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1

Observation Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Observation Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Observation Wells Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(15) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Total dissolved solids, fluid pressure, flow rates, and flow direction Thermal: Monitors temperature of circulating fluids Dictionary.png Observation Wells: An observation well is used to monitor important hydrologic parameters in a geothermal system that can indicate performance, longevity, and transient processes. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

2

Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Reinjection test wells can be used to obtain quite precise measurements of reservoir permeability....

3

Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Reeder,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Reeder, 1957) Exploration Activity Details Location...

4

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Definition:Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246"

5

Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single well seismic imaging (SWSI) is the application of borehole seismic sources and receivers on the same string within a single borehole in order to acquire CMP type shot gathers. Cross well seismic places sources and receivers in adjacent wells in order to image the interwell volume.[1] Also Known As SWSI References ↑ http://library.seg.org/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Single-Well_And_Cross-Well_Seismic_Imaging&oldid=690246" Category:

6

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes 4 wells References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Observation_Wells_At_Mccoy_Geothermal_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402599" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services

7

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging (Redirected from Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation.

8

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Imaging Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Borehole Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Borehole Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

9

Well test imaging - a new method for determination of boundaries from well test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method has been developed for analysis of well test data, which allows the direct calculation of the location of arbitrary reservoir boundaries which are detected during a well test. The method is based on elements of ray tracing and information theory, and is centered on the calculation of an instantaneous {open_quote}angle of view{close_quote} of the reservoir boundaries. In the absence of other information, the relative reservoir shape and boundary distances are retrievable in the form of a Diagnostic Image. If other reservoir information, such as 3-D seismic, is available; the full shape and orientation of arbitrary (non-straight line or circular arc) boundaries can be determined in the form of a Reservoir Image. The well test imaging method can be used to greatly enhance the information available from well tests and other geological data, and provides a method to integrate data from multiple disciplines to improve reservoir characterization. This paper covers the derivation of the analytical technique of well test imaging and shows examples of application of the technique to a number of reservoirs.

Slevinsky, B.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging Authors Thomas M. Daley, Ernest L. Majer, Roland Gritto and Jerry M. Harris Conference 70th Annual International Meeting of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists, Expanded Abstracts; N/A; 2000/01/01 Published N/A, 2000 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Progress and issues in single well seismic imaging Citation

11

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed16 Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributedflow processes near a geothermal well under heating and

Freifeld, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Polarization Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polarization observations of the cosmic microwave background with the Cosmic Background Imager from September 2002 to May 2004 provide a significant detection of the E-mode polarization and reveal an angular power spectrum of polarized emission showing peaks and valleys that are shifted in phase by half a cycle relative to those of the total intensity spectrum. This key agreement between the phase of the observed polarization spectrum and that predicted based on the total intensity spectrum provides support for the standard model of cosmology, in which dark matter and dark energy are the dominant constituents, the geometry is close to flat, and primordial density fluctuations are predominantly adiabatic with a matter power spectrum commensurate with inflationary cosmological models.

A. C. S. Readhead; S. T. Myers; T. J. Pearson; J. L. Sievers; B. S. Mason; C. R. Contaldi; J. R. Bond; R. Bustos; P. Altamirano; C. Achermann; L. Bronfman; J. E. Carlstrom; J. K. Cartwright; S. Casassus; C. Dickinson; W. L. Holzapfel; J. M. Kovac; E. M. Leitch; J. May; S. Padin; D. Pogosyan; M. Pospieszalski; C. Pryke; R. Reeves; M. C. Shepherd; S. Torres

2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

Empirical Determination of the Energy Loss Rate of Accelerated Electrons in a Well-Observed Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Empirical Determination of the Energy Loss Rate of Accelerated Electrons in a Well-Observed Solar & Michele Piana1,3 ABSTRACT We present electron images of an extended solar flare source, deduced from the impulsive phase of a solar flare typically appears in the form of accelerated electrons. In the generally

