary Analysis in Vinalhaven, Maine Prepared from the turbines is unwelcome and annoying. Fox Islands Wind, the owner of the facility, hypothesized

189

Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Impact High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS August 9, 2013 V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library Loading Vulnerabilities The vulnerabilities are reported in versions 1.4.1 and prior August 8, 2013 V-214: Mozilla Firefox Multiple Vulnerabilities The vulnerabilities are reported in versions prior to 23.0. August 5, 2013 V-211: IBM iNotes Multiple Vulnerabilities IBM iNotes has two cross-site scripting vulnerabilities and an ActiveX Integer overflow vulnerability August 2, 2013 V -209:Cisco WAAS (Wide Area Application Services) Arbitrary Code Execution Vulnerabilities Cisco Wide Area Application Services (WAAS) when configured as Central Manager (CM), contains a vulnerability that could allow an unauthenticated,

191

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Impact High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS June 28, 2013 V-188: Apache XML Security XPointer Expressions Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability The vulnerability addresses the possibility of a heap overflow condition June 27, 2013 V-187: Mozilla Firefox Multiple Vulnerabilities These vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious people to conduct cross-site scripting and spoofing attacks, disclose potentially sensitive information, bypass certain security restrictions, and compromise a user's system. June 19, 2013 V-181: Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory - June 2013 Multiple vulnerabilities were reported in Oracle Java. June 14, 2013 V-178: IBM Data Studio Web Console Java Multiple Vulnerabilities IBM Data Studio Web Console uses the IBM Java Runtime Environment (JRE) and

192

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Impact High Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS November 7, 2012 V-018: Adobe Flash Player Buffer Overflows and Memory Corruption Errors Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code Several vulnerabilities were reported in Adobe Flash Player. November 5, 2012 V-016: HP Performance Insight Bugs with Sybase Database Let Remote Users Deny Service and Take Full Control of the Target System Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP Performance Insight. November 2, 2012 V-015: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code, Local Users Bypass the Screen Lock, and Applications Obtain Kernel Address Information Three vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. November 1, 2012 V-014: Cisco Prime Data Center Network Manager JBoss RMI Services Let

193

JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medium Impact Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS September 9, 2013 V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities TYPO3 comes with the possibility to restrict editors to certain file actions (copy, delete, move etc.) and to restrict these actions to be performed in certain locations September 4, 2013 V-234: EMC RSA Archer GRC Open Redirection Weakness and Security Bypass Security Issue This fixes multiple vulnerabilities, which can be exploited to bypass certain security restrictions and to conduct spoofing attacks September 3, 2013 V-233: Red Hat update for JBoss Fuse This fixes multiple vulnerabilities, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions and cause a DoS. August 28, 2013 V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting

194

JC3 Low Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Impact Low Impact Assessment Bulletins JC3 Low Impact Assessment Bulletins RSS July 31, 2013 V-207: Wireshark Multiple Denial of Service Vulnerabilities Successful exploitation of this vulnerability may allow execution of arbitrary code. July 30, 2013 V-206: Apache HTTP Server mod_rewrite and "httpOnly" Cookie Disclosure Vulnerabilities Two vulnerabilities have been reported in Apache HTTP Server July 29, 2013 V-205: IBM Tivoli System Automation for Multiplatforms Java Multiple Vulnerabilities The weakness and the vulnerabilities are caused due to a bundled vulnerable version of Java. November 30, 2011 U-048: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update Firmware with Arbitrary Code A remote user can upgrade the printer's firmware with arbitrary code

195

Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions Assess Potential Changes in Business Travel that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For a Federal agency, changes in the demand for business travel can be difficult to predict. Changes in the nature of the agency's work may have a substantial impact on the demand for business travel. It is therefore important to account for these changes when planning for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction. Conditions that may contribute to a significant increase or decrease in the agency's business travel, beyond specific efforts to reduce business travel demand, include: Significant changes in the agency's budget Addition or completion of major program activities that require

196

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 28, 2010 May 28, 2010 EIS-0419: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Whistling Ridge Energy Project, Construction and Operation of a 75-megawatt Wind Turbine Facility, City of White Salmon, Skamania County, WA May 13, 2010 EA-1707: Draft Environmental Assessment Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington April 9, 2010 EIS-0404: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California April 9, 2010 EIS-0455: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA April 9, 2010 EIS-0455: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA

197

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 5, 2011 August 5, 2011 EIS-0444: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Texas Clean Energy Project, Ector, Texas August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee to High Plains II, LLC for the California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County and Kern County, California July 29, 2011 EIS-0426: Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Continued Operation of the Nevada National Security Site and Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada July 29, 2011 EIS-0426: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Public Hearings

198

Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Developing a Modeling Framework for Assessing Population Impacts of Residential Air Quality Policies Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: November 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Brett Singer People spend the majority of their time in residences and the health burden of indoor air is significant. However, the definitions of "acceptable" and "good" indoor air quality (IAQ), and the most effective, energy efficient methods for achieving various levels of IAQ are still matters of research and debate. Current ventilation standards focus on minimum requirements for overall and mechanically provided ventilation rates, and vented combustion equipment, and require only the installation of kitchen and bath exhaust fans for source control. These standards generally are

200

Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind #12;1 Pennsylvania Energy Impacts Assessment Report 1: Marcellus Shale Natural Gas and Wind November 15, 2010 Author.....................................................................................................................3 Marcellus Shale Natural Gas

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A semantic approach to life cycle assessment applied on energy environmental impact data management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental impact assessment of goods and services is nowadays a major challenge for both economic and ethical reasons. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) provides a well-accepted methodology for modelling environmental impacts of human activities. One stage ... Keywords: energy impact data management, life cycle assessment, ontology

Benjamin Bertin; Vasile-Marian Scuturici; Emmanuel Risler; Jean-Marie Pinon

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Bates solar industrial process steam application environmental impact assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is planned to install 34,440 square feet of linear parabolic trough solar collectors at a new corrugator plant for making corrugated boxes. The system is to operate in parallel with a fossil fuel boiler. An assessment is presented of the impacts of the solar energy system on the existing environment and to determine whether or not a more detailed environmental impact statement is needed. The environmental assessment is based on actual operational data obtained on the collector, fluid, and heat transport system. A description of the design of the solar energy system and its application is given. Also included is a discussion of the location of the new plant in Fort Worth, Texas, and of the surrounding environment. Environmental impacts are discussed in detail, and alternatives to the solar industrial process steam retrofit application are offered. It is concluded that the overall benefits from the solar industrial process heat system outweigh any negative environmental factors. Benefits include reduced fossil fuel demand, with attending reductions in air pollutants. The selection of a stable heat transfer fluid with low toxicity and biodegradable qualities minimizes environmental damage due to fluid spills, personal exposure, and degradation byproducts. The collector is found to be aesthetically attractive with minimal hazards due to glare. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Geothermal power production: impact assessments and environmental monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role that baseline and postoperational environmental monitoring plays in assessing impacts of geothermal power production is emphasized. Based on experience in the Imperial Valley, where substantial geothermal resources exist, the important characteristics of monitoring programs involving subsidence, seismicity, and air and water quality are examined. The importance of environmental monitoring for situations where predictive models either do not exist (e.g., seismicity), or are still being developed (e.g., land subsidence) are discussed. In these cases the need for acquiring and analyzing data that can provide timely information on changes caused by geothermal operations are emphasized. Monitoring is also useful in verifying predictions of air quality changes - in particular, violations of ambient standards after control technologies are implemented. Water quality can be monitored with existing sampling programs where the potential for geothermal impacts is thought to be rather small. The significant issues in these environmental areas, the status of baseline data and predictive capability that currently exists, and the need for future monitoring and modeling programs to assess the impacts of geothermal development are summarized.

Layton, D.W.; Pimentel, K.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Socioeconomic impact assessment: a methodology applied to synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Report is a supporting document for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Alternative Fuels Demonstration Program, which was filed with the Council on Environmental Quality in November, 1977. It describes the methodology developed for the socioeconomic impact assessments contained in the Environmental Impact Statement, and highlights the findings. Part I of this Report explains clearly how the numbers are derived, and presents the salient planning issues. Starting with the labor force of a synthetic fuels facility, a public official, decision-maker, or student of socioeconomic impacts can use this Report to derive a reasonable set of estimates which reflect the resultant population, income, employment, land use, public facility costs, and local public revenues. Part II of this Report is the application of this methodology to synthetic fuels. Numerical estimates are given for the social and economic effects resulting from such energy technologies as coal gasification and liquefaction, oil shale, and the conversion of solid wastes and agricultural products to energy. Although the methodology is not site specific, illustrative sites, chosen from the major coal-bearing counties in the United States, have been included. This allows a user to compare the relative impacts of a given energy facility in various geographical locations and types of communities. The section on mitigating measures may be of special interest because of its treatment of problem areas and its broad range of suggested solutions. One advantage of the methodology is that it derives from a broad data base that is readily accessible: the United States Census. Another advantage is that impacts can be calculated by hand. Finally, it is applicable to a wide variety of energy technologies and not restricted to synthetic fuels.

Not Available

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 Planned changes in a Federal agency's size, missions, transportation needs, and vehicle inventory all impact the strategic portfolio planning efforts that target greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions mitigation for vehicles and mobile equipment. Under Section 142 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) and Section 8 of Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, agencies are required to develop a plan that will reduce fleet GHG emissions to meet Federally mandated petroleum reduction and alternative fuel increase targets. Agencies can use these plans as a basis for determining potential changes in fleet size and

206

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Emissions Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis Federal agencies should establish planned changes in operations that could have a substantial impact on emissions for each greenhouse gas (GHG) emission source: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. Such changes could represent either an additional significant hurdle to overcome or a significant reduction in the effort required to drive emissions down-in the absence of any direct GHG mitigation reduction strategies. This will help each organization establish its "business as usual" emission profile in 2020, the year agencies are expected to meet their Scope 1 and 2 and Scope 3 GHG emission-reduction goals.

207

EA-1472: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1472: Final Environmental Assessment Commercial Demonstration fo the Low Nox Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) Integration System Emission Reduction Technology, Holcolm Station, Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Finnety County, Kansas This EA evaluates DOE's proposal to provide partial funding to the Sunflower Electric Power Corporation (Sunflower), to demonstrate the commerical application of Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve NOx emission reduction to the level of 0.15 to 0.22 pounds per million British thermal units (lb/MM Btu). EA-1472-FEA-2003.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1472: Finding of No Significant Impact PIA - Sunflower (BPA) CX-006850: Categorical Exclusion Determination

208

Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Multi-jurisdictional environmental impact assessment: Canadian experiences  

SciTech Connect

This research examines complexities surrounding environmental impact assessment (EIA) in a multi-jurisdictional environment, with a specific focus on opportunities for public participation. With almost universal adoption of EIA, projects are increasingly subject to more than one assessment process. Thus there is demand to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination of EIAs. Canada has growing expertise with multijuristictional EIA that serves to illustrate the costs and opportunities associated with three different approaches to coordination: standardization, harmonization and substitution. Findings suggest that, although fraught with issues, harmonization is the most realistic approach for coordinating efforts. Harmonization has the potential to minimize duplication, avoid process uncertainty and increase efficiency and effectiveness in EIA. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrates that a bilateral agreement between jurisdictions is the best approach to harmonization, so long as negotiation of the agreement includes opportunities for meaningful participation, and implementation includes activities designed to communicate the assessment responsibilities of each jurisdiction, activities and schedules to the public. The experience of participants of different coordinated EIAs in Canada serves as counsel for on-going and future efforts to facilitate inter-jurisdictional coordination.

Fitzpatrick, Patricia, E-mail: p.fitzpatrick@uwinnipeg.c [Department of Geography, The University of Winnipeg 515 Portage Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada); Sinclair, A. John, E-mail: Jsincla@ms.umanitoba.c [Natural Resources Institute, Sinnott Building, 70 Dysart Rd., University of Manitoba Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Assess Potential Agency Size Changes that Impact Greenhouse Gases from Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 1:42pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 1 For employee commuting, it is important to account for any planned or expected changes in a Federal agency's size when estimating the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential for different operating units or worksites. Considerations include: Are employment levels expected to change in the next decade at specific facilities or agency-wide? Are there any planned facility moves at major worksites? Employee commute coordinators may want to engage human resources and strategic planners in this effort to establish likely changes in employment numbers. Facility planners may be engaged to understand changes in commutes

211

The Environmental Style: Writing Environmental Assessments And Impact Statements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STYLE STYLE WRITING ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS AND IMPACT STATEMENTS R.P. Detwiler NNSA Office of General Counsel October 2005 In his introduction to William Strunk's classic on writing, The Elements of Style, E. B. White described the plight of those who read many of our NEPA documents: Will [Strunk] felt that the reader was in serious trouble most of the time, a man foundering in a swamp, and that it was the duty of anyone attempting to write English to drain this swamp quickly and get this man on dry ground, or at least throw him a rope. In revising text, I have tried to hold steadily in mind a belief of his, this concern for the bewildered reader. The Department and its contractors need to hold in their minds the women and men - decision makers, citizens, regulators and judges - who slog through our environmental

212

Differing forms, differing purposes: A typology of health impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is currently considerable diversity in health impact assessment (HIA) practice internationally. Historically this diversity has been described as simple dichotomies, for example the differences between HIAs of projects and policies. However these distinctions have failed to adequately describe the differences that can be observed between different forms of HIAs. This paper describes the three historical and disciplinary fields from which HIA has emerged - environmental health, a social view of health, and health equity. It also puts forward a typology of four different forms of HIA that can be observed in current HIA practice: mandated, decision-support, advocacy, and community-led HIAs. This paper argues that these different forms of HIA serve different purposes and are not necessarily in competition; rather they allow HIA to be responsive to a range of population health concerns and purposes.

Harris-Roxas, Ben, E-mail: b.harris-roxas@unsw.edu.au; Harris, Elizabeth, E-mail: e.harris@unsw.edu.a

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation of environmental impact assessment system in Pakistan  

SciTech Connect

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) was first introduced in Pakistan based on the Environmental Protection Ordinance 1983. The EIA process was further strengthened under the Pakistan Environmental Protection Act 1997, which became operational under EIA Regulations 2000. Despite a sound legal basis and comprehensive guidelines, evidence suggests that EIA has not yet evolved satisfactorily in Pakistan. An evaluation of the EIA system against systematic evaluation criteria, based on interviews with EIA approval authorities, consulting firms and experts, reveals various shortcomings of the EIA system. These mainly include; inadequate capacity of EIA approval authorities, deficiencies in screening and scoping, poor EIA quality, inadequate public participation and weak monitoring. Overall, EIA is used presently as a project justification tool rather than as a project planning tool to contribute to achieving sustainable development. Whilst shortcomings are challenging, central government has recently shown a high degree of commitment to the environmental protection by making EIA compulsory for all the public sector projects likely to have adverse environmental impacts. The paper identifies opportunities for taking advantage of the current environment for strengthening the EIA process.

Nadeem, Obaidullah [Department of City and Regional Planning, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: obaidnadeem@yahoo.com; Hameed, Rizwan [Department of City and Regional Planning, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: d_rizwan@hotmail.com

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements, Second Edition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recommendations Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Environment, Safety and Health Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance printed on recycled paper Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements, Second Edition Preface This document provides recommendations for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) preparation of environmental assessments and environmental impact statements under the National Environmental

215

Health impact assessment of air pollution using a dynamic exposure profile: Implications for exposure and health impact estimates  

SciTech Connect

In both ambient air pollution epidemiology and health impact assessment an accurate assessment of the population exposure is crucial. Although considerable advances have been made in assessing human exposure outdoors, the assessments often do not consider the impact of individual travel behavior on such exposures. Population-based exposures to NO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} using only home addresses were compared with models that integrate all time-activity patterns-including time in commute-for Flanders and Brussels. The exposure estimates were used to estimate the air pollution impact on years of life lost due to respiratory mortality. Health impact of NO{sub 2} using an exposure that integrates time-activity information was on average 1.2% higher than when assuming that people are always at their home address. For ozone the overall estimated health impact was 0.8% lower. Local differences could be much larger, with estimates that differ up to 12% from the exposure using residential addresses only. Depending on age and gender, deviations from the population average were seen. Our results showed modest differences on a regional level. At the local level, however, time-activity patterns indicated larger differences in exposure and health impact estimates, mainly for people living in more rural areas. These results suggest that for local analyses the dynamic approach can contribute to an improved assessment of the health impact of various types of pollution and to the understanding of exposure differences between population groups. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure to ambient air pollution was assessed integrating population mobility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This dynamic exposure was integrated into a health impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differences between the dynamic and residential exposure were quantified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modest differences in health impact were found at a regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At municipal level larger differences were found, influenced by gender and age.

Dhondt, Stijn, E-mail: stijn.dhondt@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Beckx, Carolien, E-mail: Carolien.Beckx@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Degraeuwe, Bart, E-mail: Bart.Degraeuwe@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Lefebvre, Wouter, E-mail: Wouter.Lefebvre@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Kochan, Bruno, E-mail: Bruno.Kochan@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Bellemans, Tom, E-mail: Tom.Bellemans@uhasselt.be [Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Int Panis, Luc, E-mail: Luc.intpanis@vito.be [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Transportation Research Institute, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 5 bus 6, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Macharis, Cathy, E-mail: cjmachar@vub.ac.be [Department MOSI-Transport and Logistics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050, Brussels (Belgium); Putman, Koen, E-mail: kputman@vub.ac.be [Department of Medical Sociology and Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103, B-1090, Brussels (Belgium); Interuniversity Centre for Health Economics Research (I-CHER), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate.

Alexander, D.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Agency/Company /Organization: Forest Trends, The Climate, Community and Biodiversity (CCB) Alliance, The Rainforest Alliance, Flora and Fauna International Partner: United Nations Development Programme, U.S. Agency for International Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.forest-trends.org/documents/files/doc_2436.pdf Cost: Free Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Screenshot References: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects[1]

218

The Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM): Technology share component  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The models described in this report are used to allocate total energy consumption in an energy end-use service area by fuel type (including electricity) within the Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM) framework. The primary objective of the DIAM is to provide energy consumption and expenditure forecasts for different population categories that are consistent with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) forecast, which is produced annually in the Annual Energy Outlook and periodically in support of DOE policy formulation and analysis. The models are multinominal logit models that have been estimated using EIA`s 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Three models were estimated: space heating share, water heating share, and cooking share. These models are used to allocate total end-use service consumption over different technologies defined by fuel type characteristics. For each of the end-use service categories, consumption shares are estimated for a subset of six fuel types: natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas, fuel oil/kerosene, wood, and other fuel.

Poyer, D.A.; Earl, E.; Bonner, B.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Assessment of impact of degree of automation on human roles: the experts' analysis using gaming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the two assessments performed to evaluate the impact of increasing levels of automation (LoA) on Human Factors aspects and the impact on their responsibilities and interactions. This activity has been developed within ... Keywords: ATM, assessment, automation, gaming, human factors

R. Casar, A. Arranz, B. Escribano, A. Grosskreutz, R. Garcia, R. Suikat, M. Jipp, G. D. R. Zon, M. Joosse

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Walking the sustainability assessment talk - Progressing the practice of environmental impact assessment (EIA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internationally there is a growing demand for environmental impact assessment (EIA) to move away from its traditional focus towards delivering more sustainable outcomes. South Africa is an example of a country where the EIA system seems to have embraced the concept of sustainability. In this paper we test the existing objectives for EIA in South Africa against sustainability principles and then critique the effectiveness of EIA practice in delivering these objectives. The outcome of the research suggests that notwithstanding a strong and explicit sustainability mandate through policy and legislation, the effectiveness of EIA practice falls far short of what is mandated. This shows that further legislative reform is not required to improve effectiveness but rather a focus on changing the behaviour of individual professionals. We conclude by inviting further debate on what exactly practitioners can do to give effect to sustainability in EIA practice.

Morrison-Saunders, Angus, E-mail: a.morrison-saunders@murdoch.edu.au [School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North West University (South Africa); School of Environmental Science, Murdoch University (Australia); Retief, Francois [School of Environmental Sciences and Development, North West University (South Africa)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 23, 2009 September 23, 2009 EIS-0407: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Abengoa Biorefinery Project near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas September 21, 2009 EIS-0435: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Conduct a Scoping Meeting Modification of the Groton Generation Station Interconnection Agreement, Brown County, South Dakota September 15, 2009 EIS-0434: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and to Conduct Scoping Meetings Hualapai Valley Solar Interconnection Project in Mohave County, Arizona July 30, 2009 EIS-0425: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Project, Chelan and Okanogan Counties, WA

222

Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H. Wiser Pagination 17 Date Published 062010 Institution LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department...

