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1

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus AreaDataBusPFAN)Change Assessment Model (GCAM) | OpenWells

2

Category:Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind FarmAdd aMinutesMap Files JumpObservation

3

A New Method For Robust High-Precision Time-Series Photometry From Well-Sampled Images: Application to Archival MMT/Megacam Observations of the Open Cluster M37  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce new methods for robust high-precision photometry from well-sampled images of a non-crowded field with a strongly varying point-spread function. For this work, we used archival imaging data of the open cluster M37 taken by MMT 6.5m telescope. We find that the archival light curves from the original image subtraction procedure exhibit many unusual outliers, and more than 20% of data get rejected by the simple filtering algorithm adopted by early analysis. In order to achieve better photometric precisions and also to utilize all available data, the entire imaging database was re-analyzed with our time-series photometry technique (Multi-aperture Indexing Photometry) and a set of sophisticated calibration procedures. The merit of this approach is as follows: we find an optimal aperture for each star with a maximum signal-to-noise ratio, and also treat peculiar situations where photometry returns misleading information with more optimal photometric index. We also adopt photometric de-trending based on ...

Chang, S -W; Hartman, J D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Seismic Signal Processing for Single Well Imaging Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the concept of Single Well Imaging (SWI) in which a seismic source and receivers are deployed in a borehole to investigate the surrounding geology. The Uniwell project (1997-1999) was the first ...

Walsh, Brendan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Well test imaging - a new method for determination of boundaries from well test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method has been developed for analysis of well test data, which allows the direct calculation of the location of arbitrary reservoir boundaries which are detected during a well test. The method is based on elements of ray tracing and information theory, and is centered on the calculation of an instantaneous {open_quote}angle of view{close_quote} of the reservoir boundaries. In the absence of other information, the relative reservoir shape and boundary distances are retrievable in the form of a Diagnostic Image. If other reservoir information, such as 3-D seismic, is available; the full shape and orientation of arbitrary (non-straight line or circular arc) boundaries can be determined in the form of a Reservoir Image. The well test imaging method can be used to greatly enhance the information available from well tests and other geological data, and provides a method to integrate data from multiple disciplines to improve reservoir characterization. This paper covers the derivation of the analytical technique of well test imaging and shows examples of application of the technique to a number of reservoirs.

Slevinsky, B.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed16 Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributedflow processes near a geothermal well under heating and

Freifeld, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Empirical Study Of Tube Wave Suppression For Single Well Seismic Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's portion of a collaborative effort with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories on a borehole seismic project called Single Well Seismic Imaging. The INEEL's role was to design, fabricate, deploy, and test a number of passive devices to suppress the energy within the borehole. This energy is generally known as tube waves. Heretofore, tube waves precluded acquisition of meaningful single-well seismic data. This report addresses the INEEL tests, theories, observations, and test results.

West, Phillip Bradley; Weinberg, David Michael; Fincke, James Russell

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Empirical Study Of Tube Wave Suppression For Single Well Seismic Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's portion of a collaborative effort with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories on a borehole seismic project called Single Well Seismic Imaging. The INEEL's role was to design, fabricate, deploy, and test a number of passive devices to suppress the energy within the borehole. This energy is generally known as tube waves. Heretofore, tube waves precluded acquisition of meaningful single-well seismic data. This report addresses the INEEL tests, theories, observations, and test results.

West, P.B.; Weinberg, D.M.; Fincke, J.R.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Empirical Determination of the Energy Loss Rate of Accelerated Electrons in a Well-Observed Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Empirical Determination of the Energy Loss Rate of Accelerated Electrons in a Well-Observed Solar & Michele Piana1,3 ABSTRACT We present electron images of an extended solar flare source, deduced from the impulsive phase of a solar flare typically appears in the form of accelerated electrons. In the generally

Piana, Michele

10

Segmentation of complex geophysical structures with well Running title: Image segmentation with well data.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with well data. Authors: Christian Gout§, and Carole Le Guyader. Complete affiliation: § Universit´e de 96822-2273 , USA. chris gout@cal.berkeley.edu : INSA de Rennes 20 Avenue des Buttes de Co¨esmes CS 14315 35043 Rennes, France. carole.le-guyader@insa-rennes.fr Corresponding author : Christian Gout

Boyer, Edmond

11

Geothermal Well Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture Imaging |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeaugaInformation Mexico - A Survey of Work to DateWellOpen

12

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

Fischlin, Andreas

13

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: A New Geothermal Well Imaging Tool. 1.To develop a robust and easily deployable DTPS for monitoring in geothermal wells; and 2. Develop the associated analysis methodology for flow imaging; and?when possible by wellbore conditions?to determine in situthermal conductivity and basal heat flux.

14

Observation of the proton aurora with IMAGE FUV imager and simultaneous ion flux in situ measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observation of the proton aurora with IMAGE FUV imager and simultaneous ion flux in situ satellite images the aurora in three different spectral regions. One of the channels of the spectrographic to spectrally discriminate between the proton and electron FUV aurora and to globally map the energetic protons

California at Berkeley, University of

15

Review Article Imaging and observing the electrical Moho  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Article Imaging and observing the electrical Moho Alan G. Jones Dublin Institute Electrical Moho Electrical conductivity Electrical resistivity Crust­mantle boundary Defining the depth on crustal and mantle rocks suggest that there should be a concomitant step-lie change in electrical

Jones, Alan G.

16

INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL ATOMS AT 1 AU OBSERVED BY THE IMAGE/LENA IMAGER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations from the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora: Global Exploration (IMAGE) Low Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager from 2005 are used to investigate characteristics of interstellar neutrals in the inner solar system. The LENA imager detected an interstellar neutral signal starting in 2004 December and extending to early 2005 April. Using the orientation of the field of view of the imager and the date of the loss of the interstellar neutral signal, it is concluded that the signal is consistent with a relatively compact (several degrees wide in ecliptic latitude and longitude) source of neutral helium and/or energetic (>150 eV) hydrogen originating from the solar apex direction. Observations later in 2005 are used to distinguish the composition and conclude that the relatively compact source likely contains some energetic hydrogen (in addition to the helium)

Fuselier, S. A.; Ghielmetti, A. G. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Wurz, P. [Physikalishes Institut, University of Bern, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland)], E-mail: Stephen.a.fuselier@lmco.com, E-mail: gmetti@mail.spasci.com, E-mail: peter.wurz@space.unibe.ch

2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evidence Estimation for Bayesian Partially Observed MRFs Yutian Chen Max Welling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(2006) use Langevin dynamics with approximate gradients, Welling and Parise (2006); Parise and Welling

Welling, Max

18

Observation of spin-dependent quantum well resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the observation of spin-dependent quantum well (QW) resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB free layers of single MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy spectra clearly show the presence of resonant oscillations in the parallel configuration, which are related with the appearance of majority-spin ?{sub 1} QW states in the CoFeB free layer. To gain a quantitative understanding, we calculated QW state positions in the voltage-thickness plane using the so-called phase accumulation model (PAM) and compared the PAM solutions with the experimental resonant voltages observed for a set of MTJs with different CoFeB free layer thicknesses (t{sub fl}?=?1.55, 1.65, 1.95, and 3.0?nm). An overall good agreement between experiment and theory was obtained. An enhancement of the tunnel magnetoresistance with bias is observed in a bias voltage region corresponding to the resonant oscillations.

Teixeira, J. M., E-mail: jmteixeira@fc.up.pt; Costa, J. D.; Ventura, J.; Sousa, J. B. [IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Wisniowski, P. [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Freitas, P. P. [INESC-MN and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol, 9-1, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal)

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

19

Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan, and Bjarne Foss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan flow systems is an area of increasing interest for the oil and gas industry. Oil wells with highly related to oil and gas wells exist, and in this study, unstable gas lifted wells will be the area

Foss, Bjarne A.

20

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Task 2 is to develop a numerical method for the efficient and accurate analysis of distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) data for (1) imaging flow profiles and (2) in situ determination of thermal conductivities and heat fluxes. Numerical forward and inverse modeling is employed to: (1) Examine heat and fluid flow processes near a geothermal well under heating and cooling conditions; (2) Demonstrate ability to interpret DTPS thermal profiles with acceptable estimation uncertainty using inverse modeling of synthetic temperature data; and (3) Develop template model and analysis procedure for the inversion of temperature data collected during a thermal perturbation test using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensors. This status report summarizes initial model developments and analyses.

Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Observation of room temperature optical absorption in InP/GaAs type-II ultrathin quantum wells and quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Room temperature optical absorption process is observed in ultrathin quantum wells (QWs) and quantum dots (QDs) of InP/GaAs type-II band alignment system using surface photovoltage spectroscopy technique, where no measurable photoluminescence signal is available. Clear signature of absorption edge in the sub band gap region of GaAs barrier layer is observed for the ultrathin QWs and QDs, which red shifts with the amount of deposited InP material. Movement of photogenerated holes towards the sample surface is proposed to be the main mechanism for the generation of surface photovoltage in type-II ultrathin QWs and QDs. QDs of smaller size are found to be free from the dislocations as confirmed by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

Singh, S. D., E-mail: devsh@rrcat.gov.in; Porwal, S.; Mondal, Puspen; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukherjee, C.; Dixit, V. K.; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Improving resolution and depth of astronomical observations via modern mathematical methods for image analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Pilo, Stefano; Falcone, Maurizio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Shock aurora: Ground-based imager observations X.-Y. Zhou,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shock aurora: Ground-based imager observations X.-Y. Zhou,1 K. Fukui,2 H. C. Carlson,3 J. I. Moen,4; published 23 December 2009. [1] This paper studies dayside shock aurora forms and their variations observed. The intensified green emissions were mainly diffuse aurora on closed field lines. They were latitudinally below

California at Berkeley, University of

24

Influence of image charge effect on exciton fine structure in an organic-inorganic quantum well material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated experimentally excitonic properties in organic-inorganic hybrid multi quantum well crystals, (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4} and (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}?C{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4}, by measuring photoluminescence, reflectance, photoluminescence excitation spectra. In these materials, the excitonic binding energies are enhanced not only by quantum confinement effect (QCE) but also by image charge effect (ICE), since the dielectric constant of the barrier layers is much smaller than that of the well layers. By comparing the 1s-exciton and 2s-exciton energies, we have investigated the influence of ICE with regard to the difference of the Bohr radius.

Takagi, Hidetsugu; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Ema, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Sato, Mikio; Takeoka, Yuko [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

25

Blind and pointed Sunyaev-Zel'dovich observations with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blind and Pointed Sunyaev-Zeldovich Observations with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Timothy William Shimwell Cavendish Astrophysics and Churchill College University of Cambridge A dissertation submitted to the University of Cambridge... and use these to characterise the analysis. I then, for the first time, apply the analysis to data from the AMI blind cluster survey. I identify several previously unknown SZ decrements. Finally, I conduct pointed observations towards a high luminosity sub...

Shimwell, Timothy William

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

26

Imaging and spectroscopic observations of magnetic reconnection and chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfv\\'{e}n speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of greatly redshifted ($\\sim$125 km s$^{-1}$ along line of sight) Fe {\\sc{xxi}} 1354.08\\AA{} emission line with a $\\sim$100 km s$^{-1}$ nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe {\\sc{xxi}} feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-Ray source observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) also...

Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K; Raymond, John C; Guo, Fan; Liu, Wei; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Vortices and Rossby waves in cylinder wakes on a parabolic -plane observed by altimetric imaging velocimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, geostrophic and gradient wind velocity, and potential vorticity fields with very high spatial resolutionVortices and Rossby waves in cylinder wakes on a parabolic -plane observed by altimetric imaging in the wake of a circular cylinder are investigated in a rotating parabolic polar -plane fluid. This system

Afanassiev, Iakov

28

Reverse convection and cusp proton aurora: Cluster, polar and image observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reverse convection and cusp proton aurora: Cluster, polar and image observation Q.-G. Zong a,b,*, TT) at Earth. Cusp proton aurora was caused by the leading phase of the CME. Cusp proton aurora generally of the cusp proton aurora shifted about 30 from dawnside to duskside when IMF By changed from 10 to 5 n

California at Berkeley, University of

29

Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Multi observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment S Institut Telecom - Telecom Bretagne, Brest, F-29200 France. Abstract. In Positron Emission Tomography (PET-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do

Brest, Université de

30

Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofof Multiple

31

Energy relaxation during hot-exciton transport in quantum wells: Direct observation by spatially resolved phonon-sideband spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the energy relaxation of excitons during the real-space transport in ZnSe quantum wells by using microphotoluminescence with spatial resolution enhanced by a solid immersion lens. The spatial evolution of ...

Zhao, Hui; Moehl, Sebastian; Kalt, Heinz

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

First Spectroscopic Imaging Observations of the Sun at Low Radio Frequencies with the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9201.6 MHz. ...

Oberoi, Divya

33

Autonomous Observing and Control Systems for PAIRITEL, a 1.3m Infrared Imaging Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL) is the first meter-class telescope operating as a fully robotic IR imaging system. Dedicated in October 2004, PAIRITEL began regular observations in mid-December 2004 as part of a 1.5 year commissioning period. The system was designed to respond without human intervention to new gamma-ray burst transients: this milestone was finally reached on November 9, 2005 but the telescope had a number of semi-automated sub-10 minute responses throughout early commissioning. When not operating in Target of Opportunity mode, PAIRITEL performs a number of queue scheduled transient monitoring campaigns. To achieve this level of automation, we have developed communicating tools to connect the various sub-systems: an intelligent queue scheduling database, run-time configurable observation sequence software, a data reduction pipeline, and a master state machine which monitors and controls all functions within and affecting the observatory.

J. S. Bloom; Dan L. Starr; Cullen H. Blake; M. F. Skrutskie; Emilio E. Falco

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Wavelength Determination for Solar Features Observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wavelength calibration of solar lines observed by the high resolution EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode satellite is reported. Spectral features of the quiet sun and of two mildly active areas were measured and calibrated. A listing of the stronger observed lines with identification of the leading contributor ions is presented. 41 lines are reported, with 90% identified. Wavelength precisions (2{sigma}) of {+-}0.0031 Angstroms for the EIS short band and {+-}0.0029 Angstroms for the EIS long band are obtained. These lines, typical of 1-2x10{sup 6} K plasmas, are recommended as standards for the establishment of EIS wavelength scales. The temperature of EIS varies by about 1.5 C around the orbit and also with spacecraft pointing. The correlation of these temperature changes with wavelength versus pixel number scale changes is reported.

Brown,C.; Hara, H.; Kamio, S.; Feldman, U.; Seely, J.; Doschek, G.; Mariska, J.; Korendyke, C.; Lang, J.; Dere, K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS: CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct revised response functions for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) using the new atomic data, ionization equilibria, and coronal abundances available in CHIANTI 7.1. We then use these response functions in multithermal analysis of coronal loops, which allows us to determine a specific cross-field temperature distribution without ad hoc assumptions. Our method uses data from the six coronal filters and the Monte Carlo solutions available from our differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The resulting temperature distributions are not consistent with isothermal plasma. Therefore, the observed loops cannot be modeled as single flux tubes and must be composed of a collection of magnetic strands. This result is now supported by observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager, which show fine-scale braiding of coronal strands that are reconnecting and releasing energy. Multithermal analysis is one of the major scientific goals of AIA, and these results represent an important step toward the successful achievement of that goal. As AIA DEM analysis becomes more straightforward, the solar community will be able to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution of the instrument.

Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

36

Numerical procedure for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical procedure is developed for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors, and is applied to three sets of higher resolution data provided to us by J. C. Seamus Davis and E. W. Hudson. Each image...

Wang, Q.; Hu, Chia-Ren.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Observations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae with the VERITAS Array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many of the recently discovered galactic very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray sources are associated with Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which is the most populous Galactic source category at TeV energies. The extended synchrotron nebulae of these objects observed in the X-ray band are a hallmark of the relativistic winds, generated by the young, energetic neutron stars, that interact with the matter ejected by the supernova explosion and the surrounding interstellar gas. Relativistic electrons, or protons, accelerated in the pulsar winds, or at their shock boundaries, interact with the magnetic field and low energy seed photons to produce the observed VHE gamma-ray emission. The VERITAS array of four imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes was designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy domain from about 100 GeV up to several tens of TeV. The sensitivity of the VERITAS array allows detailed studies of the morphology and spectral features of gamma-ray emission from PWNe. Three northern sky PWNe, G75.2+0.1, G106.6+2.9, and 3C58, were observed with VERITAS during 2006. No evidence for TeV gamma-ray emission at the position of the pu lsar associated with these PWNe is demonstrated.

A. Konopelko; for the VERITAS collaboration

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

Stratospheric profiles of nitrogen dioxide observed by Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System on the Odin satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratospheric profiles of nitrogen dioxide observed by Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager of nitrogen dioxide in the 19­40 km altitude range are successfully retrieved over the globe from Optical, iterative onion peel Citation: Sioris, C. E., et al., Stratospheric profiles of nitrogen dioxide observed

Chance, Kelly

39

ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007 (India); Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUN AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES WITH THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY PROTOTYPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9- 201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of 'low' to 'medium' activity, one broadband emission feature and numerous short-lived, narrowband, non-thermal emission features are evident. Our data represent a significant advance in low radio frequency solar imaging, enabling us to follow the spatial, spectral, and temporal evolution of events simultaneously and in unprecedented detail. The rich variety of features seen here reaffirms the coronal diagnostic capability of low radio frequency emission and provides an early glimpse of the nature of radio observations that will become available as the next generation of low-frequency radio interferometers come online over the next few years.

Oberoi, Divya; Matthews, Lynn D.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Benkevitch, Leonid [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA (United States); Cairns, Iver H.; Lobzin, Vasili [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Emrich, David; Wayth, Randall B.; Arcus, Wayne [Curtin Institute for Radio Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Morgan, Edward H.; Williams, Christopher [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); Prabu, T.; Vedantham, Harish [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore (India); Williams, Andrew [Perth Observatory, The University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); White, Stephen M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland, NM (United States); Allen, G. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW (Australia); Barnes, David [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Bernardi, Gianni [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Bowman, Judd D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Briggs, Frank H. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fracture Detection and Water Sweep Characterization Using Single-well Imaging, Vertical Seismic Profiling and Cross-dipole Methods in Tight and Super-k Zones, Haradh II, Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustain the targeted oil production rates and they die much sooner than expected when water enters the wells. The study attempted to identify fracture systems and their role in the irregular water sweep. Single-well acoustic migration imaging (SWI...

Aljeshi, Hussain Abdulhadi A.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Aerosols in the Caribbean MidAtlantic Region as Observed with the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerosols in the Caribbean MidAtlantic Region as Observed with the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging the year, changes in precipitation patterns and greater health risks for the Caribbean region during the spring months. Keywords: MODIS, MODIS Conversion Toolkit, aerosols, Caribbean region INTRODUCTION

Gilbes, Fernando

43

OBSERVERS BASED SYNCHRONIZATION AND INPUT RECOVERY FOR A CLASS OF CHAOTIC SYSTEMS. APPLICATION TO IMAGE TRANSMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO IMAGE TRANSMISSION Estelle Cherrier, , Jos´e Ragot , CRAN UMR 7039 / Nancy-Universit´e, CNRS 2 Avenue transmission as an application of a chaotic cryptosystem. The underlying problem concerns nonlinear state on the message. Efficiency of the proposed approach is shown through an image transmission. 1. INTRODUCTION

Boyer, Edmond

44

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager observation of the 1809 keV line from Galactic 26Al  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of the central radian of the Galaxy by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI) have yielded a high-resolution measurement of the 1809 keV line from 26Al, detected at 11 sigma significance in nine months of data. The RHESSI result for the width of the cosmic line is 2.03 (+0.78, -1.21) keV FWHM. The best fit line width of 5.4 keV FWHM reported by Naya et al. (1996) using the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) balloon instrument is rejected with high confidence.

David M. Smith

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF THE QUIET CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T approx 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, David R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping/observation densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping August 2013; accepted 7 September 2013; published 13 November 2013. [1] 3-D Hydraulic tomography (3-D HT (primarily hydraulic conductivity, K) is estimated by joint inversion of head change data from multiple

Barrash, Warren

47

BRIGHT POINTS AND JETS IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of polar coronal hole bright points (BPs) made with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. The data consist of raster images of BPs in multiple spectral lines from mostly coronal ions, e.g., Fe X-Fe XV. The BPs are observed for short intervals and thus the data are snapshots of the BPs obtained during their evolution. The images reveal a complex unresolved temperature structure (EIS resolution is about 2''), with the highest temperature being about 2 x 10{sup 6} K. Some BPs appear as small loops with temperatures that are highest near the top. But others are more point-like with surrounding structures. However, the thermal time evolution of the BPs is an important factor in their appearance. A BP may appear quite different at different times. We discuss one BP with an associated jet that is bright enough to allow statistically meaningful measurements. The jet Doppler speed along the line of sight is about 15-20 km s{sup -1}. Electron densities of the BPs and the jet are typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}, which implies path lengths along the line of sight on the order of a few arcsec. We also construct differential emission measure curves for two of the best observed BPs. High spatial resolution (significantly better than 1'') is required to fully resolve the BP structures.

Doschek, G. A.; Landi, E.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Harra, L. K., E-mail: george.doschek@nrl.navy.mi [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar, for observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager RHESSI. INTRODUCTION The Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, RHESSI,1 is a space-based solar x

California at Berkeley, University of

49

the atmosphere (31, 32). The style of activity imaged requires that the observed slipfaces are not  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can only be determined with future multiyear observations. In locations where wind energy that grainflow formation and remobilization of sediment by wind may be ap- proximately in equilibrium Conference, 15 to 19 March 2004, League City, TX, abstr. 1918

Nicolussi, Kurt

50

HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

POLARIMETRIC IMAGING OF LARGE CAVITY STRUCTURES IN THE PRE-TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND PDS 70: OBSERVATIONS OF THE DISK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present high-resolution H-band polarized intensity (FWHM = 0.''1: 14 AU) and L'-band imaging data (FWHM = 0.''11: 15 AU) of the circumstellar disk around the weak-lined T Tauri star PDS 70 in Centaurus at a radial distance of 28 AU (0.''2) up to 210 AU (1.''5). In both images, a giant inner gap is clearly resolved for the first time, and the radius of the gap is {approx}70 AU. Our data show that the geometric center of the disk shifts by {approx}6 AU toward the minor axis. We confirm that the brown dwarf companion candidate to the north of PDS 70 is a background star based on its proper motion. As a result of spectral energy distribution fitting by Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling, we infer the existence of an optically thick inner disk at a few AU. Combining our observations and modeling, we classify the disk of PDS 70 as a pre-transitional disk. Furthermore, based on the analysis of L'-band imaging data, we put an upper limit of {approx}30 to {approx}50 M{sub J} on the mass of companions within the gap. Taking into account the presence of the large and sharp gap, we suggest that the gap could be formed by dynamical interactions of sub-stellar companions or multiple unseen giant planets in the gap.

Hashimoto, J.; Hayashi, M. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Dong, R.; Zhu, Z.; Brandt, T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kudo, T.; Egner, S.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y. [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Honda, M. [Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); McClure, M. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Building, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Muto, T. [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Wisniewski, J. [University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Abe, L. [Laboratoire Hippolyte Fizeau, UMR6525, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 28, avenue Valrose, F-06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France); Brandner, W.; Carson, J.; Feldt, M. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fukagawa, M. [Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Goto, M. [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Grady, C. A., E-mail: jun.hashimoto@nao.ac.jp [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

Barty, Christopher P.J.