Piana, Michele

14

Segmentation of complex geophysical structures with well Running title: Image segmentation with well data.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with well data. Authors: Christian Gout�, and Carole Le Guyader. Complete affiliation: � Universit�e de 96822-2273 , USA. chris gout@cal.berkeley.edu : INSA de Rennes 20 Avenue des Buttes de Co�esmes CS 14315 35043 Rennes, France. carole.le-guyader@insa-rennes.fr Corresponding author : Christian Gout

Boyer, Edmond

15

Adaptive Observer Design under Low Data Rate Transmission with Applications to Oil Well Drill-string  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Observer Design under Low Data Rate Transmission with Applications to Oil Well Drill system. Index Terms-- Stick-Slip, Oil Well drill string, D-OSKIL, unknown parameter adaptive observer, time-variant, delay, stability. I. INTRODUCTION Oil well drilling operations present a particular

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

16

OBSERVATIONS OF RECONNECTING FLARE LOOPS WITH THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perhaps the most compelling evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares comes from the supra-arcade downflows that have been observed above many post-flare loop arcades. These downflows are thought to be related to highly non-potential field lines that have reconnected and are propagating away from the current sheet. We present new observations of supra-arcade downflows taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The morphology and dynamics of the downflows observed with AIA provide new evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares. With these new observations we are able to measure downflows originating at larger heights than in previous studies. We find, however, that the initial velocities measured here ({approx}144 km s{sup -1}) are well below the Alfven speed expected in the lower corona, and consistent with previous results. We also find no evidence that the downflows brighten with time, as would be expected from chromospheric evaporation. These observations suggest that simple two-dimensional models cannot explain the detailed observations of solar flares.

Warren, Harry P.; Sheeley, Neil R. Jr. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); O'Brien, Casey M. [Also at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

Fischlin, Andreas

18

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: A New Geothermal Well Imaging Tool. 1.To develop a robust and easily deployable DTPS for monitoring in geothermal wells; and 2. Develop the associated analysis methodology for flow imaging; and?when possible by wellbore conditions?to determine in situthermal conductivity and basal heat flux.

19

Using borehole images for target-zone evaluation in horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Horizontal wells are rarely horizontal. Instead, operators commonly try to drill such wells into particular rock layers, or target zones, which may or may not be truly horizontal. Thicknesses of target zones commonly range from a few feet to a few tens of feet (1-10 m). Target-zone evaluation concerns whether a horizontal well was successfully located and drilled in a given rock layer. Borehole-imaging logs provide a powerful tool for stratigraphic interpretation and target-zone evaluation in the Austin Chalk, Niobrara Formation, San Andres Formation, and other units. This study uses borehole images generated by Schlumberger's Formation MicroScanner (FMS), a microconductivity logging device. Open fractures and clay-rich interbeds appear as dark, high-conductivity tracers on the FMS log. These traces can be fit with sinusoidal curves and oriented on a computer workstation. The shape of the sinusoidal curve that fits a particular bedding plane tells the interpreter whether the borehole was moving upward or downward through the strata. STRATLOG (trademark of Sierra Geophysics, Inc., a Halliburton Company) software has been used to display borehole profiles by combining FMS data on fracture intensities and bedding-plane intersections with gamma-ray logs, mud logs, and borehole-deviation surveys. To aid in planning future wells, multiple penetrations of the same horizon can be detected and used to calculate highly accurate bedding-plane dips. Fault interpretation, including the detection of rollover beds, it also possible. Finally, stratigraphic interpretation can be combined with observed fractures to determine which rock layers are most highly fractured, and, therefore, should be target zones.9 refs., 5 figs.

Hurley, N.F.; Carlson, J.L. (Marathon Oil Company, Littleton, CO (United States)); Thorn, D.R. (Schlumberger Well Services, Aurora (Colombia)); Eichelberger, L.W. (Marathon Oil Company, Tyler, TX (United States))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The awardee conducted seismic, gravity, resistivity, and airborne magnetic surveys, drilled temperature-gradient wells, and selected a location for a test well (52-7). The test well was drilled to a total depth of 770 m during 2003. Maximum temperatures approached 140degrees C and a short flow test suggested that a production well could be drilled to 600 m and produce economic volumes of 130-140degrees C fluid. A final assessment of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Observation Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Observation Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Observation Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Observation_Wells_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511330"

22

High definition cross-well electrical resistivity imaging using seismoelectric focusing and image-guided inversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Seismoelectric imaging of the vadose zone of a sand aquifer. Geophysics (2007) 72(6):A81-A85...modeling in boreholes penetrating a sandy aquifer. J. geophys. Res. (2009) 114:B10306...for moment tensor characterization of fracking events. Geophysics (2012) 77(5......