223

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 8, 2007 November 8, 2007 EIS-0382: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Mesaba Energy Project, Itasca, Minnesota October 17, 2007 EIS-0402: Advance Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory August 10, 2007 EIS-0400: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard-Windy Gap Substation Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Grand County, CO July 23, 2007 EIS-0375: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste August 31, 2006 EIS-0380: Notice to Extend Comment Period on the Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New

224

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 3, 2011 June 3, 2011 EIS-0435: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Groton Generation Station Interconnection Agreement, Brown County, South Dakota May 23, 2011 EIS-0460: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement FutureGen 2.0 Project, Morgan County, Illinois May 20, 2011 EIS-0471: Final Environmental Impact Statement Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho May 20, 2011 EIS-0471: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, Idaho May 20, 2011 EIS-0468: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement American Centrifuge Plant, Piketon, OH April 29, 2011 EIS-0350-S1: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplemental

225

Environmental Impact Statements and Environmental Assessments Status Chart  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 12, 2011 January 12, 2011 EIS-0407: Record of Decision Abengoa Biorefinery Project Near Hugoton, Stevens County, Kansas January 4, 2011 EIS-0450: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission Project in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada December 17, 2010 EIS-0455: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA December 17, 2010 EIS-0403: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States December 14, 2010 EIS-0459: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Hawai'i Interisland Renewable Energy Program December 10, 2010 EIS-0421: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

226

New Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Zealand-Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New Zealand Agency/Company /Organization New Zealand Ministry of the Environment Sector Energy, Climate Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Guide/manual Website http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publica Country New Zealand Australia and New Zealand References Climate Change Effects and Impacts Assessment: A Guidance Manual for Local Government in New Zealand [1] "This Guidance Manual: provides projections of future climate change around New Zealand compares these projections with present climate extremes and variations identifies potential effects on local government functions and

227

Environmental impact assessment of abnormal events: a follow-up study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Impact analyses included in environmental assessments for a selected nuclear power plant, petroleum storage facility, crude oil pipeline, and geopressure well that have experienced operational, abnormal events are compared with the data quantifying the environmental impacts of the events. Comparisons of predicted vs actual impacts suggests that prediction of the types of events and associated impacts could be improved; in some instances, impacts have been underestimated. Analysis of abnormal events is especially important in environmental assessment documents addressing a technology that is novel or unique to a particular area. Incorporation of abnormal event impact analysis into project environmental monitoring and emergency response plans can help improve these plans and can help reduce the magnitude of environmental impacts resulting from said events.

Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Lee, D.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 2: Assessment of health impacts; Final report  

SciTech Connect

The task 2 report compares the relative health and hazard impacts of EV battery recycling technologies. Task 2 compared the relative impact of recycling EV batteries in terms of cancer, toxicity, and ecotoxicological potential, as well as leachability, flammability, and corrosivity/reactivity hazards. Impacts were evaluated for lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride, sodium sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron sulfide and disulfide, lithium-polymer, lithium-ion, and zinc-air batteries. Health/hazard impacts were evaluated for recycling methods including smelting, electrowinning, and other appropriate techniques that apply to different battery technologies.

Unnasch, S.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the availability of hydro power has the greatest impact oncontribute to a redesigned hydro power supply system in thein 2050 (like all non-hydro power plants in this analysis,

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Life cycle assessment of concrete pavements : impacts and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concrete pavement network in the United States plays a crucial role in the economy by enabling the transport of people and goods, but it also leads to resource consumption and environmental impacts. This thesis is ...

Loijos, Alex (Alexander Nikos)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on RegionalAnalysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles, ANL/ESD/09-2,of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles, Volume 2: United States

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Baseload wind energy: modeling the competition betweenSystems Integrated with Wind Energy Resources in California,Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems, Environmental

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Environmental Economics, I. (2007) Wind Resources, Cost, andWind power planning: assessing long-term costs and benefits, Energy

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and sublittoral zones. The results include: (a) the exposure dose rates assessed by a car-borne scintillation spectrometry system; (b) laboratory measurements of the activity...

236

An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Elevated Natural Radioactivity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Assessment Of The External Radiological Impact In Areas Of Greece With Elevated Natural Radioactivity Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In the present study, the radiological impact assessment in three selected areas of elevated natural radioactivity in Greece is attempted, based on measurements, theoretical relations, and simple model application. These areas are Milos - an island of volcanic origin in Cyclades Archipelago, Ikaria - an island in the Eastern Aegean Sea and Loutraki - a coastal area in mainland Greece. These areas are characterized by their

237

Development of techniques for rapidly assessing the local air quality impacts of airports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combustion of fossil fuels for aviation activity harms air quality and human health near airports through the production of PM2.5. Currently, dispersion models can assess these local-scale (distances ~10 km) impacts, ...

Lee, Gideon (Gideon Luther)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

On the Development of Regional Climatic Scenarios for Policy-Oriented Climatic-Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review on the development of climatic scenarios related to policy-oriented assessment of the impact of climatic variations is presented. It seeks to provide background information needed to evaluate the extent to which existing regional ...

Peter J. Lamb

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Comparison of life cycle impact assessment tools in the case of biofuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) tools exist, each with different methodologies. These tools often provide different results, thus making it difficult for the LCA practitioner to determine which results yield the best or most likely estimate ...

Amy E. Landis; Thomas L. Theis

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE STUDIES USED TO DETECT IMPACTS TO MARINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts Thermal impacts occur as a result of discharging water used to cool the power plant back and Pittsburg Power Plants thermal effects assessment, 1991-1992. Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco Luis Obispo. 7 pp. Tenera (Tenera Environmental Sciences). 1997. Diablo Canyon Power Plant Thermal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Proposal of ontology for environmental impact assessment: An application with knowledge mobilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental impact assessment (EIA) analyses the effects of human activity, ecosystem integrity and the quality of the environmental services that can be provided by them. This analysis must be done prior to project execution in order to have a preventive ... Keywords: EIA, Environmental impact, Knowledge mobilization, OWL, Ontology

Julián Garrido; Ignacio Requena

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and R.H. Socolow (2007) Baseload wind energy: modeling theEfficiency Assessment of Baseload Wind Energy Systems,to more highly-utilized baseload plants with lower operating

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Assessment of the Value, Impact, and Validity of the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Suite of Models  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), use input-output methodology to estimate gross (not net) jobs and economic impacts of building and operating selected types of renewable electricity generation and fuel plants. This analysis provides the DOE with an assessment of the value, impact, and validity of the JEDI suite of models. While the models produce estimates of jobs, earnings, and economic output, this analysis focuses only on jobs estimates. This validation report includes an introduction to JEDI models, an analysis of the value and impact of the JEDI models, and an analysis of the validity of job estimates generated by JEDI model through comparison to other modeled estimates and comparison to empirical, observed jobs data as reported or estimated for a commercial project, a state, or a region.

Billman, L.; Keyser, D.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Assessing the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Radiative Impact of Clouds of the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth W. O'Hirok and P. Ricchiazzi Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California C. Gautier Department of Geography and Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Analysis from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) reveals that the global mean cloud optical depth is surprisingly low (i.e., Ď„ = 3.8). While this value is probably dominated by extensive fields of cirrus, the average for liquid water clouds is also likely smaller than expected. It is in this regime (Ď„ <10) where remote measurements of cloud optical thickness or liquid water path (LWP)

245

DOE issues Finding of No Significant Impact on Environmental Assessment for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

issues Finding of No Significant Impact on Environmental issues Finding of No Significant Impact on Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low Level Radioactive Waste Generated at Idaho Site DOE issues Finding of No Significant Impact on Environmental Assessment for Replacement Capability for Disposal of Remote-Handled Low Level Radioactive Waste Generated at Idaho Site December 21, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Tim Jackson 208-526-8484 Idaho Falls, ID - After completing a careful assessment, the U.S. Department of Energy has determined that building a new facility at its Idaho National Laboratory site for continued disposal of remote-handled low level radioactive waste generated by operations at the site will not have a significant impact on the environment. "A new disposal facility at INL for this type of waste will be built in a

246

An Integrated Approach Towards Environmental Impact Assessment Of Projects And Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monetary valuation of environmental impacts consist a highly complex matter. Several approaches and techniques have been employed over the last three decades in order to assess effectively environmental projects or policies, within the context of cost benefit analysis. The current paper demonstrates a concise description of the existing environmental impact appraisal methods and, simultaneously, a new combination of monetary valuation techniques applied in each potential receptor which intends to provide an innovative multiperspective assessment concerning future environmental projects. Key words: Environmental assessment, monetary valuation techniques, cost benefit analysis

Aravossis Konstantinos; Vassilios Karydis

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Assessing Vehicle Electricity Demand Impacts on California Electricity Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power planning: assessing long-term costs and benefits, Energy Policy,wind energy: modeling the competition between gas turbines and compressed air energy storage for supplemental generation, Energy Policy,wind or solar power will singularly provide a majority of renewable generation in a future with energy policies

McCarthy, Ryan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 17, 2012 October 17, 2012 V-004: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2012 October 2012 Critical Patch Update, security vulnerability fixes for proprietary components of Oracle Linux will be announced in Oracle Critical Patch Updates. October 16, 2012 V-003: Suse Update For Mozillafirefox - Critical An update that fixes 25 vulnerabilities is now available. October 12, 2012 V-001: Mozilla Security vulnerabilities Mozilla Firefox / Thunderbird / SeaMonkey Multiple Vulnerabilities October 10, 2012 U-278: Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for October 2012 Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for October 2012. Microsoft has posted 1 Critical Bulletins and 6 Important Bulletins. Bulletins with the Maximum Severity Rating and Vulnerability Impact of

249

Integrating health impact assessment into the triple bottom line concept  

SciTech Connect

This theoretical study explores the links between the Triple Bottom Line (TBL) concept and the principles of HIA and considers the potential role of HIA to provide a mechanism for integrating health concerns within a broader agenda of government and business. TBL is a framework linked to the broader sustainability agenda that underpins and reviews environmental, economic and social performance of organizations. In its simplest form, TBL acts as a tool for reporting to stakeholders/shareholders organizational performance and the nature of the impacts on the community. The links to HIA are clear as both seek to determine the impact (potential and actual) on the health and well-being of the population. The study found that TBL can operate at four levels within organizations ranging from reporting through to full integration with the organization's goals and practices. Health is narrowly defined and there are tensions about how to undertake the social accountability functions. The study shows the potential role for HIA within the broader policy and accountability agenda. As health is one of the main outcomes of an organization's activities it needs to be taken into account at all levels of activity.

Mahoney, Mary; Potter, Jenny-Lynn

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Preliminary assessment of the environmental impacts of the Satellite Power System (SPS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of the Satellite Power System (SPS) Microwave Power Transmission System (MPTS) as well as impacts related to other elements of the total SPS on the environment are being determined. The goal of these programs is to advance the state of knowledge by the year 1980 to the point where an assessment can be made of the probability and severity of the impacts of the SPS. Assessments will be made of the effects on the health and safety of the public, and occupationally involved personnel, and the ecology; the upper and lower atmosphere including climatological impacts; and on communications systems including electromagnetic compatibility, the effects of microwave heating of the ionosphere and magnetosphere, and the effects of F-layer depletion by launch vehicle and transport vehicle effluents. If the assessment indicates that the impacts are acceptable or that feasible mitigating strategies can be implemented and if other related assessments (the impact on society and a competitive comparison of the SPS with other energy alternatives) are favorable, a decision may be made to implement the development of the SPS related technologies. This paper identifies postulated effects and summarizes the research efforts to determine whether or not these effects will occur.

Halverson, S.L.; Rote, D.M.; Rush, C.M.; Davis, K.; White, M.; Cahill, D.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2012 September 13, 2012 U-259: RSA BSAFE SSL-C Lets Remote Users Decrypt SSL/TLS Traffic and SSL Buffer Overflow Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code RSA BSAFE SSL-C Multiple Vulnerabilities September 12, 2012 U-258: Adobe Flash Player Flaw Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. September 11, 2012 U-256: Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for September 2012 Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for September 2012. Microsoft has posted 0 Critical Bulletins and 2 Important Bulletins. Bulletins with the Maximum Severity Rating and Vulnerability Impact of "Critical" may allow remote execution of code. Microsoft is hosting a webcast to address customer questions on these bulletins on September 12,

252

JC3 Medium Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 24, 2011 February 24, 2011 T-564: Vulnerabilities in Citrix Licensing administration components The vulnerabilities impact all current versions of the Citrix Licensing Administration Console, formerly known as the License Management Console. February 23, 2011 T-563: Red Hat Directory Server Bugs Let Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges and Remote and Local Users Deny Service Several vulnerabilities were reported in Red Hat Directory Server. A local user can obtain elevated privileges on the target system. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. A local user can cause denial of service conditions. February 22, 2011 T-562: Novell ZENworks Configuration Management novell-tftp.exe Buffer Overflow A vulnerability has been reported in Novell ZENworks Configuration

253

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 10, 2012 July 10, 2012 U-209: Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for July 2012 Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for July 2012. Microsoft has posted 3 Critical Bulletins and 6 Important Bulletins. Bulletins with the Maximum Severity Rating and Vulnerability Impact of "Critical" may allow remote execution of code. Microsoft is hosting a webcast to address customer questions on these bulletins on July 11, 2012, at 11:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada). July 10, 2012 U-208: HP Operations Agent Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code Two vulnerabilities were reported in HP Operations Agent. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system July 2, 2012 U-203: HP Photosmart Bug Lets Remote Users Deny Service A vulnerability was reported in HP Photosmart. A remote user can cause

254

JC3 High Impact Assessment Bulletins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12, 2011 12, 2011 U-058: Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection Vulnerability Apache Struts Conversion Error OGNL Expression Injection Vulnerability. December 9, 2011 U-057: Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for December 2011 Microsoft Security Bulletin Advance Notification for December 2011. Microsoft has posted 3 Critical Bulletins and 11 Important bulletins. Bulletins with the Maximum Severity Rating and Vulnerability Impact of "Critical" may allow propagation of Internet worm without user action. Microsoft will host a webcast to address customer questions on the security bulletins on December 14, 2011, at 11:00 AM Pacific Time (US & Canada). December 8, 2011 U-055: Adobe Flash Player Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

255

Assessment of California reformulated gasoline impact on vehicle fuel economy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel economy data contained in the 1996 California Air Resources Board (CAROB) report with respect to the introduction of California Reformulated Gasoline (CaRFG) has been examined and reanalyzed by two additional statistical methodologies. Additional data has also been analyzed by these two statistical approaches. Within the assumptions of the analysis, point estimates for the reduction in fuel economy using CaRFG as compared to conventional, non-reformulated gasoline were 2-4 %, with a 95% upper confidence bound of 6 %. Substantial variations in fuel economy are routine and inevitable due to additional factors which affect mileage, even if there is no change in fuel reformulation. This additional analysis confirms the conclusion reached by CAROB with respect to the impact of CaRFG on fuel economy.

Aceves, S.; Glaser, R.; Richardson, J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Assessment of the global impact of aerosols on tropospheric oxidants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We present here a fully coupled global aerosol and chemistry model for the troposphere. The model is used to assess the interactions between aerosols and chemical oxidants in the troposphere, including (1) the conversion from gas-phase oxidants into the condensed phase during the formation of aerosols, (2) the heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surface of aerosols, and (3) the effect of aerosols on ultraviolet radiation and photolysis rates. The present study uses the global three-dimensional chemical/ transport model, Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 2 (MOZART-2), in which aerosols are coupled with the model. The model accounts for the presence of

Xuexi Tie; Sasha Madronich; Stacy Walters; David P. Edwards; Paul Ginoux; Natalie Mahowald; Renyi Zhang; Chao Lou; Guy Brasseur

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Kalina Geothermal Demonstration Project Steamboat Springs, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to provide the DOE and other public agency decision makers with the environmental documentation required to take informed discretionary action on the proposed Kalina Geothermal Demonstration project. The EA assesses the potential environmental impacts and cumulative impacts, possible ways to minimize effects associated with partial funding of the proposed project, and discusses alternatives to DOE actions. The DOE will use this EA as a basis for their decision to provide financial assistance to Exergy, Inc. (Exergy), the project applicant. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human or physical environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

258

Preliminary study assesses potential impact of seismic event at Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary study assesses potential impact of seismic event at Los Preliminary study assesses potential impact of seismic event at Los Alamos Preliminary study assesses potential impact of seismic event at Los Alamos New or proposed facilities are designed to meet the latest seismic response criteria. April 15, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

259

Impact of Electricity Deregulation on Industrial Assessment Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores many of the changes in typical industrial assessment recommendations, which have resulted from deregulation of the electric and gas industries. While anticipating that energy efficiency would almost always be a good idea, changes in rate structures and indeed the very nature of how energy is purchased can put some energy efficiency technologies outside of normal economically acceptable ranges. A major focus will be changes in and the elimination of time-of-use rates for electricity. An entire generation of DSM'ers (people working in "Demand-Side Management") worked under the principle that there was economic benefit to load leveling. Time-of-use rates are changing throughout the country and in many cases disappearing. Bulk purchase of electricity has even resulted in cases where, with minimum consumption requirements, industrial plants need to find ways to increase their electrical use to avoid penalties. Energy storage devices including thermal energy storage must be re-examined in terms of this new paradigm. There are applications where they are advisable, but for different reasons then demand management. Another area of particular interest is fuel selection, multiply fuel capability, and contracting. An industrial assessment at two neighboring plants can result in entirely different recommendations based on how energy is purchased and billed. In many cases, an industrial plant may be better off spending resources on energy purchasing agents as opposed to anything like an energy efficiency project. Onsite generation of power and the changing rationales for its adoption has also experienced big changes. Energy security is becoming a strong motivation for industrial plants, options are increased, and third party funding is also starting to appear. Intermediate solutions like gas driven compressors bring these two areas together and leave industrial clients with more options but often more confusion than ever before. Finally, the paper discusses some of the new challenges facing an industrial assessment team in terms of information gathering. It is becoming necessary to examine many possible energy purchase options and each has ramifications on energy efficiency projects. Use of the Internet, computer tools and other information sources is presented.

Kasten, D. J.; Muller, M. R.; Pavlovic, F.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Assessment Of The Wind Farm Impact On The Radar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study shows the means to evaluate the wind farm impact on the radar. It proposes the set of tools, which can be used to realise this objective. The big part of report covers the study of complex pattern propagation factor as the critical issue of the Advanced Propagation Model (APM). Finally, the reader can find here the implementation of this algorithm - the real scenario in Inverness airport (the United Kingdom), where the ATC radar STAR 2000, developed by Thales Air Systems, operates in the presence of several wind farms. Basically, the project is based on terms of the department "Strategy Technology & Innovation", where it has been done. Also you can find here how the radar industry can act with the problem engendered by wind farms. The current strategies in this area are presented, such as a wind turbine production, improvements of air traffic handling procedures and the collaboration between developers of radars and wind turbines. The possible strategy for Thales as a main pioneer was given as ...

Norman, Evgeny D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Environmental impact assessment practices in the sub-Saharan Africa: cases from Kenya  

SciTech Connect

The aim for this research is to review environmental impact assessment (EIA) practices in sub-Saharan Africa, drawing upon appropriate theoretical and methodological work on EIA. This study uses a comparative evaluation method to examine the extent of environmental impact assessment (EIA) in project analysis. It uses site and services low cost housing projects from Kenya. The research has three major components: (1) review of environmental practice in Sub-Saharan Africa through literature review and case studies; (2) review of general literature on EIA as practiced by international agencies and developed countries; and (3) formulation of more suitable guidelines for EIA procedures in Sub-Saharan Africa.

Ngunjiri, P.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Impact assessment and performance targets for lighting and envelope systems  

SciTech Connect

Electric lighting loads and cooling from solar heat gains and from lights are the two largest components of peak demand in commercial buildings. The most cost effective demand side management solutions are generally those that directly reduce or eliminate these loads. Existing technologies can provide modest reductions, however they are typically applied an a piecemeal manner that yields less than optimal results. The full potential of existing technologies will be realized when they are commercially available in an integrated package easily specifiable by architects and engineers. Emerging technologies can also be developed to provide even greater savings and extend the savings over a greater portion of the building floor area. This report assesses achievable energy and peak demand performance in California commercial buildings with technologies available today and in the future. We characterize energy performance over a large range of building envelope and lighting conditions, both through computer simulation models and through case study measured data, and subsequently determine reasonable energy targets if building design were further optimized with integrated systems of current or new technologies. Energy targets are derived from the study after consideration of industry priorities, design constraints, market forces, energy code influence, and the state of current building stock.

Sullivan, R.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act of 2002 requires Federal agencies to perform Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs), an analysis of how information is handled, in order: (i) to ensure handling conforms to......

264

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal agencies to perform Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs), an analysis of how information is handled, in order: (i) to ensure handling conforms to... http:energy.gov...

265

Assessing the impacts of tropical cyclone Tracy on residential building stock – 1974 and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tropical cyclone Tracy (Tracy) remains one of the most destructive natural hazard events in Australia’s history. Growth in the population and size of Darwin since 1974 makes it desirable to know what impact an event similar to Tracy would have on the present day built environment. To assess the impacts in 1974 and the present day, we apply the Tropical Cyclone Risk Model (TCRM) developed at Geoscience Australia. A parametric wind field generated by TCRM is applied to building damage models in an attempt to reproduce the widespread damage to residential structures associated with Tracy in 1974. Employing these models yields a mean damage estimate of 36 per cent of replacement cost across all residential building stock in Darwin — a figure lower than that determined by post-event damage assessments. The unaccounted impact of large windborne debris is one possible explanation for the discrepancy between the observed and simulated damage. Based on the satisfactory replication of the damage associated with the historical impacts of Tracy, the wind field is then applied to the current day residential building database in order to assess the impact of Tracy were it to strike Darwin in 2008. We find that the mean damage to Darwin for the same urban footprint as the 1974 analysis in the present day would be around five per cent. This represents an approximately 90 per cent reduction in the modelled damage, and a significant portion of this reduction can be attributed to building code improvements.