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

IMAGE and FAST observations of substorm recovery phase aurora Stephen B. Mende, Harald U. Frey, Charles W. Carlson, and J. McFadden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMAGE and FAST observations of substorm recovery phase aurora Stephen B. Mende, Harald U. Frey aurora. In agreement with IMAGE, the highest intensity proton flux measured by FAST was concentrated latitude diffuse oval occasional structured auroras were embedded. These structured auroras were mostly

California at Berkeley, University of

55

ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING FOR TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT UPFLOW IN THE DIMMING REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE/EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We previously found a temperature-dependent upflow in the dimming region following a coronal mass ejection observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). In this paper, we reanalyzed the observations along with previous work on this event and provided boundary conditions for modeling. We found that the intensity in the dimming region dramatically drops within 30 minutes from the flare onset, and the dimming region reaches the equilibrium stage after {approx}1 hr. The temperature-dependent upflows were observed during the equilibrium stage by EIS. The cross-sectional area of the flux tube in the dimming region does not appear to expand significantly. From the observational constraints, we reconstructed the temperature-dependent upflow by using a new method that considers the mass and momentum conservation law and demonstrated the height variation of plasma conditions in the dimming region. We found that a super-radial expansion of the cross-sectional area is required to satisfy the mass conservation and momentum equations. There is a steep temperature and velocity gradient of around 7 Mm from the solar surface. This result may suggest that the strong heating occurred above 7 Mm from the solar surface in the dimming region. We also showed that the ionization equilibrium assumption in the dimming region is violated, especially in the higher temperature range.

Imada, S.; Shimizu, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Hara, H.; Watanabe, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Zweibel, E. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: A novel 2D VSP imaging technology and patented processing techniques will be used to create accurate, high-resolution reflection images of a classic Basin and Range fault system in a fraction of previous compute times.

57

Dimensions of Wellness Staying Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to protect your physical health by eating a well-balanced diet, getting plenty of physical activity-evaluation and self-assessment. Wellness involves continually learning and making changes to enhance your state) A state in which your mind is engaged in lively interaction with the world around you. Intellectual

Fernandez, Eduardo

58

CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN M1.8 FLARE OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s{sup -1} upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s{sup -1} upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s{sup -1}. We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive tests of models of chromospheric evaporation as envisaged in the Standard Flare Model.

Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)] [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

THREE-MINUTE OSCILLATIONS ABOVE SUNSPOT UMBRA OBSERVED WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY AND NOBEYAMA RADIOHELIOGRAPH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-minute oscillations over a sunspot's umbra in AR 11131 were observed simultaneously in UV/EUV emission by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and in radio emission by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). We use 24 hr series of SDO and 8 hr series of NoRH observations to study spectral, spatial, and temporal variations of pulsations in the 5-9 mHz frequency range at different layers of the solar atmosphere. High spatial and temporal resolution of SDO/AIA in combination with long-duration observations allowed us to trace the variations of the cutoff frequency and spectrum of oscillations across the umbra. We found that higher frequency oscillations are more pronounced closer to the umbra's center, while the lower frequencies concentrate on the peripheral parts. We interpreted this discovery as a manifestation of variation of the magnetic field inclination across the umbra at the level of temperature minimum. Possible implications of this interpretation for the diagnostics of sunspot atmospheres are discussed.

Reznikova, V. E.; Shibasaki, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Sych, R. A. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, NAOC, Beijing 100012 (China); Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: reznik@nro.nao.ac.jp [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

On Thermal-Pulse-Driven Plasma Flows in Coronal Funnels as Observed by Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using one-arcsecond-slit scan observations from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on 05 February 2007, we find the plasma outflows in the open and expanding coronal funnels at the eastern boundary of AR 10940. The Doppler velocity map of Fe XII 195.120 A shows that the diffuse close-loop system to be mostly red-shifted. The open arches (funnels) at the eastern boundary of AR exhibit blue-shifts with a maximum speed of about 10-15 km/s. This implies outflowing plasma through these magnetic structures. In support of these observations, we perform a 2D numerical simulation of the expanding coronal funnels by solving the set of ideal MHD equations in appropriate VAL-III C initial temperature conditions using the FLASH code. We implement a rarefied and hotter region at the footpoint of the model funnel, which results in the evolution of slow plasma perturbations propagating outward in the form of plasma flows. We conclude that the heating, which may result from magnetic reconnection, can trigger the observ...

Srivastava, A K; Murawski, K; Dwivedi, B N; Mohan, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

63

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign In About |Imaging Imaging Print

65

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:

66

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasicsScience atIanIgorIlyaBuildingImaging Print

67

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasicsScience atIanIgorIlyaBuildingImaging

68

The time evolution of a vortex-flame interaction observed via planar imaging of CH and OH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging diagnostics of OH and CH are used to examine a premixed laminar flame subjected to a strong line-vortex pair. Results are reported for a fuel-rcih lamiar CH{sub 4}-air-N{sub 2} rod-stabilized flame. The flow studied was highly reproducible, which enabled the use of phase-sampled imaging to provide time-resolved image sequences. Image sequences are shown for a condition sufficient to produce localized extinction of the primary flame. Results indicate that a breakage in the CH front is not preceded by any distinct change in the OH front. The structure of the CH and OH profiles during the transient leading up to, and through the breakage of the CH front do not appear to be consistent with the concept of a strained laminar flame.

Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Paul, P.H.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Astron. Nachr./AN 32X (2002) X, XXXXXX Imaging Magnetographs for High-Resolution Solar Observations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetograph (VIM) is basically a twin of IRIM for observations in the wavelength range from 550 nm to 700 nm goals of VIM and IRIM are high temporal and spatial resolution observations while maintaining moderate

70

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

ALFALFA Discovery of the Nearby Gas-Rich Dwarf Galaxy Leo~P. II. Optical Imaging Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from ground-based optical imaging of a low-mass dwarf galaxy discovered by the ALFALFA 21-cm HI survey. Broadband (BVR) data obtained with the WIYN 3.5-m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) are used to construct color-magnitude diagrams of the galaxy's stellar population down to V_0 ~ 25. We also use narrowband H-alpha imaging from the KPNO 2.1-m telescope to identify an HII region in the galaxy. We use these data to constrain the distance to the galaxy to be between 1.5 and 2.0 Mpc. This places Leo P within the Local Volume but beyond the Local Group. Its properties are extreme: it is the lowest-mass system known that contains significant amounts of gas and is currently forming stars.

Rhode, Katherine L; Haurberg, Nathalie C; Van Sistine, Angela; Young, Michael D; Haynes, Martha P; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M; Skillman, Evan D; McQuinn, Kristen B W; Adams, Elizabeth A K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

LARGE-SCALE CORONAL PROPAGATING FRONTS IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS AS OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORYAN ENSEMBLE STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study of a large sample of global disturbances in the solar corona with characteristic propagating fronts as intensity enhancement, similar to the phenomena that have often been referred to as Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves. Now EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a significantly improved view of these large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs). Between 2010 April and 2013 January, a total of 171 LCPFs have been identified through visual inspection of AIA images in the 193 channel. Here we focus on the 138 LCPFs that are seen to propagate across the solar disk, first studying how they are associated with flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and type II radio bursts. We measure the speed of the LCPF in various directions until it is clearly altered by active regions or coronal holes. The highest speed is extracted for each LCPF. It is often considerably higher than EIT waves. We do not find a pattern where faster LCPFs decelerate and slow LCPFs accelerate. Furthermore, the speeds are not strongly correlated with the flare intensity or CME magnitude, nor do they show an association with type II bursts. We do not find a good correlation either between the speeds of LCPFs and CMEs in a subset of 86 LCPFs observed by one or both of the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft as limb events.

Nitta, Nariaki V.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Liu, Wei [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Dept/A021S, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nanometer-scale temperature imaging for independent observation of Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports a technique for independent observation of nanometer-scale Joule heating and thermoelectric effects, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based measurements of nanometer-scale temperature fields. When electrical current flows through nanoscale devices and contacts the temperature distribution is governed by both Joule and thermoelectric effects. When the device is driven by an electrical current that is both periodic and bipolar, the temperature rise due to the Joule effect is at a different harmonic than the temperature rise due to the Peltier effect. An AFM tip scanning over the device can simultaneously measure all of the relevant harmonic responses, such that the Joule effect and the Peltier effect can be independently measured. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of the technique by measuring Joule and Peltier effects in phase change memory devices. By comparing the observed temperature responses of these working devices, we measure the device thermopower, which is in the range of 30 3 to 250 10 ?V K{sup ?1}. This technique could facilitate improved measurements of thermoelectric phenomena and properties at the nanometer-scale.

Grosse, Kyle L. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); King, William P., E-mail: wpk@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

THE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR CORONA. I. OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN WITH THE EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the temperature and density structure of the solar corona provide critical constraints on theories of coronal heating. Unfortunately, the complexity of the solar atmosphere, observational uncertainties, and the limitations of current atomic calculations, particularly those for Fe, all conspire to make this task very difficult. A critical assessment of plasma diagnostics in the corona is essential to making progress on the coronal heating problem. In this paper, we present an analysis of temperature and density measurements above the limb in the quiet corona using new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. By comparing the Si and Fe emission observed with EIS we are able to identify emission lines that yield consistent emission measure distributions. With these data we find that the distribution of temperatures in the quiet corona above the limb is strongly peaked near 1 MK, consistent with previous studies. We also find, however, that there is a tail in the emission measure distribution that extends to higher temperatures. EIS density measurements from several density sensitive line ratios are found to be generally consistent with each other and with previous measurements in the quiet corona. Our analysis, however, also indicates that a significant fraction of the weaker emission lines observed in the EIS wavelength ranges cannot be understood with current atomic data.

Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

76

EIS - An Imaging Survey for VLT Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The imaging data assembled by the recently completed ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) are reviewed and their scientific value briefly assessed. Among the various applications, the imaging data has been used to build a large sample of candidate distant clusters of galaxies in the Southern Hemisphere to be used for follow-up observations with the VLT as well as other space and ground-based facilities. Preliminary results from ongoing work to confirm these candidates are reported and the future prospects discussed.

Luiz da Costa

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

77

Well control procedures for extended reach wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been found to be critical to the success of ERD are torque and drag, drillstring design, wellbore stability, hole cleaning, casing design, directional drilling optimization, drilling dynamics and rig sizing.4 Other technologies of vital importance... are the use of rotary steerable systems (RSS) together with measurement while drilling (MWD) and logging while drilling (LWD) to geosteer the well into the geological target.5 Many of the wells drilled at Wytch Farm would not have been possible to drill...

Gjorv, Bjorn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

First High-resolution Spectroscopic Observations of an Erupting Prominence Within a Coronal Mass Ejection by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopic observations of prominence eruptions associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), although relatively rare, can provide valuable plasma and 3D geometry diagnostics. We report the first observations by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission of a spectacular fast CME/prominence eruption associated with an equivalent X1.6 flare on 2014 May 9. The maximum plane-of-sky and Doppler velocities of the eruption are 1200 and 460 km/s, respectively. There are two eruption components separated by ~200 km/s in Doppler velocity: a primary, bright component and a secondary, faint component, suggesting a hollow, rather than solid, cone-shaped distribution of material. The eruption involves a left-handed helical structure undergoing counter-clockwise (viewed top-down) unwinding motion. There is a temporal evolution from upward eruption to downward fallback with less-than-free-fall speeds and decreasing nonthermal line widths. We find a wide range of Mg II k/h line intensity ratios (less than ...

Liu, Wei; Vial, Jean-Claude; Title, Alan M; Carlsson, Mats; Uitenbroek, Han; Okamoto, Takenori J; Berger, Thomas E; Antolin, Patrick

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Englezos, P. , 2009. Gas hydrate formation in a variableDOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test WellFormation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. 1.

Kneafsey, T.J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Regulations of Wells (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

82

Very High Energy gamma-ray observations of Mrk 501 using TACTIC imaging gamma-ray telescope during 2005-06  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we report on the Markarian 501 results obtained during our TeV $\\gamma$-ray observations from March 11 to May 12, 2005 and February 28 to May 7, 2006 for 112.5 hours with the TACTIC $\\gamma$-ray telescope. During 2005 observations for 45.7 hours, the source was found to be in a low state and we have placed an upper limit of 4.62 $\\times$ 10$^{-12}$ photons cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ at 3$\\sigma$ level on the integrated TeV $\\gamma$-ray flux above 1 TeV from the source direction. However, during the 2006 observations for 66.8h, detailed data analysis revealed the presence of a TeV $\\gamma$-ray signal from the source with a statistical significance of 7.5$\\sigma$ above $E_{\\gamma}\\geq$ 1 TeV. The time averaged differential energy spectrum of the source in the energy range 1-11 TeV is found to match well with the power law function of the form ($d\\Phi/dE=f_0 E^{-\\Gamma}$) with $f_0=(1.66\\pm0.52)\\times 10^{-11}cm^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1}$ and $\\Gamma=2.80\\pm0.27$.

Godambe, S V; Chandra, P; Yadav, K K; Tickoo, A K; Venugopal, K; Bhatt, N; Bhattacharya, S; Chanchalani, K; Dhar, V K; Goyal, H C; Kaul, R K; Kothari, M; Kotwal, S; Koul, M K; Koul, R; Sahaynathan, B S; Sharma, M; Thoudam, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Plugging Abandoned Water Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is recommended that before you begin the process of plugging an aban- doned well that you seek advice from your local groundwater conservation district, a licensed water well driller in your area, or the Water Well Drillers Program with the Texas Department... hire a licensed water well driller or pump installer to seal and plug an abandoned well. Well contractors have the equipment and an understanding of soil condi- tions to determine how a well should be properly plugged. How can you take care...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

86

Well drilling apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A drill rig for drilling wells having a derrick adapted to hold and lower a conductor string and drill pipe string. A support frame is fixed to the derrick to extend over the well to be drilled, and a rotary table, for holding and rotating drill pipe strings, is movably mounted thereon. The table is displaceable between an active position in alignment with the axis of the well and an inactive position laterally spaced therefrom. A drill pipe holder is movably mounted on the frame below the rotary table for displacement between a first position laterally of the axis of the well and a second position in alignment with the axis of the well. The rotary table and said drill pipe holder are displaced in opposition to each other, so that the rotary table may be removed from alignment with the axis of the well and said drill pipe string simultaneously held without removal from said well.

Prins, K.; Prins, R.K.

1982-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

A NEW CEPHEID DISTANCE TO THE GIANT SPIRAL M101 BASED ON IMAGE SUBTRACTION OF HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We accurately determine a new Cepheid distance to M101 (NGC 5457) using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys V and I time series photometry of two fields within the galaxy. We make a slight modification to the ISIS image subtraction package to obtain optimal differential light curves from HST data. We discovered 827 Cepheids with periods between 3 and 80 days, the largest extragalactic sample of Cepheids observed with HST by a factor of two. With this large Cepheid sample, we find that the relative distance of M101 from the Large Magellanic Cloud is {Delta}{mu}{sub LMC} = 10.63 {+-} 0.04 (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag. If we use the geometrically determined maser distance to NGC 4258 as our distance anchor, the distance modulus of M101 is {mu}{sub 0} = 29.04 {+-} 0.05 (random) {+-} 0.18 (systematic) mag or D = 6.4 {+-} 0.2 (random) {+-} 0.5 (systematic) Mpc. The uncertainty is dominated by the maser distance estimate ({+-}0.15 mag), which should improve over the next few years. We determine a steep metallicity dependence, {gamma}, for our Cepheid sample through two methods, yielding {gamma} = -0.80 {+-} 0.21 (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag dex{sup -1} and {gamma} = -0.72{sup +0.22}{sub -0.25} (random) {+-} 0.06 (systematic) mag dex{sup -1}. We see marginal evidence for variations in the Wesenheit period-luminosity relation slope as a function of deprojected galactocentric radius. We also use the tip of the red giant branch method to independently determine the distance modulus to M101 of {mu}{sub 0} = 29.05 {+-} 0.06 (random) {+-} 0.12 (systematic) mag.

Shappee, Benjamin J.; Stanek, K. Z., E-mail: shappee@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: kstanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

David Lim

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

David Lim

90

Penrose Well Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

Christopherson, Karen

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, D.F.

1980-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

VIMS images of the Huygens landing site on Titan: S. Rodriguez et al. Cassini/VIMS hyperspectral observations of the HUYGENS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIMS images of the Huygens landing site on Titan: S. Rodriguez et al. 1 Cassini/VIMS hyperspectral.N. Clark2 , B. Buratti3 , R.H. Brown4 , T.B. McCord5 , P.D. Nicholson6 , K.H. Baines3 and the VIMS science Number of Table(s): 1 Number of figure(s): 11 Running Head: VIMS images of the Huygens probe landing site

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Geothermal well stimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class...

96

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S...

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

Isobaric groundwater well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

VIII. OBSERVATION WELLS TO MEET SPECIAL PERMIT CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, with flush-joint, internal-upset, threaded-type connec- tions. The hole packing material was 0.0100.020-in @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy Screen 14.7' 3.8' Gravels, cobbles and claystone, with lenses of sand and gravel, dry; part of Puye Conglomerate over- lying basalt that outcrops

99

Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Reeder, 1957) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpen Energy1988)

100

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Spacer for deep wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A spacer for use in a deep well that is to have a submersible pump situated downhole and with a string of tubing attached to the pump for delivering the pumped fluid. The pump is electrically driven, and power is supplied via an armored cable which parallels the string of tubing. Spacers are clamped to the cable and have the tubing running through an eccentrically located passage in each spacer. The outside dimensions of a spacer fit freely inside any casing in the well.

Klein, G. D.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

Candy, J.V.

1996-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ER-011 6-06 Mark L. McFarland, Associate Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist; Diane E. Boellstorff, Program Specialist Water Quality; Tony L. Provin, Associate Professor and Extension Soil Chemist; Monty C. Dozier, Assistant... and local hospitals may also test water samples for bacteria. The cost of the test ranges from $8 to $30, depending on the lab. Well disinfection does not eliminate hydrocarbons (fuels, oils), pesticides, heavy metals or other types of nonbiological...

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Vision Statement Marketing at Kent State University should consist of centrally developed, well-managed, well-funded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of centrally developed, well-managed, well-funded and strategically placed image, message support and involvement. The Kent State University "Brand" Marketing research requirements to building brand equity. While terms such as "brand," "branding

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

107

Quantifying aerosol direct radiative effect with Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer observations: Top-of-atmosphere albedo change by aerosols based on land surface types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.eosweb.larc.nasa.gov). References Abdou, W. A. , D. J.B. J. Gaitley, and W. A. Abdou (2007), The MISR radiometricAOD) retrievals over land [Abdou et al. , 2005], as well as

Chen, Yang; Li, Qinbin; Kahn, Ralph A; Randerson, James T; Diner, David J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area...

109

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic...

110

EVIDENCE FOR THE WAVE NATURE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves have been found for about 15 years. However, significant controversy remains over their physical natures and origins. In this paper, we report an EUV wave that was accompanied by an X1.9 flare and a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME). Using high temporal and spatial resolution observations taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory, we are able to investigate the detailed kinematics of the EUV wave. We find several arguments that support the fast-mode wave scenario. (1) The speed of the EUV wave (570 km s{sup -1}) is higher than the sound speed of the quiet-Sun corona. (2) Significant deceleration of the EUV wave (-130 m s{sup -2}) is found during its propagation. (3) The EUV wave resulted in the oscillations of a loop and a filament along its propagation path, and a reflected wave from the polar coronal hole is also detected. (4) Refraction or reflection effect is observed when the EUV wave was passing through two coronal bright points. (5) The dimming region behind the wavefront stopped to expand when the wavefront started to become diffuse. (6) The profiles of the wavefront exhibited a dispersive nature, and the magnetosonic Mach number of the EUV wave derived from the highest intensity jump is about 1.4. In addition, triangulation indicates that the EUV wave propagated within a height range of about 60-100 Mm above the photosphere. We propose that the EUV wave observed should be a nonlinear fast-mode magnetosonic wave that propagated freely in the corona after it was driven by the CME expanding flanks during the initial period.

Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton AbbeyARaftPadomaSierraSilverSinaeSingapore:

112

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton

113

Category:Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascadeJump to:ListsGeothermalpower.jpgInformation

114

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

116

Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation

117

Observables of Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

ON THE CONTINUITY OF IMAGES BY TRANSMISSION IMAGING Abstract. Transmission imaging is an important imaging technique which is widely used in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE CONTINUITY OF IMAGES BY TRANSMISSION IMAGING CHUNLIN WU Abstract. Transmission imaging imaging principle is quite different from that of reflection imaging used in our everyday life. As well scholars studied the application of TV regularization to processing images generated by transmission

Soatto, Stefano

119

Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

Camilli, Richard

120

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for 12 sequential images sam- pled at 7.5Hz. Observations 2,distributions of six sam- ple image sequences selected from

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sampling for Bacteria in Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication will instruct you on the proper procedures for collecting a sample from a water well for bacteriological analysis....

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Doppler maps and surface differential rotation of EI Eri from the MUSICOS 1998 observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present time-series Doppler images of the rapidly-rotating active binary star EI Eri from spectroscopic observations collected during the MUSICOS multi-site campaign in 1998, since the critical rotation period of 1.947 days makes it impossible to obtain time-resolved images from a single site. From the surface reconstructions a weak solar-type differential rotation, as well as a tiny poleward meridional flow are measured.

Zs. K?vri; A. Washuettl; B. H. Foing; K. Vida; J. Bartus; K. Olh; the MUSICOS 98 team

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

Well Monitoring System for EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

125

Well Monitoring System for EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Peer Review Well Monitoring Systems for EGS Principal Investigator Randy Normann Perma Works LLC May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or...

126

Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in a Double Well Atomic Josephson Junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observation of these Josephson junction resonances. 2.dressed Bose condensed Josephson junction Let us consider ain a Double Well Atomic Josephson Junction J.O. Weatherall

Weatherall, J. O.; Search, C. P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach...

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

1983-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

129

Device for wavelength-selective imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

First use of a HyViSI H4RG for Astronomical Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first astronomical results from a 4K2 Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN array detector (HyViSI) read out with the Teledyne Scientific and Imaging SIDECAR ASIC. These results include observations of astronomical standards and photometric measurements using the 2.1m KPNO telescope. We also report results from a test program in the Rochester Imaging Detector Laboratory (RIDL), including: read noise, dark current, linearity, gain, well depth, quantum efficiency, and substrate voltage effects. Lastly, we highlight results from operation of the detector in window read out mode and discuss its potential role for focusing, image correction, and use as a telescope guide camera.

Simms, Lance M.; /SLAC; Figer, Donald F.; Hanold, Brandon J.; Kerr, Daniel J.; /Rochester Imaging Lab.; Gilmore, D.Kirk; Kahn, Steven M.; /SLAC; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC,

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

Image Utility Assessment and a Relationship with Image Quality Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Image Utility Assessment and a Relationship with Image Quality Assessment David M. Rouse , Romuald information to humans, and this paper investigates the utility assessment task, where human observers evaluate the usefulness of a natural image as a surrogate for a reference. Current QA algorithms implicitly assess utility

Hemami, Sheila S.

132

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Video Toroid Cavity Imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Test Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

136

Image Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recognition Image Analysis and Recognition Snapshot1498121slicesqResedison Fibers permeating imaged material (Courtesy: Bale, Loring, Perciano and Ushizima) Imagery coming from...

137

Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general wellbore flow model is presented to incorporate not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow. Influence of inflow or outflow on the wellbore pressure drop is analyzed. New friction factor correlations accounting for both inflow and outflow are also developed. The greatest source of uncertainty is reservoir description and how it is used in simulators. Integration of data through geostatistical techniques leads to multiple descriptions that all honor available data. The reality is never known. The only way to reduce this uncertainty is to use more data from geological studies, formation evaluation, high resolution seismic, well tests and production history to constrain stochastic images. Even with a perfect knowledge about reservoir geology, current models cannot do routine simulations at a fine enough scale. Furthermore, we normally don't know what scale is fine enough. Upscaling introduces errors and masks some of the physical phenomenon that we are trying to model. The scale at which upscaling is robust is not known and it is probably smaller in most cases than the scale actually used for predicting performance. Uncertainties in the well index can cause errors in predictions that are of the same magnitude as those caused by reservoir heterogeneities. Simplified semi-analytical models for cresting behavior and productivity predictions can be very misleading.

Khalid Aziz; Sepehr Arababi; Thomas A. Hewett

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

138

High Spatial Resolution Observations of Loops in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determining how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in July 2012. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data for a subset of 79 of these loops and find that their temperature distributions are narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of proposed physical mechanisms.