P. Sava; A. Revil; M. Karaoulis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Direct observation of an electronic phase transition in a double quantum well  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report in situ tuning of electron density through an electronic phase transition in a double quantum well. As density is increased, the well-formed quantum Hall state at energy-level filling factor ?=3 is replaced by a gapless correlated bilayer state. These observations establish that a phase transition exists which is driven by electron correlation (not, e.g., by the disorder potential). Activation energies in the transition region reveal a threshold density, above which the excitation gap decreases rapidly to zero.

G. S. Boebinger; L. N. Pfeiffer; K. W. West

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Review Article Imaging and observing the electrical Moho  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Article Imaging and observing the electrical Moho Alan G. Jones Dublin Institute Electrical Moho Electrical conductivity Electrical resistivity Crust­mantle boundary Defining the depth on crustal and mantle rocks suggest that there should be a concomitant step-lie change in electrical

Jones, Alan G.

25

Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan, and Bjarne Foss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan flow systems is an area of increasing interest for the oil and gas industry. Oil wells with highly related to oil and gas wells exist, and in this study, unstable gas lifted wells will be the area

Foss, Bjarne A.

26

Observing the invisible through imaging mass spectrometry, a window into the metabolic exchange patterns of microbes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observing the invisible through imaging mass spectrometry, a window into the metabolic exchange this article as: Gonzalez DJ., et al, Observing the invisible through imaging mass spectrometry, a window

Nizet, Victor

27

First Intrinsic Anisotropy Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first results of observations of the intrinsic anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with the Cosmic Background Imager from a site at 5080 m altitude in northern Chile. Our observations show a sharp decrease in C_l in the range l=400 - 1500. The broadband amplitudes we have measured are deltaT(band) = 58.7 (-6.3, +7.7) microK for l = 603 (-166, +180) and 29.7 (-4.2, +4.8) microK for l = 1190 (-224, +261), where these are half-power widths in l. Such a decrease in power at high l is one of the fundamental predictions of the standard cosmological model, and these are the first observations which cover a broad enough l range to show this decrease in a single experiment. The C_l we have measured enable us to place limits on the density parameter, Omega(tot) = 0.7 (90% confidence).

S. Padin; J. K. Cartwright; B. S. Mason; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; J. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; W. L. Holzapfel; S. T. Myers; J. E. Carlstrom; E. M. Leitch; M. Joy; L. Bronfman; J. May

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

28

Extended Mosaic Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two years of microwave background observations with the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) have been combined to give a sensitive, high resolution angular power spectrum over the range 400 2000 power previously seen with the CBI is reduced. Under the assumption that any signal in excess of the primary anisotropy is due to a secondary Sunyaev-Zeldovich anisotropy in distant galaxy clusters we use CBI, ACBAR, and BIMA data to place a constraint on the present-day rms mass fluctuation sigma_8. We present the results of a cosmological parameter analysis on the l < 2000 primary anisotropy data which show significant improvements in the parameters as compared to WMAP alone, and we explore the role of the small-scale cosmic microwave background data in breaking parameter degeneracies.