Anthony Schofield; Craig Arthur; Bob Cechet

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Regional Climate Simulations for Impact Assessment: Project to Intercompare Regional Climate Simulations (PIRCS) Interim Report -- 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project provides the first direct intercomparison of regional climate model predictions with observations, as a means to quantify the uncertainties in future predictions of climate change. Results from regional climate model simulations will be inputs to national and international assessments of possible future climate change and impacts due to increased emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group: Assessment of the IMPACTS-BRC Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To properly interpret values generated by the IMPACTS-BRC computer code, users need an awareness of its conservatisms, parameter sensitivities, and potential errors. A review of the code revealed some conservatism, documented the software's sensitivity to changes in modeling assumptions and parameter values, and assessed its accuracy in performing specified dose calculations.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

A network-based assessment approach for change impacts on complex product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complex product design is a continuously changing process from customer requirements to a maturity design. During this process a change of one part will, in most cases, causes changes in other parts and even the whole product. The assessment for ... Keywords: Change impacts, Change propagation, Changeability indices, Complex products, Networks

Hui Cheng; Xuening Chu

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Environmental Impact Assessment of Artificial Aggregate Systems Based on Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aggregates are food for construction industry and hydraulic and hydropower engineering, account for 80% of concrete. Now the number of artificial aggregate systems of being used and preparing to put into use is considerable, which calls for an efficient ... Keywords: Artificial Aggregate System, Environment Impact Assessment, Fuzzy Comprehensive evaluation

Qin Hongling; Meng Suimin; Zhou Xincong

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

New Madrid and Wabash Valley Seismic Study: Assessing the Impacts on Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Madrid and Wabash Valley Seismic Study: Assessing the Impacts on Natural Gas Transmission.S. Natural Gas Pipeline System Key Findings ­ New Madrid and Wabash Events Summary of Damages and Estimated Restoration Time Seismic Performance of Underground Storage Facilities Conclusions ­ Natural Gas Pipeline

Kemner, Ken

271

Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment Saheeb, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad-44000, Pakistan saheebk@ceme.nust.edu.pk Abstract. INTRODUCTION Pakistan has recently successfully completed the raising of Mangla dam, a major water works system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

Assessing climate change impacts on the near-term stability of the wind energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing climate change impacts on the near-term stability of the wind energy resource over- ble emissions of carbon dioxide. The wind energy resource is natu- rally a function of the climate, leading some to question the continued viability of the wind energy industry. Here we briefly articulate

Pryor, Sara C.

273

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE FUTURE LOCATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2002 DOEIEA-1438 . 30, 2002 DOEIEA-1438 . FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE FUTURE LOCATION OF HEAT SOURCEfRADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM: ASSEMBLY AND TEST OPERATIONS CURRENTLY LOCATED AT THE MOUND SITE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Reat SourcelRadioisotope Power System Assembly and Test Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute' a major Federal action significantly affecting the

274

Evaluating the use of Social Impact Assessment in the context of agricultural development projects in Iran  

SciTech Connect

The utilisation of Social Impact Assessment (SIA) in Iran is analysed in terms of its policy context and its application in practice. Five case studies where SIA was employed in conjunction with Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) for agricultural development projects are evaluated. In addition, the performance of the policy context is assessed. This research revealed that there are legal and institutional constraints to the effective functioning of SIA in Iran, and that there are deficiencies in the operating guidelines. There were serious problems associated with the way SIA was undertaken in all five case studies. Recommendations to improve the policy framework for the conduct of SIA are made. The recommendations advocate for a higher profile of SIA within legislation, for social issues to have greater emphasis in official guidelines for the conduct of EIA and SIA, and for a range of measures to increase the professionalism of SIA practice.

Ahmadvand, Mostafa, E-mail: ahmadvand_2000@yahoo.co [Faculty of Agriculture, Yasuj University, Yasuj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karami, Ezatollah, E-mail: ekarami@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, Gholam Hossein, E-mail: zamani@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Extension and Education, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: Frank.Vanclay@utas.edu.a [Tasmanian Institute of Agricultural Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 4: Environmental Impact Assessment Approach, Assumptions, and Methodology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 4 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT APPROACH, ASSUMPTIONS, AND METHODOLOGY This EIS evaluates potential impacts on human health and the natural environment from building and operating a DUF 6 conversion facility at three alternative locations at the Paducah site and for a no action alternative. These impacts might be positive, in that they would improve conditions in the human or natural environment, or negative, in that they would cause a decline in those conditions. This chapter provides an overview of the methods used to estimate the potential impacts associated with the EIS alternatives, summarizes the major assumptions that formed the basis of the evaluation, and provides some background information on human health

276

Value impact assessment: A preliminary assessment of improvement opportunities at the Quantico Central Heating Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a preliminary assessment of opportunities for improvement at the US Marine Corps (USMC) Quantico, Virginia, Central Heating Plant (CHP). This study is part of a program intended to provide the CHP staff with a computerized Artificial Intelligence (AI) decision support system that will assist in a more efficient, reliable, and safe operation of their plant. As part of the effort to provide the AI decision support system, a team of six scientists and engineers from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) visited the plant to characterize the conditions and environment of the CHP. This assessment resulted in a list of potential performance improvement opportunities at the CHP. In this report, 12 of these opportunities are discussed and qualitatively analyzed. 70 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Brambley, M.R.; Weakley, S.A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Privacy Impact Assessment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Privacy Impact Assessment Privacy Impact Assessment Name of Project: Web Domains Maintained by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) Bureau: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Project's Unique ID: N/A Contact Information: [Mailing address for 1 through 5 below is: DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831.] Who is the person completing this document? (Name, title, organization, and contact information.) Valerie S. Allen, Technical Information Specialist allenv@osti.gov, Telephone 865-576-3469 Who is the system owner? (Name, organization, and contact information.) Judy C. Gilmore, OSTI Acting Assistant Director for Program Integration gilmorej@osti.gov, Telephone 865-576-5600 Who is the system manager for this system or application? (Name,

278

Methodology for the Assessment of the Macroeconomic Impacts of Stricter CAF. Standards  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

For For a full documentation of the macroeconomic linkage refer to "Model Documentation Report: Macroeconomic Activity Module (MAM) of the National Energy Modeling System," January 2002 found on the EIA web site at http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/FTPROOT/modeldoc/m065(2002).pdf Methodology for the Assessment of the Macroeconomic Impacts of Stricter CAFÉ Standards This assessment of the economic impacts of CAFÉ standards marks the first time EIA has used the new direct linkage of the DRI-WEFA Macroeconomic Model to NEMS in a policy setting. This methodology assures an internally consistent solution between the energy market concepts forecast by NEMS and the aggregate economy as forecast by the DRI-WEFA Macroeconomic Model of the U.S. Economy. While we refer to DRI- WEFA model as a macro model, the full DRI-WEFA model forecasts more than 1600 detailed concepts covering

279

Framework for Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection for Nonproliferation Impact Assessments.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a framework for proliferation resistance and physical protection evaluation for the fuel cycle systems envisioned in the expansion of nuclear power for electricity generation. The methodology is based on an approach developed as part of the Generation IV technical evaluation framework and on a qualitative evaluation approach to policy factors similar to those that were introduced in previous Nonproliferation Impact Assessments performed by DOE.

Bari,R.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Assessing impacts of climate change on forests: The state of biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rauscher, H.M. [Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MI (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

Geothermal Environmental Impact Assessment: Subsurface Environmental Assessment for Four Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal systems are described for Imperial Valley and The Geysers, California; Klamath Falls, Oregon; and the Rio Grande Rift Zone, New Mexico; including information on location, area, depth, temperature, fluid phase and composition, resource base and status of development. The subsurface environmental assessment evaluates potential groundwater degradation, seismicity and subsidence. A general discussion on geothermal systems, pollution potential, chemical characteristics of geothermal fluids and environmental effects of geothermal water pollutants is presented as background material. For the Imperial Valley, all publicly available water quality and location data for geothermal and nongeothermal wells in and near the East Mesa, Salton Sea, Heber, Brawley, Dunes and Glamis KGRAs have been compiled and plotted. The geothermal fluids which will be reinjected range in salinity from a few thousand to more than a quarter million ppm. Although Imperial Valley is a major agricultural center, groundwater use in and near most of these KGRAs is minimal. Extensive seismicity and subsidence monitoring networks have been established in this area of high natural seismicity and subsidence. The vapor-dominated Geysers geothermal field is the largest electricity producer in the world. Groundwater in this mountainous region flows with poor hydraulic continuity in fractured rock. Ground and surface water quality is generally good, but high boron concentrations in hot springs and geothermal effluents is of significant concern; however, spent condensate is reinjected. High microearthquake activity is noted around the geothermal reservoir and potential subsidence effects are considered minimal. In Klamath Falls, geothermal fluids up to 113 C (235 F) are used for space heating, mostly through downhole heat exchangers with only minor, relatively benign, geothermal fluid being produced at the surface. Seismicity is low and is not expected to increase. Subsidence is not recognized. Of all geothermal occurrences in the Rio Grande Rift, the Valles Caldera is currently of primary interest. injection of geothermal effluent from hydrothermal production wells should remove any hydrologic hazard due to some potentially noxious constituents. Waters circulating in the LASL Hot Dry Rock experiment are potable. Seismic effects are expected to be minimal. Subsidence effects could develop.

Sanyal, Subir; Weiss, Richard

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Making communities safer from crime: An undervalued element in impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crime and safety are significant issues for individuals, communities and businesses but they have tended to be undervalued elements in the consideration of social impacts in impact assessment theory and practice. It has been argued that crime is a form of pollution and an externality of development. In principle, the precautionary impact assessment family of approaches should be very useful here. The paper explores first the coverage of crime and safety issues in both the longer history of EIA, followed by the much shorter history of SEA and Sustainability Appraisal (SA). It then considers several key issues for advancing better practice. These include: the recognition of the lifecycles of projects and plans and the relevant dimensions of the local safety and crime baseline; the need to employ meaningful data, including 'fear of crime' considerations; and the consideration of innovative approaches to the use of indicators. Evidence and theories from the field of environmental criminology are presented as crucial to understanding crime and its association with land-use. The paper concludes with an exploration of appropriate mitigation measures for anticipating and designing out crime. Examples draw in particular on evolving practice in the UK and Australia.

Glasson, John, E-mail: jglasson@brookes.ac.u [Oxford Brookes University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Cozens, Paul [Curtin University, Perth (Australia)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Preliminary assessment of the impact of commercial aircraft on local air quality in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the impact of aircraft emissions on local air quality by performing two analyses: an assessment of U.S. commercial aircraft contribution to county budgets of primary pollutants in nonattainment areas, ...

Ratliff, Gayle L. (Gayle Lois)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

An assessment of the potential environmental impact of electric and hybrid-electric vehicles in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in environmental and air quality problems due to continued growth in automobile population and usage have prompted many states including Texas to consider the implementation of an alternative vehicle program to alleviate these problems. Given the need for such programs, there has been minimal research conducted in analyzing the potential impacts of alternative vehicles, namely electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). This research addresses the need for assessing the potential environmental impacts of alternative vehicles for the state of Texas. The main contributions of this research are the derivation of emission rates for EVs that are representative of Texas, and an analysis of the potential impact of various alternative vehicle programs incorporating EVs and HEVS. Specifically, emission inventory results from various alternative vehicle Scenarios were compared to a Baseline Scenario with conventional vehicles, in order to measure the relative benefits of each program. Emission inventories were generated by standard EPA procedure using Mobile5b. Two major findings of this research were the negative impact of EVs on NO,, Emissions and the HEVs superior Emissions performance for all the three pollutants addressed in this study. Based on the research findings, the use of HEVs as an alternative vehicle for the state of Texas is recommended.

Kim, Jung-Woo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

SciTech Connect

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be used to assist carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) planners to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and avoid unintended environmental trade-offs. LCA is an analytical framework for determining environmental impacts resulting from processes, products, and services. All life cycle stages are evaluated including raw material sourcing, processing, operation, maintenance, and component end-of-life, as well as intermediate stages such as transportation. In recent years a growing number of LCA studies have analyzed CCS systems. We reviewed 50+ LCA studies, and selected 11 studies that compared the environmental performance of 23 electric power plants with and without CCS. Here we summarize and interpret the findings of these studies. Regarding overall climatemitigation effectiveness of CCS, we distinguish between the capture percentage of carbon in the fuels, the net carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction, and the net GHG emission reduction. We also identify trade-offs between the climate benefits and the potential increased non-climate impacts of CCS. Emissions of non-CO2 flue gases such as NOx may increase due to the greater throughput of fuel, and toxicity issues may arise due to the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) capture solvent, resulting in ecological and human health impacts. We discuss areas where improvements in LCA data or methods are needed. The decision to implement CCS should be based on knowledge of the overall environmental impacts of the technologies, not just their carbon capture effectiveness. LCA will be an important tool in providing that knowledge.

Sathre, Roger; Masanet, Eric; Cain, Jennifer; Chester, Mikhail

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Billy Shaw Dam and Reservoir : Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impacts.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This notice announces BPA`s decision to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of the Billy Shaw Dam and Reservoir on the Duck Valley Reservation. This project is part of a continuing effort to address system-wide fish and wildlife losses caused by the development of the hydropower system in the Columbia River Basin. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the potential environmental impacts of the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the Proposed Action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Shoshone-Paiute Tribes of the Duck Valley Reservation, Nevada.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Super-Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation volume 2: Preliminary impact and market transformation assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) is a collaborative utility program intended to transform the market for energy-efficient and environmentally friendly refrigerators. It is one of the first examples of a large-scale {open_quotes}market transformation{close_quotes} energy efficiency program. This report documents the preliminary impact and market transformation evaluation of SERP ({open_quotes}the Program{close_quotes}). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this evaluation for the U.S. Department of Energy. This study focuses on the preliminary impact evaluation and market transformation assessment, but also presents limited process evaluation information. It is based on interviews with refrigerator dealers and manufacturers, interviews with utility participants, industry data, and information from the Program administrators. Results from this study complement those from prior process evaluation also conducted by PNNL. 42 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Lee, A.D.; Conger, R.L.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program, a small-scale production initiative designed to increase numbers of a weak but potentially recoverable population of spring chinook salmon in the Tucannon River in the State of Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-l326) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

N /A

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction Feasibility Project : Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund research for 2 to 3 years on the feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon into mid-Columbia River basin tributaries. The research would take place in the Methow and Wenatchee river basins in Chelan and Okanogan Counties, Washington. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1282) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and BPA is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation; Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Appropriate Methodology for Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 Interest in wind power development is growing as a means of expanding local economies. Such development holds promise as a provider of short-term employment during facility construction and long-term employment from ongoing facility operation and maintenance. It may also support some expansion of the local economy through ripple effects resulting from initial increases in jobs and income. However, there is a need for a theoretically sound method for assessing the economic impacts of wind power development. These ripple effects stem from subsequent expenditures for goods and services made possible by first-round income from the development, and are expressed in terms of a multiplier. If the local economy offers a wide range of goods and services the resulting multiplier can be substantial--as much as three or four. If not, then much of the initial income will leave the local economy to buy goods and services from elsewhere. Loss of initial income to other locales is referred to as a leakage. Northwest Economic Associates (NEA), under contract to the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC), investigated three case study areas in the United States where wind power projects were recently developed. The full report, ''Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power,'' is available at NWCC's website http://www.nationalwind.org/. The methodology used for that study is summarized here in order to provide guidance for future studies of the economic impacts of other wind power developments. The methodology used in the NEA study was specifically designed for these particular case study areas; however, it can be generally applied to other areas. Significant differences in local economic conditions and the amount of goods and services that are purchased locally as opposed to imported from outside the will strongly influence results obtained. Listed below are some of the key tasks that interested parties should undertake to develop a reasonable picture of local economic impacts that may accrue from existing or future wind development.

NWCC Economic Development Work Group

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

292

Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HABITAT EVALUATION: HABITAT EVALUATION: GUIDANCE FOR THE REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTS EPA Contract No. 68-C0-0070 work Assignments B-21, 1-12 January 1993 Submitted to: Jim Serfis U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Federal Activities 401 M Street, SW Washington, DC 20460 Submitted by: Mark Southerland Dynamac Corporation The Dynamac Building 2275 Research Boulevard Rockville, MD 20850 CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION ... ...... .... ... ................................................. 1 Habitat Conservation .......................................... 2 Habitat Evaluation Methodology ................................... 2 Habitats of Concern ........................................... 3 Definition of Habitat ..................................... 4

293

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-S-26 Crib, 200 West Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 216-S-26 Crib on groundwater quality. The 216-S-26 Crib, located in the southern 200 West Area, has been in use since 1984 to dispose of liquid effluents from the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The 222-S Laboratory Complex effluent stream includes wastewater from four sources: the 222-S Laboratory, the 219-S Waste Storage Facility, the 222-SA Chemical Standards Laboratory, and the 291-S Exhaust Fan Control House and Stack. Based on assessment of groundwater chemistry and flow data, contaminant transport predictions, and groundwater chemistry data, the 216-S-26 Crib has minimal influence on groundwater contamination in the southern 200 West Area.

Lindberg, J.W.; Evelo, S.D.; Alexander, D.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Assessing the Impact of NGO Advocacy Campaigns on World Bank Projects and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projects with actual socěal impact on the ground. Some Bankdepending on their varied social impact and rhe degree tocise), ronmental and social impacts, were due exclusively to

Fox, Jonathan A; Brown, L. David

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Health impact assessment: A comparison of 45 local, national, and international guidelines  

SciTech Connect

This article provides a comparison of health impact assessment (HIA) guidelines from around the world and for multiple geographic scales. We identify commonalities and differences within HIA guides to discuss the plausibility of consensus guidelines and to inform guideline development. The practice of HIA has grown over the last two decades with a concurrent growth of HIA guides. This study expands on earlier review work and includes guides published since 2007 (Mindell, Boltong and Forde, 2008). From April 2010 to October 2011, 45 HIA guides were identified through an internet search and review of previous research. Common characteristics, key features, and the HIA process were analyzed. The 45 documents recommended similar but not identical processes for conducting HIAs. These analyses suggest that guidelines for HIAs are similar in many areas of the world and that new HIA practitioners can use these findings to inform their approach. Further discussion is needed to determine if the approaches established in these guidelines are followed and if one set of common guidelines could be written for use in numerous countries and regions. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze 45 health impact assessment (HIA) guidelines worldwide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine similarities and unique attributes of each guideline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of developing consensus guidelines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identifying additional guidelines aides in future HIA work and evaluation.

Hebert, Katherine A., E-mail: jsx3@cdc.gov; Wendel, Arthur M., E-mail: dvq6@cdc.gov; Kennedy, Sarah K., E-mail: heaton.sarah@gmail.com; Dannenberg, Andrew L., E-mail: adannenberg2@gmail.com

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

ABSTRACT The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Disaster: A Graphical Assessment of its Impact on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill occurred in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010. Considered the largest accidental marine oil spill in history, oil flowed for three months and approximately five million barrels of oil spilled through by mid-July 2010. In this report, we analyse fish and bird data to assess the impact of the oil spill on the Gulf wildlife. Our findings based on the available fish data for 2005, 2006, and 2010 are not very helpful to make a judgement on the negative impact of the oil spill on fish species. On the other hand, the bird data analysis shows that the closer the surface oil spill area approached to bird habitats, the more dead birds were observed. The highest number of dead birds was observed in July and August when birds bred and raised their offspring. However, the migration behaviour of different bird species makes it impossible to entirely estimate the full impact of the oil spill on birds. (362 pages) iii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank my advisor Dr. Jürgen Symanzik for spending countless hours in assistance and guidance over the completion of this project. His wisdom,

Anvar Suyundikov; Dr. Jürgen Symanzik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Effective use of environmental impact assessments (EIAs) for geothermal development projects  

SciTech Connect

Both the developed and developing nations of the world would like to move toward a position of sustainable development while paying attention to the restoration of natural resources, improving the environment, and improving the quality of life. The impacts of geothermal development projects are generally positive. It is important, however, that the environmental issues associated with development be addressed in a systematic fashion. Drafted early in the project planning stage, a well-prepared Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) can significantly add to the quality of the overall project. An EIA customarily ends with the decision to proceed with the project. The environmental analysis process could be more effective if regular monitoring, detailed in the EIA, continues during project implementation. Geothermal development EIAs should be analytic rather than encyclopedic, emphasizing the impacts most closely associated with energy sector development. Air quality, water resources and quality, geologic factors, and socioeconomic issues will invariably be the most important factors. The purpose of an EIA should not be to generate paperwork, but to enable superb response. The EIA should be intended to help public officials make decisions that are based on an understanding of environmental consequences and take proper actions. The EIA process has been defined in different ways throughout the world. In fact, it appears that no two countries have defined it in exactly the same way. Going hand in hand with the different approaches to the process is the wide variety of formats available. It is recommended that the world geothermal community work towards the adoption of a standard. The Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)(OLADE, 1993) prepared a guide that presents a comprehensive discussion of the environmental impacts and suggested mitigation alternatives associated with geothermal development projects. The OLADE guide is a good start for providing the geothermal community a standard EIA format. As decision makers may only read the Executive Summary of the EIA, this summary should be well written and present the significant impacts (in order of importance), clarifying which are unavoidable and which are irreversible; the measures which can be taken to mitigate them; the cumulative effects of impacts; and the requirements for monitoring and supervision. Quality plans and Public Participation plans should also be included as part of the environmental analysis process.

Goff, S.J.

2000-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Impact assessment of draft DOE Order 5820.2B. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a revision to DOE Order 5820.2A, entitled ``Radioactive Waste Management.`` DOE issued DOE Order 5820.2A in September 1988 and, as the title implies, it covered only radioactive waste forms. The proposed draft order, entitled ``Waste Management,`` addresses the management of both radioactive and nonradioactive waste forms. It also includes spent nuclear fuel, which DOE does not consider a waste. Waste forms covered include hazardous waste, high-level waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level radioactive waste, uranium and thorium mill tailings, mixed waste, and sanitary waste. The Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program (TSP) of Leached Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) is facilitating the revision of this order. The EM Regulatory Compliance Division (EM-331) has requested that TSP estimate the impacts and costs of compliance with the revised order. TSP requested Dames & Moore to aid in this assessment by comparing requirements in Draft Order 5820.2B to ones in DOE Order 5820.2A and other DOE orders and Federal regulations. The assessment started with a draft version of 5820.2B dated January 14, 1994. DOE has released three updated versions of the draft order since then (dated May 20, 1994; August 26, 1994; and January 23, 1995). Each time DOE revised the order, Dames and Moore updated the assessment work to reflect the text changes. This report reflects the January 23, 1995 version of the draft order.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

SR/OIAF/2000-04 Accelerated Depletion: Assessing Its Impacts  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Accelerated Depletion: Assessing Its Impacts on Domestic Oil and Natural Gas Prices and Production July 2000 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requester. Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy

300

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

A. Petraglia; C. Sabbarese; M. De Cesare; N. De Cesare; F. Quinto; F. Terrasi; A. D'Onofrio; P. Steier; L. K. Fifield; A. M. Esposito

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Organizational change and environmental impact assessment at the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand: 1972--1988  

SciTech Connect

This study examines the influence of leadership, political entrepreneurship, and organizational change on the institutionalization of environmental impact assessment (EIA). The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) initiated EIA activities earlier and more comprehensively than most developing countries. How and why were EIA activities pursued? Part of the explanation for EGAT`s EIA activities involves external controls exerted by the World Bank, the Thai government, and concerned citizens. However, an explanation based on external factors alone overlooks the significant influence of internal forces and entrepreneurial activities within EGAT. Their analysis of EIA Adoption at EGAT reveals three factors that can contribute to the successful implementation of EIA: (1) mutually reinforcing support for EIA from both inside and outside a development agency, (2) political entrepreneurship by agency staff that are concerned about the environment and (3) the transformation of power relationships within the agency by environmental professionals.