Brooks, David H; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Winebarger, Amy R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A new well surveying tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

directional well was to tip the entire rig, then block up one side of the rotary table so as to incline the uppermost joint of the drill pipe. The accuracy obtained by this method left much to be desired. The technique of controlled directional drilling... by Surveying Device for S and 19 , N and 41 . 21 3. Comparison of Measured Angles and Angles Indicated by Surveying Device for NE snd 9 , W and 45 . . . . . . . ~ 22 ABSTRNl T Ever since the advent of rotary drilling the petroleum industry has been...

Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

System for stabbing well casing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Apparatus for stabbing well casing to join casing sections to each other, includes a rotary table assembly for supporting a casing section in a well bore, a derrick over the rotary table assembly, a crown block at the top of the derrick, a first piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on one side of the derrick over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block for pivotation about a horizontal axis, a second piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on a second side of the derrick for pivotation about a horizontal axis. The second piston and cylinder subassembly is located over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block and extends substantially normal to the direction of extension of the first piston and cylinder subassembly. The cooperating casing clamping elements are carried on the piston rods of the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies, and counter balancing subassemblies are connected to the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies for pivoting the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies to a vertically extending inoperative position.

McArthur, J.R.

1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

143

Image Reconstruction for Prostate Specific Nuclear Medicine imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is increasing interest in the design and construction of nuclear medicine detectors for dedicated prostate imaging. These include detectors designed for imaging the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with single gamma as well as positron-emitting radionuclides. New detectors and acquisition geometries present challenges and opportunities for image reconstruction. In this contribution various strategies for image reconstruction for these special purpose imagers are reviewed. Iterative statistical algorithms provide a framework for reconstructing prostate images from a wide variety of detectors and acquisition geometries for PET and SPECT. The key to their success is modeling the physics of photon transport and data acquisition and the Poisson statistics of nuclear decay. Analytic image reconstruction methods can be fast and are useful for favorable acquisition geometries. Future perspectives on algorithm development and data analysis for prostate imaging are presented.

Mark Smith

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

Nuclear medicine imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

1983-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

People Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

People Images People Images Several hundred of the 1700 U.S. scientists contributing to the LHC accelerator and experiments gathered in June 2008 in CERN's building 40 CE0252 Joel...

147

arrays ultrasonic imaging: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1988-01-01 74 The SORDS trimodal imager detector arrays MIT - DSpace Summary: The Raytheon Trimodal Imager (TMI) uses coded aperture and Compton imaging technologies as well as...

148

Image alignment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

Dowell, Larry Jonathan

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

High-dose MVCT image guidance for stereotactic body radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a potent treatment for early stage primary and limited metastatic disease. Accurate tumor localization is essential to administer SBRT safely and effectively. Tomotherapy combines helical IMRT with onboard megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging and is well suited for SBRT; however, MVCT results in reduced soft tissue contrast and increased image noise compared with kilovoltage CT. The goal of this work was to investigate the use of increased imaging doses on a clinical tomotherapy machine to improve image quality for SBRT image guidance. Methods: Two nonstandard, high-dose imaging modes were created on a tomotherapy machine by increasing the linear accelerator (LINAC) pulse rate from the nominal setting of 80 Hz, to 160 Hz and 300 Hz, respectively. Weighted CT dose indexes (wCTDIs) were measured for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes in a 30 cm solid water phantom using a calibrated A1SL ion chamber. Image quality was assessed from scans of a customized image quality phantom. Metrics evaluated include: contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), high-contrast spatial resolution, image uniformity, and percent image noise. In addition, two patients receiving SBRT were localized using high-dose MVCT scans. Raw detector data collected after each scan were used to reconstruct standard-dose images for comparison. Results: MVCT scans acquired using a pitch of 1.0 resulted in wCTDI values of 2.2, 4.7, and 8.5 cGy for the standard, medium, and high-dose modes respectively. CNR values for both low and high-contrast materials were found to increase with the square root of dose. Axial high-contrast spatial resolution was comparable for all imaging modes at 0.5 lp/mm. Image uniformity was improved and percent noise decreased as the imaging dose increased. Similar improvements in image quality were observed in patient images, with decreases in image noise being the most notable. Conclusions: High-dose imaging modes are made possible on a clinical tomotherapy machine by increasing the LINAC pulse rate. Increasing the imaging dose results in increased CNRs; making it easier to distinguish the boundaries of low contrast objects. The imaging dose levels observed in this work are considered acceptable at our institution for SBRT treatments delivered in 3-5 fractions.

Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chao, Edward; Lucas, Dan; Flynn, Ryan T.; Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Accuray Inc., Madison, Wisconsin 53717 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

151

Speckle-free laser imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many imaging applications require increasingly bright illumination sources, motivating the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with light emitting diodes (LEDs), superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and lasers. Despite their brightness, lasers and SLDs are poorly suited for full-field imaging applications because their high spatial coherence leads to coherent artifacts known as speckle that corrupt image formation. We recently demonstrated that random lasers can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence. Here, we exploit the low spatial coherence of specifically-designed random lasers to perform speckle-free full-field imaging in the setting of significant optical scattering. We quantitatively demonstrate that images generated with random laser illumination exhibit higher resolution than images generated with spatially coherent illumination. By providing intense laser illumination without the drawback of coherent artifacts, random lasers are well suited for a host of full-field imaging applicatio...

Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Time-Encoded Imagers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

EBSD Images Theoretical Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivation EBSD Images Theoretical Background Defects in the Weld Grain Growth Low Speed Welding High Speed Welding Conclusion Heat-Affected Zone Observations Welding Experiments The low density in the transportation industries. Reproducibility and the low cost make welding a major large scale assembly process

Candea, George

154

Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness Taking care of your body Wellness Taking care of what's around you 2Health andWellness Guide for Students #12;Physical Wellness Communicate with your partner if you have questions or concerns Meet with a Health Care Provider on campus

155

IMPROVED NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research conducted during Budget Period One on the project ''Improved Natural Gas Storage Well Remediation''. The project team consisted of Furness-Newburge, Inc., the technology developer; TechSavants, Inc., the technology validator; and Nicor Technologies, Inc., the technology user. The overall objectives for the project were: (1) To develop, fabricate and test prototype laboratory devices using sonication and underwater plasma to remove scale from natural gas storage well piping and perforations; (2) To modify the laboratory devices into units capable of being used downhole; (3) To test the capability of the downhole units to remove scale in an observation well at a natural gas storage field; (4) To modify (if necessary) and field harden the units and then test the units in two pressurized injection/withdrawal gas storage wells; and (5) To prepare the project's final report. This report covers activities addressing objectives 1-3. Prototype laboratory units were developed, fabricated, and tested. Laboratory testing of the sonication technology indicated that low-frequency sonication was more effective than high-frequency (ultrasonication) at removing scale and rust from pipe sections and tubing. Use of a finned horn instead of a smooth horn improves energy dispersal and increases the efficiency of removal. The chemical data confirmed that rust and scale were removed from the pipe. The sonication technology showed significant potential and technical maturity to warrant a field test. The underwater plasma technology showed a potential for more effective scale and rust removal than the sonication technology. Chemical data from these tests also confirmed the removal of rust and scale from pipe sections and tubing. Focusing of the underwater plasma's energy field through the design and fabrication of a parabolic shield will increase the technology's efficiency. Power delivered to the underwater plasma unit by a sparkplug repeatedly was interrupted by sparkplug failure. The lifecycle for the plugs was less than 10 hours. An electrode feed system for delivering continuous power needs to be designed and developed. As a result, further work on the underwater plasma technology was terminated. It needs development of a new sparking system and a redesign of the pulsed power supply system to enable the unit to operate within a well diameter of less than three inches. Both of these needs were beyond the scope of the project. Meanwhile, the laboratory sonication unit was waterproofed and hardened, enabling the unit to be used as a field prototype, operating at temperatures to 350 F and depths of 15,000 feet. The field prototype was extensively tested at a field service company's test facility before taking it to the field site. The field test was run in August 2001 in a Nicor Gas storage field observation well at Pontiac, Illinois. Segmented bond logs, gamma ray neutron logs, water level measurements and water chemistry samples were obtained before and after the downhole demonstration. Fifteen tests were completed in the field. Results from the water chemistry analysis showed an increase in the range of calcium from 1755-1984 mg/l before testing to 3400-4028 mg/l after testing. For magnesium, the range increased from 285-296 mg/l to 461-480 mg/l. The change in pH from a range of 3.11-3.25 to 8.23-8.45 indicated a buffering of the acidic well water, probably due to the increased calcium available for buffering. The segmented bond logs showed no damage to the cement bond in the well and the gamma ray neutron log showed no increase in the amount of hydrocarbons present in the formation where the testing took place. Thus, the gas storage bubble in the aquifer was not compromised. A review of all the field test data collected documents the fact that the application of low-frequency sonication technology definitely removes scale from well pipe. Phase One of this project took sonication technology from the concept stage through a successful ''proof-of-concept'' downhole application in a natural gas storage field

James C. Furness; Donald O. Johnson; Michael L. Wilkey; Lynn Furness; Keith Vanderlee; P. David Paulsen

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Computing Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computing Images The interior of an automated tape library in Brookhaven's RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility. Brookhaven engineers in the RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility....

157

Neural networks predict well inflow performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting well inflow performance relationship accurately is very important for production engineers. From these predictions, future plans for handling and improving well performance can be established. One method of predicting well inflow...

Alrumah, Muhammad K.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Denver, CO (United States); Denhan, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Watkins, D. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The performance of new multilateral well in heterogeneous reservoirs is studied, and that is compared with vertical well architecture also. In order to study the productivity of new multilateral wells, we use a numerical simulation method to set up heterogeneous...

Jia, Hongqiao

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil, Gas, . . 81 and Geothermal Well Tests (abstract) W.has been testing geothermal wells for about three years, andof Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Well Tests W. E. Brigham

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation having possession or control of any natural gas well, oil well or coalbed natural gas well, whether as a contractor, owner, lessee, agent or...

162

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in determining the condition of your well, contact: S your local groundwater conservation dis- trict http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/permitting/ water_supply/groundwater/districts.html S a licensed water well driller in your area S the Water Well Drillers Program... are the steps in capping a well? The landowner, a licensed well driller or a licensed pump installer may cap a well. There are several steps involved. The well casing should extend above the ground surface to limit the risk of water entering the well...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v 3 Observations of wave breaking kinematics in fetch-crest length . . . . . C.6 Wave elevation . . . . . . . .breaking waves in the images . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.3

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

166

Thank you for joining: 360WELLNESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shortly. If you are experiencing technical difficulties with Adobe Connect, please call 1 March 22, 2012 12 pm ­ 1pm ET #12;360° WELLNESS: Achieving Wellness At Work And At Home Workshop & Self-Assessment © Joe Rosenlicht, Certified Coach 3 #12;8 Wellness Areas Wellness Nutrition Brain Power Fitness Sleep

Vertes, Akos

167

Direct Observations of Plasma Upflows and Condensation in a Catastrophically Cooling Solar Transition Region Looop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models, as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the {\\it EUV Imaging Spectrometer} (EIS) onboard {\\it Hinode}, we observe fast upflows ($v_\\lambda$\\,$\\le$\\,$-$10 km s$^{-1}$) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8\\,$\\le$\\,$\\log T$\\,$\\le$ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop ($\\log T$\\,$\\le$\\,6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of $+$\\,5 km s$^{-1}$ and $-$\\,60 km s$^{-1}$ are observed at footpoint sites. These flows speeds and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at site of upflows only) derived from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory}'s (SDOs) { \\it Helioseismic Magnetic Imager}'s (HMI) line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30\\% mass in-flux at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic coo...

Orange, N B; Oluseyi, H M; Hesterly, K; Patel, M; Champey, P R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Observations of Edge Turbulence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofofEdge Turbulence

169

New well control companies stress planning, engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology for capping a blowing well has not changed during the last 50 years. Still, operators are finding new ways of using well control companies' expertise to help avoid potentially disastrous situations. This trend is especially critical given the current environmentally sensitive and cost-cutting times facing the oil industry. While regulatory agencies world-wide continue to hinder well control efforts during an offshore event, well control companies are focusing on technologies to make their job easier. Some of the most exciting are the hydraulic jet cutter, which gained fame in Kuwait, and electromagnetic ranging for drilling more accurate relief wells. With the number of subsea wells increasing, subsea intervention is a major target for future innovations. Well control companies are experiencing a change in their role to the offshore oil industry. Well control professionals discuss this expanded responsibility as well as other aspects of offshore blowouts including regulatory hindrances, subsea intervention and future technologies.

Bell, S.; Wright, R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

172

Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Well performance graph simplifies field calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphic Methods are widely employed in order to understand overall well behavior using only surface parameters. The authors propose a new graphic method, used successfully by Agip for oil and gas wells in Italy, Libya, Nigeria and Tunisia. The well performance graph helps solve many production problems, including estimation of: inflow performance relationship; causes of rate decline throughout well life; and production rate and bottomhole flowing pressure for various pressures upstream of the surface choke, and vice-versa. This method differs from others by using flow behavior through the choke for both critical and subcritical conditions. Equations describing flow through the formation, string and surface choke are also used. Results are quite reliable when these theoretical equations are calibrated with field data, either from the well concerned or from nearby wells producing the same fluid. This article describes the technique as it applies to oil wells. The methodology for gas wells is similar.

De Ghetto, G.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

175

Economic evaluation of smart well technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comprehensive review of this technology has been discussed. The possible reservoir environments in which smart well technology could be used and also, the possible benefits that could be realized by utilizing smart well technology has been discussed...

Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach....

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Trans. , AGU (1935),of a well using ground-water storage: ~n. Geophys. Unionof a Well Using Ground-Water Storage," Trans. , AGU (1935),

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

Fay, Noah

179

Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important...

Khan, Waqar A.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)ReferencesNuiqsut,Place,Oakmont,Obion County, Tennessee:Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

screened intervals (415421 m and 689695 m; Figure 2) in the observations wells will be useful  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies.We thank Bayshore Concrete and Ray Otten of the Sustainable Technology Park for access Chesapeake Bay Crater,522 pp.,Springer-Verlag, New York. Rieke,H.H.,and G.V.Chilingarian (1974),Compaction.Edwards,and Jean M. Self-Trail,USGS,Reston,Va.; and Roger H.Morin, USGS,Lakewood,Colo. For additional information

Sprintall, Janet

182

Observation Wells At Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:Energy Information

183

Observation Wells At East Brawley Area (Matlick & Jayne, 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:Energy

184

Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpen Energy

185

Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpen Energy1988) |

186

Observation Wells At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpenThe Needles Area

187

Suzaku observations of AGN and synergy with GLAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In next five years, dramatic progress is anticipated for the AGN studies, as we have two important missions to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST and Suzaku. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite which was successfully launched in July 2005. It carries four X-ray sensitive imaging CCD cameras (0.2-12 keV) located in the focal planes of X-ray telescope, and a non-imaging, collimated hard X-ray detector, which extends the bandpass of the observatory to include the 10-600 keV range. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments (GLAST and Suzaku) will be particularly valuable for variable radio-loud AGN, allowing the cross-correlations of time series as well as detailed modeling of the spectral evolution between the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. In this paper, we show early highlights from Suzaku observations of radio-loud AGNs, and discuss what we can do with GLAST in forthcoming years.

Kataoka, Jun [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Takahashi, Tad [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, Kanagawa, 229-8510 (Japan); Madejski, Greg [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University (United States)

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Suzaku Observations of AGN and Synergy with GLAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In next five years, dramatic progress is anticipated for the AGN studies, as we have two important missions to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST and Suzaku. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite which was successfully launched in July 2005. It carries four X-ray sensitive imaging CCD cameras (0.2-12 keV) located in the focal planes of X-ray telescope, and a non-imaging, collimated hard X-ray detector, which extends the bandpass of the observatory to include the 10-600 keV range. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments (GLAST and Suzaku) will be particularly valuable for variable radio-loud AGN, allowing the cross-correlations of time series as well as detailed modeling of the spectral evolution between the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. In this paper, we show early highlights from Suzaku observations of radio-loud AGNs, and discuss what we can do with GLAST in forthcoming years.

Kataoka, Jun; /Tokyo Inst. Tech.; Takahashi, Tad; /JAXA, Sagamihara; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

Stephen Wolhart

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

THE 2012 HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD (UDF12): OBSERVATIONAL OVERVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128 orbit Cycle 19 Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at extending previous Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%, as well as adding an extremely deep parallel field with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in the F814W filter with a total exposure time of 128 orbits. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at z ?> 8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at z ? 7-8, facilitate the construction of new samples of z ? 9-10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to z ? 12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky. In this paper we present the observational overview of the project and describe the procedures used in reducing the data as well as the final products that were produced. We present the details of several special procedures that we implemented to correct calibration issues in the data for both the WFC3/IR observations of the main UDF field and our deep 128 orbit ACS/WFC F814W parallel field image, including treatment for persistence, correction for time-variable sky backgrounds, and astrometric alignment to an accuracy of a few milliarcseconds. We release the full, combined mosaics comprising a single, unified set of mosaics of the UDF, providing the deepest near-infrared blank-field view of the universe currently achievable, reaching magnitudes as deep as AB ? 30 mag in the near-infrared, and yielding a legacy dataset on this field.

Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V.; Targett, T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Stark, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Charlot, Stephane [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014, Paris (France); Furlanetto, Steven R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden and Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have enhanced and streamlined our software, and we are beta-testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We have processed all well information and identified potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, the final technical report is almost finished and a draft version is being reviewed by Gary Covatch.

Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

195

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates wells, borings, and underground storage with regards to protecting groundwater resources. The Commissioner of the Department of Health has jurisdiction, and can grant permits...

199

Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

Patrick Longmire

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF AN EIT WAVE/DIMMING OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves are a wavelike phenomenon propagating outward from the coronal mass ejection source region, with expanding dimmings following behind. We present a spectroscopic study of an EIT wave/dimming event observed by the Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer. Although the identification of the wave front is somewhat affected by the pre-existing loop structures, the expanding dimming is well defined. We investigate the line intensity, width, and Doppler velocity for four EUV lines. In addition to the significant blueshift implying plasma outflows in the dimming region as revealed in previous studies, we find that the widths of all four spectral lines increase at the outer edge of the dimmings. We illustrate that this feature can be well explained by the field line stretching model, which claims that EIT waves are apparently moving brightenings that are generated by the successive stretching of the closed field lines.

Chen, F.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F., E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.c [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Geospatial Visualization of Global Satellite Images with Vis-EROS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center of U.S. Geological Survey is currently managing and maintaining the world largest satellite images distribution system, which provides 24/7 free download service for researchers all over the globe in many areas such as Geology, Hydrology, Climate Modeling, and Earth Sciences. A large amount of geospatial data contained in satellite images maintained by EROS is generated every day. However, this data is not well utilized due to the lack of efficient data visualization tools. This software implements a method for visualizing various characteristics of the global satellite image download requests. More specifically, Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files are generated which can be loaded into an earth browser such as Google Earth. Colored rectangles associated with stored satellite scenes are painted onto the earth browser; and the color and opacity of each rectangle is varied as a function of the popularity of the corresponding satellite image. An analysis of the geospatial information obtained relative to specified time constraints provides an ability to relate image download requests to environmental, political, and social events.

Standart, G. D.; Stulken, K. R.; Zhang, Xuesong; Zong, Ziliang

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

203

SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013 #12;HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS UPDATE ON SAFETY PROGRAMS The professionals working in the Health and Safety team and Rehabilitation Services group have had a very successful year in supporting individuals to take accountability for their own safety and health

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

204

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Observation of early shell-dopant mix in OMEGA direct-drive implosions and comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved x-ray image data from direct-drive implosions on OMEGA were interpreted with the aid of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Neither clean calculations nor those using a turbulent mix model can explain fully the observed migration of shell-dopant material (titanium) into the core. Shell-dopant migration was observed via time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, and spatially and spectrally resolved x-ray images of capsule implosions and resultant dopant emissions. The titanium emission was centrally peaked in narrowband x-ray images. In post-processed clean simulations, the peak titanium emission forms in a ring in self-emission images as the capsule implodes. Post-processed simulations with mix reproduce trends in time-dependent, spatially integrated spectra, as well having centrally peaked Ti emission in synthetic multiple monochromatic imager. However, mix simulations still do not transport Ti to the core as is observed in the experiment. This suggests that phenomena in addition to the turbulent mix must be responsible for the transport of Ti. Simple diffusion estimates are unable to explain the early Ti mix into the core. Mechanisms suggested for further study are capsule surface roughness, illumination non-uniformity, and shock entrainment.

Baumgaertel, J. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Tregillis, I. L.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Shah, R. C.; Obrey, K. D.; Batha, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Johns, H.; Joshi, T.; Mayes, D.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Optimization of well length in waterflooding a five-spot pattern of horizontal wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the horizontal wells and provide a good return on investment. Horizontal Wells in Waterflood Pr t A worldwide interest exists today in drilling horizontal wells to increase productivity, Horizontal wells can be used in any phase of reservoir recovery... efficiency7. Several investigatorss-ic have studied waterflooding using horizontal wells. droman et al, s reported a field application using horizontal wells in the Prudhoe Bay Unit where the main reservoir drive mechanism is gas cap expansion...

Jimenez, Zulay J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The effect of perforation patterns upon well productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)ority of reservoirs it has been observed that the oil exists originally at or near its bubble point? llhen che pressure is reduoed at the well bore, oonsiderable quantities of gas are evolved The oreation of a free gas phase in the interstioes of the porous medium... the flow of oil into the well borea The use of a direot eleotrioal analogy beoomes someuhat more diffioult when dealing with sn oil not highly undersaturated, The oreation of a free gas phase oauses severe ohanges in the resistanoe to the flow of oil...

Neale, John William

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Multiphase Halo of NGC 891: WIYN H-alpha and BVI Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new, deep optical images (BVI+H-alpha) of the interstellar medium (ISM) far above the plane of NGC 891. These sub-arcsecond images give a direct visual view of two physically distinct ``phases'' of the thick interstellar disk of this galaxy. A dense phase of the thick disk ISM is observed in our BVI images as highly-structured dust-bearing clouds viewed against the stellar light of the galaxy. These structures are traceable to heights |z|=2 kpc from the midplane. Very few highly-structured dust features are present at |z|>2 kpc. The more prominent dust structures have gas masses in excess of 10^5 solar masses, each having visual extinctions well in excess of unity. A warm ionized phase of the high-z ISM is observed through its well-studied H-alpha emission. Our images of the well-studied diffuse ionized medium, to date the highest-resolution observations of this phase of the ISM in NGC 891, show it is relatively smoothly distributed with some filamentary structure superposed on this smooth background. There is little correspondence between the H-alpha emitting material and the absorbing dust structures. These two phases of the multiphase high-z ISM are physically distinct. The H-alpha emission is being heavily extincted in many places by the dense dust-bearing medium. Our H-alpha observations show evidence for several discrete H II regions at large distances from the midplane (to |z|=2 kpc). The presence of these H II regions in the thick disk of NGC 891 suggests that on-going star formation may be present in some of the dense, high-z clouds visible in our images. (Abstract Abridged)

J. Christopher Howk; Blair D. Savage

1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Production-systems analysis for fractured wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production-systems analysis has been in use for many years to design completion configurations on the basis of an expected reservoir capacity. The most common equations used for the reservoir calculations are for steady-state radial flow. Most hydraulically fractured wells require the use of an unsteady-state production simulator to predict the higher flow rates associated with the stimulated well. These high flow rates may present problems with excessive pressure drops through production tubing designed for radial-flow production. Therefore, the unsteady-state nature of fractured-well production precludes the use of steady-state radial-flow inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to calculate reservoir performance. An accurate prediction of fractured-well production must be made to design the most economically efficient production configuration. It has been suggested in the literature that a normalized reference curve can be used to generate the IPR's necessary for production-systems analysis. However, this work shows that the reference curve for fractured-well response becomes time-dependent when reservoir boundaries are considered. A general approach for constructing IPR curves is presented, and the use of an unsteady-state fractured-well-production simulator coupled with the production-systems-analysis approach is described. A field case demonstrates the application of this method to fractured wells.