A. C. S. Readhead; B. S. Mason; C. R. Contaldi; T. J. Pearson; J. R. Bond; S. T. Myers; S. Padin; J. L. Sievers; J. K. Cartwright; M. C. Shepherd; D. Pogosyan; S. Prunet; P. Altamirano; R. Bustos; L. Bronfman; S. Casassus; W. L. Holzapfel; J. May; U. -L. Pen; S. Torres; P. S. Udomprasert

2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Qualities of Sequential Chromospheric Brightenings Observed in H? and UV Images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chromospheric flare ribbons observed in H? appear well-organized when first examined: ribbons impulsively brighten, morphologically evolve, and exponentially decay back to pre-flare levels. Upon closer inspection of the H? flares, there is often a significant number of compact areas brightening in concert with the flare eruption but are spatially separated from the evolving flare ribbon. One class of these brightenings is known as sequential chromospheric brightenings (SCBs). SCBs are often observed in the immediate vicinity of erupting flares and are associated with coronal mass ejections. In the past decade there have been several previous investigations of SCBs. These studies have exclusively relied upon H? images to discover and analyze these ephemeral brightenings. This work employs the automated detection algorithm of Kirk et al. to extract the physical qualities of SCBs in observations of ground-based H? images and complementary Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images in He II, C IV, and 1700 . The metadata produced in this tracking process are then culled using complementary Doppler velocities to isolate three distinguishable types of SCBs. From a statistical analysis, we find that the SCBs at the chromospheric H? layer appear earlier and last longer than their corresponding signatures measured in AIA. From this multi-layer analysis, we infer that SCBs are spatially constrained to the mid-chromosphere. We also derive an energy budget to explain SCBs which have a postulated energy of not more than 0.01% of the total flare energy.

Michael S. Kirk; K. S. Balasubramaniam; Jason Jackiewicz; R. T. James McAteer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Gemini Planet Imager Observational Calibrations II: Detector Performance and Calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gemini Planet Imager is a newly commissioned facility instrument designed to measure the near-infrared spectra of young extrasolar planets in the solar neighborhood and obtain imaging polarimetry of circumstellar disks. GPI's science instrument is an integral field spectrograph that utilizes a HAWAII-2RG detector with a SIDECAR ASIC readout system. This paper describes the detector characterization and calibrations performed by the GPI Data Reduction Pipeline to compensate for effects including bad/hot/cold pixels, persistence, non-linearity, vibration induced microphonics and correlated read noise.

Ingraham, Patrick; Sadakuni, Naru; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Maire, Jerome; Chilcote, Jeff; Larkin, James; Marchis, Franck; Galicher, Raphael; Weiss, Jason

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on this diagram, represent high-beta inclusions in the low corona. WAVE DRIVERS AND IMAGES We still do not have), even with a long history of MHD model development (e.g., [4]) for flares and CMEs This reflects our

California at Berkeley, University of

32

Improving resolution and depth of astronomical observations via modern mathematical methods for image analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Pilo, Stefano; Falcone, Maurizio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hyperspectral imaging signatures detect amyloidopathy in Alzheimers mouse retina well before onset of cognitive decline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technique was found useful for monitoring retinal and brain amyloidopathy in an ongoing preclinical anti-AD study, attesting to the techniques sensitivity and specificity. ... Interestingly, the technique was found applicable not just to excised brain tissue, but also to isolated mouse retina. ... With the retina being heralded widely as a (diagnostic) extension of the CNS and retinal amyloidopathy occurring well before that in the brain, this development raises a possibility for the first direct retinal imaging diagnosis of early, asymptomatic Alzheimers disease. ...

Swati Sudhakar More; Robert Vince

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

Influence of image charge effect on exciton fine structure in an organic-inorganic quantum well material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated experimentally excitonic properties in organic-inorganic hybrid multi quantum well crystals, (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4} and (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}?C{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4}, by measuring photoluminescence, reflectance, photoluminescence excitation spectra. In these materials, the excitonic binding energies are enhanced not only by quantum confinement effect (QCE) but also by image charge effect (ICE), since the dielectric constant of the barrier layers is much smaller than that of the well layers. By comparing the 1s-exciton and 2s-exciton energies, we have investigated the influence of ICE with regard to the difference of the Bohr radius.