Shepherd, A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States); Ortolano, L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning nuclear power plant in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assessment of the radiological impact of a decommissioning Nuclear Power Plant is presented here through the results of an environmental monitoring survey carried out in the area surrounding the Garigliano Power Plant. The levels of radioactivity in soil, water, air and other environmental matrices are shown, in which {\\alpha}, {\\beta} and {\\gamma} activity and {\\gamma} equivalent dose rate are measured. Radioactivity levels of the samples from the Garigliano area are analyzed and then compared to those from a control zone situated more than 100 km away. Moreover, a comparison is made with a previous survey held in 2001. The analyses and comparisons show no significant alteration in the radiological characteristics of the area surroundings the plant, with an overall radioactivity depending mainly from the global fallout and natural sources.

Petraglia, A; De Cesare, M; De Cesare, N; Quinto, F; Terrasi, F; D'Onofrio, A; Steier, P; Fifield, L K; Esposito, A M; 10.1051/radiopro/2012010

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Participatory health impact assessment for the development of local government regulation on hazard control  

SciTech Connect

The Thai Public Health Act 1992 required the Thai local governments to issue respective regulations to take control of any possible health-hazard related activities, both from commercial and noncommercial sources. Since 1999, there has been centrally decentralized of power to a new form of local government establishment, namely Sub-district Administrative Organization (SAO). The SAO is asmall-scale local governing structure while its legitimate function is for community services, including control of health impact related activities. Most elected SAO administrators and officers are new and less experience with any of public health code of practice, particularly on health-hazard control. This action research attempted to introduce and apply a participatory health impact assessment (HIA) tool for the development of SAO health-hazard control regulation. The study sites were at Ban Meang and Kok See SAOs, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand, while all intervention activities conducted during May 2005-April 2006. A set of cooperative activities between researchers and community representatives were planned and organized by; surveying and identifying place and service base locally causing local environmental health problems, organizing community participatory workshops for drafting and proposing the health-hazard control regulation, and appropriate practices for health-hazard controlling measures. This action research eventually could successfully enable the SAO administrators and officers understanding of local environmental-related health problem, as well as development of imposed health-hazard control regulation for local community.

Inmuong, Uraiwan, E-mail: uraiwan@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rithmak, Panee, E-mail: panrit@kku.ac.t [Department of Environmental Health Science, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University (Thailand); Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Thailand 123 Mittrapharb Road, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Srisookwatana, Soomol, E-mail: soomol.s@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Traithin, Nathathai, E-mail: nathathai.t@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand); Maisuporn, Pornpun, E-mail: pornpun.m@anamai.mail.go.t [Public Health Law Administration Center, Department of Health, Ministry of Public Health (Thailand)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

NGFAST: a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U.S. state borders and import points  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. ...

Edgar C. Portante; Brian A. Craig; Stephen M. Folga

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Health impact assessment research and practice: A place for paradigm positioning?  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we provide a critical review of the place of paradigm in health impact assessment (HIA) research and practice. We contend that most HIA practitioners have given insufficient attention to paradigm positioning when developing and applying HIA methodologies and that some concerns about current HIA practice can be attributed to this. We review HIA literature to assess the extent and nature of attention given to paradigm positioning and these related concerns. We then respond to our critique by exploring the implications, opportunities and challenges of adopting a critical realist paradigm, which we believe has the potential to help HIA practitioners to develop HIA methodology in a way that addresses these issues. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide a critical review of the place of paradigm in HIA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate that HIA practitioners give insufficient attention to paradigm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The implications, opportunities and challenges of adopting a critical realist paradigm are explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first paper, to our knowledge, that discusses a critical realist approach to HIA.

Haigh, Fiona, E-mail: f.haigh@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation (CHETRE), Part of the UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Harris, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation (CHETRE), Part of the UNSW Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Haigh, Neil, E-mail: neil.haigh@aut.ac.nz [Research and Scholarship Development, Centre for Learning and Teaching, AUT University, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF TOA PARTITIONING ON DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY  

SciTech Connect

An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of increasing the amount of TOA in the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon of the current solvent limit (150 ppm) in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would be about 7% higher and the nonvolatile hydrogen would be 2% higher than the actual current solvent (126 ppm) with an addition of up to 3 ppm of TOA when the concentration of Isopar? L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm and the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle. Therefore, the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 3 ppm of TOA in the effluent based on these assumptions. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

Daniel, G.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Impact of the Texas A&M University- Kingsville's Industrial Assessment Center in South Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) was established at Texas A&M University-Kingsville in November 1993 by the U. S. Department of Energy. The Center is managed by the University City Science Center, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. During the period of November, 93 through July, 96 the Center conducted 65 energy audits of small and medium sized manufacturing plants in South Texas. The Center's chief purpose is to serve the energy and waste related needs of small and medium sized manufacturers. The findings were reported to the manufacturers, together with estimates of their savings, implementation costs, and payback periods. By the end of July, 1996, the center had performed 65 industrial survey and had recommended over 388 Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) and 53 Waste Minimization Opportunities (WMOs). During this time, the IAC estimated energy savings totaled 158,906 MMBtu/year (7.6 percent of total energy usage) for a total savings of over $1.89 million (9.3 percent of total energy costs). The waste assessment audits have estimated a total of $1.14 million in waste reductions costs (10.5 percent of total waste related costs). This paper describes the Center, its mission, and its impact in South Texas. The estimated average savings per plant including energy and waste reductions was approximately $81,030/yr.

Medina, M. A.; Elkassabgi, Y.; Farahmand, K.; Bhalavat, M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Assessment of the Impacts of Standards and Labeling Programs in Mexico (four products).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the impacts of standards in Mexico 0. EXECUTIVE SUMMARYAssessment of the impacts of standards in Mexico TABLE OFSUMMARY INTRODUCTION STANDARDS ANALYZED METHODOLOGY 3.1.

Sanchez, Itha; Pulido, Henry; McNeil, Michael A.; Turiel, Isaac; della Cava, Mirka

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with outside organizations. Because changes in the Arctic environment are happening so rapidly, a successful program will be one that can adapt very quickly to new information as it becomes available, and can provide decision makers with projections on the 1-5 year time scale over which the most disruptive, high-consequence changes are likely to occur. The greatest short-term impact would be to initiate exploratory simulations to discover new emergent and robust phenomena associated with one or more of the following changing systems: Arctic hydrological cycle, sea ice extent, ocean and atmospheric circulation, permafrost deterioration, carbon mobilization, Greenland ice sheet stability, and coastal erosion. Sandia can also contribute to new technology solutions for improved observations in the Arctic, which is currently a data-sparse region. Sensitivity analyses have the potential to identify thresholds which would enable the collaborative development of 'early warning' sensor systems to seek predicted phenomena that might be precursory to major, high-consequence changes. Much of this work will require improved regional climate models and advanced computing capabilities. Socio-economic modeling tools can help define human and national security consequences. Formal uncertainty quantification must be an integral part of any results that emerge from this work.

Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Landscape futures analysis: Assessing the impacts of environmental targets under alternative spatial policy options and future scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental targets are often used in planning for sustainable agricultural landscapes but their impacts are rarely known. In this paper we introduce landscape futures analysis as a method which combines linear programming optimisation with scenario ... Keywords: Futures analysis, GIS, Integrated assessment, Landscape planning, Optimisation, Regional, Scenarios

Brett A. Bryan; Neville D. Crossman; Darran King; Wayne S. Meyer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Spatial Structural and Statistical Approach to Building Classification of Residential Function for City-Scale Impact Assessment Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to implement robust climate change adaption and mitigation strategies in cities fine spatial scale information on building stock is required. However, for many cities such information is rarely available. In response, we present a methodology ... Keywords: City Spatial Planning and Impact Assessment, Morphological and Spatial Metrics, Multinomial Logistic Regression, Residential Building Classification

Dimitrios P. Triantakonstantis; Stuart L. Barr

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Finding of No Significant Impact Environmental Assessment for The Ohio State University, Ohio 4-H center with Green Building Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Golden Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 December 27, 2006 DOE/EA 1571 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT For The Ohio State University, Ohio 4-H Center with Green Building Technologies AGENCY: Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The US Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an Environmental Assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of the Ohio State University (OSU) 4-H Center with Green Building Technologies in Franklin County, Ohio. Based on action by the U.S. Congress, DOE has funding available to support the construction phase of two features within the Ohio 4-H Center designed for energy efficiency: 1) A hybrid geothermal/cooling tower heating, ventilating, and cooling (HVAC) system, and,

313

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

Yde, Chris A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Environmental impacts of lighting technologies - Life cycle assessment and sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

With two regulations, 244/2009 and 245/2009, the European Commission recently put into practice the EuP Directive in the area of lighting devices, aiming to improve energy efficiency in the domestic lighting sector. This article presents a comprehensive life cycle assessment comparison of four different lighting technologies: the tungsten lamp, the halogen lamp, the conventional fluorescent lamp and the compact fluorescent lamp. Taking advantage of the most up-to-date life cycle inventory database available (ecoinvent data version 2.01), all life cycle phases were assessed and the sensitivity of the results for varying assumptions analysed: different qualities of compact fluorescent lamps (production phase), different electricity mixes (use phase), and end-of-life scenarios for WEEE recycling versus municipal solid waste incineration (disposal phase). A functional unit of 'one hour of lighting' was defined and the environmental burdens for the whole life cycle for all four lamp types were calculated, showing a clearly lower impact for the two gas-discharge lamps, i.e. the fluorescent and the compact fluorescent lamp. Differences in the product quality of the compact fluorescent lamps reveal to have only a very small effect on the overall environmental performance of this lamp type; a decline of the actual life time of this lamp type doesn't result in a change of the rank order of the results of the here examined four lamp types. It was also shown that the environmental break-even point of the gas-discharge lamps is reached long before the end of their expected life-span. All in all, it can be concluded that a change from today's tungsten lamp technology to a low-energy-consuming technology such as the compact fluorescent lamp results in a substantial environmental benefit.

Welz, Tobias; Hischier, Roland, E-mail: Roland.Hischier@empa.ch; Hilty, Lorenz M.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability  

SciTech Connect

An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

Daniel, W. E.

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

316

Health impact assessment in Australia: A review and directions for progress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides an overview of Health Impact Assessment (HIA) within Australia. We discuss the development and current position of HIA and offer some directions for HIA's progression. Since the early 1990s HIA activity in Australia has increased and diversified in application and practice. This article first highlights the emergent streams of HIA practice across environmental, policy and health equity foci, and how these have developed within Australia. The article then provides summaries of current practice provided by each Australian state and territory. We then offer some insight into current issues that require further progression or resolution if HIA is to progress effectively in Australia. This progress rests both on developing broad system support for HIA across government, led by the health sector, and developing system capacity to undertake, commission or review HIAs. We argue that a unified and clear HIA approach is required as a prerequisite to gaining the understanding and support for HIA in the public and private sectors and the wider community.

Harris, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.harris@unsw.edu.a [Research Fellow, Centre for Health Equity Training, Research and Evaluation, Part of the Centres for Primary Health Care and Equity, UNSW, Locked Mail Bag 7103, Liverpool BC, NSW 1871 (Australia); Spickett, Jeff, E-mail: J.Spickett@curtin.edu.a [WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health Impact Assessment, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987 Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Using biodiversity methods to assess the impacts of oil and gas development in tropical rain forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas development in tropical rain forests has attracted international attention because of the potentially adverse effects on the forest ecosystems. Biodiversity is a topic of particular concern, but is difficult to assess for small areas of disturbance. In July 1992 we used light traps to compare insect diversity at canopy and ground level as a means of detecting the impacts of an exploratory well site and related facilities within mature Amazonian rain forest in the Oriente Province of Ecuador. Replicate samples were collected at the well site, in a nearby area of agricultural development, and in a reference site within mature forest. Species richness was determined, and diversity indices were calculated for each set of samples. Results indicated that changes in diversity could be detected in the canopy and at ground level at the well site, but that the reduction in diversity was small. Biological diversity was substantially reduced in the area of agricultural development. Limitations and possible applications of this approach are discussed.

Reagan, D.P.; Silva del Poso, X. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Sociedad Entomologica Ecuatoriana, Quito (Ecuador)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Integrated assessment of the spatial variability of ozone impacts from emissions of nitrogen oxides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the ozone (O{sub 3}) damages caused by nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in different locations around the Atlanta metropolitan area during a summer month. Ozone impacts are calculated using a new integrated assessment model that links pollution emissions to their chemical transformation, transport, population exposures, and effects on human health. It was found that increased NOx emissions in rural areas around Atlanta increase human exposure to ambient O{sub 3} twice as much as suburban emissions. However, increased NOx emissions in central city Atlanta actually reduce O{sub 3} exposures. For downtown emissions, the reduction in human exposures to O{sub 3} from titration by NO in the central city outweighs the effects from increased downwind O{sub 3}. The results indicate that the marginal damage from NOx emissions varies greatly across a metropolitan area. The results raise concerns if cap and trade regulations cause emissions to migrate toward higher marginal damage locations. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Daniel Q. Tong; Nicholas Z. Muller; Denise L. Mauzerall; Robert O. Mendelsohn [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States). Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Program, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

An economic assessment of the impact of two crude oil price scenarios on households  

SciTech Connect

The impact of two possible future crude oil price scenarios -- high and low price cases -- is assessed for three population groups: majority (non-Hispanic and nonblack), black, and Hispanic. The two price scenarios were taken from the energy security'' report published by the US Department of Energy in 1987. Effects of the two crude oil price scenarios for the 1986--95 period are measured for energy demand and composition and for share of income spent on energy by the three population groups at both the national and census-region levels. The effects on blacks are marginally more adverse than on majority householders, while effects on Hispanics are about the same as those on the majority. Little change is seen in percentage of income spent on energy over the forecast period. Both Hispanic and black households would spend a larger share of their incomes on energy than would majority households. The relatively adverse effects in the higher price scenario shift from the South and West Census regions to the Northeast and Midwest. 24 refs., 7 figs., 22 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.; Hemphill, R.C.; Hill, L.G.; Marinelli, J.L.; Rose, K.J.; Santini, D.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Assessment of the Impacts of Standards and Labeling Programs in Mexico (four products).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the impacts of standards in Mexico (ref: Documento No.the impacts of standards in Mexico 0. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ThisCountry Coordinator for Mexico, facilitated this activity.

Sanchez, Itha; Pulido, Henry; McNeil, Michael A.; Turiel, Isaac; della Cava, Mirka

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Assessing the socio-economic impact of 3D visualization in cultural heritage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the multitude of impact measurement techniques available to heritage site managers there is a case for the bigger strategic picture to figure more strongly in impact measurement decision making for ICT and 3D applications in the heritage sector. ... Keywords: 3D visualisation, economics, socio-economic impact

Jaime Kaminski; Jim McLoughlin; Babak Sodagar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Assessing health impacts in complex eco-epidemiological settings in the humid tropics: Modular baseline health surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantitative assessment of health impacts has been identified as a crucial feature for realising the full potential of health impact assessment (HIA). In settings where demographic and health data are notoriously scarce, but there is a broad range of ascertainable ecological, environmental, epidemiological and socioeconomic information, a diverse toolkit of data collection strategies becomes relevant for the mainly small-area impacts of interest. We present a modular, cross-sectional baseline health survey study design, which has been developed for HIA of industrial development projects in the humid tropics. The modular nature of our toolkit allows our methodology to be readily adapted to the prevailing eco-epidemiological characteristics of a given project setting. Central to our design is a broad set of key performance indicators, covering a multiplicity of health outcomes and determinants at different levels and scales. We present experience and key findings from our modular baseline health survey methodology employed in 14 selected sentinel sites within an iron ore mining project in the Republic of Guinea. We argue that our methodology is a generic example of rapid evidence assembly in difficult-to-reach localities, where improvement of the predictive validity of the assessment and establishment of a benchmark for longitudinal monitoring of project impacts and mitigation efforts is needed.

Winkler, Mirko S., E-mail: mirko.winkler@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Divall, Mark J., E-mail: mdivall@shapeconsulting.org [SHAPE Consulting Ltd., Pretoria 0062 (South Africa); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.com [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Schmidlin, Sandro, E-mail: sandro.schmidlin@gmail.com [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Magassouba, Mohamed L., E-mail: laminemagass@yahoo.fr [Clinique Ambroise Pare, P.O. Box, 1042 Conakry (Guinea); Knoblauch, Astrid M., E-mail: astrid.knoblauch@me.com [SHAPE Consulting Ltd., Pretoria 0062 (South Africa); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.edu [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Utzinger, Juerg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Life cycle assessment of TV sets in China: A case study of the impacts of CRT monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with the rapid increase in both production and use of TV sets in China, there is an increasing awareness of the environmental impacts related to the accelerating mass production, electricity use, and waste management of these sets. This paper aims to describe the application of life cycle assessment (LCA) to investigate the environmental performance of Chinese TV sets. An assessment of the TV set device (focusing on the Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitor) was carried out using a detailed modular LCA based on the international standards of the ISO 14040 series. The LCA was constructed using SimaPro software version 7.2 and expressed with the Eco-indicator' 99 life cycle impact assessment method. For a sensitivity analysis of the overall LCA results, the CML method was used in order to estimate the influence of the choice of the assessment method on the results. Life cycle inventory information was compiled by Ecoinvent 2.2 databases, combined with literature and field investigations on the current Chinese situation. The established LCA study shows that the use stage of such devices has the highest environmental impact, followed by the manufacturing stage. In the manufacturing stage, the CRT and the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) are those components contributing the most environmental impacts. During the use phase, the environmental impacts are due entirely to the methods of electricity generation used to run them, since no other aspects were taken into account for this phase. The final processing step-the end-of-life stage-can lead to a clear environmental benefit when the TV sets are processed through the formal dismantling enterprises in China.

Song Qingbin [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau (Macao); Wang Zhishi, E-mail: zswang@umac.mo [Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau (Macao); Li Jinhui; Zeng Xianlai [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact for the General Services Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is authorizing the release of the General Services Administration (GSA) property in Watertown, MA, for unrestricted use, and has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), resulting in a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI), in support of this decision. SUMMARY NRC reviewed the results of the decommissioning of the GSA facility in Watertown, MA. The site was a parcel of the former Watertown Arsenal which the U.S. Army used for depleted uranium (DU) munition operations authorized under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) License No. SUB-238. From 1955-1966, an area northeast of the Arsenal site (now identified as the GSA property) was designated for stabilization of DU scrap from Arsenal activities. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District, (USACE) currently manages the property for the GSA. The USACE proposed unrestricted site release without further remediation. The proposal is based on an examination of radiological data from previous site surveys. A sitespecific dose analysis was conducted using RESRAD version 6.0 dose-modeling software. Based on the measured concentrations of total uranium remaining at the GSA site, and the physical characteristics of depleted uranium, the USACE has demonstrated that the facility meets the license termination criteria in Subpart E of 10 CFR Part 20, (the License Termination Rule, or LTR). The annual total effective dose equivalent to the average member of the critical group is significantly less than 0.25 millisieverts per year (mSv/yr) (25 millirem per yr (25 mrem/yr)), and the dose is as low as is reasonably achievable. The NRC staff has evaluated the USACE’s request and the results of the surveys, and has developed this EA in accordance with the requirements of 10 CFR Part 51. Based on the staff’s evaluation, the conclusion of the EA is that the proposed action will not have a significant impact on human health and the environment, and, with respect to residual radioactivity, the site is acceptable for unrestricted release.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Optimizing Feedstock Logistics and Assessment of Hydrologic Impacts for Sustainable Bio-Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising world petroleum prices and global warming are contributing to interest in renewable energy sources, including energy produced from agricultural crops and waste sources of biomass. A network of small mobile pyrolysis units may be the most cost effective system to convert biomass from agricultural feedstocks to bio-crude oil. Mobile pyrolysis units could be moved to the feedstock production fields thereby greatly simplifying feedstock logistics. In the North Central (NC) region of the U.S., possible feedstocks are corn stover, energy sorghum, and switchgrass. A grid-based Geographic Information System (GIS) program was developed to identify optimum locations for mobile pyrolysis units based on feedstock availability in the NC region. Model builder was used to automate the GIS analysis. Network analysis was used to find the best route to move the mobile pyrolysis units to new locations and to identify the closest refinery to transport the bio-crude oil. To produce bioenergy from feedstocks, the removal of biomass from agricultural fields will impact the hydrology and sediment transport in rural watersheds. Therefore, the hydrologic effects of removing corn stover from corn production fields in Illinois (IL) were evaluated using the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated and validated for streamflow and sediment yields in the Spoon River basin in IL using observed data from the USGS. The modeling results indicated that as residue removal rates increased, evapotranspiration (ET) and sediment yields increased, while streamflows decreased. Biochar is a carbon-based byproduct of pyrolysis. To ensure that the mobile pyrolysis system is economically and environmental sustainable, the biochar must be land applied to the feedstock production fields as a soil amendment. An assessment of hydrologic changes due to the land application of biochar was made using the SWAT model in the Spoon River basin and changes in soil properties due to incorporation of biochar into the soil obtained from laboratory experiments by Cook et al. (2012). Model simulations indicated that a biochar application rate of 128 Mg/ha decreased water yield, and sediment yield in surface runoff and increased soil moisture and ET.