Hunt, J.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

UV-BRIGHT NEARBY EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES OBSERVED IN THE MID-INFRARED: EVIDENCE FOR A MULTI-STAGE FORMATION HISTORY BY WAY OF WISE AND GALEX IMAGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the local universe, 10% of massive elliptical galaxies are observed to exhibit a peculiar property: a substantial excess of ultraviolet emission than what is expected from their old, red stellar populations. Several origins for this ultraviolet excess (UVX) have been proposed including a population of hot young stars and a population of old, blue horizontal branch or extended horizontal branch (BHB or EHB) stars that have undergone substantial mass loss from their outer atmospheres. We explore the radial distribution of UVX in a selection of 49 nearby E/S0-type galaxies by measuring their extended photometry in the UV through mid-infrared (mid-IR) with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We compare UV/optical and UV/mid-IR colors with the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis models, which allow for the inclusion of EHB stars. We find that combined WISE mid-IR and GALEX UV colors are more effective in distinguishing models than optical colors, and that the UV/mid-IR combination is sensitive to the EHB fraction. There are strong color gradients, with the outer radii bluer than the inner half-light radii by {approx}1 mag. This color difference is easily accounted for with an increase in the BHB fraction of 0.25 with radius. We estimated that the average ages for the inner and outer radii are 7.0 {+-} 0.3 Gyr, and 6.2 {+-} 0.2 Gyr, respectively, with the implication that the outer regions are likely to have formed {approx}1 Gyr after the inner regions. Additionally, we find that metallicity gradients are likely not a significant factor in the color difference. The separation of color between the inner and outer regions, which agrees with a specific stellar population difference (e.g., higher EHB populations), and the {approx}0.5-2 Gyr age difference suggests multi-stage formation. Our results are best explained by inside-out formation: rapid star formation within the core at early epochs (>4 Gyr ago) and at least one later stage starburst event coinciding with z {approx} 1.

Petty, S. M.; Farrah, D. G. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Neill, J. D.; Bridge, C. R. [Division of Physics, Math, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Jarrett, T. H.; Tsai, C.-W. [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Blain, A. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Rich, R. M.; Lake, S. E.; Wright, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Benford, D. J. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Masci, F. J. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fish embryo multimodal imaging by laser Doppler digital holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A laser Doppler imaging scheme combined to an upright microscope is proposed. Quantitative Doppler imaging in both velocity norm and direction, as well as amplitude contrast of either zebrafish flesh or vasculature is demonstrated.

Verrier, Nicolas; Picart, Pascal; Gross, Michel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging using parallel transmission at 7T  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), also known as phase-encoded (PE) chemical shift imaging (CSI), suffers from both low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the brain metabolites, as well as inflexible ...

Gagoski, Borjan Aleksandar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Completion of Oil Wells May 4, 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Completion of Oil Wells John Rudge May 4, 2003 1 Introduction After the initial drilling of an oil the small gap, lubrication theory can be used to study the flow. Non-dimensionalise all lengths on the gap

Rudge, John

215

Two-phase flow in horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow in horizontal wells and two-phase flow interaction with the reservoir were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Two-phase flow behavior has been recognized as one of the most important problems in production engineering. The authors designed and constructed a new test facility suitable for acquiring data on the relationship between pressure drop and liquid holdup along the well and fluid influx from the reservoir. For the theoretical work, an initial model was proposed to describe the flow behavior in a horizontal well configuration. The model uses the inflow-performance-relationship (IPR) approach and empirical correlations or mechanistic models for wellbore hydraulics. Although good agreement was found between the model and experimental data, a new IPR apart from the extension of Darcy`s law must be investigated extensively to aid in the proper design of horizontal wells.

Ihara, Masaru [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan); Yanai, Koji [Nippon Kokan Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Yanai, Koji

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interpretation of Drill Stem Test M. F. Anderson Halliburtonby William value of drill-stem tests. Myron Dorfman dis-well development, drill-stem tests, direc- tional surveys,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

219

Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is a catalog of modeling techniques useful in simulating well behavior in certain types of reservoirs that are often encountered in petroleum reservoirs. Emphasis has been placed on techniques that can be used with any conventional...

Rattu, Bungen Christina

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Characterization Well R-7 Geochemistry Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides analytical results for four groundwater-sampling rounds conducted at characterization well R-7. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine if contaminants from Technical Area (TA)-2 and TA-21 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. Figure 1.0-1 shows the well's location in the narrow upper part of Los Alamos Canyon, between the inactive Omega West reactor and the mouth of DP Canyon. Well R-7 is in an excellent location to characterize the hydrology and groundwater chemistry in both perched groundwater and the regional aquifer near sites of known Laboratory effluent release, including radionuclides and inorganic chemicals (Stone et al. 2002, 72717). The Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship-Remediation (RRES-R) Program (formerly the Environmental Restoration [ER] Project) installed well R-7 as part of groundwater investigations to satisfy requirements of the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599) and to support the Laboratory's ''Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (LANL 1996, 70215). Well R-7 was designed primarily to provide geochemical or water quality and hydrogeologic data for the regional aquifer within the Puye Formation. This report also presents a geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for well R-7 and provides hydrogeochemical interpretations using analytical results for groundwater samples collected at the well. Discussion of other hydrogeochemical data collected within the east-central portion of the Laboratory, however, is deferred until they can be evaluated in the context of sitewide information collected from other RRES and Hydrogeologic Workplan characterization wells (R-8A, R-9, and R-9i). Once all deep groundwater investigations in the east-central portion of the Laboratory are completed, geochemical and hydrogeologic conceptual models for the Los Alamos Canyon watershed may be included in a groundwater risk analysis. These models will include an evaluation of potential contaminant transport pathways. Well R-7 was completed on March 9, 2001, with three screens (363.2 to 379.2 ft, 730.4 to 746.4 ft, and 895.5 to 937.4 ft). Screen No.2 was dry during characterization sampling. Four rounds of groundwater characterization samples, collected from a perched zone and the regional aquifer from depths of 378.0 ft (screen No.1) and 915.0 ft (screen No.3), were chemically characterized for radionuclides, metals and trace elements, major ions, high-explosive (HE) compounds, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, organic compounds, and stable isotopes (H, N, and O). Although well R-7 is primarily a characterization well, its design and construction also meet the requirements of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant monitoring well as described in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document ''RCRA Groundwater Monitoring: Draft Technical Guidance,'' November 1992, EPA 530-R-93- 001. Incorporation of this well into a Laboratory-wide groundwater-monitoring program will be considered, and more specifically evaluated (e.g., sampling frequency, analytes, etc.), when the results of the well R-7 characterization activities are comprehensively evaluated in conjunction with other groundwater investigations in the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599).

P.Longmire; F.Goff

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Wurden, G.A.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Extragalactic Lens VLBI Imaging Survey (ELVIS) : investigating galaxy cores and black holes with gravitational lens central images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the Extragalactic Lens VLBI Imaging Survey (ELVIS), a search for central images in gravitational lenses. We present the first four ELVIS targets, for which we have radio VLBI observations with resolutions ...

Boyce, Edward R

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous recording microearthquake monitoring networks have been established around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal design wells in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas since summer 1980 to assess the effects well development may have had on subsidence and growth-fault activation. This monitoring has shown several unusual characteristics of Gulf Coast seismic activity. The observed activity is classified into two dominant types, one with identifiable body phases (type 1) and the other with only surface-wave signatures (type 2). During this reporting period no type 1 or body-wave events were reported. A total of 230 type 2 or surface-wave events were recorded. Origins of the type 2 events are still not positively understood; however, little or no evidence is available to connect them with geopressured-geothermal well activity. We continue to suspect sonic booms from military aircraft or some other human-induced source. 37 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thermal extraction analysis of five Los Azufres production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal energy extraction from five wells supplying 5-MWe wellhead generators in three zones of the Los Azufres geothermal field has been examined from production and chemical data compiled over 14-years of operation. The data, as annual means, are useful in observing small-scale changes in reservoir performance with continuous production. The chemical components are chloride for quality control and the geothermometer elements for reservoir temperatures. The flowrate and fluid enthalpy data are used to calculate the thermal extraction rates. Integration of these data provides an estimate of the total energy extracted from the zone surrounding the well. The combined production and chemical geothermometer data are used to model the produced fluid as coming from just-penetrating wells for which the annual produced mass originates from a series of concentric hemispheric shells moving out into the reservoir. Estimates are made of the drawdown distance into the reservoir and the far-field conditions.

Kruger, Paul; Quijano, Luis

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

Malinowksi, Richard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Recent Cosmic Inflation Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization (BICEP2) observations are believed as an evidence for the cosmic inflation. BICEP2 provided a first direct evidence for the inflation, determined its energy scale and debriefed witnesses for the quantum gravitational processes. The ratio of scalar-to-tensor fluctuations $r$ which is the canonical measurement of the gravitational waves, was estimated as $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$. Apparently, this value agrees well with the upper bound value corresponding to PLANCK $r\\leq 0.012$ and to WMAP9 experiment $r=0.2$. It is believed that the existence of a minimal length is one of the greatest predictions leading to modifications in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle or a GUP at the Planck scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting recent BICEP2 observations through quantum gravity or GUP. We estimate the slow-roll parameters, the tensorial and the scalar density fluctuations which are characterized by the scalar field $\\phi$. Taking into account the background (matter and radiation) energy density, $\\phi$ is assumed to interact with the gravity and with itself. We first review the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) Universe and then suggest modification in the Friedmann equation due to GUP. By using a single potential for a chaotic inflation model, various inflationary parameters are estimated and compared with the PLANCK and BICEP2 observations. While GUP is conjectured to break down the expansion of the early Universe (Hubble parameter and scale factor), two inflation potentials based on certain minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model result in $r$ and spectral index matching well with the observations. Corresponding to BICEP2 observations, our estimation for $r$ depends on the inflation potential and the scalar field. A power-law inflation potential does not.

Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Abdel Magied Diab

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

232

Project management improves well control events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a well control operation, the efficient use of personnel and equipment, through good project management techniques, contributes to increased safety and ensures a quality project. The key to a successful blowout control project is to use all resources in the most efficient manner. Excessive use of resources leads to unnecessary expenditures and delays in bringing the project under control. The Kuwait well control project, which involved more than 700 blowouts, was accomplished in a much shorter time (8 months) than first estimated (5 years). This improvement partly resulted from the application of sound project management techniques. These projects were prime examples of the need for a formal project management approach to handling wild well projects. There are many examples of projects that were successful in controlling wells but were economic disasters. Only through the effective application of project management can complex well control projects be completed in reasonable time frames at reasonable cost. The paper describes team management, project scope, organizational structures, scheduling, tracking models, critical path method, and decision trees.

Oberlender, G.D. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Abel, L.W. [Wild Well Control Inc., Spring, TX (United States)

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

233

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger-Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process the information and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway. During this quarter, we have presented our project and discussed the software to numerous Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) workshops located in various regions of the United States.

Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Snubdrilling a new well in Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new well was successfully drilled using a snubbing jack. The drill bit was rotated using a rotary table, downhole motors and combination of the two. Expected high-pressure zones prompted this use of ``snubdrilling.`` The primary objective was to drill a vertical well through underlying sands and gain information about formation pressures. This data would aid in the drilling of a relief well using a conventional drilling rig. The secondary objective was to relieve pressure by putting this new well on production. In addition to special high-pressure drilling jobs, there are other drilling applications where snubbing jacks are a feasible alternative to conventional rotary drilling rigs or coiled tubing units. Slimhole, underbalanced and flow drilling, and sidetracking of existing wells are excellent applications for snubdrilling. Advantages of snubdrilling vs. coiled tubing drilling, include ability to rotate drillstrings, use high-torque downhole motors, pump at high rates and pressures, apply significant overpull in case of stuck pipe, and run casing and liners without rigging down. Shortcomings of drilling with snubbing jacks compared to coiled tubing are the need to stop circulation while making new connections and inability to run continuous cable inside workstrings.

Aasen, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Stepped-frequency continuous-wave microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microwave-induced thermoacoustic (TA) imaging combines the dielectric contrast of microwave imaging with the resolution of ultrasound imaging. Prior studies have only focused on time-domain techniques with short but powerful microwave pulses that require a peak output power in excess of several kilowatts to achieve sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This poses safety concerns as well as to render the imager expensive and bulky with requiring a large vacuum radio frequency source. Here, we propose and demonstrate a coherent stepped-frequency continuous-wave (SFCW) technique for TA imaging which enables substantial improvements in SNR and consequently a reduction in peak power requirements for the imager. Constructive and destructive interferences between TA signals are observed and explained. Full coherency across microwave and acoustic domains, in the thermo-elastic response, is experimentally verified and this enables demonstration of coherent SFCW microwave-induced TA imaging. Compared to the pulsed technique, an improvement of 17?dB in SNR is demonstrated.

Nan, Hao, E-mail: haonan@stanford.edu; Arbabian, Amin [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

David M. Smith

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Estimating atmospheric parameters and reducing noise for multispectral imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for estimating atmospheric radiance and transmittance. An atmospheric estimation system is divided into a first phase and a second phase. The first phase inputs an observed multispectral image and an initial estimate of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band and calculates the atmospheric radiance and transmittance for each spectral band, which can be used to generate a "corrected" multispectral image that is an estimate of the surface multispectral image. The second phase inputs the observed multispectral image and the surface multispectral image that was generated by the first phase and removes noise from the surface multispectral image by smoothing out change in average deviations of temperatures.

Conger, James Lynn

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

238

Apparatus for stringing well pipe of casing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for use in running a string of threaded well pipe or casing in a vertical configuration in a deep well bore which is adapted to convert a top head drive drilling rig for use in running each length of pipe into the well bore. A drive spindle adaptor is provided which may be securely attached in a removably mounted manner to the rotary drive spindle or sub of a top head drive drilling rig. The drive spindle includes a pair of opposing, outwardly extending lugs disposed at a right angle to the axial direction of the spindle and a true centering guide means. A collar is included which is provided with frictional gripping members for removably securing the collar to one end of a length of conventional pipe and a pair of axially extending, spaced ears which cooperate upon engagement with said lugs on said spindle adaptor to transfer rotary motion of said spindle to said length of pipe.

Sexton, J.L.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Apparatus for rotating and reciprocating well pipe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for simultaneously rotating and reciprocating well pipe, having an upper end, and mechanically utilizing a rotary table attached to a drilling rig, comprising: a rotating pipe clamp assembly having an irregular cross-sectional mid-member and clamp members for releasably gripping the well pipe connected to the ends of the mid-member for rotation therewith; a square block for fitting to the rotary table square and having a selected grooved interior configuration; a torque transmitting means fitted into the grooves having openings therethrough having the same irregular cross-section as the mid-member cross-section; and a torque limiting means connecting the torque transmitting means and the block for limiting torque applied through the well pipe via the clamp assembly and the torque transmitting means.

Davis, K.D.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

240

Numerical simulation of an energy storage well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ Isothera aap oC ~ at the end of 0. 25 yr. of in]ectiou. . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ . ~ ~ . ~ 48 7 ~ Isobar aap, Rilopascals, after 0. 25 yr. of storaqe. 49 8. Isothera aap, oC ~ after 0 25 yr. of stozaqe. . . . ~ 50 9 Isobar nap. Rilopascal, after 0 ~ 25 yr...-recovery schedules to insure an economical operation and to prevent theraal pollution of the aquifer. Sa~iaal 511~I mayer and Todd (1973) did preliminary calculations for a well in a 33 a thick confined aquifer of 25 percent poros- ity. The well received 99o...

Ebeling, Lynn Louis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pressure buildup characteristics in Austin Chalk wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

20 40 60 60 Mr lee IOOKrlemelere EEKAR 6 UA SALMI' WILSON LAVACA hrAVERICK ZAVA' A FRIG ATAECOSA KARNES DE WITT 0 0 IMMIT LA SALLE ~CO o& @g'v Figure I ? Austin Chalk Trend in Texas Early in the development of Clayton W, Williams, Jr..., Henry J. , Jr. : "Well- Test Analysis for Vertically Fractured Wells, " J. Pet. Tech. (Aug. 1972) 1014-1020; Trans. , AINE, 253. VITA Name: Eddy Claycomb Birth Date: March 18, 1956 Birthplace: Tyler, Texas Parents: Mr. and Mrs. Tom Claycomb, Jr...

Claycomb, Eddy

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Simplified image processing system for softcopy presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based i, echniques for its particular application. In the field of astronomy, digital image processing techniques are used to process images acquired through earth-based telescopes as well as earth orbiting outward- looking satellites jfij, I7j, j8... and analysis is being used to support computerized axial tomography and ultrasound scanning systems ]9]. Typical digital techniques used in biomedical applications include image enhancement, geometric transformation, edge detection, color and pseudo color...

Corleto-Mena, Jose Gilberto

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Precursors to radiopharmaceutical agents for tissue imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A class of radiolabeled compounds to be used in tissue imaging that exhibits rapid brain uptake, good brain:blood radioactivity ratios, and long retention times. The imaging agents are more specifically radioiodinated aromatic amines attached to dihydropyridine carriers, that exhibit heart as well as brain specificity. In addition to the radiolabeled compounds, classes of compounds are also described that are used as precursors and intermediates in the preparation of the imaging agents.

Srivastava, Prem C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Foolproof completions for high rate production wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gravel pack (GP) and high rate water pack (HRWP) completions over high-permeability fracturing (HPF), known in the vernacular as a frac&pack (FP) for very high rate wells. While a properly designed GP completion may prevent sand production, it does...

Tosic, Slavko

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Foolproof completions for high rate production wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gravel pack (GP) and high rate water pack (HRWP) completions over high-permeability fracturing (HPF), known in the vernacular as a frac&pack (FP) for very high rate wells. While a properly designed GP completion may prevent sand production, it does...

Tosic, Slavko

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Well performance under solutions gas drive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully implicit black-oil simulator was written to predict the drawdown and buildup responses for a single well under Solution Gas Drive. The model is capable of handling the following reservoir behaviors: Unfractured reservoir, Double-Porosity system, and Double Permeability-Double Porosity model of Bourdet. The accuracy of the model results is tested for both single-phase liquid flow and two-phase flow. The results presented here provide a basis for the empirical equations presented in the literature. New definitions of pseudopressure and dimensionless time are presented. By using these two definitions, the multiphase flow solutions correlate with the constant rate liquid flow solution for both transient and boundary-dominated flow. For pressure buildup tests, an analogue for the liquid solution is constructed from the drawdown pseudopressure, similar to the reservoir integral of J. Jones. The utility of using the producing gas-oil ration at shut in to compute pseudopressures and pseudotimes is documented. The influence of pressure level and skin factor on the Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) of wells producing solution gas drive systems is examined. A new definition of flow efficiency that is based on the structure of the deliverability equations is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the presently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells. The need for using pseudopressures to analyze well test data for fractured reservoirs is shown. Expressions to compute sandface saturations for fractured systems are presented.

Camacho-Velazquez, R.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Visualizing Motion in Potential Wells* Pratibha Jolly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, directly and plot the potential energy diagrams using a magnetic field sensor. The ease of measurement of potential #12;2 barriers and wells. The previous developers used a photo-interrupt and timing device for the sake of economy a single sensor was employed. Then, the experiment had to be repeated a large number

Zollman, Dean

248

Promoting Balance, Wellness & Fitness Creating healthier lives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in student recruitment and retention. Engagement ­ We provide opportunities for students and members of their leisure time. Participation in such activities also assists students in performing well in a demanding interpersonal conflicts, learn healthy life-style habits, provide first aid and emergency response services

Washington at Seattle, University of

249

T2WELL/ECO2N  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002966IBMPC00 T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water http:..esd.lbl.gov/tough/licensing.html

250

FOR THE ACTIVE Health and Wellness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR THE ACTIVE Health and Wellness n EARLY BIRD SWIM Monday, Wednesday & Friday Sept. 16-Dec. 6, 7, Seniors: $58 n SWIMMER'S SPECIAL (Participate in 36 swims of your choice of Early Bird or Evening Swim Education fasttrac for 55+ ASTRONOMY ­ OUR SOLAR SYSTEM AND BEYOND This basic introductory course

deYoung, Brad

251

FOR THE ACTIVE Health and Wellness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR THE ACTIVE Health and Wellness n EARLY BIRD SWIM Monday, Wednesday & Friday Sept. 16-Dec. 6, 7, Seniors: $58 n SWIMMER'S SPECIAL (Participate in 36 swims of your choice of Early Bird or Evening Swim Education fasttrac for 55+ ASTRONOMY ­ Our Solar System and Beyond This basic introductory course

deYoung, Brad

252

Fracturing pressures and near-well fracture geometry of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydraulic fracturing of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is made challenging by the far more complicated near-well fracture geometry compared to that of conventional vertical wells. This geometry is important both for hydraulic fracture propagation and the subsequent post-treatment well performance. Fracture tortuosity of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is likely to cause large initiation pressures and reduction in the fracture widths. This paper presents a comprehensive study of the effects of important variables, including the principal stresses, wellbore orientation, and perforation configuration on fracture geometry. Initiation pressures, the contact between arbitrarily oriented wells and the fracture plane, and the near-well fracture geometry are determined and discussed. This study also shows that because of the near-well stress concentration the fracture width at the wellbore is always smaller than the maximum fracture width. This can have important consequences during hydraulic fracturing.

Chen, Z.; Economides, M.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Imaging Genetics --Towards Discovery Neuroscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variants that influence measures derived from anatomical or functional brain im- ages, which are in turn related to brain-related illnesses or fundamental cognitive, emotional and behavioral processes a tremendous growth in brain imaging as well as an enor- mous explosion of interest and success in genomics

Feng, Jianfeng

254

Image Fusion for MR Bias Correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For example, for fast-spin echo (FSE) pulse sequences, the MR signal is given by this equation: · Target T1Image Fusion for MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group Joint work with W. Wells, J strength · Spatially varying field strength encodes spatial location in the frequency domain #12;MR Imaging

Willsky, Alan S.

255

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by... Professor growing field which has provided for nanometric optical imaging in the near-field. Even though a variety of techniques are being developed with nanometric optical imaging potential, near-field optics remains the most

256

Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Slide no. 4 Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images Charlotte Bay Hasager images for offshore wind ressource assessment in lieu of in-situ mast observations #12;4 Slide no Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps in the North

257

Substorm expansion phase: Observations from Geotail, Polar and IMAGE network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is not at the center of the sheet anymore, detects an ion velocity directed earthward but essentially field aligned Plasma Sheet (CPS) and Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL) and on the relation between this transport

California at Berkeley, University of

258

Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at new wave- lengths, including most directly soft X-rays (which show the direct thermal emission of a coronal shock front; only the non-thermal signatures such as radio waves or particle acceleration can in the heliosphere should have the character of bow waves; if the disturbance propagates into a region of reduced

Hudson, Hugh

259

Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at new wave- lengths, including most directly soft X-rays (which show the direct thermal emission of a coronal shock front; only the non-thermal signatures such as radio waves or particle acceleration can the character of bow waves; if the disturbance propagates into a region of reduced Alfvén speed, a high Mach

California at Berkeley, University of

260

ALMA's high-cadence imaging capabilities for solar observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array offers an unprecedented view of our Sun at sub-/millimeter wavelengths. The high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution facilitates the measurement of gas temperatures and magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere with high precision. The anticipated results will revolutionize our understanding of the solar atmosphere and may in particular result in major steps towards solving the coronal heating problem. Based on state-of-the-art 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we calculate the emergent continuum intensity (and thus brightness temperature maps) in the wavelength range accessed by ALMA and simulate instrumental effects for different array configurations. First results show that the local gas temperature can be closely mapped with ALMA and that much of the complex small-scale chromospheric pattern can be resolved.

Wedemeyer, Sven

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - aster image gallery Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Japan Summary: at least one clear image at any area of the world Red color indicates the area observed by ASTER. Dense... are clearly observed on the SWIRTIR images. Temperature...