Takagi, Hidetsugu; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Ema, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Sato, Mikio; Takeoka, Yuko [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

35

Vortices and Rossby waves in cylinder wakes on a parabolic -plane observed by altimetric imaging velocimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, geostrophic and gradient wind velocity, and potential vorticity fields with very high spatial resolutionVortices and Rossby waves in cylinder wakes on a parabolic -plane observed by altimetric imaging in the wake of a circular cylinder are investigated in a rotating parabolic polar -plane fluid. This system

Afanassiev, Iakov

36

Imaging and spectroscopic observations of magnetic reconnection and chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfv\\'{e}n speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of greatly redshifted ($\\sim$125 km s$^{-1}$ along line of sight) Fe {\\sc{xxi}} 1354.08\\AA{} emission line with a $\\sim$100 km s$^{-1}$ nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe {\\sc{xxi}} feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-Ray source observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) also...

Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K; Raymond, John C; Guo, Fan; Liu, Wei; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Energy relaxation during hot-exciton transport in quantum wells: Direct observation by spatially resolved phonon-sideband spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the energy relaxation of excitons during the real-space transport in ZnSe quantum wells by using microphotoluminescence with spatial resolution enhanced by a solid immersion lens. The spatial evolution of ...

Zhao, Hui; Moehl, Sebastian; Kalt, Heinz

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Autonomous Observing and Control Systems for PAIRITEL, a 1.3m Infrared Imaging Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL) is the first meter-class telescope operating as a fully robotic IR imaging system. Dedicated in October 2004, PAIRITEL began regular observations in mid-December 2004 as part of a 1.5 year commissioning period. The system was designed to respond without human intervention to new gamma-ray burst transients: this milestone was finally reached on November 9, 2005 but the telescope had a number of semi-automated sub-10 minute responses throughout early commissioning. When not operating in Target of Opportunity mode, PAIRITEL performs a number of queue scheduled transient monitoring campaigns. To achieve this level of automation, we have developed communicating tools to connect the various sub-systems: an intelligent queue scheduling database, run-time configurable observation sequence software, a data reduction pipeline, and a master state machine which monitors and controls all functions within and affecting the observatory.

J. S. Bloom; Dan L. Starr; Cullen H. Blake; M. F. Skrutskie; Emilio E. Falco

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

First Spectroscopic Imaging Observations of the Sun at Low Radio Frequencies with the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9201.6 MHz. ...

Oberoi, Divya

40

Cosmological Parameters from Cosmic Background Imager Observations and Comparisons with BOOMERANG, DASI, and MAXIMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the cosmological parameters derived from observations with the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI), covering 40 square degrees and the multipole range 300 < l < 3500. The angular scales probed by the CBI correspond to structures which cover the mass range from 10^14 to 10^17 M_sun, and the observations reveal, for the first time, the seeds that gave rise to clusters of galaxies. These unique, high-resolution observations also show damping in the power spectrum to l ~ 2000, which we interpret as due to the finite width of the photon-baryon decoupling region and the viscosity operating at decoupling. Because the observations extend to much higher l the CBI results provide information complementary to that probed by the Boomerang, DASI, Maxima, and VSA experiments. As the observations are pushed to higher multipoles no anomalies relative to standard models appear, and extremely good consistency is found between the cosmological parameters derived for the CBI observations over the range 610 < l < 2000 and observations at lower l [abridged].

J. L. Sievers; J. R. Bond; J. K. Cartwright; C. R. Contaldi; B. S. Mason; S. T. Myers; S. Padin; T. J. Pearson; U. -L. Pen; D. Pogosyan; S. Prunet; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; P. S. Udomprasert; L. Bronfman; W. L. Holzapfel; J. May

2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Observation  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

structure of K x Fe 2-y Se 2 . (a) FS mapping with the 2-Fe BZ boundary marked in green. (b),(d) Spec- tral images and (c),(e) second derivative in energy along the -X...

42

Large scale image projection setup for observation of flocculation in heavy oil?water emulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A heavy oil-in-water emulsion is heated by a continuous wave laser beam thus producing an ascending thermoconvective liquid flow. Once at the open free surface the oil particles are directly heated by the incoming laser beam which gives rise to flocculation and eventually to coalescence. A bright enlarged image of the heated region is formed in a projection screen using the backscattered light of their own laser beam. The device thus allows direct observation and high speed photographic recording of the flocculation process as a function of the sample temperature which is monitored by means of a thermographic camera.