Ha, Mi-Ae 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Air quality analysis and related risk assessment for the Bonneville Power Administration's Resource Program Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is considering 12 different alternatives for acquiring energy resources over the next 20 years. Each of the alternatives utilizes a full range of energy resources (e.g., coal, cogeneration, conservation, and nuclear); however, individual alternatives place greater emphases on different types of power-producing resources and employ different timetables for implementing these resources. The environmental impacts that would result from the implementation of each alternative and the economic valuations of these impacts, will be an important consideration in the alternative selection process. In this report we discuss the methods used to estimate environmental impacts from the resource alternatives. We focus on pollutant emissions rates, ground-level air concentrations of basic criteria pollutants, the acidity of rain, particulate deposition, ozone concentrations, visibility attenuation, global warming, human health effects, agricultural and forest impacts, and wildlife impacts. For this study, pollutant emission rates are computed by processing BPA data on power production and associated pollutant emissions. The assessment of human health effects from ozone indicated little variation between the resource alternatives. Impacts on plants, crops, and wildlife populations from power plant emissions are projected to be minimal for all resource alternatives.

Glantz, C S; Burk, K W; Driver, C J; Liljegren, J C; Neitzel, D A; Schwartz, M N; Dana, M T; Laws, G L; Mahoney, L A; Rhoads, K

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A multi-scale qualitative approach to assess the impact of urbanization on natural habitats and their connectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Habitat loss and fragmentation are often concurrent to land conversion and urbanization. Simple application of GIS-based landscape pattern indicators may be not sufficient to support meaningful biodiversity impact assessment. A review of the literature reveals that habitat definition and habitat fragmentation are frequently inadequately considered in environmental assessment, notwithstanding the increasing number of tools and approaches reported in the landscape ecology literature. This paper presents an approach for assessing impacts on habitats on a local scale, where availability of species data is often limited, developed for an alpine valley in northern Italy. The perspective of the methodology is multiple scale and species-oriented, and provides both qualitative and quantitative definitions of impact significance. A qualitative decision model is used to assess ecological values in order to support land-use decisions at the local level. Building on recent studies in the same region, the methodology integrates various approaches, such as landscape graphs, object-oriented rule-based habitat assessment and expert knowledge. The results provide insights into future habitat loss and fragmentation caused by land-use changes, and aim at supporting decision-making in planning and suggesting possible ecological compensation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many environmental assessments inadequately consider habitat loss and fragmentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Species-perspective for defining habitat quality and connectivity is claimed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Species-based tools are difficult to be applied with limited availability of data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose a species-oriented and multiple scale-based qualitative approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Advantages include being species-oriented and providing value-based information.

Scolozzi, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.scolozzi@fmach.it [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all& #x27; Adige, (Italy); Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: geneletti@ing.unitn.it [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

329

Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Assessing the impacts of carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impacts of low carbohydrate information on the market demand of US meats, vegetables, and fruits. The study further explores the combined… (more)

Paudel, Laxmi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

NWCC Guidelines for Assessing the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 The primary objective of this study is to provide examples of thorough and consistent analysis and documentation of economic impacts from wind power development.

Michael Taylor, Northwest Economic Associates Alan Fox, Northwest Economic Associates Jill Chilton, Northwest Economic Associates NWCC Economic Development Work Group Contributors Steve Clemmer, Lisa Daniels, Ed DeMeo, Rick Halet, Ron Lehr, Michael Milligan Vince Robinson

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

332

ACTION: Environmental Assessment and Draft Finding of No Significant Impact. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission (NRC) has prepared an Environmental Assessment for the issuance of an Order under Section 274f of the Atomic Energy Act that would modify an Order issued to Waste Control Specialists, LLC (WCS) on November 5, 2004. In accordance with 10 CFR 51.33, the NRC has also prepared a draft Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for public review and comment. The current action is in response to a request by

Licensing Requirements For Special

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant withAnalysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Assessing the Impact of Heat Rejection Technology on CSP Plant Revenue: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the impact of cooling technology on revenue for hybrid-cooled plants with varying wet cooling penetration for four representative locations in the American Southwest. The impact of ACC design-point initial temperature difference (ITD - the difference between the condensing steam temperature and ambient dry-bulb) is also included in the analysis.

Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C. F.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Impact assessment of wind generation on the operations of a power system  

SciTech Connect

The impact of intermittent wind generation on the operations of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) power system is investigated. The operations of the TVA power system are outlined, and the hypothetical reconfiguration of the TVA transmission system to accommodate wind generation is described. Simulations and analyses of wind generation impacts on unit commitment, unit predispatch, and automatic control of generation are also presented.

Sadanandan, N.D.; Hilson, D.W.; Morris, K.W.; Needham, M.E.; Sendaula, M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Bulk Energy Storage: Assessment of Green House Gas Impacts to the Electric Power Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities are interested in understanding the role and impacts electric energy storage systems can have on reducing the electric sector's green house gas (GHG) emissions. This research project was undertaken to better understand and quantify GHG impacts of electric storage systems. The project specifically focuses on bulk energy storage systems such as compressed air energy storage (CAES).

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Petroleum Displacement: A Regional Economic Impact Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in alternatives to conventional vehicles such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) has risen because of the environmental and energy security concerns associated with petroleum dependence, but what would be the economic impact of the widespread use of such vehicles? This study quantified the regional economic impacts associated with an increased market penetration of PHEVs in the household vehicle market.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

A STRUCTURAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF FLAWS DETECTED DURING ULTRASONIC EXAMINATION OF TANK 15  

SciTech Connect

Ultrasonic (UT) inspection of Tank 15 was conducted between April and July 2007 in accordance with the Tank 15 UT inspection plan. This was a planned re-inspection of this tank, the previous one was performed in 2002. Ten cracks were characterized in the previous examination. The re-inspection was performed to verify the present models and understanding for stress corrosion cracking. During this re-examination, one indication that was initially reported as a 'possible perpendicular crack <25% through wall' in 2002, was clearly shown not to be a crack. Additionally, examination of a new area immediately adjacent to other cracks along a vertical weld revealed three new cracks. It is not known when these new cracks formed as they could very well have been present in 2002 as well. Therefore, a total of twelve cracks were evaluated during the re-examination. A critical review of the information describing stress corrosion crack behavior for the SRS waste tanks, as well as a summary review of the service history of Tank 15, was performed. Each crack was then evaluated for service exposure history, consistency of the crack behavior with the current understanding of stress corrosion cracking, and present and future impact to the structural integrity of the tank. Crack instability calculations were performed on each crack for a bounding waste removal loading condition in Tank 15. In all cases, the crack behavior was determined to be consistent with the previous understanding of stress corrosion cracking in the SRS waste tank environment. The length of the cracks was limited due to the short-range nature of the residual stresses near seam, repair and attachment welds. Of the twelve cracks, nine were located in the vapor space above the sludge layer, including the three new cracks. Comparison of the crack lengths measured in 2002 and 2007 revealed that crack growth had occurred in four of the six previously measured vapor space cracks. However, the growth remained within the residual stress zone. None of the three cracks beneath the sludge showed evidence of growth. The impact of the cracks that grew on the future service of Tank 15 was also assessed. Tank 15 is expected to undergo closure activities including sludge waste removal. A bounding loading condition for waste removal of the sludge at the bottom of Tank 15 was considered for this analysis. The analysis showed that the combination of hydrostatic, seismic, pump and weld residual stresses are not expected to drive any of the cracks identified during the Tank 15 UT inspection to instability. Wall thickness mapping for general thinning and pitting was also performed. No significant wall thinning was observed. The average wall thickness values were well above nominal. Two isolated pit-like indications were observed. Both were approximately 30 mils deep. However, the remaining wall thickness was still greater than nominal specified for the original construction plate material. It was recommended that a third examination of selected cracks in Tank 15 be performed in 2014. This examination would provide information to determine whether any additional detectable degradation is occurring in Tank 15 and to supplement the basis for characterization of conditions that are non-aggressive to tank corrosion damage. The in-service inspection program is re-evaluated on a three year periodicity. The Type I and II tanks are not active receipt tanks at present, and are therefore not a part of the In-Service Inspection Program for the Type III Tanks [1]. Changes to the mission for Tank 15 and other Type I and II tanks may be considered by the In-Service Inspection Review Committee (ISIRC) and the program adjusted accordingly.

Wiersma, B; James Elder, J

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

339

Impact of WRF Physics and Grid Resolution on Low-level Wind Prediction: Towards the Assessment of Climate Change Impact on Future Wind Power  

SciTech Connect

The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used in short-range simulations to explore the sensitivity of model physics and horizontal grid resolution. We choose five events with the clear-sky conditions to study the impact of different planetary boundary layer (PBL), surface and soil-layer physics on low-level wind forecast for two wind farms; one in California (CA) and the other in Texas (TX). Short-range simulations are validated with field measurements. Results indicate that the forecast error of the CA case decreases with increasing grid resolution due to the improved representation of valley winds. Besides, the model physics configuration has a significant impact on the forecast error at this location. In contrast, the forecast error of the TX case exhibits little dependence on grid resolution and is relatively independent of physics configuration. Therefore, the occurrence frequency of lowest root mean square errors (RMSEs) at this location is used to determine an optimal model configuration for subsequent decade-scale regional climate model (RCM) simulations. In this study, we perform two sets of 20-year RCM simulations using the data from the NCAR Global Climate Model (GCM) simulations; one set models the present climate and the other simulates the future climate. These RCM simulations will be used to assess the impact of climate change on future wind energy.

Chin, H S; Glascoe, L; Lundquist, J; Wharton, S

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

340

Assessing health impacts in complex eco-epidemiological settings in the humid tropics: The centrality of scoping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural resources development projects are - and have been for more than 150 years - located in remote rural areas in developing countries, where local level data on community health is notoriously scarce. Health impact assessment (HIA) aims at identifying potential negative health consequences of such projects and providing the initial evidence-base for prevention and mitigation of diseases, injuries and risk factors, as well as promotion of positive effects. An important, but under-systematised early phase of the HIA process is scoping. It aims at organising diverse, often fragmentary, evidence and identifying potential project-related health impacts and underlying data gaps. It is also a key element in defining the terms of reference for the entire assessment. We present novel methodological features for the scoping process, emphasising the evaluation of quality of evidence, and illustrate its use in a contemporary HIA of the Simandou iron ore project in the Republic of Guinea. Assessment of data quality is integrated with specific content information via an analytical framework for the systematic identification of health outcomes and determinants of major concern. A subsequent gap analysis is utilised to assess the need for further baseline data collection and to facilitate the specification of a set of potential key performance indicators and strategies to inform the required evidence-base. We argue that scoping also plays a central role in the design of surveillance systems for longitudinal monitoring of health, equity and wellbeing following project implementation.

Winkler, Mirko S., E-mail: mirko.winkler@unibas.c [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Divall, Mark J., E-mail: mdivall@newfields.co [NewFields, LLC, Pretoria 0062 (South Africa); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.co [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Balge, Marci Z., E-mail: mbalge@newfields.co [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.ed [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Utzinger, Juerg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.c [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Y-12 Potable Water System Upgrade (03/29/06)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE Y-12 POTABLE WATER SYSTEM UPGRADE U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Y-12 Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration DOE/EA - 1548 March 2006 DOE/EA-1548 Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Y-12 Potable Water System Upgrade U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration March 2006 Final Environmental Assessment for the Y-12 Potable Water System Upgrade

342

Assessing cumulative impacts to wintering Bald Eagles and their habitats in western Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) of Washington, the largest wintering population in the lower 48 states, are subject to numerous pressures and impacts from human activites. An evaluative method potential cumulative impacts of multiple hydroelectric development and logging activities on known and potential eagle use areas. Four resource components include food supply, roost sites, mature riparian forest, and disturbance. In addition to actual estimates of losses in food supply (fish biomass in kg) and habitat (km/sup 2/) in one river basin, impact levels from 0 (none) to 4 (high) were assigned for each development and for each component based on the impacts anticipated and the estimated value of the site to eagles. Midwinter eagle surveys, aerial photography, topographic and forest stand maps, and site visits were used in the analysis. Impacts were considered additive for all but the disturbance component, which was adjusted for potential synergism between developments. Adjustments were made for mitigation before the impacts were aggregated into a single, dimensionless cumulative impact score. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Witmer, G.W.; O'Neil, T.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Chariton Valley Biomass Project Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Switchgrass is a warm-weather, native Iowa grass that grows well on marginal land. It has been identified and extensively studied for its potential as a biomass energy crop, especially its potential for use as co-fire feedstock in coal-burning plants. In this environmental assessment (EA), the term ''co-fire'' refers to the burning of switchgrass in the OGS boiler in conjunction with coal, with the goal of reducing the amount of coal used and reducing emissions of some objectionable air pollutants associated with coal combustion. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide partial funding for (1) the design and construction of a biomass (switchgrass [Panicum virgatum]) storage, handling, and conveying system into the boiler at the Ottumwa Generating Station (OGS) near Chillicothe, Iowa; (2) operational testing of switchgrass as a biomass co-fire feedstock at OGS; and (3) ancillary activities related to growing, harvesting, storing, and transporting switchgrass in areas of the Rathbun Lake watershed. Chillicothe is in Wapello County on the south side of the Des Moines River, approximately 16 kilometers (10 miles) northwest of Ottumwa, Iowa, and 130 kilometers (80 miles) southeast of Des Moines. The OGS is a 725-megawatt (MW) maximum output, low-sulfur, pulverized coal-burning plant jointly owned by several Iowa utilities and operated by Alliant Energy. The plant is located about 1.6 kilometers (1 mile) northwest of Chillicothe, Iowa, on the Des Moines River. The following three-phase switchgrass co-fire test campaign has been planned and partially implemented at OGS: During Phase 1, which occurred from November 2000 through January 2001, Alliant Energy conducted Co-fire Test 1 at OGS. Phase 2 testing, the Proposed Action, would consist of two additional co-fire tests. Co-fire Test 2, which would utilize some residual equipment from Co-fire Test 1 and also test some new equipment, is currently planned for September/October 2003. It would be designed to test and demonstrate the engineering and environmental feasibility of co-firing up to 11.3 tonnes (12.5 tons) of switchgrass per hour and would burn a maximum of 5,440 tonnes (6,000 tons) of switchgrass. Co-fire Test 3, which is tentatively planned for winter 2004/2005, would test the long-term (approximately 2,000 hours) sustainability of processing 11.3 tonnes (12.5 tons) per hour. Co-fire Test 3 would be conducted using a proposed new process building and storage barn that would be constructed at the OGS as part of the Proposed Action. Phase 3, commercial operations, may occur if Phase 2 indicated that commercial operations were technically, environmentally, and economically feasible. Continuous, full-scale commercial operations could process up to 23 tonnes (25 tons) of switchgrass per hour, generate 35 MW per year of OGS's annual output, and replace 5 percent of the coal burned at OGS with switchgrass. Chariton Valley Resource Conservation and Development Inc. (Chariton Valley RC&D), a rural-development-oriented, non-profit corporation (Chariton Valley RC&D 2003a) and Alliant Energy would implement Phase 3 at their discretion after the completion of the Phase 2 co-fire tests. DOE's Proposed Action would support only Phase 2 testing; that is, Co-fire Tests 2 and 3. DOE has no plans to provide financial support for the commercial operations that would be performed during Phase 3. The new construction that DOE proposes to partially fund would include a new switchgrass processing facility and equipment and a new storage barn that would be used for Co-fire Test 3. This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the environmental impacts that could result from the Proposed Action. It also evaluates the impacts that could occur if DOE decided not to partially fund the Proposed Action (the No Action Alternative). No other action alternatives are analyzed because (1) no generating plants other than OGS have the installed infrastructure and operating experience necessary to conduct Phase 2 co-fire testing, and (2) the Rathbun Lake watershed is the only viable

N /A

2003-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

344

Assessment of the Impact of Observations on Analyses Derived from Observing System Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observing system experiments (OSEs) are commonly used to quantify the impact of different observation types on forecasts produced by a specific numerical weather prediction system. Recently, methods based on degree of freedom for signal (DFS) have ...

Cristina Lupu; Pierre Gauthier; Stéphane Laroche

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Assessing the Impact of Different Satellite Retrieval Methods on Forecast Available Potential Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The isentropic form for available potential energy (APE) is used to analyze the impact of the inclusion of satellite temperature retrieval data on forecasts made with the NASA Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) fourth order model. Two ...

Linda M. Whittaker; Lyle H. Horn

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Environmental impact assessment of commercial aircraft operations in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the environmental trade-offs inherent in multi-criteria objectives of an integrated environmental policy. A probabilistic multi-attribute impact pathway analysis (MAIPA) was ...

Lukachko, Stephen P. (Stephen Paul)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Assessing the Impact of Differential Genotyping Errors on Rare Variant Tests of Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genotyping errors are well-known to impact the power and type I error rate in single marker tests of association. Genotyping errors that happen according to the same process in cases and controls are known as non-differential ...

Fast, Shannon Marie

348

Impact of RFID technologies on helicopter processes: Assessment on customer oriented Charlotte JIMENEZa,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYSTEM Impacts on the global maintenance management system Aircrafts, and in particular helicopters). Thus, the configuration "as maintained" (the one present into the maintenance management system Information System (MIS) like a CMMS (Customized Maintenance Management System). The follow

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

349

Toward an Integrated Assessment of the Impacts of Extreme Wind Events on Barrow, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warming of the arctic climate is having a substantial impact on the Alaskan North Slope coastal region. The warming is associated with increasing amounts of open water in the arctic seas, rising sea level, and thawing permafrost. Coastal ...

A. H. Lynch; J. A. Curry; R. D. Brunner; J. A. Maslanik

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Assessing Power Quality Impacts and Solutions for the California Food Processing Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern food processing equipment can easily be impacted by very brief voltage reductions, commonly known as voltage sags, originating from utility distribution and transmission systems. Even minor voltage sags can lead to unscheduled process downtime, delayed client orders, loss of clients, and lost revenue. This project, sponsored by the California Energy Commission (CEC), analyzed the impact of power quality on the California food processing industry and made recommendations for short-term and long-ter...

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Power Plant.Analysis: Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) Power Plant.assessment of natural gas combined cycle power plant with

Sathre, Roger

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 1: Assessment of recycling technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Approximately ten different candidate EV battery technologies were examined based on their performance and recyclability, and were ranked based on these examinations. The batteries evaluated were lead-acid (all types), nickel-cadmium, nickel-iron, nickel-metal hydride, sodium-sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron disulfide, lithium-ion, lithium polymer, and zinc (zinc-air and zinc-bromine). Locations of present recycling facilities were identified. Markets for recycled products were assessed: the value of recycled materials were found too unstable to fully support recycling efforts. All these batteries exhibit the characteristic of hazardous waste in California, and are therefore subject to strict regulations (finalization of the new EPA Universal Waste Rule could change this).

Unnasch, S.; Montano, M.; Franklin, P.; Nowell, G.; Martin, C.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Identifying Steam Opportunity "Impact" Inputs for the Steam System Assessment Tool (SSAT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE BestPractices Steam "Steam System Assessment Tool" (SSAT) is a powerful tool for quantifying potential steam improvement opportunities in steam systems. However, all assessment tools are only as good as the validity of the modeling inputs.

Harrell, G.; Jendrucko, R.; Wright, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Impacts Analyses Supporting the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and health impacts are presented for activities associated with transient testing of nuclear fuel and material using two candidate test reactors. Transient testing involves irradiation of nuclear fuel or materials for short time-periods under high neutron flux rates. The transient testing process includes transportation of nuclear fuel or materials inside a robust shipping cask to a hot cell, removal from the shipping cask, pre-irradiation examination of the nuclear materials, assembly of an experiment assembly, transportation of the experiment assembly to the test reactor, irradiation in the test reactor, transport back to the hot cell, and post-irradiation examination of the nuclear fuel or material. The potential for environmental or health consequences during the transportation, examination, and irradiation actions are assessed for normal operations, off-normal (accident) scenarios, and transportation. Impacts to the environment (air, soil, and groundwater), are assessed during each phase of the transient testing process. This report documents the evaluation of potential consequences to the general public. This document supports the Environmental Assessment (EA) required by the U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (42 USC Subsection 4321 et seq.).

Annette L. Schafer; Lloyd C. Brown; David C. Carathers; Boyd D. Christensen; James J. Dahl; Mark L. Miller; Cathy Ottinger Farnum; Steven Peterson; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Peter V. Subaiya; Daniel M. Wachs; Ruth F. Weiner

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Impact Assessment of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on the U.S. Power Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US electricity grid is a national infrastructure that has the potential to deliver significant amounts of the daily driving energy of the US light duty vehicle (cars, pickups, SUVs, and vans) fleet. This paper discusses a 2030 scenario with 37 million plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on the road in the US demanding electricity for an average daily driving distance of about 33 miles (53 km). The paper addresses the potential grid impacts of the PHEVs fleet relative to their effects on the production cost of electricity, and the emissions from the electricity sector. The results of this analysis indicate significant regional difference on the cost impacts and the CO2 emissions. Battery charging during the day may have twice the cost impacts than charging during the night. The CO2 emissions impacts are very region-dependent. In predominantly coal regions (Midwest), the new PHEV load may reduce the CO2 emission intensity (ton/MWh), while in others regions with significant clean generation (hydro and renewable energy) the CO2 emission intensity may increase. Discussed will the potential impact of the results with the valuation of carbon emissions.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Nguyen, Tony B.; Jin, Chunlian; Balducci, Patrick J.; Secrest, Thomas J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Y-12 Steam Plant Life Extenstion Project - Steam Plant Replacement Subproject  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93 93 Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Y-12 Steam Plant Life Extension Project - Steam Plant Replacement Subproject U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Y-12 Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration August 2007 DOE/EA-1593 Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Y-12 Steam Plant Life Extension Project - Steam Plant Replacement Subproject U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration

357

Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model DOE Tool for Assessing Impact of Research on Cost of Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a spreadsheet model to provide insight as to how its research activities can impact of cost of producing power from geothermal energy. This model is referred to as GETEM, which stands for “Geothermal Electricity Technologies Evaluation Model”. Based on user input, the model develops estimates of costs associated with exploration, well field development, and power plant construction that are used along with estimated operating costs to provide a predicted power generation cost. The model allows the user to evaluate how reductions in cost, or increases in performance or productivity will impact the predicted power generation cost. This feature provides a means of determining how specific technology improvements can impact generation costs, and as such assists DOE in both prioritizing research areas and identifying where research is needed.