262

EIS/Hinode observations of Doppler flow seen through the 40 arcsec wide slit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode is the first solar telescope to obtain wide slit spectral images that can be used for detecting Doppler flows in transition region and coronal lines on the Sun and to relate them to their surrounding small scale dynamics. We select EIS lines covering the temperature range 6x10^4 K to 2x10^6 K that give spectrally pure images of the Sun with the 40 arcsec slit. In these images Doppler shifts are seen as horizontal brightenings. Inside the image it is difficult to distinguish shifts from horizontal structures but emission beyond the image edge can be unambiguously identified as a line shift in several lines separated from others on their blue or red side by more than the width of the spectrometer slit (40 pixels). In the blue wing of He II, we find a large number of events with properties (size and lifetime) similar to the well-studied explosive events seen in the ultraviolet spectral range. Comparison with X-Ray Telescope (XRT) images shows many Doppler shift events at the footpoints of small X-ray loops. The most spectacular event observed showed a strong blue shift in transition region and lower corona lines from a small X-ray spot that lasted less than 7 min. The emission appears to be near a cool coronal loop connecting an X-ray bright point to an adjacent region of quiet Sun. The width of the emission implies a line-of-sight velocity of 220 km/s. In addition, we show an example of an Fe XV shift with a velocity about 120 km/s, coming from what looks like a narrow loop leg connecting a small X-ray brightening to a larger region of X-ray emission.

D. E. Innes; R. Attie; H. Hara; M. S. Madjarska

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

Z. Adam Szybinski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Efficiency limits of quantum well solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum well solar cell (QWSC) has been proposed as a flexible means to ensuring current matching for tandem cells. This paper explores the further advantage afforded by the indication that QWSCs operate in the radiative limit because radiative contribution to the dark current is seen to dominate in experimental data at biases corresponding to operation under concentration. The dark currents of QWSCs are analysed in terms of a light and dark current model. The model calculates the spectral response (QE) from field bearing regions and charge neutral layers and from the quantum wells by calculating the confined densities of states and absorption coefficient, and solving transport equations analytically. The total dark current is expressed as the sum of depletion layer and charge neutral radiative and non radiative currents consistent with parameter values extracted from QE fits to data. The depletion layer dark current is a sum of Shockley-Read-Hall non radiative, and radiative contributions. The charge neu...

Connolly, J P; Barnham, K W J; Bushnell, D B; Tibbits, T N D; Roberts, J S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy loss rate in disordered quantum well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the effect of dynamically screened deformation potential on the electron energy loss rate in disordered semiconductor quantum well. Interaction of confined electrons with bulk acoustic phonons has been considered in the deformation coupling. The study concludes that the dynamically screened deformation potential coupling plays a significant role as it substantially affects the power dependency of electron relaxation on temperature and mean free path.

Tripathi, P.; Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Centre of Excellence in Nanomaterials, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Hasan, S. T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Sibli National College, Azamgarh-276128 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gas well operation with liquid production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prediction of liquid loading in gas wells is discussed in terms of intersecting tubing or system performance curves with IPR curves and by using a more simplified critical velocity relationship. Different methods of liquid removal are discussed including such methods as intermittent lift, plunger lift, use of foam, gas lift, and rod, jet, and electric submersible pumps. Advantages, disadvantages, and techniques for design and application of the methods of liquid removal are discussed.

Lea, J.F.; Tighe, R.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Oscillation dynamics of multi-well condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new approach to the macroscopic dynamics of three-well Bose-Einstein condensates, giving particular emphasis to self-trapping and Josephson oscillations. Although these effects have been studied quite thoroughly in the mean-field approximation, a full quantum description is desirable, since it avoids pathologies due to the nonlinear character of the mean-field equations. Using superpositions of quantum eigenstates, we construct various oscillation and trapping scenarios.

S. Mossmann; C. Jung

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeaugaInformation Mexico - A Survey of Work to DateWell

272

Imaging the Antikythera Mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1900, a party of sponge divers chanced on the wreck of a Roman merchant vessel between Crete and mainland Greece. It was found to contain numerous ancient Greek treasures, among them a mysterious lump of clay that split open to reveal 'mathematical gears' as it dried out. This object is now known as the Antikythera Mechanism, one of the most enlightening artifacts in terms of revealing the advanced nature of ancient Greek science and technology. In 2005 we travelled to the National Archeological Museum in Athens to apply our Reflectance Imaging methods to the mechanism in the hopes of revealing ancient writing on the device. We were successful, and along with the results of Microfocus CT imaging, we are able to decipher 3000 characters compared with the original 800 known. This lead to an understanding that the device was a mechanical, astronomical computer from 150 B.C.E. capable of predicting solar and lunar eclipses along with other celestial events. This talk will overview both the imaging methods as well as what they reveal about the Antikythera Mechanism.

Malzbender, Tom (Hewlett Packard Laboratories) [Hewlett Packard Laboratories

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Effects of Vehicle Image in Gasoline-Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Images of Hybrid Vehicles Each of the householdsbetween hybrid and non-hybrid vehicles was observed in smallowned Honda Civic Hybrids, vehicles that are virtually

Heffner, Reid R.; Kurani, Kenneth S; Turrentine, Tom

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Program solves for gas well inflow performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Windows-based program, GasIPR, can solve for the gas well inflow performance relationship (IPR). The program calculates gas producing rates at various pressures and is applicable for both turbulent and non-turbulent flow. It also has the following capabilities: computes PVT properties {gamma}{sub g}, P{sub c}, T{sub c}, heating value, Z, {mu}{sub g}, B{sub g}, and {rho}{sub g} from input gas composition data; calculates the Reynolds number (N{sub Re}) and shows the gas flow rates at the sandface at which the turbulence effect must be considered; helps the user to optimize the net perforation interval (h{sub p}) so that the turbulence effect can be minimized; and helps the user to evaluate the sensitivity of formation permeability on gas flow rate for a new play. IPR is a critical component in forecasting gas well deliverability. IPRs are used for sizing optimum tubing configurations and compressors, designing gravel packs, and solving gas well loading problems. IPR is the key reference for nodal analysis.

Engineer, R. [AERA Energy LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Grillete, G. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Bitumen production through a horizontal well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for thermal stimulation and production of a viscous hydrocarbon from a reservoir having a productive layer which retains the hydrocarbon until the latter is made flowable by contact with a hot stimulating medium. The method includes the steps of: forming a borehole having a substantially horizontal segment which transverses the productive layer, registering a well completion in the borehole which includes; an elongated perforate well liner, a fluid conduit extending through the liner and having a discharge end, and a well head at the liner upper end communicated with the fluid conduit, positioning a variable length flow diverter in the liner adjacent to the fluid conduit discharge end, whereby to define a quasi-barrier in the liner which is pervious to passage of the hot stimulating medium, and which divides the liner into injection and production segments respectively, heating the productive layer about the substantially horizontal segment of the elongated liner, introducing a pressurized stream of the hot stimulant through the fluid conduit and into the liner injection segment, and producing hydrocarbon emulsion which flows into the liner production segment.

Livesey, D.B.; Toma, P.

1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

276

Method of drilling and casing a well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A well drilling rig having a rotary table for driving a drill string rotatively and having jacking mechanism for lowering casing into the well after drilling, with the jacking mechanism including fluid pressure actuated piston and cylinder means which may be left in the rig during drilling and which are positioned low enough in the rig to avoid interference with operation of the rotary table. The jacking mechanism also includes a structure which is adapted to be connected to the piston and cylinder means when the casing or other well pipe is to be lowered and which is actuable upwardly and downwardly and carries one of two pipe gripping units for progressively jacking the pipe downwardly by vertical reciprocation of that structure. The reciprocating structure may take the form of a beam extending between two pistons and actuable thereby, with a second beam being connected to cylinders within which the pistons are contained and being utilized to support the second gripping element. In one form of the invention, the rotary table when in use is supported by this second beam.

Boyadjieff, G.I.; Campbell, A.B.

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Recompletion Report for Well UE-10j  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing Well UE-10j was deepened and recompleted for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was originally drilled to a total depth of 725.4 meters in 1965 for use as a hydrologic test hole in the northern portion of Yucca Flat in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site. The well is located up-gradient of the Yucca Flat underground test area and penetrates deep into the Paleozoic rocks that form the lower carbonate aquifer of the NTS and surrounding areas. The original 24.4-centimeter-diameter borehole was drilled to a depth of 725.4 meters and left uncompleted. Water-level measurements were made periodically by the U.S. Geological Survey, but access to the water table was lost between 1979 and 1981 due to hole sloughing. In 1993, the hole was opened to 44.5 centimeters and cased off to a depth of 670.0 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 796.4 meters. The depth to water in the open borehole was measured at 658.7 meters on March 18, 1993.

M. J. Townsend

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Remote down-hole well telemetry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

In-well pumped mid-infrared PbTe/CdTe quantum well vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical in-well pumped mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers based on PbTe quantum wells embedded in CdTe barriers are realized. In contrast to the usual ternary barrier materials of lead salt lasers such as PbEuTe of PbSrTe, the combination of narrow-gap PbTe with wide-gap CdTe offers an extremely large carrier confinement, preventing charge carrier leakage from the quantum wells. In addition, optical in-well pumping can be achieved with cost effective and readily available near infrared lasers. Free carrier absorption, which is a strong loss mechanism in the mid-infrared, is strongly reduced due to the insulating property of CdTe. Lasing is observed from 85?K to 300?K covering a wavelength range of 3.34.2??m. The best laser performance is achieved for quantum well thicknesses of 20?nm. At low temperature, the threshold power is around 100 mW{sub P} and the output power more than 700 mW{sub P}. The significance of various charge carrier loss mechanisms are analyzed by modeling the device performance. Although Auger losses are quite low in IVVI semiconductors, an Auger coefficient of C{sub A}?=?3.5??10{sup ?27} cm{sup 6} s{sup ?1} was estimated for the laser structure, which is attributed to the large conduction band offset.

Khiar, A., E-mail: amir.khiar@jku.at; Witzan, M.; Hochreiner, A.; Eibelhuber, M.; Springholz, G. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Volobuev, V. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); National Technical University Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute, Frunze str. 21, 61002 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

280

OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Lab, Org. A021S, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Kuzin, Sergey [P. N. Lebedev Physical institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii prospekt, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Walsh, Robert [University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); DeForest, Craig, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

before and after hydraulic fracturing. Temperature databefore and after hydraulic fracturing of the Elba Quartzitebefore and after hydraulic fracturing of the Lower Narrows

Freifeld, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer D.G. Long', P.J. Hardin2, and RA to SASS data for the study of Greenland's ice sheet. We present a time series of the radar backscatter images over Greenland covering the time period July-September 1978. The images provide an island

Long, David G.

283

Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

284

Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: Laboratory studies Mathematical modeling Sonic tool design and development Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Apparatus for use in rejuvenating oil wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sub incorporating a check valve is connected into the lower end of a well pipestring. This valve will pass hot steam injected down the pipestring to the formations to loosen up the thick crude oil. The check valve prevents back flow and thus will hold the high pressure steam. To resume production, the production pump can then be lowered through the pipestring. The pump itself is provided with an extended probe member which will unseat the check valve when the pump is in proper position so that production pumping can resume.

Warnock, C.E. Sr.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

286

Decline curve analysis for horizontal wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

support kept me from losing sight of my goals. Thanks to Sam Hou, Joseph Wang, Robert Liau, James Wang, and Shou for their company and in particular to Li Fan and Mrs. Shou-Lee Chang for their caring and delicious meals when I forgot my dinner. Thanks... Pressure (L/2xe= 0. 2) Composite Dimensionless Flow Rate Integral and Flow Rate Integral Derivative Functions Type Curve for an Infinite-Conductivity Horizontal Well Located in the Center of a Square Drainage Area, Producing at Constant Bottomhole...

Shih, Min-Yu

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

RMOTC - Field Information - Wells and Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001Data sets Notice: As ofOnlineWells

288

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDSWawarsing,Webb County,Energy Information 2001)Al.,Well

289

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm(CTIhinderProject SmartSalt Wells

290

Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEdit JumpWill County, Illinois: Facility WillowWell

291

Wells Rural Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save EnergyGlouster,Winside,WarrenWells Rural Electric Co Place:

292

Category:Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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293

Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

abandoned wells: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Lesson Topics WhatisDiabetes? Nutrition-FirstSteptoDiabetesManagement...

295

abandoning wells working: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Lesson Topics WhatisDiabetes? Nutrition-FirstSteptoDiabetesManagement...

296

Monitoring polymer properties in production wells of Chateaurenard oilfield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A polymer flooding test was conducted in the Chateaurenard field (France) from 1985 to 1989. The test was run on a ten-acre inverted five-spot. A total of 240,000 m{sup 3} of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide at a concentration of 1000 ppm was injected followed by an equal volume of solution but at a tapered concentration. A strong response in oil recovery for three of the four producers was observed. This paper reports on an original methodology that was designed for sampling and analyzing the polymer in the effluents of the producing wells. Concentrations and main characteristics of produced polyacrylamide were determined versus injected volume. No degradation of the polymer was detected. A molecular weight fractionation during polymer slug propagation into the reservoir due to adsorption/retention chromatography was observed. The low-polymer concentration of the effluents could be explained by a strong retention of the polymer in the low permeability zones of the reservoir.

Putz, A.G. (Elf Aquitaine, Avenue Larribau, Pau (FR)); Lecourtier, J. (Inst. Francais du Petrole, Avenue Bois-Preau, 92500 Rueil-Malmaison (FR))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods? Andrea K Barreiro1*, Eric T Shea-Brown1, Fred M Rieke2,3, Julijana Gjorgjieva4 From Nineteenth Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS*2010 San... Antonio, TX, USA. 24-30 July 2010 Recent experiments in retina and cortex have demon- strated that pairwise maximum entropy (PME) methods can approximate observed spiking patterns to a high degree of accuracy [1,2]. In this paper we examine...

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Well injection valve with retractable choke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An injection valve is described for use in a well conduit consisting of: a housing having a bore, a valve closure member in the bore moving between open and closed positions, a flow tube telescopically movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means for biasing the flow tube in a direction for allowing the valve closure member to move to the closed position, an expandable and contractible fluid restriction connected to the flow tube and extending into the bore for moving the flow tube to the open position in response to injection fluid, but allowing the passage of well tools through the valve, the restriction contractible in response to fluid flow, the restriction includes, segments movable into and out of the bore, and biasing means yieldably urging the segments into the bore, a no-go shoulder on the flow tube, and releasable lockout means between the flow tube and the housing for locking the flow tube and valve in the open position.

Pringle, R.E.

1986-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

299

Methoden Wetenschappelijk and Observational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methoden Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Fact-free and Observational Science #12;Data · Part of modern science is based on observation ­How do we do this? ­And what are the pitfalls? · Knowing how to observe is an important step in experimental design #12;Three kinds of science · There are (in my view) three ways

Steels, Luc

300

Split image optical display  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gamma-ray Imaging Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

302

Multivariate Mathematical Morphology applied to Color Image Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 10 Multivariate Mathematical Morphology applied to Color Image Analysis 10.1. Introduction analysis framework, currently fully developed for both binary and gray-level images. Its popularity in the image processing community is mainly due to its rigorous mathematical foundation as well as its inherent

Lefèvre, Sébastien

303

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Bayesian Learning via Stochastic Gradient Langevin Dynamics Max Welling welling@ics.uci.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian Learning via Stochastic Gradient Langevin Dynamics Max Welling welling@ics.uci.edu D. Bren on iterative learning from small mini-batches. By adding the right amount of noise to a standard stochastic" and collects sam- ples after it has been surpassed. We apply the method to three models: a mixture of Gaussians

Kaski, Samuel

305

Color Appearance and the Digital Imaging Pipeline Brian A. Wandell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Color Appearance and the Digital Imaging Pipeline Brian A. Wandell Psychology Department Stanford reproduction pipeline, spanning image capture, processing and display, must be designed to account for the properties of the human observer. In designing an image pipeline, three principles of human vision

Wandell, Brian A.

306

Drilling of wells with top drive unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well drilling apparatus including a top drive drilling assembly having a motor driven stem adapted to be attached to the upper end of a drill string and drive it during a drilling operation, a torque wrench carried by the top drive assembly and movable upwardly and downwardly therewith and operable to break a threated connection between the drill string and the stem, and an elevator carried by and suspended from the top drive assembly and adapted to engage a section of drill pipe beneath the torque wrench in suspending relation. The torque wrench and elevator are preferably retained against rotation with the rotary element which drives the drill string, but may be movable vertically relative to that rotary element and relative to one another in a manner actuating the apparatus between various different operating conditions.

Boyadjieff, G.I.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Kuwait poised for massive well kill effort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that full scale efforts to extinguish Kuwait's oil well fires are to begin. The campaign to combat history's worst oil fires, originally expected to begin in mid-March, has been hamstrung by logistical problems, including delays in equipment deliveries caused by damage to Kuwait's infrastructure. Meantime, production from a key field off Kuwait--largely unaffected by the war--is expected to resume in May, but Kuwaiti oil exports will still be hindered by damaged onshore facilities. In addition, Kuwait is lining up equipment and personnel to restore production from its heavily damaged oil fields. Elsewhere in the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia reports progress in combating history's worst oil spills but acknowledges a continuing threat.

Not Available

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

308

Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

Valmianski, Ilya, E-mail: ivalmian@ucsd.edu; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Femtosecond Transient Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes a novel framework called transient imaging for image formation and scene understanding through impulse illumination and time images. Using time-of-flight cameras and multi-path analysis of global light ...

Kirmani, Ahmed (Ghulam Ahmed)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Imaging the Expanding Shell of SN 2011dh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on third epoch VLBI observations of the radio-bright supernova SN 2011dh located in the nearby galaxy (7.8 Mpc) M51. The observations took place at $t=453$ d after the explosion and at a frequency of 8.4 GHz. We obtained a fairly well resolved image of the shell of SN 2011dh, making it one of only six recent supernovae for which resolved images of the ejecta are available. By fitting a spherical shell model directly to the visibility measurements we determine the angular radius of SN 2011dh's radio emission to be $636 \\pm 29$ $\\mu$as . At a distance of 7.8 Mpc, this angular radius corresponds to a linear radius of $(7.4 \\pm 0.3) \\times 10^{16}$ cm and an average expansion velocity since the explosion of $18900^{+2800}_{-2400}$ kms$^{-1}$. We also calculated more precise radius measurements for the earlier VLBI observations and we show that all the measured values of the radius of the emission region, up to $t=453$ d, are still almost perfectly consistent with those derived from fitting synchrotron s...

de Witt, A; Kamble, A; Soderberg, A M; Brunthaler, A; Zauderer, B; Bartel, N; Rupen, M P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Completion report for Well ER-EC-6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

M. J. Townsend

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The 2MASS Wide-Field T Dwarf Search. IV Unting out T dwarfs with Methane Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present first results from a major program of methane filter photometry for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. The definition of a new methane filter photometric system is described. A recipe is provided for the differential calibration of methane imaging data using existing 2MASS photometry. We show that these filters are effective in discriminating T dwarfs from other types of stars, and demonstrate this with Anglo-Australian Telescope observations using the IRIS2 imager. Methane imaging data and proper motions are presented for ten T dwarfs identified as part of the 2MASS "Wide Field T Dwarf Search" -- seven of them initially identified as T dwarfs using methane imaging. We also present near-infrared moderate resolution spectra for five T dwarfs, newly discovered by this technique. Spectral types obtained from these spectra are compared to those derived from both our methane filter observations, and spectral types derived by other observers. Finally, we suggest a range of future programs to which these filters are clearly well suited: the winnowing of T dwarf and Y dwarf candidate objects coming from the next generation of near-infrared sky surveys; the robust detection of candidate planetary-mass brown dwarfs in clusters; the detection of T dwarf companions to known L and T dwarfs via deep methane imaging; and the search for rotationally-modulated time-variable surface features on cool brown dwarfs.

C. G. Tinney; Adam J. Burgasser; J. Davy Kirkpatrick; Michael W. McElwain

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

313

Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. I. Intrinsic dimension and correlation analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complexity of an active region is related to its flare-productivity. Mount Wilson or McIntosh sunspot classifications measure such complexity but in a categorical way, and may therefore not use all the information present in the observations. Moreover, such categorical schemes hinder a systematic study of an active region's evolution for example. We propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity and relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. We analyze the local correlation structure within continuum and magnetogram data, as well as the cross-correlation between continuum and magnetogram data. We compute the intrinsic dimension, partial correlation, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of image patches of continuum and magnetogram active region images taken from the SOHO-MDI instrument. We use masks of sunspots derived from continuum as well as larger masks of magnetic active regions derived from the magnetogram to analyze separately the core part of an active region fr...

Moon, Kevin R; Delouille, Veronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Astrometry of the stellar image of U Her amplified by the circumstellar 22 GHz water masers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 22 GHz H_2O masers in the circumstellar envelope of the Mira variable star U Her have been observed with MERLIN using a phase referencing technique to determine accurate astrometric positions. The positions were compared with the optical positions obtained with the Hipparcos satellite to an accuracy of 18 mas. The absolute radio position of the brightest H_2O maser spot is found to match the optical position, indicating that this spot is the stellar image amplified by the maser screen in front of it. The occurrence of an amplified image in the 22 GHz maser can be used to accurately determine the positions of the H_2O with respect to the star as well as with respect to the SiO and OH masers. Our observations seem to indicate that the star is not in the centre of the distribution of maser spots, which has been interpreted as a ring.

W. H. T. Vlemmings; H. J. van Langevelde; P. J. Diamond

2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

315

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Flow in geothermal wells: Part III. Calculation model for self-flowing well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical model described predicts the temperature, pressure, dynamic dryness fraction, and void fraction along the vertical channel of two-phase flow. The existing data from operating wells indicate good agreement with the model. (MHR)

Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.; Michaelides, E.E.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used to obtain downhole flow conditions, which is key information to control and optimize horizontal well production. However, the fluid flow in the reservoir is often multiphase and complex, which makes temperature and pressure interpretation very...

Li, Zhuoyi

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hot Pot Field Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

319

Hot Pot Field Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

320

SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF A CORONAL MORETON WAVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We observed a coronal wave (EIT wave) on 2011 February 16, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and EUV spectral data from the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The wave accompanied an M1.6 flare that produced a surge and a coronal mass ejection (CME). EIS data of the wave show a prominent redshifted signature indicating line-of-sight velocities of {approx}20 km s{sup -1} or greater. Following the main redshifted wave front, there is a low-velocity period (and perhaps slightly blueshifted), followed by a second redshift somewhat weaker than the first; this progression may be due to oscillations of the EUV atmosphere set in motion by the initial wave front, although alternative explanations may be possible. Along the direction of the EIS slit the wave front's velocity was {approx}500 km s{sup -1}, consistent with its apparent propagation velocity projected against the solar disk as measured in the AIA images, and the second redshifted feature had propagation velocities between {approx}200 and 500 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the observed wave being generated by the outgoing CME, as in the scenario for the classic Moreton wave. This type of detailed spectral study of coronal waves has hitherto been a challenge, but is now possible due to the availability of concurrent AIA and EIS data.

Harra, Louise K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Sterling, Alphonse C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goemoery, Peter [Astronomical Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, SK-05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia); Veronig, Astrid, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: gomory@astro.s, E-mail: astrid.veronig@uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Spatial Corrections of ROSAT HRI Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray observations with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) often have spatial smearing on the order of 10 arcsec (Morse 1994). This degradation of the intrinsic resolution of the instrument (5 arcsec) can be attributed to errors in the aspect solution associated with the wobble of the space craft or with the reacquisition of the guide stars. We have developed a set of IRAF/PROS and MIDAS/EXSAS routines to minimize these effects. Our procedure attempts to isolate aspect errors that are repeated through each cycle of the wobble. The method assigns a 'wobble phase' to each event based on the 402 second period of the ROSAT wobble. The observation is grouped into a number of phase bins and a centroid is calculated for each sub-image. The corrected HRI event list is reconstructed by adding the sub-images which have been shifted to a common source position. This method has shown approx. 30% reduction of the full width half maximum (FWHM) of an X-ray observation of the radio galaxy 3C 120. Additional examples are presented.