Germn Da Costa

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS: CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct revised response functions for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) using the new atomic data, ionization equilibria, and coronal abundances available in CHIANTI 7.1. We then use these response functions in multithermal analysis of coronal loops, which allows us to determine a specific cross-field temperature distribution without ad hoc assumptions. Our method uses data from the six coronal filters and the Monte Carlo solutions available from our differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The resulting temperature distributions are not consistent with isothermal plasma. Therefore, the observed loops cannot be modeled as single flux tubes and must be composed of a collection of magnetic strands. This result is now supported by observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager, which show fine-scale braiding of coronal strands that are reconnecting and releasing energy. Multithermal analysis is one of the major scientific goals of AIA, and these results represent an important step toward the successful achievement of that goal. As AIA DEM analysis becomes more straightforward, the solar community will be able to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution of the instrument.

Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

Numerical procedure for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical procedure is developed for analyzing impurity-induced resonant-state STM images observed in high-T-c superconductors, and is applied to three sets of higher resolution data provided to us by J. C. Seamus Davis and E. W. Hudson. Each image...

Wang, Q.; Hu, Chia-Ren.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Stratospheric profiles of nitrogen dioxide observed by Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System on the Odin satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratospheric profiles of nitrogen dioxide observed by Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager of nitrogen dioxide in the 19­40 km altitude range are successfully retrieved over the globe from Optical, iterative onion peel Citation: Sioris, C. E., et al., Stratospheric profiles of nitrogen dioxide observed

Chance, Kelly

46

ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007 (India); Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Monochromatic x-ray sampling streak imager for fast-ignitor plasma observation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging is required to investigate the dynamics of fast-heated core plasma in inertial confinement fusion research. A novel x-ray imager, consisting of two toroidally bent Bragg crystals and an ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging camera, has been demonstrated. Sequential and 2D monochromatic x-ray images of laser-imploded core plasma were obtained with a temporal resolution of 20 ps, a spatial resolution of 31 {mu}m, and a spectral resolution of over 200, simultaneously.

Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mima, Kunioki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fracture Detection and Water Sweep Characterization Using Single-well Imaging, Vertical Seismic Profiling and Cross-dipole Methods in Tight and Super-k Zones, Haradh II, Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustain the targeted oil production rates and they die much sooner than expected when water enters the wells. The study attempted to identify fracture systems and their role in the irregular water sweep. Single-well acoustic migration imaging (SWI...

Aljeshi, Hussain Abdulhadi A.

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

OBSERVERS BASED SYNCHRONIZATION AND INPUT RECOVERY FOR A CLASS OF CHAOTIC SYSTEMS. APPLICATION TO IMAGE TRANSMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO IMAGE TRANSMISSION Estelle Cherrier, , Jos´e Ragot , CRAN UMR 7039 / Nancy-Universit´e, CNRS 2 Avenue transmission as an application of a chaotic cryptosystem. The underlying problem concerns nonlinear state on the message. Efficiency of the proposed approach is shown through an image transmission. 1. INTRODUCTION

Boyer, Edmond

50

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Print Imaging Print The wavelengths of soft x-ray photons (1-15 nm) are very well matched to the creation of "nanoscopes" capable of probing the interior structure of biological cells and inorganic mesoscopic systems.Topics addressed by soft x-ray imaging techniques include cell biology, nanomagnetism, environmental science, and polymers. The tunability of synchrotron radiation is absolutely essential for the creation of contrast mechanisms. Cell biology CAT scans are performed in the "water window" (300-500 eV). Nanomagnetism studies require the energy range characteristic of iron, cobalt, and nickel (600-900 eV). Mid- and far-infrared (energies below 1 eV) microprobes using synchrotron radiation are being used to address problems such as chemistry in biological tissues, chemical identification and molecular conformation, environmental biodegradation, mineral phases in geological and astronomical specimens, and electronic properties of novel materials. Infrared synchrotron radiation is focused through, or reflected from, a small spot on the specimen and then analyzed using a spectrometer. Tuning to characteristic vibrational frequencies serves as a sensitive fingerprint for molecular species. Images of the various species are built up by raster scanning the specimen through the small illuminated spot.