Greg Mines

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and their Impact on the Electric Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Vehicle Transportation Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2010 New Analysis of Alternative Transportation Technologies 3 What's New? * Additional Alternative Transportation Vehicles - Compressed Air Vehicles (CAVs) * Use electricity from the grid to power air compressor that stores compressed air - Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) * Connection to grid is in competing demand for fuel * Still an internal combustion engine (ICE) - Hydrogen Vehicles * Use fuel cell technology, no connection to electricity grid 4 General Takeaways * CAVs - Unproven technology - Poor environmental performance - High cost * NGVs - Poor environmental performance - Lack of refueling infrastructure - Cheaper fuel cost than ICEs - No direct impact on electric power grid * Hydrogen - Unproven technology

359

Economic Impacts from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program: Using Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the economic impacts (including job creation) from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program (CSLP), an example of Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. The CSLP was the first test of PACE financing on a multi-jurisdictional level (involving individual cities as well as the county government). It was also the first PACE program to comprehensively address energy efficiency measures and renewable energy, and it was the first funded by a public offering of both taxable and tax-exempt bonds.

Goldberg, M.; Cliburn, J. K.; Coughlin, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A cost allocation model for assessing the impact of energy storage technologies upon electric utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to assist the Division of Energy Storage Systems in the U.S. Department of Energy in prioritizing, developing, and commercializing storage technologies a computer simulation code has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to assess the ...

R. Giese; L. Holt; R. Scheithauer

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Estimating Potential Evaporation from Vegetated Surfaces for Water Management Impact Assessments Using Climate Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin managers concerned with maintaining water supplies and mitigating flood risk in the face of climate change are taking outputs from climate models and using them in hydrological models for assessment purposes. While precipitation is the ...

Victoria A. Bell; Nicola Gedney; Alison L. Kay; Roderick N. B. Smith; Richard G. Jones; Robert J. Moore

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Assessing Hydrologic Impact of Climate Change with Uncertainty Estimates: Bayesian Neural Network Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major challenge in assessing the hydrologic effect of climate change remains the estimation of uncertainties associated with different sources, such as the global climate models, emission scenarios, downscaling methods, and hydrologic models. ...

Mohammad Sajjad Khan; Paulin Coulibaly

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

System level assessment of uncertainty in aviation environmental policy impact analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis demonstrates the assessment of uncertainty of a simulation model at the system level, which takes into account the interaction between the modules that comprise the system. Results from this system level ...

Liem, Rhea Patricia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Final environmental impact assessment of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

This document considers: the need for uranium enrichment facilities; site location; plant description; and describes the power generating facilities in light of its existing environment. The impacts from continuing operations are compared with alternatives of shutdown, relocation, and alternative power systems. (PSB)

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Pilot plant assessment of blend properties and their impact on critical power plant components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of tests were performed to determine the effects of blending eastern bituminous coals with western subbituminous coals on utility boiler operation. Relative to the baseline bituminous coal, the testing reported here indicated that there were significant impacts to boiler performance due to the blending of the eastern and western coals. Results indicated that fuel blending can be used to adequately control flue gas emissions of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} at the expense of reduced milling efficiency, increased sootblowing in the high-temperature and low-temperature regions of the boiler and, to a lesser extent, decreased collection efficiency for an electrostatic precipitator. The higher reactivity of the subbituminous coal increased the overall combustion efficiency, which may tend to decrease the impact of milling efficiency losses. The extent of these impacts was directly related to the percentage of subbituminous coal in the blends. At the lowest blend ratios of subbituminous coal, the impacts were greatly reduced.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Assessment of the radiative processes impact on surface fluxes and temperature forecast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the study is estimating the impact of improvements in the physical parameterization scheme on forecast quality in the T169L31 model (Hydrometeorological Research Centre—HMRC—of Russia). Surface temperature is one determinative element for boundary layer computational characteristics

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Using Data-Driven Analytics to Assess the Impact of Design Parameters on Production from Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Esmaili, S., West Virginia University and Mohaghegh, S.D., Intelligent Solution Inc. and West of SPE copyright. Abstract The importance of production from Shale and its impact on the total US energy from Shale assets with different degrees of success. The notion that shale is a "statistical play" may

Mohaghegh, Shahab

368

Assessing the Thermal Environmental Impacts of an Groundwater Heat Pump in Southeastern Washington State  

SciTech Connect

A thermal analysis of a large-scale (e.g., 1900 gpm), open-loop ground source heat pump (GSHP) installed on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in southeastern Washington State has been performed using a numerical modeling approach. Water temperature increases at the upgradient extraction wells in the system and at the downgradient Columbia River are potential concerns, especially since heat rejection to the subsurface will occur year-round. Hence, thermal impacts of the open-loop GSHP were investigated to identify operational scenarios that minimized downgradient environmental impacts at the river, and upgradient temperature drift at the production wells. Simulations examined the sensitivity of the system to variations in pumping rates and injected water temperatures, as well as to hydraulic conductivity estimates of the aquifer. Results demonstrated that both downgradient and upgradient thermal impacts were more sensitive to injection flow rates than estimates of hydraulic conductivity. Higher injection rates at lower temperatures resulted in higher temperature increases at the extraction wells but lower increases at the river. Conversely, lower pumping rates and higher injected water temperatures resulted in a smaller temperature increase at the extraction wells, but higher increases at the river. The scenario with lower pumping rates is operationally more efficient, but does increase the likelihood of a thermal plume discharging into the Columbia River. However, this impact would be mitigated by mixing within the hyporheic zone and the Columbia River. The impact under current operational conditions is negligible, but future increases in heat rejection could require a compromise between maximizing operational efficiency and minimizing temperature increases at the shoreline.

Freedman, Vicky L.; Waichler, Scott R.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

N /A

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

N /A

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Pilot Plant Assessment of Blend Properties and Their Impact on Critical Power Plant Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-sulfur subbituminous coals, currently in demand to meet regulated SO2 emission standards, are very different in composition from bituminous coal and affect many operating characteristics when fired in boilers designed for bituminous coal. This report documents a pilot-scale study of the relative impacts of a subbituminous coal or blend containing subbituminous coal on unit operating characteristics such as mill performance, furnace wall slagging, convective pass fouling, and electrostatic precipitato...

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Groundwater Quality Signatures for Assessing Potential Impacts from Coal Combustion Product Leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron and sulfate are recognized as potential indicators of the influence of leachate from coal-combustion products (CCPs) on groundwater quality. However, there are cases in which these two constituents do not provide sufficient data to characterize groundwater for potential impacts from CCPs. In these cases, the concentrations of other indicator constituents in solution and/or advanced analytical techniques may be used to support other information. A three-tiered analysis approach can provide a ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

An assessment of the impact of deregulation on the relative price of electricity in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though it's commonly thought that electricity deregulation has, by and large, failed to deliver its anticipated results, consumers in Illinois have benefited from deregulation when compared to what has happened to rates over the past several years in bordering states. This conclusion is supported by a comparison of nominal and real rates paid by different customer classes, theoretical predictions, and consideration of fuel cost impacts and capacity expansions. (author)

Carlson, J. Lon; Loomis, David

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 2 of the project (this report) uses the conclusions from Part 1 as a point of departure to focus on two objectives: producing a more detailed and conservative assessment of the manufacturing process and providing a comparative LCA with other lighting products based on the improved manufacturing analysis and taking into consideration a wider range of environmental impacts. In this study, we first analyzed the manufacturing process for a white-light LED (based on a sapphire-substrate, blue-light, gallium-nitride LED pumping a yellow phosphor), to understand the impacts of the manufacturing process. We then conducted a comparative LCA, looking at the impacts associated with the Philips Master LEDbulb and comparing those to a CFL and an incandescent lamp. The comparison took into account the Philips Master LEDbulb as it is now in 2012 and then projected forward what it might be in 2017, accounting for some of the anticipated improvements in LED manufacturing, performance and driver electronics.

Scholand, Michael; Dillon, Heather E.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Technology assessment of solar energy systems. Socioeconomic impacts of solar deployment and conventional energy use. Volume III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study presents an analysis of socio-economic impacts of conventional energy prices and solar technology use in the residential sector. Patterns of household energy use are explored as a function of income class. Impacts on household disposable income of use of conventional fuels and technologies as compared to solar alternatives are then assessed. This analysis is conducted for 1978 and 1990 by income class and region. Profiles of residential-solar-system purchases are presented and trends in the adoption of solar systems in this sector are discussed. Because income levels and certain demographic characteristics tend to be correlated, insights regarding the distribution of impacts among population groups can be obtained by examining the demographic composition of US households. Accordingly, socio-economic profiles of the US population are developed to help identify the demographic characteristics of households most severely affected by high energy prices, as well as of those households best able to reduce energy costs through the purchase of solar energy and conservation.

Gordon, J.J.; Tahami, J.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Evaluating Utility Executives' Perceptions of Smart Grid Costs, Benefits and Adoption Plans To Assess Impacts on Building Design and Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Grid technology is likely to be implemented in various magnitudes across utilities in the near future. To accommodate these technologies significant changes will have to be incorporated in building design construction and planning. This research paper attempts to evaluate public utility executives’ plans to adopt smart grid technologies and to assess timing of smart grid impacts on future design and construction practices. Telephone survey was the data collection method used to collect information from executives at cooperative and municipal utilities. The study focuses on small and medium utilities with more than five thousand customers and fewer than one hundred thousand customers. A stratified random sampling approach was applied and sample results for fifty-nine survey responses were used to predict the timing of smart grid implementation and the timing of smart grid impacts on future design and construction practices. Results of this research indicate that design and construction professionals should already be developing knowledge and experience to accommodate smart grid impacts on the built environment.

Rao, Ameya Vinayak

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Replacement of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) at the DOE gaseous diffusion plants: An assessment of global impacts  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) formerly operated two gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) for enriching uranium and maintained a third shutdown GDP. These plants maintain a large inventory of dichlorotetrafluorethane (CFC-114), a cholorofluorocarbon (CFC), as a coolant. The paper evaluates the global impacts of four alternatives to modify GDP coolant system operations for a three-year period beginning in 1996. Interim modification of GDP coolant system operations has the potential to reduce stratospheric ozone depletion from GDP coolant releases while a permanent solution is studied.

Socolof, M.L.; Saylor, R.E.; McCold, L.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

TVA Low Impact Hydro Feasibility Study: Phase 1 Technology and Site Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)'s interest in further developing its green marketing program, it partnered with EPRI for guidance in a new study of TVA's hydropower resources. As a result of an EPRI solicitation of bids for TVA's "Low Impact Hydro Feasibility Study," Verdant Power, in its primary role as a systems integrator and site developer, was chosen to conduct the project. TVA's initial interest was to have surveyed 24 impoundment sites and several non-impoundment locations with...

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

379

EPRI Report on Solid Material Disposition: Evaluation to Assess Industry Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2005, the NRC staff requested Commission approval for publication of a proposed rule in the Federal Register to amend 10CFR Part 20 to include criteria for controlling the disposition of solid materials. This report provides an initial analysis of whether or not methods of solid material assessment, currently practiced at nuclear power facilities, would be sufficient to meet the disposition limits in the proposed rule.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Assessment of Impacts of NOx Reduction Technologies on Coal Ash Use: Volume 1: North American Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-volume report provides documentation about physical and chemical effects combustion and post-combustion low-NOx technologies have on coal fly ash. U.S., European, and, to a lesser degree, Japanese experience is discussed. The report assesses the effect of low-NOx technologies on fly ash markets in a general manner. Options for beneficiating fly ash for specific markets also appear.

1997-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

382

Assessment of Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Future Vehicle Future Vehicle Transportation Options and Their Impact on the Electric Grid January 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1466 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

383

Wildlife Impact Assessment : Bonneville, McNary, The Dalles, and John Day Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Army Corps of Engineers Bonneville project in Oregon and Washington. The project directly impacted 20,749 acres of wildlife habitat. Seven evaluation species were selected with losses and gains expressed in Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to 1 acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated a gain of 2671 HU's of lesser scaup wintering habitat. Losses of 4300 HU's of great blue heron habitat, 2443 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2767 HU's of spotted sandpiper habitat, 163 HU's of yellow warbler habitat, 1022 HU's black-capped chickadee habitat, and 1622 HU's of mink habitat occurred as a result of the project. This amounts to a total combined loss of 12,317 HU's. 18 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Rasmussen, Larry; Wright, Patrick

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design  

SciTech Connect

Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

385

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-4-2012_Integration of Spatial Data to Support Risk and Impact Assessments_20121221.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of Spatial Data to Support Integration of Spatial Data to Support Risk and Impact Assessments for Deep and Ultra-deepwater Hydrocarbon Activities in the Gulf of Mexico 21 December 2012 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-4-2012 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

386

Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of High Purity Production of High Purity Hydrogen from Domestic Coal: Assessing the Techno-Economic Impact of Emerging Technologies August 30, 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1432 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States (U.S.) government. Neither the U.S., nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

387

Assessment of Potential Flood Events and Impacts at INL's Proposed Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rates, depths, erosion potential, increased subsurface transport rates, and annual exceedance probability for potential flooding scenarios have been evaluated for the on-site alternatives of Idaho National Laboratory’s proposed remote handled low-level waste disposal facility. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of flood impacts are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE-O 435.1), its natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95), and the Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) guidance in addition to being required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA). Potential sources of water evaluated include those arising from (1) local precipitation events, (2) precipitation events occurring off of the INL (off-site precipitation), and (3) increased flows in the Big Lost River in the event of a Mackay Dam failure. On-site precipitation events include potential snow-melt and rainfall. Extreme rainfall events were evaluated for the potential to create local erosion, particularly of the barrier placed over the disposal facility. Off-site precipitation carried onto the INL by the Big Lost River channel was evaluated for overland migration of water away from the river channel. Off-site precipitation sources evaluated were those occurring in the drainage basin above Mackay Reservoir. In the worst-case scenarios, precipitation occurring above Mackay Dam could exceed the dam’s capacity, leading to overtopping, and eventually complete dam failure. Mackay Dam could also fail during a seismic event or as a result of mechanical piping. Some of the water released during dam failure, and contributing precipitation, has the potential of being carried onto the INL in the Big Lost River channel. Resulting overland flows from these flood sources were evaluated for their erosion potential, ability to overflow the proposed disposal facility, and for their ability to increase migration of contaminants from the facility. The assessment of available literature suggests that the likelihood of detrimental flood water impacting the proposed RH-LLW facility is extremely low. The annual exceedance probability associated with uncontrolled flows in the Big Lost River impacting either of the proposed sites is 1x10-5, with return interval (RI) of 10,000yrs. The most probable dam failure scenario has an annual exceedance probability of 6.3x10-6 (1.6x105 yr RI). In any of the scenarios generating possible on-site water, the duration is expected to be quite short, water depths are not expected to exceed 0.5 m, and the erosion potential can easily be mitigated by emplacement of a berm (operational period), and an engineered cover (post closure period). Subsurface mobilization of radionuclides was evaluated for a very conservative flooding scenario resulting in 50 cm deep, 30.5 day on-site water. The annual exceedance probability for which is much smaller than 3.6x10-7 (2.8x106 yr RI). For the purposes of illustration, the facility was assumed to flood every 500 years. The periodically recurring flood waters were predicted to marginally increase peak radionuclide fluxes into the aquifer by at most by a factor of three for non-sorbing radionuclides, and to have limited impact on peak radionuclide fluxes into the aquifer for contaminants that do sorb.

A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact: Biorecycling Technologies, Inc., Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant, Fresno County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a proposal from the California Energy Commission for partial funding up to $1,500,000 of the construction of the biorecycling Technologies, Inc., (BTI) Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant in Fresno County, California. BTI along with its contractors and business partners would develop the plant, which would use manure and green waste to produce biogas and a variety of organic fertilizer products. The California Energy Commission has requested funding from the DOE Commercialization Ventures program to assist in the construction of the plant, which would produce up to one megawatt of electricity by burning biogas in a cogeneration unit. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with funding development of the proposed project.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment/Management Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund wildlife management and enhancement activities for the Burlington bottoms wetlands mitigation site. Acquired by BPA in 1991, wildlife habitat at Burlington bottoms would contribute toward the goal of mitigation for wildlife losses and inundation of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal dams in the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins. Target wildlife species identified for mitigation purposes are yellow warbler, great blue heron, black-capped chickadee, red-tailed hawk, valley quail, spotted sandpiper, wood duck, and beaver. The Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment (EA) describes alternatives for managing the Burlington Bottoms area, and evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives. Included in the Draft Management Plan/EA is an implementation schedule, and a monitoring and evaluation program, both of which are subject to further review pending determination of final ownership of the Burlington Bottoms property.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Review of uncertainty estimates associated with models for assessing the impact of breeder reactor radioactivity releases  

SciTech Connect

The purpose is to summarize estimates based on currently available data of the uncertainty associated with radiological assessment models. The models being examined herein are those recommended previously for use in breeder reactor assessments. Uncertainty estimates are presented for models of atmospheric and hydrologic transport, terrestrial and aquatic food-chain bioaccumulation, and internal and external dosimetry. Both long-term and short-term release conditions are discussed. The uncertainty estimates presented in this report indicate that, for many sites, generic models and representative parameter values may be used to calculate doses from annual average radionuclide releases when these calculated doses are on the order of one-tenth or less of a relevant dose limit. For short-term, accidental releases, especially those from breeder reactors located in sites dominated by complex terrain and/or coastal meteorology, the uncertainty in the dose calculations may be much larger than an order of magnitude. As a result, it may be necessary to incorporate site-specific information into the dose calculation under these circumstances to reduce this uncertainty. However, even using site-specific information, natural variability and the uncertainties in the dose conversion factor will likely result in an overall uncertainty of greater than an order of magnitude for predictions of dose or concentration in environmental media following shortterm releases.

Miller, C.; Little, C.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Assessing Energy Impact of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Significance of Daily Distance Variation over Time and Among Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate assessment of the impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) on petroleum and electricity consumption is a necessary step toward effective policies. Variations in daily vehicle miles traveled (VMT) over time and among drivers affect PHEV energy impact, but the significance is not well understood. This paper uses a graphical illustration, a mathematical derivation, and an empirical study to examine the cause and significance of such an effect. The first two methods reveal that ignoring daily variation in VMT always causes underestimation of petroleum consumption and overestimation of electricity consumption by PHEVs; both biases increase as the assumed PHEV charge-depleting (CD) range moves closer to the average daily VMT. The empirical analysis based on national travel survey data shows that the assumption of uniform daily VMT over time and among drivers causes nearly 68% underestimation of expected petroleum use and nearly 48% overestimation of expected electricity use by PHEVs with a 40-mi CD range (PHEV40s). Also for PHEV40s, consideration of daily variation in VMT over time but not among drivers similar to the way the utility factor curve is derived in SAE Standard SAE J2841 causes underestimation of expected petroleum use by more than 24% and overestimation of expected electricity use by about 17%. Underestimation of petroleum use and overestimation of electricity use increase with larger-battery PHEVs.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Impact of support system failure limitations on probabilistic safety assessment and in regulatory decision making  

SciTech Connect

When used as a tool for safety decision making, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is as effective as it realistically characterizes the overall frequency and consequences of various types of system and component failures. If significant support system failure events are omitted from consideration, the PSA process omits the characterization of possible unique contributors to core damage risk, possibly underestimates the frequency of core damage, and reduces the future utility of the PSA as a decision making tool for the omitted support system. This paper is based on a review of several recent US PSA studies and the author's participation in several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sponsored peer reviews. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Bickel, J.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

GROW1: a crop growth model for assessing impacts of gaseous pollutants from geothermal technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary model of photosynthesis and growth of field crops was developed to assess the effects of gaseous pollutants, particularly airborne sulfur compounds, resulting from energy production from geothermal resources. The model simulates photosynthesis as a function of such variables as irradiance, CO/sub 2/ diffusion resistances, and internal biochemical processes. The model allocates the products of photosynthesis to structural (leaf, stem, root, and fruit) and storage compartments of the plant. The simulations encompass the entire growing season from germination to senescence. The model is described conceptually and mathematically and examples of model output are provided for various levels of pollutant stress. Also, future developments that would improve this preliminary model are outlined and its applications are discussed.

Kercher, J.R.

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

395

Financing, performance analysis and impact assessment of bio-methanation projects in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conversion of wastes into energy and the protection of the environment are major concerns today. With mounting environmental pressures, it has become mandatory for almost all industrial sectors to comply with environmental regulations and treat the effluents, if any. There are about 285 distilleries in India generating effluents, of which nearly 177 have either implemented or are on the verge of completing effluent treatment plants. The effluents from distillery units are treated with a dual purpose of pollution abatement and recovery of energy. Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Ltd. (IREDA) has so far funded 59 process industries, mostly distillery units, for the generation of biogas from effluents. IREDA`s contribution towards the generation of biogas by financing these units amounts to about 0.86 million cubic meters of biogas per day which is equivalent to saving 965 tonnes of coal per day, in turn leading to carbon dioxide avoidance of about 1,330 tonnes per day. IREDA conducted a sample study on performance of these biogas plants and their impact on environment.