D. E. Harris; J. D. Silverman; G. Hasinger; I. Lehmann

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

322

ARSENIC IN PRIVATE WELLS IN NH YEAR 1 FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performed geospatial analysis of the well water arsenic estimates and survey results and produced the maps .................................................................................................. 7 Well water quality...................................................................................................... 7 Well water testing

Bucci, David J.

323

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well...

324

NMR imaging of materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in the area of NMR imaging has been driven by the widespread success of medical imaging. John M. Listerud of the Pendergrass Diagnostic Research Laboratories, Steven W. Sinton of Lockheed, and Gary P. Drobny of the University of Washington describe the principal image reconstruction methods, factors limiting spatial resolution, and applications of imaging to the study of materials.

Listerud, J.M.; Sinton, S.W.; Drobny, G.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWellsWells Drilled (Feet per

326

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

327

Geologic Results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a deep well in the center of a major Quaternary caldera, the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) provides a new perspective on the relationship between hydrothermal circulation and a large crustal magma chamber. It also provides an important test of models for the subsurface structure of active continental calderas. Results will impact geothermal exploration, assessment, and management of the Long Valley resource and should be applicable to other igneous-related geothermal systems. Our task is to use the cuttings and core from LVEW to interpret the evolution of the central caldera region, with emphasis on evidence of current hydrothermal conditions and circulation. LVEW has reached a depth of 2313 m, passing through post-caldera extrusives and the intracaldera Bishop Tuff to bottom in the Mt. Morrison roof pendant of the Sierran basement. The base of the section of Quaternary volcanic rocks related to Long Valley Caldera was encountered at 1800 m of which 1178 m is Bishop Tuff. The lithologies sampled generally support the classic view of large intercontinental calderas as piston-cylinder-like structures. In this model, the roof of the huge magma chamber, like an ill-fitting piston, broke and sank 2 km along a ring fracture system that simultaneously and explosively leaked magma as Bishop Tuff. Results from LVEW which support this model are the presence of intact basement at depth at the center of the caldera, the presence of a thick Bishop Tuff section, and textural evidence that the tuff encountered is not near-vent despite its central caldera location. An unexpected observation was the presence of rhyolite intrusions within the tuff with a cumulative apparent thickness in excess of 300 m. Chemical analyses indicate that these are high-silica, high-barium rhyolites. Preliminary {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses determined an age of 626 {+-} 38 ka (this paper). These observations would indicate that the intrusions belong to the early post-collapse episode of volcanism and are contemporaneous with resurgence of the caldera floor. If they are extensive sills rather than dikes, a possibility being investigated through relogging of core from neighboring wells, they were responsible for resurgence. A {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 769 {+-} 14 ka from Bishop Tuff at 820 m depth conforms with tuff ages from outside the caldera and indicates an absence of shallow hydrothermal activity (>300 C) persisting after emplacement. Work is proceeding on investigating hydrothermal alteration deeper in the well. This alteration includes sulfide+quartz fracture fillings, calcite+quartz replacement of feldspars, and disseminated pyrite in both the tuff and basement. Electron microprobe analysis of phases are being conducted to determine initial magmatic and subsequent hydrothermal conditions.

McConnell, Vicki S.; Eichelberger, John C.; Keskinen, Mary J.; Layer, Paul W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

EGRET observations of bursts at MeV energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present preliminary results from the analysis of 16 bright bursts that have been observed by the EGRET NaI calorimeter, or TASC. Seven bursts have been imaged in the EGRET spark chamber above 30 MeV, but in most cases the TASC data gives the highest energy spectra available for these bursts. The TASC can obtain spectral and rate information for bursts well outside the field of view of the EGRET spark chambers, and is sensitive in the energy range from 1 to 200 MeV. The spectra for these bursts are mostly consistent with a simple power law with spectral index in the range from 1.7 to 3.7, with several of the brighter bursts showing emission past 100 MeV. No high energy cutoff has been observed. These high energy photons offer important clues to the physical processes involved at the origin of burst emission. For bursts at cosmological distances extremely high bulk Lorentz factors are implied by the presence of MeV and GeV photons which have not been attenuated by pair production with the lower energy photons from the source.

Catelli, J. R. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); NASA/GSFC Code 661, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Dingus, B. L. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Schneid, E. J. [Northrop Grumman Co., MS A01-26, Bethpage, New York 11714 (United States)

1998-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

329

Polarization imaging apparatus with auto-calibration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polarization imaging apparatus measures the Stokes image of a sample. The apparatus consists of an optical lens set, a first variable phase retarder (VPR) with its optical axis aligned 22.5.degree., a second variable phase retarder with its optical axis aligned 45.degree., a linear polarizer, a imaging sensor for sensing the intensity images of the sample, a controller and a computer. Two variable phase retarders were controlled independently by a computer through a controller unit which generates a sequential of voltages to control the phase retardations of the first and second variable phase retarders. A auto-calibration procedure was incorporated into the polarization imaging apparatus to correct the misalignment of first and second VPRs, as well as the half-wave voltage of the VPRs. A set of four intensity images, I.sub.0, I.sub.1, I.sub.2 and I.sub.3 of the sample were captured by imaging sensor when the phase retardations of VPRs were set at (0,0), (.pi.,0), (.pi.,.pi.) and (.pi./2,.pi.), respectively. Then four Stokes components of a Stokes image, S.sub.0, S.sub.1, S.sub.2 and S.sub.3 were calculated using the four intensity images.

Zou, Yingyin Kevin; Zhao, Hongzhi; Chen, Qiushui

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

331

The Effect of Well Trajectory on Production Performance of Tight Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been studied. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of the trajectory angle on pressure drop in horizontal wells. In addition, the contribution of water flow to pressure drop is a part of this research. Generally, water comes from...

Aldousari, Mohammad

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

New wells architectures to access deep geothermal reservoirsand increase well productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the higher costs of well drilling and completion. Our first step in tackling theproblem,was to consider with the wellbore flow which is modelled by a 1D momentum equation describing the conservation of the fluid in the wellbore fluid coupled to the heat transfer in the reservoir.We apply this coupled wellbore and reservoir

Boyer, Edmond

333

Phonon-drag thermopower in anisotropic AlAs quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work we have developed a generalized theory of phonon-drag thermopower ?{sup g} for a highly anisotropic two-dimensional electron gas. For electrons confined in AlAs quantum wells we calculate ?{sup g} as function of temperature. We show that ?{sup g} exhibits a strong anisotropic behavior depending on valley occupancy which can be tuned by well width and strain. Also a great enhancement of ?{sup g} is observed compared to GaAs quantum wells.

Lehmann, Dietmar [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Technische Universitt Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Tsaousidou, Margarita [Materials Science Department, University of Patras, Patras 26 504 (Greece); Kubakaddi, Shrishail [Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad-580 003 (India)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

334

Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems Under Well-Controlled Temperature Condition. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems...

335

Image Artifacts Resulting from Gamma-Ray Tracking Algorithms Used with Compton Imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For Compton imaging it is necessary to determine the sequence of gamma-ray interactions in a single detector or array of detectors. This can be done by time-of-flight measurements if the interactions are sufficiently far apart. However, in small detectors the time between interactions can be too small to measure, and other means of gamma-ray sequencing must be used. In this work, several popular sequencing algorithms are reviewed for sequences with two observed events and three or more observed events in the detector. These algorithms can result in poor imaging resolution and introduce artifacts in the backprojection images. The effects of gamma-ray tracking algorithms on Compton imaging are explored in the context of the 4? Compton imager built by the University of Michigan.

Seifert, Carolyn E.; He, Zhong

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Robust diffusion imaging framework for clinical studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clinical diffusion imaging requires short acquisition times and good image quality to permit its use in various medical applications. In turn, these demands require the development of a robust and efficient post-processing framework in order to guarantee useful and reliable results. However, multiple artefacts abound in in vivo measurements; from either subject such as cardiac pulsation, bulk head motion, respiratory motion and involuntary tics and tremor, or imaging hardware related problems, such as table vibrations, etc. These artefacts can severely degrade the resulting images and render diffusion analysis difficult or impossible. In order to overcome these problems, we developed a robust and efficient framework enabling the use of initially corrupted images from a clinical study. At the heart of this framework is an improved least trimmed squares diffusion tensor estimation algorithm that works well with severely degraded datasets with low signal-to-noise ratio. This approach has been compared with other...

Maximov, Ivan I; Neuner, Irene; Shah, N Jon

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Altering Reservoir Wettability to Improve Production from Single Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured and typically produce less than 10% original oil in place during primary recovery. Spontaneous imbibition has proven an important mechanism for oil recovery from fractured reservoirs, which are usually weak waterflood candidates. In some situations, chemical stimulation can promote imbibition of water to alter the reservoir wettability toward water-wetness such that oil is produced at an economic rate from the rock matrix into fractures. In this project, cores and fluids from five reservoirs were used in laboratory tests: the San Andres formation (Fuhrman Masho and Eagle Creek fields) in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico; and the Interlake, Stony Mountain, and Red River formations from the Cedar Creek Anticline in Montana and South Dakota. Solutions of nonionic, anionic, and amphoteric surfactants with formation water were used to promote waterwetness. Some Fuhrman Masho cores soaked in surfactant solution had improved oil recovery up to 38%. Most Eagle Creek cores did not respond to any of the tested surfactants. Some Cedar Creek anticline cores had good response to two anionic surfactants (CD 128 and A246L). The results indicate that cores with higher permeability responded better to the surfactants. The increased recovery is mainly ascribed to increased water-wetness. It is suspected that rock mineralogy is also an important factor. The laboratory work generated three field tests of the surfactant soak process in the West Fuhrman Masho San Andres Unit. The flawlessly designed tests included mechanical well clean out, installation of new pumps, and daily well tests before and after the treatments. Treatments were designed using artificial intelligence (AI) correlations developed from 23 previous surfactant soak treatments. The treatments were conducted during the last quarter of 2006. One of the wells produced a marginal volume of incremental oil through October. It is interesting to note that the field tests were conducted in an area of the field that has not met production expectations. The dataset on the 23 Phosphoria well surfactant soaks was updated. An analysis of the oil decline curves indicted that 4.5 lb of chemical produced a barrel of incremental oil. The AI analysis supports the adage 'good wells are the best candidates.' The generally better performance of surfactant in the high permeability core laboratory tests supports this observation. AI correlations were developed to predict the response to water-frac stimulations in a tight San Andres reservoir. The correlations maybe useful in the design of Cedar Creek Anticline surfactant soak treatments planned for next year. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scans of dolomite cores to measure porosity and saturation during the high temperature laboratory work were acquired. The scans could not be correlated with physical measurement using either conventional or AI methods.

W. W. Weiss

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nuclear medicine imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear medicine imaging system having two large field of view scintillation cameras mounted on a rotatable gantry and being movable diametrically toward or away from each other is disclosed. In addition, each camera may be rotated about an axis perpendicular to the diameter of the gantry. The movement of the cameras allows the system to be used for a variety of studies, including positron annihilation, and conventional single photon emission, as well as static orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography. In orthogonal dual multi-pinhole tomography, each camera is fitted with a seven pinhole collimator to provide seven views from slightly different perspectives. By using two cameras at an angle to each other, improved sensitivity and depth resolution is achieved. The computer system and interface acquires and stores a broad range of information in list mode, including patient physiological data, energy data over the full range detected by the cameras, and the camera position. The list mode acquisition permits the study of attenuation as a result of Compton scatter, as well as studies involving the isolation and correlation of energy with a range of physiological conditions.

Bennett, Gerald W. (East Moriches, NY); Brill, A. Bertrand (Shoreham, NY); Bizais, Yves J. C. (Upton, NY); Rowe, R. Wanda (Upton, NY); Zubal, I. George (Upton, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Investigation of heterodyne performance of quantum-well detectors. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc., (Contractor) and Martin Marietta Electronic Missles (Participant) is the determination of the heterodyne characteristics of quantum-well detectors. The Participant has developed a quantum-well infrared imaging video detector with very low light level characteristics. A further improvement in low-level infrared detection could be achieved if this device can be operated in the coherent or heterodyne mode. A major program in the Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) presently uses individual heterodyne infrared detectors in a system under development for fusion diagnostics. An imaging infrared heterodyne detector would represent a major breakthrough in this area and would have major implications for other plasma diagnostic programs. The Participant is also studying the application of this device in the area of laser radar.

Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Calabretta, J. [Martin Marietta Electronic Missles (United States)

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

340

INTEGRAL observations of HER X-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First results of observations of the low mass X-ray binary Her X-1/HZ Her performed by the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005 are presented. A significant part of one 35 day main-on state was covered. The cyclotron line in the X-ray spectrum is well observed and its position and shape, as well as its variability with time and phase of the 1.24 s pulsation are explored. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy bands are studied throughout the observation. The pulse period is found to vary on short time scales revealing a dynamical spin-up/spin-down behavior. Results of simultaneous optical observations of HZ Her are also discussed.

D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; K. P. Postnov; N. I. Shakura; S. A. Potanin; C. Ferrigno; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Observing Massive Galaxy Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

Christopher J. Conselice

2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

342

Air Observe System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Global optimization of data quality checks on 2-D and 3-D networks of GPR cross-well tomographic data for automatic correction of unknown well deviations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant errors related to poor time zero estimation, well deviation or mislocation of the transmitter (TX) and receiver (RX) stations can render even the most sophisticated modeling and inversion routine useless. Previous examples of methods for the analysis and correction of data errors in geophysical tomography include the works of Maurer and Green (1997), Squires et al. (1992) and Peterson (2001). Here we follow the analysis and techniques of Peterson (2001) for data quality control and error correction. Through our data acquisition and quality control procedures we have very accurate control on the surface locations of wells, the travel distance of both the transmitter and receiver within the boreholes, and the change in apparent zero time. However, we often have poor control on well deviations, either because of economic constraints or the nature of the borehole itself prevented the acquisition of well deviation logs. Also, well deviation logs can sometimes have significant errors. Problems with borehole deviations can be diagnosed prior to inversion of travel-time tomography data sets by plotting the apparent velocity of a straight ray connecting a transmitter (TX) to a receiver (RX) against the take-off angle of the ray. Issues with the time-zero pick or distances between wells appear as symmetric smiles or frown in these QC plots. Well deviation or dipping-strong anisotropy will result in an asymmetric correlation between apparent velocity and take-off angle (Figure 1-B). In addition, when a network of interconnected GPR tomography data is available, one has the additional quality constraint of insuring that there is continuity in velocity between immediately adjacent tomograms. A sudden shift in the mean velocity indicates that either position deviations are present or there is a shift in the pick times. Small errors in well geometry may be effectively treated during inversion by including weighting, or relaxation, parameters into the inversion (e.g. Bautu et al., 2006). In the technique of algebraic reconstruction tomography (ART), which is used herein for the travel time inversion (Peterson et al., 1985), a small relaxation parameter will smooth imaging artifacts caused by data errors at the expense of resolution and contrast (Figure 2). However, large data errors such as unaccounted well deviations cannot be adequately suppressed through inversion weighting schemes. Previously, problems with tomograms were treated manually. However, in large data sets and/or networks of data sets, trial and error changes to well geometries become increasingly difficult and ineffective. Mislocation of the transmitter and receiver stations of GPR cross-well tomography data sets can lead to serious imaging artifacts if not accounted for prior to inversion. Previously, problems with tomograms have been treated manually prior to inversion. In large data sets and/or networks of tomographic data sets, trial and error changes to well geometries become increasingly difficult and ineffective. Our approach is to use cross-well data quality checks and a simplified model of borehole deviation with particle swarm optimization (PSO) to automatically correct for source and receiver locations prior to tomographic inversion. We present a simple model of well deviation, which is designed to minimize potential corruption of actual data trends. We also provide quantitative quality control measures based on minimizing correlations between take-off angle and apparent velocity, and a quality check on the continuity of velocity between adjacent wells. This methodology is shown to be accurate and robust for simple 2-D synthetic test cases. Plus, we demonstrate the method on actual field data where it is compared to deviation logs. This study shows the promise for automatic correction of well deviations in GPR tomographic data. Analysis of synthetic data shows that very precise estimates of well deviation can be made for small deviations, even in the presence of static data errors. However, the analysis of the synthetic data and the application of

Sassen, D. S.; Peterson, J. E.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

Greg Ruskauff

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Deep Near-Infrared Observations and Identifications of Chandra Sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 2 and 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We conducted deep NIR imaging observations of the Orion molecular cloud 2 and 3 using QUIRC on the 88-inch telescope of the University of Hawaii. Our purposes are 1) to generate a comprehensive NIR source catalog of these star forming clouds, and 2) to identify the NIR counterpart of the Chandra X-ray sources that have no counterpart in the 2MASS catalog. Our J-, H-, and K-band observations are about 2 mag deeper than those of 2MASS, and well match the current Chandra observation. We detected 1448 NIR sources, for which we derived the position, the J-, H-, and K-band magnitude, and the 2MASS counterpart. Using this catalog, we identified the NIR counterpart for about 42% of the 2MASS-unIDed Chandra sources. The nature of these Chandra sources are discussed using their NIR colors and spatial distributions, and a dozen protostar and brown dwarf candidates are identified.

M. Tsujimoto; K. Koyama; N. Kobayashi; M. Goto; Y. Tsuboi; A. T. Tokunaga

2002-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWells Drilled (Feet per

347

U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWells Drilledper

348

U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWells DrilledperExploratory

349

Academic Writing Observation Papers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

350

Academic Writing Observation Papers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

351

Global Warming Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

Schofield, Jeremy

352

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

353

Natural geometric representation for electron local observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

Minogin, V.G., E-mail: minogin@isan.troitsk.ru

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

ULTRADEEP K{sub S} IMAGING IN THE GOODS-N  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an ultradeep K{sub S} -band image that covers 0.5 x 0.5 deg{sup 2} centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N). The image reaches a 5{sigma} depth of K{sub S,AB}=24.45 in the GOODS-N region, which is as deep as the GOODS-N Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6 {mu}m image. We present a new method of constructing IRAC catalogs that uses the higher spatial resolution K{sub S} image and catalog as priors and iteratively subtracts fluxes from the IRAC images to estimate the IRAC fluxes. Our iterative method is different from the {chi}{sup 2} approach adopted by other groups. We verified our results using data taken in two different epochs of observations, as well as by comparing our colors with the colors of stars and with the colors derived from model spectral energy distributions of galaxies at various redshifts. We make available to the community our WIRCam K{sub S} -band image and catalog (94,951 objects in 0.25 deg{sup 2}), the Interactive Data Language pipeline used for reducing the WIRCam images, and our IRAC 3.6-8.0 {mu}m catalog (16,950 objects in 0.06 deg{sup 2} at 3.6 {mu}m). With this improved K{sub S} and IRAC catalog and a large spectroscopic sample from our previous work, we study the color-magnitude and color-color diagrams of galaxies. We compare the effectiveness of using K{sub S} and IRAC colors to select active galactic nuclei and galaxies at various redshifts. We also study a color selection of z = 0.65-1.2 galaxies using the K{sub S} , 3.6 {mu}m, and 4.5 {mu}m bands.

Wang, W.-H.; Ting, H.-C. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, PO Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Keenan, Ryan C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

LabelMe: a database and web-based tool for image annotation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research in object detection and recognition in cluttered scenes requires large image collections with ground truth labels. The labels should provide information about the object classes present in each image, as well as ...

Russell, Bryan C.

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

356

Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

Gambhir; Sanjiv (Portola Valley, CA), Pritha; Ray (Mountain View, CA)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Imaging in radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The text contains details of recording media, image quality, sensitometry, processing and equipment used in radiotherapy for imaging. It reflects part of the syllabus for the College of Radiographers.

Taylor, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

User Science Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Image: OBrianImageBig.png | png | 5 MB SlavaFull.png FES: Small Scale Experimental Plasma Research October 21, 2010 | Author(s): Vyacheslav Lukin (NRL) | Category: Fusion Energy |...

359

Dual Plane Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a technique called Dual Plane Imaging which should significantly improve images which would otherwise be blurred due to atmospheric turbulence. The technique involves capturing all the spatial, directional and temporal information about the arriving photons and processing the data afterwards to produce the sharpened images. The technique has particular relevance for imaging at around 400-1000nm on extremely large telescopes (ELTs).

Parry, Ian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Consumers' Image of Broilers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which they feel the product possesses. This research was designed to determine consumers' favorable and unfavorable images as to broilers, both in making purchases in stores and in serving them as a meat dish. These images, summarized briefly here... count. The Preparation and Cooking Image: The h0u.l wife's image of broilers focuses on one metliotl- frying. The major deterrent to preparing othci dishes was that these are either too difficult or canno* be prepared satisfactorily...

Courtenay, Henry V.; Branson, Robert E.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Imaging with Scattered Neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-resolution images by scattered neutron radiography and tomography are presented.

H. Ballhausen; H. Abele; R. Gaehler; M. Trapp; A. Van Overberghe

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Economic viability of multiple-lateral horizontal wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizontal wells are gaining popularity throughout the petroleum industry as a means to increase well productivity and enhance incremental economics. Horizontal wells provide greater reservoir exposure and are useful in intersecting additional pay...

Smith, Christopher Jason

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Medical imaging systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

Frangioni, John V

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch Freie Universit¨at Berlin, Institut f¨ur Experimentalphysik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin, Germany kuch@physik.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Imaging of magnetic domains has- ern techniques is used nowadays routinely for magnetic imaging of magnetic ma- terials

Kuch, Wolfgang

365

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

Rambaut, Andrew

366

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

Rambaut, Andrew

367

Near-electrode imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

Henderson, Bradley G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Suszcynsky, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamlin, Timothy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeffery, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Kyle C [TEXAS TECH U.; Orville, R E [TEXAS A& M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

370

Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well...

371

Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act regulates the construction, alteration, enlargement, abandonment and removal of horizontal wells and associated water and wastewater use and storage. The...

372

ELIMINATING THE WELLBORE RESPONSE IN TRANSIENT WELL TEST ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam-Water Flow in Geothermal Wells", J. Pet. Tech. , ~, p.Storage Effects in Geothermal Wells," Soc. Pet. Eng. J. ,

Miller, C.W.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

395. Notes Among these wells were exploration and monitoring wells drilled near the Fish Hatchery Springs in preparation for the siting of a second binary geothermal power...

374

Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ?50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Automation in image cytometry : continuous HCS and kinetic image cytometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Automation in Image Cytometry:xiv Abstract of Dissertation Automation in Image Cytometry:

Charlot, David J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Results from laboratory tests of the two-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of laboratory experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of two dimensional time-encoded imaging. A prototype two-dimensional time encoded imaging system was designed and constructed. Results from imaging measurements of single and multiple point sources as well as extended source distributions are presented. Time encoded imaging has proven to be a simple method for achieving high resolution two-dimensional imaging with potential to be used in future arms control and treaty verification applications.

Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D; Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) system. Microcalcification clusters extracted from magnified images of slices of mastectomies were electronically inserted into half of the images. The calcification clusters had a subtle appearance. All images were adjusted using a validated mathematical method to simulate the appearance of images from a computed radiography (CR) imaging system at the same dose, from both systems at half this dose, and from the DR system at quarter this dose. The original 162 images were processed with both Hologic and Agfa (Musica-2) image processing. All other image qualities were processed with Agfa (Musica-2) image processing only. Seven experienced observers marked and rated any identified suspicious regions. Free response operating characteristic (FROC) and ROC analyses were performed on the data. The lesion sensitivity at a nonlesion localization fraction (NLF) of 0.1 was also calculated. Images of the CDMAM mammographic test phantom were acquired using the automatic setting on the DR system. These images were modified to the additional image qualities used in the observer study. The images were analyzed using automated software. In order to assess the relationship between threshold gold thickness and calcification detection a power law was fitted to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in calcification detection using CR compared with DR: the alternative FROC (AFROC) area decreased from 0.84 to 0.63 and the ROC area decreased from 0.91 to 0.79 (p < 0.0001). This corresponded to a 30% drop in lesion sensitivity at a NLF equal to 0.1. Detection was also sensitive to the dose used. There was no significant difference in detection between the two image processing algorithms used (p > 0.05). It was additionally found that lower threshold gold thickness from CDMAM analysis implied better cluster detection. The measured threshold gold thickness passed the acceptable limit set in the EU standards for all image qualities except half dose CR. However, calcification detection varied significantly between image qualities. This suggests that the current EU guidelines may need revising. Conclusions: Microcalcification detection was found to be sensitive to detector and dose used. Standard measurements of image quality were a good predictor of microcalcification cluster detection.