51

Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer Observations of the Temperature Structure of the Quiet Corona  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T ~ 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

David H. Brooks; Harry P. Warren; David R. Williams; Tetsuya Watanabe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF THE QUIET CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T approx 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, David R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hubble Space Telescope Cycle 11 General Observer Proposal Imaging Quasar 3C 273  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the choices for formattedsubmission Principal Investigator: Ms. Christina Bunker Institution: State University of New York at Stony Brook United States Electronic mail: christina.bunker@gmail.com Scientific category.86 UVIS ACCUM F606W 2 Grand total orbit request 2 #12;Ms. Christina Bunker Imaging Quasar 3C 273

Walter, Frederick M.

54

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar, for observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager RHESSI. INTRODUCTION The Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, RHESSI,1 is a space-based solar x

California at Berkeley, University of

55

Hydraulic conductivity imaging from 3-D transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping/observation densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transport and design and operation of ground- water remediation systems, are crucially dependent transient hydraulic tomography at several pumping/observation densities, Water Resour. Res., 49, 7311

Barrash, Warren

56

the atmosphere (31, 32). The style of activity imaged requires that the observed slipfaces are not  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can only be determined with future multiyear observations. In locations where wind energy that grainflow formation and remobilization of sediment by wind may be ap- proximately in equilibrium Conference, 15 to 19 March 2004, League City, TX, abstr. 1918

Nicolussi, Kurt

57

The Anisotropy of the Microwave Background to l = 3500: Deep Field Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report measurements of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation over the multipole range l ~ 200 - 3500 with the Cosmic Background Imager based on deep observations of three fields. These results confirm the drop in power with increasing l first reported in earlier measurements with this instrument, and extend the observations of this decline in power out to l \\~ 2000. The decline in power is consistent with the predicted damping of primary anisotropies. At larger multipoles, l = 2000 - 3500, the power is 3.1 sigma greater than standard models for intrinsic microwave background anisotropy in this multipole range, and 3.5 sigma greater than zero. This excess power is not consistent with expected levels of residual radio source contamination but, for sigma_8 >~ 1, is consistent with predicted levels due to a secondary Sunyaev-Zeldovich anisotropy. Further observations are necessary to confirm the level of this excess and, if confirmed, determine its origin.

B. S. Mason; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; J. L. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; J. K. Cartwright; A. J. Farmer; S. Padin; S. T. Myers; J. R. Bond; C. R. Contaldi; U. -L. Pen; S. Prunet; D. Pogosyan; J. E. Carlstrom; J. Kovac; E. M. Leitch; C. Pryke; N. W. Halverson; W. L. Holzapfel; P. Altamirano; L. Bronfman; S. Casassus; J. May; M. Joy

2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

58

Shock event, an impact phenomenon observed in water wells around the Arabian Gulf coastal city Dammam, Saudi Arabia: possible relationship with Sumatra tsunami event of December 26, 2004  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sudden disturbance in water level was recorded by hydrographs monitoring wells in the coastal city Dammam, Saudi Arabia on December 26, 2004. The water level was being ... h after the Sumatra earthquake/tsunami...

Arun Kumar; Syed A. Alam

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dual isotope notch observer for isotope identification, assay and imaging with mono-energetic gamma-ray sources includes a detector arrangement consists of three detectors downstream from the object under observation. The latter detector, which operates as a beam monitor, is an integrating detector that monitors the total beam power arriving at its surface. The first detector and the middle detector each include an integrating detector surrounding a foil. The foils of these two detectors are made of the same atomic material, but each foil is a different isotope, e.g., the first foil may comprise U235 and second foil may comprise U238. The integrating detectors surrounding these pieces of foil measure the total power scattered from the foil and can be similar in composition to the final beam monitor. Non-resonant photons will, after calibration, scatter equally from both foils.

Barty, Christopher P.J.