Naidu, B.S.K. [Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Ltd., New Delhi (India)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

2007. Impacts Assessment of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles on Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. electric power infrastructure is a strategic national asset that is underutilized most of the time. With the proper changes in the operational paradigm, it could generate and deliver the necessary energy to fuel the majority of the U.S. light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet. In doing so, it would reduce greenhouse gas emissions, improve the economics of the electricity industry, and reduce the U.S. dependency on foreign oil. Two companion papers investigate the technical potential and economic impacts of using the existing idle capacity of the electric infrastructure in conjunction with the emerging plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technology to meet the majority of the daily energy needs of the U.S. LDV fleet. This initial paper estimates the regional percentages of the energy requirements for the U.S. LDV stock that could potentially be supported by the existing infrastructure, based on the 12 modified North American Electric Reliability Council regions, as of 2002. For the United States as a whole, up to 84% of U.S. cars, pickup trucks, and sport utility vehicles (SUVs) could be supported by the existing infrastructure, although the local percentages vary by region. Using the LDV fleet classification, which includes cars, pickup trucks, SUVs, and vans, the technical potential is 73%. This has an estimated gasoline displacement potential of 6.5 million barrels of oil equivalent per day, or approximately 52 % of

Michael Kintner-meyer; Kevin Schneider; Robert Pratt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Failure Impact Analysis of Key Management in AMI Using Cybernomic Situational Assessment (CSA)  

SciTech Connect

In earlier work, we presented a computational framework for quantifying the security of a system in terms of the average loss a stakeholder stands to sustain as a result of threats to the system. We named this system, the Cyberspace Security Econometrics System (CSES). In this paper, we refine the framework and apply it to cryptographic key management within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) as an example. The stakeholders, requirements, components, and threats are determined. We then populate the matrices with justified values by addressing the AMI at a higher level, rather than trying to consider every piece of hardware and software involved. We accomplish this task by leveraging the recently established NISTR 7628 guideline for smart grid security. This allowed us to choose the stakeholders, requirements, components, and threats realistically. We reviewed the literature and selected an industry technical working group to select three representative threats from a collection of 29 threats. From this subset, we populate the stakes, dependency, and impact matrices, and the threat vector with realistic numbers. Each Stakeholder s Mean Failure Cost is then computed.

Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Hauser, Katie R [ORNL; Lantz, Margaret W [ORNL; Mili, Ali [New Jersey Insitute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

El Centro Geothermal Utility Core Field Experiment environmental-impact report and environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The City of El Centro is proposing the development of a geothermal energy utility core field experiment to demonstrate the engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing moderate temperature geothermal heat, on a pilot scale, for space cooling, space heating, and domestic hot water. The proposed facility is located on part of a 2.48 acre (1 hectare) parcel owned in fee by the City in the southeastern sector of El Centro in Imperial County, California. Geothermal fluid at an anticipated temperature of about 250/sup 0/F (121/sup 0/C) will heat a secondary fluid (water) which will be utilized directly or processed through an absorption chiller, to provide space conditioning and water heating for the El Centro Community Center, a public recreational facility located approximately one-half mile north of the proposed well site. The geothermal production well will be drilled to 8500 feet (2590m) and an injection well to 4000 feet (1220m) at the industrially designated City property. Once all relevant permits are obtained it is estimated that site preparation, facility construction, the completion and testing of both wells would be finished in approximately 26 weeks. The environmental impacts are described.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Environmental impact assessment for steeply dipping coal beds: North Knobs site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is funding an underground coal gasification (UCG) project in steeply dipping coal beds (SDB), at North Knobs, about 8 miles west of Rawlins, Carbon County, Wyoming. The project is being conducted to determine the technical, economic and environmental viability of such a technology. The development of SDB is an interesting target for UCG since such beds contain coals not normally mineable economically by ordinary techniques. Although the underground gasification of SDB has not been attempted in the US, Soviet experience and theoretical work indicate that the gasification of SDB in place offers all the advantages of underground gasification of horizontal coal seams plus some unique characteristics. The steep angle of dip helps to channel the produced gases up dip to offtake holes and permits the ash and rubble to fall away from the reaction zone helping to mitigate the blocking of the reaction zone in swelling coals. The intersection of SDB with the surface makes the seam accessible for drilling and other preparation. The tests at the North Knobs site will consist of three tests, lasting 20, 80 and 80 days, respectively. A total of 9590 tons of coal is expected to be gasified, with surface facilities utilizing 15 acres of the total section of land. The environmental effects of the experiment are expected to be very small. The key environmental impact is potential groundwater contamination by reaction products from coal gasification. There is good evidence that the surrounding coal effectively blocks the migration of these contaminants.

1978-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products, Part 3: LED Environmental Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the third part of a larger U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project to assess the life-cycle environmental and resource impacts in the manufacturing, transport, use, and disposal of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting products in relation to incumbent lighting technologies. All three reports are available on the DOE website (www.ssl.energy.gov/tech_reports.html). • Part 1: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent and LED Lamps; • Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance; • Part 3: LED Environmental Testing. Parts 1 and 2 were published in February and June 2012, respectively. The Part 1 report included a summary of the life-cycle assessment (LCA) process and methodology, provided a literature review of more than 25 existing LCA studies of various lamp types, and performed a meta-analysis comparing LED lamps with incandescent and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). Drawing from the Part 1 findings, Part 2 performed a more detailed assessment of the LED manufacturing process and used these findings to provide a comparative LCA taking into consideration a wider range of environmental impacts. Both reports concluded that the life-cycle environmental impact of a given lamp is dominated by the energy used during lamp operation—the upstream generation of electricity drives the total environmental footprint of the product. However, a more detailed understanding of end-of-life disposal considerations for LED products has become increasingly important as their installation base has grown. The Part 3 study (reported herein) was undertaken to augment the LCA findings with chemical analysis of a variety of LED, CFL, and incandescent lamps using standard testing procedures. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different models, were tested to determine whether any of 17 elements were present at levels exceeding California or Federal regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste. Key findings include: • The selected models were generally found to be below thresholds for Federally regulated elements; • All CFLs and LED lamps and most incandescent lamps exceeded California thresholds for Copper; • Most CFL samples exceeded California thresholds for Antimony and Nickel, and half of the LED samples exceeded California thresholds for Zinc; • The greatest contributors were the screw bases, drivers, ballasts, and wires or filaments; • Overall concentrations in LED lamps were comparable to cell phones and other types of electronic devices, and were generally attributable to components other than the internal LED light sources; • Although the life-cycle environmental impact of the LED lamps is favorable when compared to CFLs and incandescent lamps, recycling will likely gain importance as consumer adoption increases. This study was exploratory in nature and was not intended to provide a definitive indication of regulatory compliance for any specific lamp model or technology. Further study would be needed to more broadly characterize the various light source technologies; to more accurately and precisely characterize a specific model; or to determine whether product redesign would be appropriate.

Tuenge, Jason R.; Hollomon, Brad; Dillon, Heather E.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Kalispell Maintenance Headquarters Project : Environmental Assessment and Findings of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect

The facilities needed to maintain and repair Bonneville Power Administration (BPA`s) electrical equipment in northwest Montana are currently in two locations: A maintenance headquarters at the Kalispell Substation, and a temporary leased facility south of Kalispell. The present situation is not efficient. There is not enough space to accommodate the equipment needed at each site, and coordination and communication between the two sites is difficult. Also, two sites means duplication of equipment and facilities. BPA needs a single, centralized facility that would efficiently accommodate all the area`s maintenance activities and equipment. BPA proposes to build a maintenance headquarters facility consisting of 2 to 4 single-story buildings totaling about 35,000 square feet (office spaces and workshop areas); an open-ended vehicle storage building (carport style); a fenced-in storage year; a storage building for flammables, herbicides, and hazardous wastes; and a parking lot. The facility would require developing about 6 to 10 acres of land. Two sites are being considered for the proposed project (see the attached map for locations). This report is the environmental assessment of the two options.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A knowledge-based approximate life cycle assessment system for evaluating environmental impacts of product design alternatives in a collaborative design environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a competitive and globalized business environment, the need for the green products becomes stronger. To meet these trends, environmental impact assessment besides delivery, cost and quality of products should be considered as an important factor in ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, Collaborative design environment, Design alternatives

Ji-Hyung Park; Kwang-Kyu Seo

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Technology assessment: environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with oil recovery from US tar-sand deposits  

SciTech Connect

The tar-sand resources of the US have the potential to yield as much as 36 billion barrels (bbls) of oil. The tar-sand petroleum-extraction technologies now being considered for commercialization in the United States include both surface (above ground) systems and in situ (underground) procedures. The surface systems currently receiving the most attention include: (1) thermal decomposition processes (retorting); (2) suspension methods (solvent extraction); and (3) washing techniques (water separation). Underground bitumen extraction techniques now being field tested are: (1) in situ combustion; and (2) in situ steam-injection procedures. At this time, any commercial tar-sand facility in the US will have to comply with at least 7 major federal regulations in addition to state regulations; building, electrical, and fire codes; and petroleum-industry construction standards. Pollution-control methods needed by tar-sand technologies to comply with regulatory standards and to protect air, land, and water quality will probably be similar to those already proposed for commercial oil-shale systems. The costs of these systems could range from about $1.20 to $2.45 per barrel of oil produced. Estimates of potential pollution-emisson levels affecting land, air, and water were calculated from available data related to current surface and in situ tar-sand field experiments in the US. These data were then extrapolated to determine pollutant levels expected from conceptual commercial surface and in situ facilities producing 20,000 bbl/d. The likelihood-of-occurrence of these impacts was then assessed. Experience from other industries, including information concerning health and ecosystem damage from air pollutants, measurements of ground-water transport of organic pollutants, and the effectiveness of environmental-control technologies was used to make this assessment.

Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

1981-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

406

Risk assessment for the off-site transportation of high-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of high-level waste (HLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers risks to collective populations and individuals under both routine and accident transportation conditions for truck and rail shipment modes. The report discusses the scope of the HLW transportation assessment, describes the analytical methods used for the assessment, defines the alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, and details important assessment assumptions. Results are reported for five alternatives. In addition, to aid in the understanding and interpretation of the results, specific areas of uncertainty are described, with an emphasis on how the uncertainties may affect comparisons of the alternatives.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Impact of Proposed Disturbed Rock Zone Conceptual Model Modifications to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have recently proposed a set of updates that integrate data from recent site characterization studies to two conceptual models for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's Performance Assessment (WIPP PA) program. This paper discusses the changes to the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ) model, which describes the macroscopic manifestation of grain-scale microcracks and larger macro-cracks that are created by induced stresses in the salt surrounding excavations. The DRZ, as modeled in WIPP PA, is an important component of the repository system because its properties affect the quantity of available brine and its ability to enter the waste areas as well as the connectivity of panels after closure. The DOE and SNL have proposed decreasing the region that represents the DRZ in WIPP PA. Additionally, it has been proposed to make the permeability of DRZ a time-dependent quantity to reflect the long-term behavior. In this paper, the implementation of the proposed DRZ model changes is outlined, and the impact of the DRZ modifications on the long-term performance of the WIPP is discussed. The DRZ modifications generally reduced the amount of brine that entered into the repository, as well as reduced the pressure in the repository, except for scenarios in which a pressurized brine pocket was encountered. Overall, the saturation and pressure changes affected the frequency and magnitude of the direct brine and spalling volumes. (authors)

Clayton, D.J.; Ismail, A.E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Assessing the impacts of future demand for saline groundwater on commercial deployment of CCS in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a preliminary assessment of the potential impact that future demand for groundwater might have on the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies within the United States. A number of regions within the U.S. have populations, agriculture and industries that are particularly dependent upon groundwater. Moreover, some key freshwater aquifers are already over-utilized or depleted, and others are likely to be moving toward depletion as demand grows. The need to meet future water demands may lead some parts of the nation to consider supplementing existing supplies with lower quality groundwater resources, including brackish waters that are currently not considered sources of drinking water but which could provide supplemental water via desalination. In some areas, these same deep saline-filled geologic formations also represent possible candidate carbon dioxide (CO2) storage reservoirs. The analysis presented here suggests that future constraints on CCS deployment due to potential needs to supplement conventional water supplies by desalinating deeper and more brackish waters are likely to be necessary only in limited regions across the country, particularly in areas that are already experiencing water stress.

Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijgi/ A Spatially Intelligent Public Participation System for the Environmental Impact Assessment Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: An environmental impact assessment (EIA) is a decision-making process that evaluates the possible significant effects that a proposed project may exert on the environment. The EIA scoping and reviewing stages often involve public participation. Although its importance has long been recognized, public participation in the EIA process is often regarded as ineffective, due to time, budget, resource, technical and procedural constraints, as well as the complexity of environmental information. Geographic Information System (GIS) and Volunteer Geographic Information (VGI) have the potential to contribute to data collection, sharing and presentation, utilize local user-generated content to benefit decision-making and increase public outreach. This research integrated GIS, VGI, social media tools, data mining and mobile technology to design a spatially intelligent framework that presented and shared EIA information effectively to the public. A spatially intelligent public participative system (SIPPS) was also developed as a proof-of-concept of the framework. The research selected the Tehachapi Renewable Transmission Project (TRTP) as the pilot study area. Survey questionnaires were designed to collect feedback and conduct evaluation. Results show that SIPPS was able to improve the effectiveness of public participation, promote environmental awareness and achieve good system usability.

Lei Lei; Brian Hilton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Widening Trench 36 of the 218-E-12B Low-Level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This environmental assessment was prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action to widen and operate unused Trench 36 in the 218-E-12B Low-Level Burial Ground for disposal of low-level waste. Information contained herein will be used by the Manager, U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, to determine if the Proposed Action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the Proposed Action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the Proposed Action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact will be issued and the action may proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations 1508.27. This environmental assessment was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act of1969'', as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for ''National Environmental Polio Act'' (Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations 1021). The following is a description of each section of this environmental assessment. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This section provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S, Department of Energy is addressing with the Proposed Action. Background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. This section provides a description of the Proposed Action with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. This section describes reasonable,alternative actions to the Proposed Action, which addresses the Purpose and Need. A No Action Alternative, as required by Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This section provides a brief description of the locale in which the Proposed Action would take place. (5) Environmental Impacts. This section describes the range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, of the Proposed Action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. This section provides a brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the Proposed Action. (7) Organizations Consulted. This section lists any outside groups, agencies, or individuals contacted as part of the environmental assessment preparation and/or review. (8) References. This section provides a list of documents used to contribute information or data in preparation of this environmental assessment.

N /A

1999-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

Economic Assessment Environmental impact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-72 ...........................8.5.1.1.1 Phosphate Rock 8-74 ...................................8.5.1.1.2 Coke 8

412

Ngfast : a simulation model for rapid assessment of impacts of natural gas pipeline breaks and flow reductions at U. S. state borders and import points.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes NGfast, the new simulation and impact-analysis tool developed by Argonne National Laboratory for rapid, first-stage assessments of impacts of major pipeline breaks. The methodology, calculation logic, and main assumptions are discussed. The concepts presented are most useful to state and national energy agencies tasked as first responders to such emergencies. Within minutes of the occurrence of a break, NGfast can generate an HTML-formatted report to support briefing materials for state and federal emergency responders. Sample partial results of a simulation of a real system in the United States are presented.

Portante, E. C.; Craig, B. A.; Folga, S.M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

414

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTEGRATED NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PLAN, ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT and Finding Of No Significant Impacts for ROCK CREEK RESERVE 2001-Closure DOE/EA - 1371 Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service May, 2001 Dear Stakeholder: Enclosed is the Final Rock Creek Reserve Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (Plan), Environmental Assessment (EA), and Finding Of No Significant Impacts (FONSI). The Rock Creek Reserve was dedicated on May 17, 1999, to be jointly managed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Department of Energy. This Plan/EA was developed in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. Through cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for joint

415

DOE/EA-1371; Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan, Environmental Assessment, and Finding of No Significant Impacts for Rock Creek Reserve (5/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment for Rock Creek Reserve Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) with the assistance and cooperation of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service, prepared an Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan and Environmental Assessment (Plan)(DOE/EA-1371) for the Rock Creek Reserve at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) located north of Golden, Colorado. The Rock Creek Reserve was established in May 1999 in recognition of the area's biological significance. Although still under the ownership of the DOE, the Rock Creek Reserve will be co- managed with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of an interagency agreement signed by these two

416

DOE/EA-1342: Shelton-Kitsap Transmission Line Rebuild Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact (01/17/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A N U A R Y 2 0 0 1 A N U A R Y 2 0 0 1 SHELTON-KITSAP TRANSMISSION LINE REBUILD Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact DOE/EA-1342 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Bonneville Power Administration Shelton-Kitsap Transmission Line Rebuild Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings. Summary: This notice announces Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) proposal to rebuild its existing Shelton-Kitsap No. 2 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line as a double-circuit 230-kV line in the existing right-of-way, in order to improve system capability and reliability. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1342) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major

417

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for the European Wind Energy Conference held February 27--March 2, 2006, in Athens, Greece, showing grid impacts of wind power variability.

Parsons, B.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A method for the assessment of the visual impact caused by the large-scale deployment of renewable-energy facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of energy from renewable sources requires a significantly larger use of the territory compared with conventional (fossil and nuclear) sources. For large penetrations of renewable technologies, such as wind power, the overall visual impact at the national level can be substantial, and may prompt public reaction. This study develops a methodology for the assessment of the visual impact that can be used to measure and report the level of impact caused by several renewable technologies (wind farms, solar photovoltaic plants or solar thermal ones), both at the local and regional (e.g. national) scales. Applications are shown to several large-scale, hypothetical scenarios of wind and solar-energy penetration in Spain, and also to the vicinity of an actual, single wind farm.

Rodrigues, Marcos; Montanes, Carlos [Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50018, Zaragoza (Spain); Fueyo, Norberto, E-mail: Norberto.Fueyo@unizar.e [Fluid Mechanics Group, University of Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 3, 50018, Zaragoza (Spain)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

A Large-Scale, High-Resolution Hydrological Model Parameter Data Set for Climate Change Impact Assessment for the Conterminous US  

SciTech Connect

To extend geographical coverage, refine spatial resolution, and improve modeling efficiency, a computation- and data-intensive effort was conducted to organize a comprehensive hydrologic dataset with post-calibrated model parameters for hydro-climate impact assessment. Several key inputs for hydrologic simulation including meteorologic forcings, soil, land class, vegetation, and elevation were collected from multiple best-available data sources and organized for 2107 hydrologic subbasins (8-digit hydrologic units, HUC8s) in the conterminous United States at refined 1/24 (~4 km) spatial resolution. Using high-performance computing for intensive model calibration, a high-resolution parameter dataset was prepared for the macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model. The VIC simulation was driven by DAYMET daily meteorological forcing and was calibrated against USGS WaterWatch monthly runoff observations for each HUC8. The results showed that this new parameter dataset may help reasonably simulate runoff at most US HUC8 subbasins. Based on this exhaustive calibration effort, it is now possible to accurately estimate the resources required for further model improvement across the entire conterminous United States. We anticipate that through this hydrologic parameter dataset, the repeated effort of fundamental data processing can be lessened, so that research efforts can emphasize the more challenging task of assessing climate change impacts. The pre-organized model parameter dataset will be provided to interested parties to support further hydro-climate impact assessment.

Oubeidillah, Abdoul A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL] [ORNL; Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Tootle, Glenn [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa] [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Report to Congress on Assessment of Potential Impact of Concentrating Solar Power for Electriicty Generation (EPACT 2005--Section 934(c))  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summary of DOE's assessment of issues regarding EPAct 2005, which requires the Secretary of Energy to assess conflicting guidance on the economic potential of concentrating solar power for electricity production.

Wilkins, F.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Final Systems Development Report for the Clark County Socioeconomic Impact Assessment of the Proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, NV  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Development Report represents the third major step in the Clark County Socioeconomic Impact Assessment of the Proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mound Nevada. The first of these steps was to forge a Research Design that would serve as a guide for the overall research process. The second step was the construction of the Base Case, the purpose of which was to describe existing conditions in Clark County in the specified analytic areas of Economic-Demographic/Fiscal, Emergency Planning and Management, Transportation and Sociocultural analysis. The base case description will serve as a basis for assessing changes in these topic areas that might result from the Yucca Mountain project. These changes will be assessed by analyzing conditions with and without repository development in the county. Prior to performing such assessments, however, the snapshot type of data found in the base case must be operationalized or systematized to allow for more dynamic data utilization. In other words, a data system that can be used to analyze the consequences of the introduction of different variables (or variable values) in the Clark County context must be constructed. Such a system must be capable of being updated through subsequent data collection and monitoring efforts to both provide a rolling base case and supply information necessary to construct trend analyses. For example, during the Impact Assessment phase of the study process, the without repository analysis is accomplished by analyzing growth for the county given existing conditions and likely trends. These data are then compared to the with Yucca Mountain project conditions anticipated for the county. Similarly, once the emergency planning management and response needs associated with the repository are described, these needs will be juxtaposed against existing (and various future) capacity(ies) in order to determine the nature and magnitude of impacts in this analytic area. Analogous tasks will be performed for the other analytic areas detailed in the Base Case and outlined below.