Warren, Lucy M.; Mackenzie, Alistair; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Dance, David R.; Bosmans, Hilde; Young, Kenneth C. [National Co-ordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jarvis Breast Screening and Diagnostic Centre, Guildford GU1 1LJ (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, St. George's Healthcare NHS Trust, Tooting, London SW17 0QT (United Kingdom); Cambridge Breast Unit, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, United Kingdom and NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15210 (United States); National Co-ordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); National Co-ordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Distributed computing of Seismic Imaging Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary use of technical computing in the oil and gas industries is for seismic imaging of the earth's subsurface, driven by the business need for making well-informed drilling decisions during petroleum exploration and production. Since each oil/gas well in exploration areas costs several tens of millions of dollars, producing high-quality seismic images in a reasonable time can significantly reduce the risk of drilling a "dry hole". Similarly, these images are important as they can improve the position of wells in a billion-dollar producing oil field. However seismic imaging is very data- and compute-intensive which needs to process terabytes of data and require Gflop-years of computation (using "flop" to mean floating point operation per second). Due to the data/computing intensive nature of seismic imaging, parallel computing are used to process data to reduce the time compilation. With introducing of Cloud computing, MapReduce programming model has been attracted a lot of attention in parallel and di...

Emami, Masnida; Jaberi, Nasrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

TWRS privatization phase 1 monitoring wells engineering study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering study provides an evaluation of existing wells and boreholes (wells) within the proposed location for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Privatization Phase 1 demonstration site. Phase 1 is part of the TWRS program that was established to manage, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of high-level waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. This evaluation is to determine which wells will remain active within the demonstration site based on regulatory, programmatic, or other beneficial use requirements. An initial evaluation of wells within the demonstration site was conducted in 1996. However, changes in construction plans and expansion of the demonstration site necessitated a reevaluation and reclassification of the wells that are within the expanded site. Impacted wells include many of those previously evaluated as well as additional wells identified in or near the expansion areas. Thirty-three wells exist within and immediately adjacent to the identified boundary of the proposed demonstration site. The wells identified for decommissioning will be abandoned according to the well decommissioning plan. Future well requirements within the site include replacement wells for those wells impacted by construction activities, replacements for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) wells going dry, and a new characterization well installed to support a TWRS Phase 2 site assessment.

Williams, B.A.; Newcomer, D.R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

382

Forward observer: stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Stephen King and, quite sincerely, Peter Straub, who even now I regard to be one of the finest of American novelists, his repute shackled by his dedication to what is often perceived to be a distasteful genre) as well as those others trafficking... thing to have, nice for day-trips and the like, but. . . Their verbal ellipses brought back the old sales-department pressure to lvtfke's knuckles and recalled from retirement the fuck-'em-all pugnacity that had sent him hurtling up the ladder back...

Carpenter, Christopher Lee

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

IDL Week 4: What we'll cover today  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_continents,color=0,fill_continents=1 map_grid,color=0,latdel=15.,londel=15. colorbar, vmin of this exercise was to learn the MAP_IMAGE procedure and when it should be used instead of CONTOUR. The contour procedure produces a PS file size of 52.3 MB! The map_image file size is only 215 KB. map_set, 0

384

Comparison of electrostatic and localized plasmon induced light enhancement in hybrid InGaN/GaN quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The light enhancement phenomena in InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) infiltrated with metal nanoparticles (NPs) are studied using resonant and off-resonant localized plasmon interactions. The emission and recombination characteristics of carriers in InGaN/GaN MQW structures with inverted hexagonal pits (IHPs) are modified distinctly depending on the nature of their interaction with the metal NPs and with the pumping and emitted photons. It is observed that the emission intensity of light is significantly enhanced when the emission energy is off-resonant to the localized plasmon frequency of the metal nanoparticles. This results in enhanced emission from MQW due to Au nanoparticles and from IHPs due to Ag nanoparticles. At resonant-plasmon frequency of the Ag NPs, the emission from MQWs is quenched due to the re-absorption of the emitted photons, or due to the drift carriers from c-plane MQWs towards the NPs because of the Coulomb forces induced by the image charge effect.

Lin, Jie; Llopis, Antonio; Krokhin, Arkadii; Neogi, Arup, E-mail: arup@unt.edu [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States); Pereira, Sergio [CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Watson, Ian M. [SUPA, Institute of Photonics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

Horizontal well drill-in fluid utilizing alcohol ethoxylate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The drilling of horizontal wells in the last 6 years has significantly improved the economics of oil and gas production from depleted reservoirs or tight sands. This paper illustrates the application of an alcohol ethoxylate into a drill-in fluid designed to minimize formation damage in low permeability sandstones while drilling horizontal sections as long as 1,617 meters (5,306 ft) at depths approaching 6,580 meters (21,600 ft) and to facilitate formation cleanup. The chemistry of alcohol ethoxylates/alkoxylates are described and the more popular names used within the industry will be discussed. Laboratory results are presented which illustrate colloidal phenomena not previously reported with these systems, the routes taken for successful application into a drill-in fluid and how complex these particular colloidal systems are from a physical chemical viewpoint, along with the inevitable learning curve required to fully optimize these systems. Generalized case histories from the UK Southern North Sea will be described, along with field observations which back up the colloidal phenomena seen in the laboratory.

Jachnik, R.P.; Green, P.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Photoacoustic computed tomography in biological tissues: algorithms and breast imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are investigated in Chapter III and IV, respectively. Finally, a prototype of an RF-induced PA imaging system is introduced and experiments using phantom samples as well as a preliminary study of breast imaging for cancer detection are reported in Chapter V... PHOTOACOUSTIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUES: ALGORITHMS AND BREAST IMAGING A Dissertation by MINGHUA XU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Xu, Minghua

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Objective assessment of image quality (OAIQ) in fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.7 SNR Hot computed from simulated measurements of light intensity (filled circles) and phase (open circles) in hundred percent lumpy backgrounds of endogenous ( axi ? , ami ? , sx ? , and sm ? ) as well as exogenous ( axf ? , and amf ? ) optical..., fluorophores do not have an intrinsic half-life as do radiopharmaceuticals. This greatly enhances the duration of time for imaging, which is limited in the case of nuclear imaging, and results in higher target- to-background ratios (TBR). Despite...

Sahu, Amit K.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Evidence of former higher temperatures from alteration minerals, Bostic 1-A well, Mountain Home, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cuttings from the silicic volcanics in the Bostic 1-A well near Mountain Home, Idaho have been examined petrographically with the assistance of x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses. Results indicate that these rocks have been subjected to much higher temperatures than were observed in the well in 1974, when a static temperature log was run. It is not known to what extent the alternation may be due to greater depth of burial in the past, or whether it resulted from an early hydrothermal system of higher temperature than the one now observed.

Arney, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Observing the Inflationary Reheating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Neutron Imaging Diagnostic at NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of ICF implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherly, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The neutron imaging diagnostic at NIF (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F. E.; Clark, D. D.; Danly, C. R.; Drury, O. B.; Fatherley, V. E.; Gallegos, R.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Loomis, E. N.; Martinson, D. D.; Mares, D.; Morley, D. J.; Morgan, G. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Bower, D.; Dzenitis, J. M. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Relativistic approach to electromagnetic imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel imaging principle based on the interaction of electromagnetic waves with a beam of relativistic electrons is proposed. Wave-particle interaction is assumed to take place in a small spatial domain, so that each electron is only briefly accelerated by the incident field. In the one-dimensional case the spatial distribution of the source density can be directly observed in the temporal spectrum of the scattered field. Whereas, in the two-dimensional case the relation between the source and the spectrum is shown to be approximately the Radon transform.

Budko, N

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Relativistic approach to electromagnetic imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel imaging principle based on the interaction of electromagnetic waves with a beam of relativistic electrons is proposed. Wave-particle interaction is assumed to take place in a small spatial domain, so that each electron is only briefly accelerated by the incident field. In the one-dimensional case the spatial distribution of the source density can be directly observed in the temporal spectrum of the scattered field. Whereas, in the two-dimensional case the relation between the source and the spectrum is shown to be approximately the Radon transform.

Neil Budko

2004-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

394

IMAGE COMPRESSION USING SPLINE BASED WAVELET TRANSFORMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

known codec. Keywords: Sample, edited book Introduction The three fundamental building blocks with one well known codec. 0.1. Wavelet Based Image Coders Wavelet transforms provide very good energy of partitioning, aggregation and conditional coding­ PACC. Following these concepts, the data object emerging from

Averbuch, Amir

395

Femtosecond pulse imaging: ultrafast optical oscilloscope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Femtosecond pulse imaging: ultrafast optical oscilloscope P. C. Sun, Y. T. Mazurenko,* and Y as well as our ability to detect the shape of the ul- trashort pulses that can be seen as an ultrafast 12, 1996 A nonlinear optical processor that is capable of real-time conversion of a femtosecond pulse

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

396

Geodesic image regression with a sparse parameterization of diffeomorphisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geodesic image regression with a sparse parameterization of diffeomorphisms James Fishbaugh1 statistical analysis on longitudinal images. Geodesic models are particularly well suited for statistical, existing geodesic im- age regression models are parameterized by a large number of initial momenta, equal

Gerig, Guido

397

BAYESIAN METHOD FOR SEGMENTATION OF SAR IMAGES IN ROUGH TERRAIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BAYESIAN METHOD FOR SEGMENTATION OF SAR IMAGES IN ROUGH TERRAIN Marco Caparrini1 , Klaus Seidel1 are the basis for radiometric correction. Considering SAR images, the huge amount of processing for geographic and geometric calibration and registration that is needed prior to analysis is well established. Nonetheless

Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universität

398

Image compression technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

1997-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

Evaluation of existing wells at the Nevada Test Site for plugging and abandonment or for recompletion as monitoring wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this investigation, various information sources from the Nevada Test Site (NTS), national laboratories and the Desert Research Institute were utilized to verify the existence of approximately 250 existing wells or boreholes at the NTS. Of these wells, 40 were determined to be located within one kilometer of underground nuclear tests conducted near (within 25 m) or below the water table. These 40 existing wells were then investigated in detail to determine their drilling and construction history, lithology and hydrologic units penetrated, and current conditions. These findings are presented for each well, as well as recommendations as to whether individual wells should be plugged and abandoned or could possibly be recompleted as groundwater quality monitoring locations. Two of the 40 wells, UE-20e and UE-2a, contain lost drilling strings and do not penetrate aquifers. These two wells should be plugged and abandoned and removed from the NTS well inventory. Three other wells, TestWell No. 1, TestWell No. 5, and TestWell No. 6, are reported stemmed with sand to the surface. These three wells did not penetrate the water table and would require substantial deepening to be recompleted as groundwater monitoring locations. If not recompleted, these wells should also be plugged and abandoned and removed from the NTS well inventory. Eleven of the 34 wells, Test Well No. 7, RNM No. 1, RNM No. 2, RNM No. 2S, U-3cn No. 5, UE-20n No. 1, UE-7ns, UE-5n, UE-4t, UE-3e No. 3 and U-15k Test Hole, penetrate aquifers and do not require recompletion to produce groundwater monitoring locations. These wells are either constructed such that recompletion is not needed or not possible. Several of the 11 wells may require the removal of tubing and the placement or replacement of pump equipment. All five of the wells require wellhead rehabilitation to ensure they are not contaminated by surface water or other materials.

Gillespie, D.; Donithan, D.; Seaber, P.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Internetwork chromospheric bright grains observed with IRIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reveals small-scale rapid brightenings in the form of bright grains all over coronal holes and the quiet sun. These bright grains are seen with the IRIS 1330 \\AA, 1400 \\AA\\ and 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filters. We combine coordinated observations with IRIS and from the ground with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) which allows us to have chromospheric (Ca II 8542 \\AA, Ca II H 3968 \\AA, H\\alpha, and Mg II k 2796 \\AA), and transition region (C II 1334 \\AA, Si IV 1402) spectral imaging, and single-wavelength Stokes maps in Fe I 6302 \\AA at high spatial (0.33"), temporal and spectral resolution. We conclude that the IRIS slit-jaw grains are the counterpart of so-called acoustic grains, i.e., resulting from chromospheric acoustic waves in a non-magnetic environment. We compare slit-jaw images with spectra from the IRIS spectrograph. We conclude that the grain intensity in the 2796 \\AA\\ slit-jaw filter comes from both the Mg II k core and wings. The signal in the C II ...

Martnez-Sykora, Juan; Carlsson, Mats; De Pontieu, Bart; Pereira, Tiago M D; Boerner, Paul; Hurlburt, Neal; Kleint, Lucia; Lemen, James; Tarbell, Ted D; Title, Alan; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Hansteen, Viggo H; Golub, Leon; McKillop, Sean; Reeves, Kathy K; Saar, Steven; Testa, Paola; Tian, Hui; Jaeggli, Sarah; Kankelborg, Charles

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ESO IMAGING SURVEY: Past Activities and Future Prospects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction The ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) proj- ect is an ongoing effort to carry out pub- lic imaging surveys- erately deep, large-area survey (EIS- WIDE) and a deep optical/infrared sur- vey (EIS-DEEP), with the observations being conducted at the NTT. EIS has recently reached another milestone with the completion

Zaggia, Simone

402

The Future of Imaging Spectroscopy Prospective Technologies and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and intelligent on-board logic are prime prospective technologies. Scalable approaches in pre-processing for the detection of hydrothermal alteration minerals as proposed by A.F.H. Goetz), as well as first imaging

Dozier, Jeff

403

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

Determining Nighttime Atmospheric Optical Depth Using Mars Exploration Rover Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was compared to the expected flux to give nighttime optical depth values. The observed nighttime optical depth was consistently similar to the daytime optical depth values on both an individual image and sol-averaged basis. Recommendations are made going...

Bean, Keri Marie

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

THE NORTH AMERICAN AND PELICAN NEBULAE. II. MIPS OBSERVATIONS AND ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of {approx}7 deg{sup 2} of the North American and Pelican Nebulae region at 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m with the Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We incorporate the MIPS observations with earlier Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations, as well as archival near-infrared (IR) and optical data. We use the MIPS data to identify 1286 young stellar object (YSO) candidates. IRAC data alone can identify 806 more YSO candidates, for a total of 2076 YSO candidates. Prior to the Spitzer observations, there were only {approx}200 YSOs known in this region. Three subregions within the complex are highlighted as clusters: the Gulf of Mexico, the Pelican, and the Pelican's Hat. The Gulf of Mexico cluster is subject to the highest extinction (A{sub V} at least {approx}30) and has the widest range of infrared colors of the three clusters, including the largest excesses and by far the most point-source detections at 70 {mu}m. Just 3% of the cluster members were previously identified; we have redefined this cluster as about 10-100 times larger (in projected area) than was previously realized.

Rebull, L. M.; Stauffer, J. R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.; Padgett, D. L. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, M/S 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guieu, S. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Hillenbrand, L. A.; Carpenter, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stapelfeldt, K. R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cole, D. M. [Raytheon, Pasadena, CA (United States); Strom, S. E.; Wolff, S. C., E-mail: luisa.rebull@jpl.nasa.gov [NOAO, Tucson, AZ (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

MODELING OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Observations show that the underlying rotation curves at intermediate radii in spiral and low-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly universal. Further, in these same galaxies, the product of the central density and the core radius ({rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0}) is constant. An empirically motivated model for dark matter halos that incorporates these observational constraints is presented and shown to be in accord with the observations. A model fit to the observations of the galaxy cluster A611 shows that {rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0} for the dark matter halo in this more massive structure is larger by a factor of {approx}20 over that assumed for the galaxies. The model maintains the successful Navarro-Frenk-White form in the outer regions, although the well-defined differences in the inner regions suggest that modifications to the standard cold dark matter picture are required.

Hartwick, F. D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Accelerated Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Devices based on ultracold atoms moving in an accelerating optical lattice or double-well potential are a promising tool for precise measurements of fundamental physical constants as well as for the construction of sensors. Here, we carefully analyze the model of a couple of BECs separated by a barrier in an accelerated field and we show how the observable quantities, mainly the period of the beating motion or of the phase-shift, are related to the physical parameters of the model as well as to the energy of the initial state.

Sacchetti, Andrea

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Abstract--An image annotation is the explanatory or descriptive information about the pixel data of an image that is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their integration into other data mining and analysis efforts. This paper describes the National Cancer Institute of human image observation and inference as part of larger data mining and analysis activities. I's Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid's (caBIG) Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project, focusing on how

Rubin, Daniel L.

410

Utilizing Type Ia Supernovae in a Large, Fast, Imaging Survey to Constrain Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the utility of a large sample of type Ia supernovae that might be observed in an imaging survey that rapidly scans a large fraction of the sky for constraining dark energy. We consider information from the traditional luminosity distance test as well as the spread in SNeIa fluxes at fixed redshift induced by gravitational lensing. We include a treatment of photometric redshift uncertainties in our analysis. Our primary result is that the information contained in the mean distance moduli of SNeIa and the dispersion among SNeIa distance moduli complement each other, breaking a degeneracy between the present dark energy equation of state and its time variation without the need for a high-redshift supernova sample. To address photometric redshift uncertainties, we present dark energy constraints as a function of the size of an external set of spectroscopically-observed SNeIa that may be used for redshift calibration, nspec. We find that an imaging survey can constrain the dark energy equation of state at the epoch where it is best constrained with a 1-sigma error of sigma(wpiv)~0.03-0.09$, depending upon various assumptions. In addition, the marginal improvement in the error sigma(wpiv) from an increase in the spectroscopic calibration sample drops once nspec ~ 10^3. This result is important because it is of the order of the size of calibration samples likely to be compiled in the coming decade and because, for samples of this size, the spectroscopic and imaging surveys individually place comparable constraints on the dark energy equation of state. In all cases, it is best to calibrate photometric redshifts with a set of spectroscopically-observed SNeIa with relatively more objects at high redshift than the parent sample of imaging SNeIa.

Andrew R. Zentner; Suman Bhattacharya

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Measuring and modeling activity and travel well-being  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops methods for the measurement of activity and travel well-being and models for linking well-being and behavior. The hypotheses underlying this research are that (1) activities are planned to maintain or ...

Abou Zeid, Maya, 1979-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Hot exciton transport in ZnSe quantum wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The in-plane transport of excitons in ZnSe quantum wells is investigated directly by microphotoluminescence in combination with a solid immersion lens. Due to the strong Froehlich coupling, the initial kinetic energy of the excitons is well...

Zhao, Hui; Moehl, Sebastian; Wachter, Sven; Kalt, Heinz

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Quantitative luminescence imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

Erwin, David N. (San Antonio, TX); Kiel, Johnathan L. (San Antonio, TX); Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Stahl, Kurt A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Quantitative luminescence imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Ferroelectric optical image comparator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

EMSL - image superimposition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

image-superimposition en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structu...

417

image superimposition | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

superimposition image superimposition Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

418

Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

419

Basic Data Report for Monitor Well AEC-7 Reconfiguration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (OSE) permitted well AEC-7 as C-2742. This well has been part of the far-field monitoring network since 1974. The well was used to obtain water level elevations and hydraulic parameters from both the Bell Canyon Formation and the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation. This basic data report provides a historical account of the well from the original installation to the current configuration.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

Water coning calculations for vertical and horizontal wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breakthrough Time WOR after Breakthrough RATE SENSITIVITY 8 12 13 16 WATER CONING CALCULATIONS FOR HIGH MOBILITY RATIOS . . 19 Method of Developing Correlations Correlations for a Vertical Well Correlations for a Horizontal Well Discussion 19 26... APPENDIX E: BASE CASE AND SIMULATION RUNS FOR HORIZONTAL WELLS 98 APPENDIX F: TEST CASES AND RESULTS FOR HORIZONTAL WELLS 100 APPENDIX G: ADDINGTON'S METHOD APPENDIX H: CALCULATION OF HEIGHT h~ APPENDIX I: BASE CASE AND SIMULATION RUN SUMMARY...

Yang, Weiping

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Observing alternatives to inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

P. Peter

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

422

FISICA: The Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology & Astrophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the design, fabrication, and on-sky performance of the Florida Image Slicer for Infrared Cosmology and Astrophysics (FISICA)- a fully-cryogenic all-reflective image-slicing integral field unit for the FLAMINGOS near-infrared spectrograph. Designed to accept input beams near f/15, FISICA with FLAMINGOS provides R \\sim 1300 spectra over a 16x33-arcsec field-of-view on the Cassegrain f/15 focus of the KPNO 4-meter telescope, or a 6x12-arcsec field-of-view on the Nasmyth or Bent Cassegrain foci of the Gran Telescopio Canarias 10.4-meter telescope. FISICA accomplishes this using three sets of "monolithic" powered mirror arrays, each with 22 mirrored surfaces cut into a single piece of aluminum. We review the optical and opto-mechanical design and fabrication of FISICA, as well as laboratory test results for FISICA integrated with the FLAMINGOS instrument. Finally, we present performance results from observations with FISICA at the KPNO 4-m telescope and comparisons of FISICA performance to other available IFUs on 4-m to 8-m-class telescopes.

Stephen Eikenberry; S. Nicholas Raines; Nicolas Gruel; Richard Elston; Rafael Guzman; Jeff Julian; Glenn Boreman; Paul Glenn; Greg Hull-Allen; Jeff Hoffmann; Michael Rodgers; Kevin Thompson; Scott Flint; Lovell Comstock; Bruce Myrick

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surveys; routine activities that do not affect the integrity of the well or the formation; the removal SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations Page 1 of 13 SB 4 WELL STIMULATION TREATMENT REGULATIONS TEXT OF PROPOSED REGULATIONS Added text is shown in underline

424

WELL-CENTERED OVERRINGS OF AN INTEGRAL DOMAIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELL-CENTERED OVERRINGS OF AN INTEGRAL DOMAIN is a localization of A if and only if B is flat and well-centered over A. If the integral clo* *sure.3 that a simple flat well-centered overring of an integral domain A is a localization of A. If the integral

Heinzer, William

425

WELL-CENTERED OVERRINGS OF AN INTEGRAL DOMAIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WELL-CENTERED OVERRINGS OF AN INTEGRAL DOMAIN William Heinzer Department of Mathematics, Purdue of A if and only if B is flat and well-centered over A. If the integral closure of A is a Krull domain in Theorem 3.6 that every finitely generated well-centered over- ring of an integrally closed domain is flat

Heinzer, William

426

Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

Faulds, James E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

University of NebraskaLincoln The UNL Wellness Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programming: wellness.unl.edu Don't see what you are looking for to fulfill your wellness needs? Give us and their families may utilize short-term counseling services. Student On-campus Resource: Counseling Wellness Karen Miller, Registered Dietitian 402­472­0880 Nutrition Consultation and Assessments Receive

Powers, Robert

428

Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;i Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza 60 ECTS thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of a Magister Scientiarum #12;iv Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells 60 ECTS thesis

Karlsson, Brynjar

429

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

430

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRO-F/FIS Observing Simulation Including Detector Characteristics Woong-Seob Jeong1, Soojong Pak1 simulations to examined the detector characteristics on the FIS instrument (Far- Infrared Surveyor) images narrow and wide bands using a short wavelength (SW) and long wavelength (LW) detector array. The FIS (Far

Lee, Hyung Mok

431

Gamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detection reported Flare activity reported via ATel Gamma Ray Bursts reported via GCN Giant MC imageGamma-ray Sky Observed with Fermi Large Area Telescope RESCEU Symposium on Astroparticle Physics) Measure the photon direction Identification of the gamma-ray shower 36 planes of Si strip detectors (228 m

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

432

Observations of colocated optical and radar aurora H. Bahcivan,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations of colocated optical and radar aurora H. Bahcivan,1 D. L. Hysell,2 D. Lummerzheim,3 M of the E region radar aurora obtained with a 30 MHz imaging radar and the optical aurora (green line, the radar aurora in the vicinity of a stable evening auroral arc arises because of the arc's polarization

Lummerzheim, Dirk

433

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems, Peter Toft signal to noise ratio and the low spa­ tial resolution in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images ? And Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images? ffl Segmentation of MR Images ­ Extraction of important edges

Mosegaard, Klaus

434

Compression of Computer Graphics Images with Image-Based Rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compression of Computer Graphics Images with Image-Based Rendering Ilmi Yoon and Ulrich Neumann information from previously rendered images. Images predicted from prior images are combined with a residual-based rendering tech- nique provides accurate motion prediction and accelerates rendering at the same time

Shahabi, Cyrus

435

The Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and local information needs and decisions related to water-quality management and policy (httpThe Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well Vulnerability to Contamination: Understanding Observed Water Quality and Anticipating Future Water Quality National Water-Quality

436

Observation of d-Orbital Aromaticity. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation of aObservation

437

Temporal changes in gas hydrate mound topography and ecology: deep-sea time-lapse camera observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observed in the time-lapse record and recording the number of individuals and species in each image. 1,381 individual organisms representing 16 species were observed. Sediment resuspension and redistribution were regular occurrences during the deployment...