NONE

1992-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Influence of climate model biases and daily-scale temperature and precipitation events on hydrological impacts assessment: A case study of the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fourth Assessment Report concludes that climate change is now unequivocal, and associated increases in evaporation and atmospheric water content could intensify the hydrological cycle. However, the biases and coarse spatial resolution of global climate models limit their usefulness in hydrological impact assessment. In order to reduce these limitations, we use a high-resolution regional climate model (RegCM3) to drive a hydrological model (variable infiltration capacity) for the full contiguous United States. The simulations cover 1961-1990 in the historic period and 2071-2100 in the future (A2) period. A quantile-based bias correction technique is applied to the times series of RegCM3-simulated precipitation and temperature. Our results show that biases in the RegCM3 fields not only affect the magnitude of hydrometeorological variables in the baseline hydrological simulation, but they also affect the response of hydrological variables to projected future anthropogenic increases in greenhouse forcing. Further, we find that changes in the intensity and occurrence of severe wet and hot events are critical in determining the sign of hydrologic change. These results have important implications for the assessment of potential future hydrologic changes, as well as for developing approaches for quantitative impacts assessment.

Ashfaq, Moetasim [ORNL; Bowling, Laura C. [Purdue University; Cherkauer, Keith [Purdue University; Pal, Jeremy [Loyola University; Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Comparison of environmental impacts of steel and concrete as building materials using the Life Cycle Assessment method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the United States, the construction industry accounts for almost 75% of total raw material used. This is an obvious drain on natural resources and has a major impact on the surrounding environment. Construction materials ...

Johnson, Timothy Werner

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

High-Resolution Climate Change Impact Analysis on Medium-Sized River Catchments in Germany: An Ensemble Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of climate change on three small- to medium-sized river catchments (Ammer, Mulde, and Ruhr) in Germany is investigated for the near future (2021–50) following the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on ...

Irena Ott; Doris Duethmann; Joachim Liebert; Peter Berg; Hendrik Feldmann; Juergen Ihringer; Harald Kunstmann; Bruno Merz; Gerd Schaedler; Sven Wagner

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu and assessment of potential impacts to waterbirds from the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of endangered waterbirds on Maui and Oahu was conducted during August and September 1993 to identify potential waterbird habitats within the general area of the proposed Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission corridor and to assess the potential impacts to endangered waterbird of installing and operating a high voltage transmission line from the Island of Hawaii to the islands of Oahu and Maui. Annual waterbird survey information and other literature containing information on specific wetland sites were summarized. Literature describing impacts of overhead transmission lines on birds was used to evaluate potential impacts of the proposed project on endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. On Oahu, five wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within 2.5 miles of the proposed transmission line corridor. On Maui, three wetland habitats supporting endangered Hawaiian waterbirds were identified within the general area of the proposed transmission line corridor. Several of the wetlands identified on Oahu and Maui also supported resident wading birds and migratory shorebirds and waterfowl. Endangered waterbirds, resident wading birds, and migratory birds may collide with the proposed transmission lines wires. The frequency and numbers of bird collisions is expected to be greater on Oahu than on Maui because more wetland habitat exists and greater numbers of birds occur in the project area on Oahu. In addition, the endangered Hawaiian goose and the endangered Hawaiian petrel may be impacted by the proposed segment of the Hawaii Geothermal Project transmission line on Maui.

Evans, K.; Woodside, D.; Bruegmann, M. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Honolulu, HI (United States). Pacific Islands Office

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

DOE/EA-1605: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site Agency: U.S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1605) to analyze the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction and operation of new biomass cogeneration and heating facilities located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The draft EA was made available to the States of South Carolina and Georgia, and to the public, for a 30-day comment period. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the

428

Finding of No Significant Impact for the I'SOT Canby District Heating Project, Modoc County, California Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coiorado 80401-3393 Coiorado 80401-3393 March 7, 2003 DOEEA-1460 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT For the IN SEARCH OF TRUTH CANBY DISTRICT HEATING PROJECT CANBY, MODOC COUNTY, CALIFORNIA AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an Environmental ,4ssessment (EA) of the In Search of Truth (I'SOT) Canby District Heating Project, Modoc County, California, to evaluate potential environmental impacts of project construction and operations for three years. DOE would provide partial fundin g, through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), to I'SOT for the development and field verification of a small-scale, geothermal district heating system. Local district heating projects have the potential for widespread

429

Risk time-window specification and its impact on the assessment of medication-related adverse events.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Post-marketing studies using medical administrative databases are often conducted to assess medication-related adverse events (AE). The determination of the risk time-window, defined as the period… (more)

Cournoyer, Daniel.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Field of Dreams or Dream Team? Assessing Two Models for Drought Impact Reporting in the Semiarid Southwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To make decisions about drought declarations, status, and relief funds, decision makers need high-quality local-level drought impact data. In response to this need in Arizona the Arizona DroughtWatch program was created, which includes an online drought ...

Alison M. Meadow; Michael A. Crimmins; Daniel B. Ferguson

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Field of Dreams, or Dream Team?: Assessing Two Models For Drought Impact Reporting in the Semiarid Southwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To make decisions about drought declarations, status, and relief funds decision makers need high quality local-level drought impact data. In response to this need in Arizona, the Arizona DroughtWatch program was created, which includes an online drought ...

Alison M. Meadow; Michael A. Crimmins; Daniel B. Ferguson

432

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation and Expansion of Idaho National Laboratory Reseach and Development at a Science and Technology Campus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL FOR THE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED CONSOLIDATION AND EXPANSION OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AT A SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: DOE prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Consolidation and Expansion of the Idaho National Laboratory Research and Development at a Science and Technology Campus (STC) (DOEIEA-1555). The proposed action consists of consolidating and expanding existing laboratory and business capabilities and operations within a single geographic area, or central campus. The proposed action would accommodate anticipated program growth while allowing for the consolidation of various activities located in the Idaho

433

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Because of wind power's unique characteristics, many concerns are based on the increased variability that wind contributes to the grid, and most U.S. studies have focused on this aspect of wind generation. Grid operators are also concerned about the ability to predict wind generation over several time scales. In this report, we quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs.

Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.; Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E.; Oakleaf, B.; Wolf, K.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, R.; Ahlstrom, M.; Nakafuji, D. Y.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Environmental assessment for the Waste Water Treatment Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project and finding of no significant impact  

SciTech Connect

The possible environmental impacts from the construction and operation of a waste water treatment facility for the West Valley Demonstration Project are presented. The West Valley Project is a demonstration project on the solidification of high-level radioactive wastes. The need for the facility is the result of a rise in the work force needed for the project which rendered the existing sewage treatment plant incapable of meeting the nonradioactive waste water treatment needs.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Impact of High-Penetration PV on Distribution System Performance: Assessment of Regulation Control Options for Voltage Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaics are beginning to challenge distribution system power engineers nationwide. The impact photovoltaics (PV) has on the power system is directly tied to system characteristics which include but are not limited to voltage class, load, regulation, and short circuit capacity. In addition to the system characteristics, the solar characteristics also play a key role. These include details on the PV systems themselves in addition to the solar irradiance data. The correlation of PV output and ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Grid Impacts of Wind Power Variability: Recent Assessments from a Variety of Utilities in the United States; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of wind power's unique characteristics, many concerns are based on the increased variability that wind contributes to the grid, and most U.S. studies have focused on this aspect of wind generation. Grid operators are also concerned about the ability to predict wind generation over several time scales. In this report, we quantify the physical impacts and costs of wind generation on grid operations and the associated costs.

Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.; Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E.; Oakleaf, B.; Wolf, K.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, R.; Ahlstrom, M.; Nakafuji, D. Y.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment of Three Site Development Projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT AND FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF THREE SITE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS AT THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY SOUTH TABLE MOUNTAIN SITE July 2007 U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y G o l d e n F i e l d O f f i c e N a t i o n a l R e n e w a b l e E n e r g y L a b o r a t o r y 1 6 1 7 C o l e B o u l e v a r d G o l d e n , C o l o r a d o 8 0 4 0 1 DOE/EA-1573 Final Environmental Assessment of Three Site Development Projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory South Table Mountain Site i TABLE OF CONTENTS ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ....................................................................................................iv EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..........................................................................................................................

438

Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers including draft environmental assessment, regulatory impact analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (P.L. 100-12) and by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Amendments of 1988 (P.L. 100-357), and by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486), provides energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products` covered by the Act, and authorizes the Secretary of Energy to prescribe amended or new energy standards for each type (or class) of covered product. The assessment of the proposed standards for refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers presented in this document is designed to evaluate their economic impacts according to the criteria in the Act. It includes an engineering analysis of the cost and performance of design options to improve the efficiency of the products; forecasts of the number and average efficiency of products sold, the amount of energy the products will consume, and their prices and operating expenses; a determination of change in investment, revenues, and costs to manufacturers of the products; a calculation of the costs and benefits to consumers, electric utilities, and the nation as a whole; and an assessment of the environmental impacts of the proposed standards.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase 1, Volume Two (B), Clark Fork River Projects, Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids Dams, Operator, Washington Water Power Company.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents best available information concerning the wildlife species impacted and the degree of the impact. A target species list was developed to focus the impact assessment and to direct mitigation efforts. Many non-target species also incurred impacts but are not discussed in this report. All wildlife habitats inundated by the two reservoirs are represented by the target species. It was assumed the numerous non-target species also affected will be benefited by the mitigation measures adopted for the target species. Impacts addressed are limited to those directly attributable to the loss of habitat and displacement of wildlife populations due to the construction and operation of the two hydroelectric projects. Secondary impacts, such as the relocation of railroads and highways, and the increase of the human population, were not considered. In some cases, both positive and negative impacts were assessed; and the overall net effect was reported. The loss/gain estimates reported represent impacts considered to have occurred during one point in time except where otherwise noted. When possible, quantitative estimates were developed based on historical information from the area or on data from similar areas. Qualitative loss estimates of low, moderate, or high with supporting rationale were assessed for each species or species group.

Wood, Marilyn

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "impact assessment pia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

A multi-sensor approach for assessing the impacts of ultraviolet-absorbing aerosols on top of atmosphere radiative fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One year (June 2006-May 2007) of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) top of atmosphere (TOA) shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes are used with Ozone Monitoring Instrument-Aerosol Index (OMI-AI) data to assess the direct radiative ...

Thomas A. Jones; Sundar A. Christopher

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Till'"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

zg-..Ttr""2t.T zg-..Ttr""2t.T ? f~'···( .)'~=.~ -·pnw··-·:··· .~~., '"?""(".~, .. -.-. ··r='''' Till'" a * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL ATR NSUF Users Week 2009 PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT --~~·--:--"'-'(--~'-'·--~--~'-~'~--~-_·_-------··--I

444

Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the  

SciTech Connect

Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

REVISED GUIDELINES FOR USING CELLULOSE DEGRADATION PRODUCT-IMPACTED KD VALUES FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AND COMPOSITE ANALYSES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulosic materials include wood, paper, rags, and cardboard products. These materials are co-disposed with radiological waste at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF). Cellulosic materials readily degrade in the environment to form cellulose degradation products (CDP) that will partition to the sediment or remain mobile in the groundwater. Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has conducted studies to estimate the impact of CDP on radionuclide sorption to SRS sediments (Kd values). It was found that CDP impact on radionuclide sorption varies with radionuclide and CDP concentration. Furthermore, it was found that the amount of carbon (C) in the system could increase or decrease Kd values with respect to the base case of when no CDP was added. Throughout the expected pH range of the ELLWF, a low concentration of CDP in the system would increase Kd values (because C would sorb to the sediment and provide more exchange sites for radionuclides to sorb), whereas greater concentrations of CDP ({ge}20 mg/L C) would decrease Kd values (because C would remain in solution and complex the radionuclide and not permit the radionuclide to sorb to the sediment). A review of >230 dissolved organic carbon (DOC) groundwater concentrations in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG) at the SRS indicated that the average DOC concentration, a gross measure of CDP, was 5 mg/L C. At approximately this DOC concentration, the laboratory studies demonstrated that no anions (Tc, I, or Se) or cations (Ni, Sr, Ce, Eu, Zr, or Th) have decreased sorption in the presence of carbon (an analogue for CDP).

Kaplan, D.

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action (one action alternative), and Alternative 3, which consisted of the No Build Action that is required by 10 CFR 1021.321(c). Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-1497, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting humans or the natural environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). To further minimize impacts to environmental media, the DOE will also implement a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for this action. The MAP is included as Appendix F of this EA, which is appended to this FONSI. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, authorizes the creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to store crude oil to reduce the United States' vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Crude oil is stored in geologic formations, or salt domes, located under these facilities. The purpose of this proposed project is to construct a new RWIPL at the main site to replace the existing RWIPL which services this facility.

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action (one action alternative), and Alternative 3, which consisted of the No Build Action that is required by 10 CFR 1021.321(c). Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-1497, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting humans or the natural environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). To further minimize impacts to environmental media, the DOE will also implement a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for this action. The MAP is included as Appendix F of this EA, which is appended to this FONSI. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, authorizes the creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to store crude oil to reduce the United States' vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Crude oil is stored in geologic formations, or salt domes, located under these facilities. The purpose of this proposed project is to construct a new RWIPL at the main site to replace the existing RWIPL which services this facility.

N /A

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Management impact assessment of refuse-derived fuel implementation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Final report 30 Sep 80-11 Mar 81  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study has shown that the impact of specifying, procuring, using, and monitoring refuse-derived fuel (RDF) on the organizational structure and the operations and management activities of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base has been generally minimal and essentially absorbed into the various ongoing functional activities. However, the project manager devoted over 75 percent of his time to the program since it started and additional housecleaning personnel were assigned to the operating staff to remove the dust and debris resulting from the RDF. The research and development nature of this particular activity contributes to the necessity of having a project manager with time to keep the program on track and interested persons informed as to its progress. Weather this impact would be reflected in follow-on implementation programs is problematic and dependent upon how the program is viewed locally, the need for further RandD, and the visibility required or desired. The level of effort dedicated to this project was 5.6 man-years the first year and is expected to be 4.0 man-years the second year. The associated salary costs are $130,500 and $86,500, respectively. An assessment of the applicability of CITA to the operation of the RDF facility at WPAFB indicates that this and other Air Force central heating plants will be reviewed for possible contract operation in FY 1984.

Huff, W.J.; McIntosh, R.K.

1982-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

Prospects for electric cars: electric vehicle impact assessment study. Final report, 15 December 1975--30 April 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The characteristics of future electric cars were projected by means of parametric models of weight, cost, and performance. They included urban ranges as much as two to four times those of recent electric cars: up to 150 km for improved lead-acid batteries, 250 km for nickel-zinc batteries, and 450 km for lithium-sulfur batteries. From data tapes of major travel surveys in Los Angeles and Washington, these ranges were found to be sufficient for most needs of all three major groups of drivers: secondary and primary drivers at multi-driper households, and drivers at one-driver households. Even with the longest design ranges, however, the electric cars would be incapable of occasional long trips now made by conventional cars, and only at the shortest design ranges would they be competitive in cost. Through modeling of supply and demand for over 200 U.S. utilities it was projected that, by the year 2000, almost 60% of US cars could be electrified, only 17% of the recharging power would come from petroleum. Modeling of air pollutant emissions for 24 large urban regions showed that electrification of all cars would reduce regional hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide emissions by roughly half, but increase sulfur oxide emissions some 20%. Traffic noise would be significantly reduced, even after major quieting of conventional vehicles. Identified resources of battery materials suffice for tens of millions of electric cars, but not necessarily for complete electrification of all US autos. Economic impacts aside from added costs for motorists would be relatively minor.

Hamilton, W.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

An assessment of potential health impacts on Utrok Atoll from exposure to cesium-137 (137Cs) and plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Residual fallout contamination from the nuclear test program in the Marshall Islands is a concern to Marshall Islanders because of the potential health risks associated with exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment. Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been monitoring the amount of fallout radiation delivered to Utrok Atoll residents over the past 4 years. This briefing document gives an outline of our findings from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay monitoring programs. Additional information can be found on the Marshall Islands web site (http://eed.lnl.gov/mi/). Cesium-137 is an important radioactive isotope produced in nuclear detonations and can be taken up from coral soils into locally grown food crop products that form an important part of the Marshallese diet. The Marshall Islands whole body counting program has clearly demonstrated that the majority of Utrok Atoll residents acquire a very small but measurable quantity of cesium-137 in their bodies (Hamilton et al., 2006; Hamilton et. al., 2007a; 2007b;). During 2006, a typical resident of Utrok Atoll received about 3 mrem of radiation from internally deposited cesium-137 (Hamilton et al., 2007a). The population-average dose contribution from cesium-137 is around 2% of the total radiation dose that people normally experience from naturally occurring radiation sources in the Marshall Islands and is thousands of times lower than the level where radiation exposure is known to produce measurable health effects. The existing dose estimates from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay programs are also well below radiological protection standards for protection of the public as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies including the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claim Tribunal (NCT). Similarly, the level of internally deposited plutonium found in Utrok Atoll residents is well within the range normally expected for people living in the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, the preliminary results of the bioassay program on Utrok Atoll (Hamilton et al., 2007b) provide clear evidence that residents of Utrok Atoll have never acquired a significant uptake of plutonium either through an acute exposure event or from long-term chronic exposure to plutonium in the environment. This information and data should provide a level of assurance to the Utrok Atoll population group and its leadership that the dose contribution from exposure to residual radioactive fallout contamination on Utrok Atoll is very low, and is not likely to have any discernible impact on human health. We also estimate that the dose contribution based on current radiological exposure conditions will not produce any additional cancer fatalities (or any other measurable health condition) above that normally expected to arise in a population group of similar size. The potential risks from any genetic illnesses caused by exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment will be even lower still. In conclusion, the data and information developed from the radiological protection monitoring program on Utrok appear to support a consensus that it is safe to live on Utrok Atoll. The health risks from exposure to residual fallout contamination on the atoll are minimal when compared with other lifetime risks that people normally experience, and are very small when compared to the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a group of people.

Hamilton, T

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

454

Second National Climate Assessment (2009)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Print E-mail alt What is the Second National Climate Assessment? The Second National Climate Assessment, entitled Global Change Impacts in the United States, was published in...

455

Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy  

SciTech Connect

Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

Callaway, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

EIS-0383: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Statement EIS-0383: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Orlando Gasification Project This EIS assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result...

457

Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Annoyance: A Preliminary Analysis in Vinalhaven, Maine  

SciTech Connect

Neighbors living near the 3 turbine, 4.5 MW Vinalhaven, Maine wind power facility, which began operations in late 2009, have complained that the noise from the turbines is unwelcome and annoying. Fox Islands Wind, the owner of the facility, hypothesized that implementing a Noise Reduced Operation (NRO) for the turbines, which effectively limits the turbines maximum rpm and power output, would reduce the sound levels produced by the turbines, and therefore might also reduce the degree to which the neighbors report being annoyed by those sounds. To test this hypothesis in a preliminary fashion, a pilot study was conducted in early 2010, the results of which are the subject of this brief report. The study included asking near-by residents - those within roughly 3000 feet - to rate the sounds and the degree to which they were annoyed by them using logs which they filled out at multiple times during the day on as many days as were possible in the 35 day study period in February and March, 2010. Meanwhile, FIW adjusted the NRO settings of the turbines in a random fashion in the evenings during the same period, but in a pattern that the respondents were not made aware of. Ultimately, nine individuals turned in roughly 200 log entries (i.e., responses), each of which was time coded to allow testing if the response was correlated with the wind facility operating conditions at that time. The analysis of these data found small, non-statistically-significant differences in self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings between the periods when the NRO was enacted and when it was not, after controlling for many of the relationships that could independently influence perceived loudness and annoyance (e.g., wind direction, time of day). Possible explanations for these small differences in self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings include: the relative difference in sound output from the turbines when NRO was engaged and when it was not was small; and/or that differences in turbine sound outputs that did exist might have been masked by higher (non-turbine) wind sound levels that were coincident with NRO periods. Because this preliminary test only included a small portion of the population surrounding the turbines, the sample of self-reported ratings was itself very small. In addition, the conditions varied greatly over the study period, as described in the report that follows. Consequently, the results presented here should be considered preliminary, and further data collection and analysis are warranted. The main findings of this preliminary study are: (1) As planned, periods in which the NRO was engaged were found to have noticeably lower turbine rotational speeds (rpm), based on turbine operational data. (2) 11% of responses overall indicated that the turbines were perceived as either 'very' or 'extremely' loud at the time they were logged, and roughly two thirds of those (7% overall) indicated the sounds to be 'very' or 'extremely' annoying. (3) Self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings were higher during the night and when the wind was from the North (participants in the study were located to the east and south of the turbines). (4) Self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings were generally found to be lower during the NRO periods, but these observed differences are relatively small in magnitude, and are not statistically significant. (5) There is some limited evidence that high-speed surface winds mask self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings. Therefore, because NRO settings are only engaged during periods of high winds, the true effects of the NRO adjustments might be diluted to some degree. (6) The results of this preliminary assessment should not be applied to the full population of homeowners near the turbines in Vinalhaven, Maine because the potentially most-sensitive individuals (those most vocal of their dislike of the turbine sounds) opted not to participate in the study, and because the study did not include the relatively large numbe

Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Eckholdt, Haftan

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

458

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: The Nevada Test Site Development Corporations's Desert Rock Sky Park at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1300) (EA) which analyzes the potential environmental effects of developing operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, between Mercury Camp and U.S. Highway 95 and east of Desert Rock Airport. The EA evaluates the potential impacts of infrastructure improvements necessary to support fill build out of the 512-acre Desert Rock Sky Park. Two alternative actions were evaluated: (1) Develop, operate and maintain a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site, and (2) taking no action. The purpose and need for the commercial industrial park are addressed in Section 1.0 of the EA. A detailed description of the proposed action and alternatives is in section 2.0. Section 3.0 describes the affected environment. Section 4.0 the environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternative. Cumulative effects are addressed in Section 5.0. Mitigation measures are addressed in Section 6.0. The Department of Energy determined that the proposed action of developing, operating and maintaining a commercial/industrial park in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site would best meet the needs of the agency.

N /A

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z