Vardaro, Michael Fredric

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R. [and others

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

440

Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

Alonso, Carol T. (Orinda, CA); Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Bowman, Barry R. (Livermore, CA); Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (Pleasanton, CA); Comfort, III, William J. (Livermore, CA); Guymon, Lloyd G. (Livermore, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Pedersen, Knud B. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA); Smith, Joseph A. (Livermore, CA); Strauch, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Method for image reconstruction of moving radionuclide source distribution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for image reconstruction of moving radionuclide distributions. Its particular embodiment is for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of awake animals, though its techniques are general enough to be applied to other moving radionuclide distributions as well. The invention eliminates motion and blurring artifacts for image reconstructions of moving source distributions. This opens new avenues in the area of small animal brain imaging with radiotracers, which can now be performed without the perturbing influences of anesthesia or physical restraint on the biological system.

Stolin, Alexander V.; McKisson, John E.; Lee, Seung Joon; Smith, Mark Frederick

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

442

Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

McAlpine, J.L. (White Buffalo Petroleum Co., Tulsa, OK (US)); Joshi, S.D. (Joshi Technologies International Inc., Tulsa, OK (US))

1991-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

443

Well fluid isolation and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. A seal may be positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Purged well fluid is stored in a riser above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

CLOUD AND HAZE IN THE WINTER POLAR REGION OF TITAN OBSERVED WITH VISUAL AND INFRARED MAPPING SPECTROMETER ON BOARD CASSINI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large cloud in the north polar region of Titan was first observed by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) in 2005 and then in 2006. This cloud, confined beyond the latitude 62 Degree-Sign N, is surrounded by a mixture of aerosol and mist probably lying in the low stratosphere and troposphere. Subsequent images of this region of Titan show a gradual vanishing of this cloud which was reported previously. In this paper, we characterize the physical properties of this cloud, haze, and mist as well as their time evolutions. We note several details on the images such as a secondary cloud above the main cloud and latitudes beyond 70 Degree-Sign N. We also show that the cloud disappearance leaves the polar region poorly loaded in aerosols, yielding an annular zone of aerosols between 50 Degree-Sign N and 65 Degree-Sign N. Our analysis suggests that this structure observed by VIMS in the near-IR is an annular structure observed by ISS on board Voyager one Titan year ago in 1980.

Rannou, P. [GSMA, UMR CNRS 7331, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (France); Le Mouelic, S. [LPGN, UMR CNRS 6112, Universite de Nantes (France); Sotin, C. [JPL, California Institute of Technology, PA (United States); Brown, R. H., E-mail: pascal.rannou@univ-reims.fr [LPL, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

Zanibbi, Richard

446

Directional Multiresolution Image Representations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) are not necessarily best suited for images. Thus, there is a strong motivation to search for more powerful schemes consid´er´ees comme de bonnes repr´esentations des images na- turelles. Le lien entre les courbelettes et

Do, Minh N.

447

Medical imaging systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

Heart imaging method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

Collins, H. Dale (Richland, WA); Gribble, R. Parks (Richland, WA); Busse, Lawrence J. (Littleton, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

Mike L. Laue

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

Lucky exposures: diffraction limited astronomical imaging through the atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brightness are circled in red in d). In panels a)c) the blurring effect of the PSFs re-distributes the flux from the point sources over a wider area of the image leading to a substantial reduction in the peak pixel values in the images. can be improved... to this method as the Lucky Exposures technique. A number of other authors have published results using very similar methods, particularly 1.3. Performance of ground-based high resolution imaging techniques 11 for solar and planetary observations. Observations...

Tubbs, Robert Nigel

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

451

Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

Taniguchi, Yoshifumi [Science and Medical Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hiroaki [Corporate Manufacturing Strategy Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-1991 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

452

2009-2010 Special Projects Boellstorff: A Southern Region Well Owner Network to Safeguard Private Well and Aquifer Integrity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, improper well construction techniques, abandoned wells, improperly sited and functioning on-site wastewater treatment systems, and changes in land use. The aim of the proposed Southern Region Well Owner Network integrity. The SRWON will improve rural and rural-urban interface environmental management by providing

453

Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

454

Time encoded radiation imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

455

Computer-aided evaluation of protein expression in pathological tissue images Elisa Ficarra, Enrico Macii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by pathologists via visual inspection of tissue sam- ples images. Our techniques streamlines this errorComputer-aided evaluation of protein expression in pathological tissue images Elisa Ficarra, Enrico in pathological tissues by using, for example, images of the tissue where the localization of pro- teins, as well

De Micheli, Giovanni

456

Feasibility of an image planning system for kilovoltage image-guided radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Image guidance has become a standard of care for many treatment scenarios in radiation therapy. This is most typically accomplished by use of kV x-ray devices mounted onto the linear accelerator (Linac) gantry that yield planar, fluoroscopic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Image acquisition parameters are chosen via preset techniques that rely on broad categorizations in patient anatomy and imaging goal. However, the optimal imaging technique results in detectability of the features of interest while exposing the patient to minimum dose. Herein, the authors present an investigation into the feasibility of developing an image planning system (IPS) for radiotherapy.Methods: In this first phase, the authors focused on developing an algorithm to predict tissue contrast produced by a common radiotherapy planar imaging chain. Input parameters include a CT dataset and simulated planar imaging technique settings that include kV and mAs. Energy-specific attenuation through each voxel of the CT dataset was calculated in the algorithm to derive a net transmitted intensity. The response of the flat panel detector was integrated into the image simulation algorithm. Verification was conducted by comparing simulated and measured images using four phantoms. Comparisons were made in both high and low contrast settings, as well as changes in the geometric appearance due to image saturation. Results: The authors studied a lung nodule test object to assess the planning system's ability to predict object contrast and detectability. Verification demonstrated that the slope of the pixel intensities is similar, the presence of the nodule is evident, and image saturation at high mAs values is evident in both images. The appearance of the lung nodule is a function of the image detector saturation. The authors assessed the dimensions of the lung nodule in measured and simulated images. Good quantitative agreement affirmed the algorithm's predictive capabilities. The invariance of contrast with kVp and mAs prior to saturation was predicted, as well as the gradual loss of object detectability as saturation was approached. Small changes in soft tissue density were studied using a mammography step wedge phantom. Data were acquired at beam qualities of 80 and 120 kVp and over exposure values ranging from 0.04 to 500 mAs. The data showed good agreement in terms of the absolute value of pixel intensities predicted, as well as small variations across the step wedge pattern. The saturation pixel intensity was consistent between the two beam qualities studied. Boney tissue contrast was assessed using two abdominal phantoms. Measured and calculated values agree in terms of predicting the mAs value at which detector saturation, and subsequent loss of contrast occurs. The lack of variation in contrast over mAs values lower than 10 suggests that there is wide latitude for minimizing patient dose. Conclusions: The authors developed and tested an algorithm that can be used to assist in kV imaging technique selection during localization for radiotherapy. Phantom testing demonstrated the algorithm's predictive accuracy for both low and high contrast imaging scenarios. Detector saturation with subsequent loss of imaging detail, both in terms of object size and contrast were accurately predicted by the algorithm.

Thapa, Bishnu B.; Molloy, Janelle A. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536-0293 (United States)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Extreme commutative quantum observables are sharp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that, in the description of quantum observables, positive operator valued measures (POVMs) generalize projection valued measures (PVMs) and they also turn out be more optimal in many tasks. We show that a commutative POVM is an extreme point in the convex set of all POVMs if and only if it is a PVM. This results implies that non-commutativity is a necessary ingredient to overcome the limitations of PVMs.

Teiko Heinosaari; Juha-Pekka Pellonp

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

458

X-Atlas: An Online Archive of Chandra's Stellar High Energy Transmission Gratings Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy made possible by the 1999 deployment of the Chandra X-ray Observatory has revolutionized our understanding of stellar X-ray emission. Many puzzles remain, though, particularly regarding the mechanisms of X-ray emission from OB stars. Although numerous individual stars have been observed in high-resolution, realizing the full scientific potential of these observations will necessitate studying the high-resolution Chandra dataset as a whole. To facilitate the rapid comparison and characterization of stellar spectra, we have compiled a uniformly processed database of all stars observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG). This database, known as X-Atlas, is accessible through a web interface with searching, data retrieval, and interactive plotting capabilities. For each target, X-Atlas also features predictions of the low-resolution ACIS spectra convolved from the HETG data for comparison with stellar sources in archival ACIS images. Preliminary analyses of the hardness ratios, quantiles, and spectral fits derived from the predicted ACIS spectra reveal systematic differences between the high-mass and low-mass stars in the atlas and offer evidence for at least two distinct classes of high-mass stars. A high degree of X-ray variability is also seen in both high and low-mass stars, including Capella, long thought to exhibit minimal variability. X-Atlas contains over 130 observations of approximately 25 high-mass stars and 40 low-mass stars and will be updated as additional stellar HETG observations become public. The atlas has recently expanded to non-stellar point sources, and Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) observations are currently being added as well.

Owen W. Westbrook; Nancy Remage Evans; Scott J. Wolk; Vinay L. Kashyap; Joy S. Nichols; Peter J. Mendygral; Jonathan D. Slavin; Bradley Spitzbart; Wayne L. Waldron

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

460

How postcapping put Kuwait`s wells back onstream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late february 1991, the retreating Iraqi army blew up, or otherwise caused to blowout, some 700 wells in Kuwait. Between March and November, all of the fires were extinguished and the wells were capped. Work began in July 1991 to recomplete the damaged wells with replaced or reworked tubulars and well heads so that production could be resumed. Except for some of the earlier-capped wells into which cement was pumped, thus requiring more extensive downhole work, many of the damaged wells, particularly in Burgan field, were put back into production mode by the procedure described here, which became known as postcapping. This paper describes the equipment and techniques used in postcapping damaged wellheads.

Wilson, D. [ABB Vetco Gray Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

GEOFRAC: an explosives stimulation technique for a geothermal well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first known use of explosives for stimulating a geothermal well was successfully conducted in December 1981 with a process called GEOFRAC. The 260/sup 0/C well was located at the Union Oil Company's Geysers Field in northern California. For the initial test, 364 kg of a new explosive called HITEX II was placed at a depth of 2256 meters and detonated to verify techniques. The explosive was contained in an aluminum canister to separate it from the well fluids. In the second test, 5000 kg of explosive was used representing a column length of approximately 191 meters. The explosive was detonated at a depth of 1697 meters in the same well. The results of these tests show that HITEX II can be safely emplaced and successfully detonated in a hot geothermal well without causing damage to the well bore or casing.

Mumma, D.M.; McCullough, F. Jr.; Schmidt, E.W.; Pye, D.S.; Allen, W.C.; Pyle, D.; Hanold, R.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Eigenstate Localization in an Asymmetric Coupled Quantum Well Pair  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical pumping of a type-I/type-II coupled asymmetric quantum well pair induces a spatially separated two dimensional charge carriers plasma in the well's wide and narrow parts. Treating the two coupled wells as a single system we find that the eigenstate probability distribution localizes exclusively either in the wide or the narrow parts of the well pair. The energy of the narrow-well localized state determines the minimal excitation energy for optically pumped charge carriers separation. In a previously used design [Guliamov et al., PRB 64 035314 (2001)] this narrow well transition energy was measured to correspond to a wavelength of 646 nm. We propose modifications to the design suggested earlier with the purpose of pushing up the energy required for the optical pumping of the two-dimensional plasma into the green and blue regions of the visible spectrum.

Mialitsin, A.; Schmult, S.; Solov'yov, I. A.; Fluegel, B.; Mascarenhas, A.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Automated robotic equipment for ultrasonic inspection of pressurizer heater wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robotic device for remotely inspecting pressurizer heater wells is provided which has the advantages of quickly, precisely, and reliably acquiring data at reasonable cost while also reducing radiation exposure of an operator. The device comprises a prober assembly including a probe which enters a heater well, gathers data regarding the condition of the heater well and transmits a signal carrying that data; a mounting device for mounting the probe assembly at the opening of the heater well so that the probe can enter the heater well; a first motor mounted on the mounting device for providing movement of the probe assembly in an axial direction; and a second motor mounted on the mounting device for providing rotation of the probe assembly. This arrangement enables full inspection of the heater well to be carried out.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY); DeRossi, Raymond S. (Amsterdam, NY); Mullins, Lawrence E. (Middle Grove, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Generalized IPR curves for predicting well behavior. [Inflow Performance Relation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil well productivity calculations are required to relate surface measured oil rate to the pressure drawdown of the well in order to predict well behavior. The productivity index concept and the inflow performance relation concept can be combined to derive a workable form of a well's deliverability which covers the entire pressure range above and below the bubble point. A procedure for predicting well behavior is presented using equations to determine the relationship between shut-in bottom-hole pressure, bubble point pressure, and bottom-hole producing pressure. An example calculation is provided comparing 2 wells. The conclusion is that one set of production test data (rate and bottom-hole producing pressure) together with the shut-in bottom-hole pressure (or average reservoir pressure) and bubble point pressure are enough to construct a reliable inflow performance relation.

Patton, L.D.; Goland, M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the life of the project, 1143 wildcat wells were screened for possible use. Although many did not meet the program's requirement for sand development, a surprisingly large number were abandoned because of downhole mechanical problems. Only 94 of these wells were completed as commercial hydrocarbon producers. Five wells of opportunity were funded for testing. Of these, two were evaluated for their hydraulic energy, thermal energy, and recoverable methane, and three were abandoned because of mechanical problems. (MHR)

Hartsock, J.H.; Rodgers, J.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Well correction factors for three-dimensional reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. D. Von Gonten A three-dimensional reservoir simulation model does not calculate the correct bottomhole flowing pressure, p f, for a partially penetrating well. The simulator well cell pressure must be corrected ro obtain... an accurate value for p f. Simulation model results have wf' been used in this part to develop a new inflow equation relating cell pressure to actual bottomhole flowing pressure for a partially penetrating well. Based on the new inflow equation, an equation...

Fjerstad, Paul Albert

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Reservoirs Using Genetic Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee, Dr. Ding Zhu Dr. Hadi Nasrabadi Horizontal well placement determination within a reservoir is a significant and difficult step... optimization is an important criterion during the reservoir development phase of a horizontal-well project in gas reservoirs, but it is less significant to vertical wells in a homogeneous reservoir. It is also shown that genetic algorithms are an extremely...

Gibbs, Trevor Howard

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

468

Preliminary Analysis of Stress in the Newberry EGS Well NWG 55-29  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the planning for stimulation of the Newberry Volcano Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Demonstration project in Oregon, a high-resolution borehole televiewer (BHTV) log was acquired using the ALT ABI85 BHTV tool in the slightly deviated NWG 55-29 well. The image log reveals an extensive network of fractures in a conjugate set striking approximately N-S and dipping 50???° that are well oriented for normal slip and are consistent with surface-breaking regional normal faults in the vicinity. Similarly, breakouts indicate a consistent minimum horizontal stress, Shmin, azimuth of 092.3???±17.3???°. In conjunction with a suite of geophysical logs, a model of the stress magnitudes constrained by the width of breakouts at depth and a model of rock strength independently indicates a predominantly normal faulting stress regime.

Nicholas C. Davatzes, Stephen H. Hickman

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

469

Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 1988) Exploration...

470

wellness.umd.edu 1. Choose a balanced, energy-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sporting event 30. Play an instrument 31. Write a poem or story 32. Go ice skating at Wells Ice Rink 33

Gruner, Daniel S.

471

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California....

472

Private Water Well Education for Adult Residents of Oklahoma.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The scope of this study involved an investigation into the education of the adult residents of Oklahoma regarding private water wells. The groundwater supply for (more)

Robbins, Sharon Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

structural controls, and potential subsurface reservoir temperatures of geothermal fluids. An example is provided by the Salt Wells geothermal system in Churchill County,...

474

Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

475

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Project Officer: Dan KingGreg Stillman Total budget: 300 K April 24 , 2013 Principal Investigator: Dr. Toshifumi...

476

Knowledge-based stratigraphic well-log correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

represents the formations, and new rules for the knowledge-base that can correlate formations in reservoirs with secondary stratification. This expert system has correlated ovei' 3, 500 ft. of well-log data from three different types of rock sequences... inspirational support. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT nl DEDICATION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES x1 LIST OF FIGURES xl1 CHAPTER I ? INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Well-Logs 1. 2 Stratigraphic Well-Log Correlation . 1. 3 Well-Log Correlation...

Denton, Michael A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

osmosis, heat conduction, pressure thermal effect, and the interconvertibility of mechanical and thermal energy. The model has been applied to Raft River geothermal well RRG-9,...

479

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the...

480

Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Abstract...

482

CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1.

MARTINEZ, C.R.

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

483

Application of horizontal wells in steeply dipping reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A three-dimensional reservoir simulation study is performed to evaluate the impact of horizontal well applications on oil recovery from steeply dipping reservoirs. The Provincia field, (more)

Lopez Navarro, Jose David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Polarization transfer NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

Sillerud, Laurel O. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Effect of phonon confinement on lattice thermal conductivity of lead Telluride quantum well structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper examines the effect of spatial confinement of acoustic phonons on average group velocity and consequently the lattice thermal conductivity of a free-standing PbTe quantum well structure and their temperature dependence. The average group velocity at 100 decreases 30% to the bulk value and falls more rapidly on reducing the width of quantum well. Moreover, the lattice thermal conductivity of 100 wide PbTe quantum well with value of 0.60 W/mK shows considerable decrease of 70% compared to its bulk value. It is observed that the effect of reduction in well width is less pronounce as temperature increases. This appears mainly due to dominance of umklapp processes over the confinement effects.

Tripathi, Madhvendra Nath, E-mail: ommadhav27@gmail.com [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur-495009, Chhattisgarh (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

486

GRB 050713A: High Energy Observations of the GRB Prompt and Afterglow Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Swift discovered GRB 050713A and slewed promptly to begin observing with its narrow field instruments 72.6 seconds after the burst onset, while the prompt gamma-ray emission was still detectable in the BAT. Simultaneous emission from two flares is detected in the BAT and XRT. This burst marks just the second time that the BAT and XRT have simultaneously detected emission from a burst and the first time that both instruments have produced a well sampled, simultaneous dataset covering multiple X-ray flares. The temporal rise and decay parameters of the flares are consistent with the internal shock mechanism. In addition to the Swift coverage of GRB 050713A, we report on the Konus-Wind (K-W) detection of the prompt emission in the energy range 18-1150 keV, an upper limiting GeV measurement of the prompt emission made by the MAGIC imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope and XMM-Newton observations of the afterglow. Simultaneous observation between Swift XRT and XMM-Newton produce consistent results, showing a bre...

Morris, D C; Burrows, D N; Falcone, A D; Galante, N; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Gehrels, N; Godet, O; Krimm, H; Mizobuchi, S; Pagani, C; Palshin, V D; Reeves, J; Stamerra, A; Teshima, M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

PRECURSOR OF SUNSPOT PENUMBRAL FORMATION DISCOVERED WITH HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of a precursory signature that would be helpful for understanding the formation process of sunspot penumbrae. The Hinode Solar Optical Telescope successfully captured the entire evolution of a sunspot from the pore to a large well-developed sunspot with penumbra in an emerging flux region appearing in NOAA Active Region 11039. We found an annular zone (width 3''-5'') surrounding the umbra (pore) in Ca II H images before the penumbra formed around the umbra. The penumbra developed as if to fill the annular zone. The annular zone shows weak magnetogram signals, meaning less magnetic flux or highly inclined fields there. Pre-existing ambient magnetic field islands were distributed at the outer edge of the annular zone and did not come into the zone. There are no strong systematic flow patterns in the zone, but we occasionally observed small magnetic flux patches streaming out. The observations indicate that the annular zone is different from the sunspot moat flow region and that it represents the structure in the chromosphere. We conclude that the annular zone reflects the formation of a magnetic canopy overlying the region surrounding the umbra at the chromospheric level, long before the formation of the penumbra at the photospheric level. The magnetic field structure in the chromosphere needs to be considered in the formation process of the penumbrae.

Shimizu, Toshifumi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kamitakara-cho, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Suematsu, Yoshinori, E-mail: shimizu.toshifumi@isas.jaxa.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

488

MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A0620-00 IN QUIESCENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present contemporaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the black hole binary system, A0620-00, acquired in 2010 March. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained the first FUV spectrum of A0620-00 as well as NUV observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The observed spectrum is flat in the FUV and very faint (with continuum fluxes {approx_equal} 1e - 17 erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}). The UV spectra also show strong, broad (FWHM {approx} 2000 km s{sup -1}) emission lines of Si IV, C IV, He II, Fe II, and Mg II. The C IV doublet is anomalously weak compared to the other lines, which is consistent with the low carbon abundance seen in NIR spectra of the source. Comparison of these observations with previous NUV spectra of A0620-00 shows that the UV flux has varied by factors of 2-8 over several years. We compiled the dereddened, broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) of A0620-00 and compared it to previous SEDs as well as theoretical models. The SEDs show that the source varies at all wavelengths for which we have multiple samples. Contrary to previous observations, the optical-UV spectrum does not continue to drop to shorter wavelengths, but instead shows a recovery and an increasingly blue spectrum in the FUV. We created an optical-UV spectrum of A0620-00 with the donor star contribution removed. The non-stellar spectrum peaks at {approx_equal}3000 A. The peak can be fit with a T = 10,000 K blackbody with a small emitting area, probably originating in the hot spot where the accretion stream impacts the outer disk. However, one or more components in addition to the blackbody are needed to fit the FUV upturn and the red optical fluxes in the optical-UV spectrum. By comparing the mass accretion rate determined from the hot spot luminosity to the mean accretion rate inferred from the outburst history, we find that the latter is an order of magnitude smaller than the former, indicating that {approx}90% of the accreted mass must be lost from the system if the predictions of the disk instability model and the estimated interoutburst interval are correct. The mass accretion rate at the hot spot is 10{sup 5} the accretion rate at the black hole inferred from the X-ray luminosity. To reconcile these requires that outflows carry away virtually all of the accreted mass, a very low rate of mass transfer from the outer cold disk into the inner hot region, and/or radiatively inefficient accretion. We compared our broadband SED to two models of A0620-00 in quiescence: the advection-dominated accretion flow model and the maximally jet-dominated model. The comparison suggests that strong outflows may be present in the system, indicated by the discrepancies in accretion rates and the FUV upturn in flux in the SED.

Froning, Cynthia S.; France, Kevin; Khargharia, Juthika [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 593 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0593 (United States); and others

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

489

X-ray Observations of Mrk 231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

T. J. Turner

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

490

2D microwave imaging reflectometer electronics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 2D microwave imaging reflectometer system has been developed to visualize electron density fluctuations on the DIII-D tokamak. Simultaneously illuminated at four probe frequencie