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ESTIMATES OF THE PLANET YIELD FROM GROUND-BASED HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING OBSERVATIONS AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, {beta} Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether multiple formation mechanisms are at work. Upon relaxing our assumption that planets in ultra-wide (a > 100 AU) orbits resemble the RV sample, our simulations suggest that the companions found orbiting late-type stars (AB Pic, 1RXSJ1609, GSC 06214, etc.) are consistent with a formation channel distinct from that of RV planets. These calculations explain why planets have thus far been imaged preferentially around A-stars and K-, M-stars, but no spectral types in between, despite concerted efforts targeting F-, G-stars.

Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher, E-mail: jcrepp@astro.caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI), California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 100-22, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Estimates of the Planet Yield from Ground-based High-contrast Imaging Observations as a Function of Stellar Mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the number of extrasolar planets that are directly detectable in the solar neighborhood using current and forthcoming high-contrast imaging instruments. Our calculations take into consideration the important factors that govern the likelihood for imaging a planet, including the statistical properties of stars in the solar neighborhood, correlations between star and planet properties, observational effects, and selection criteria. We consider several different ground-based surveys, both biased and unbiased, and express the resulting planet yields as a function of stellar mass. Selecting targets based on their youth and visual brightness, we find that strong correlations between star mass and planet properties are required to reproduce high-contrast imaging results to date (i.e., HR 8799, ? Pic). Using the most recent empirical findings for the occurrence rate of gas-giant planets from radial velocity (RV) surveys, our simulations indicate that naive extrapolation of the Doppler planet population to semimajor axes accessible to high-contrast instruments provides an excellent agreement between simulations and observations using present-day contrast levels. In addition to being intrinsically young and sufficiently bright to serve as their own beacon for adaptive optics correction, A-stars have a high planet occurrence rate and propensity to form massive planets in wide orbits, making them ideal targets. The same effects responsible for creating a multitude of detectable planets around massive stars conspire to reduce the number orbiting low-mass stars. However, in the case of a young stellar cluster, where targets are approximately the same age and situated at roughly the same distance, MK-stars can easily dominate the number of detections because of an observational bias related to small number statistics. The degree to which low-mass stars produce the most planet detections in this special case depends upon whether multiple formation mechanisms are at work. Upon relaxing our assumption that planets in ultra-wide (a > 100 AU) orbits resemble the RV sample, our simulations suggest that the companions found orbiting late-type stars (AB Pic, 1RXSJ1609, GSC 06214, etc.) are consistent with a formation channel distinct from that of RV planets. These calculations explain why planets have thus far been imaged preferentially around A-stars and K-, M-stars, but no spectral types in between, despite concerted efforts targeting F-, G-stars.

Justin R. Crepp; John Asher Johnson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

ONE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING FOR TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT UPFLOW IN THE DIMMING REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE/EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We previously found a temperature-dependent upflow in the dimming region following a coronal mass ejection observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). In this paper, we reanalyzed the observations along with previous work on this event and provided boundary conditions for modeling. We found that the intensity in the dimming region dramatically drops within 30 minutes from the flare onset, and the dimming region reaches the equilibrium stage after {approx}1 hr. The temperature-dependent upflows were observed during the equilibrium stage by EIS. The cross-sectional area of the flux tube in the dimming region does not appear to expand significantly. From the observational constraints, we reconstructed the temperature-dependent upflow by using a new method that considers the mass and momentum conservation law and demonstrated the height variation of plasma conditions in the dimming region. We found that a super-radial expansion of the cross-sectional area is required to satisfy the mass conservation and momentum equations. There is a steep temperature and velocity gradient of around 7 Mm from the solar surface. This result may suggest that the strong heating occurred above 7 Mm from the solar surface in the dimming region. We also showed that the ionization equilibrium assumption in the dimming region is violated, especially in the higher temperature range.

Imada, S.; Shimizu, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Hara, H.; Watanabe, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Zweibel, E. G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Application of 2D VSP Imaging Technology to the Targeting of Exploration and Production Wells in a Basin and Range Geothermal System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: A novel 2D VSP imaging technology and patented processing techniques will be used to create accurate, high-resolution reflection images of a classic Basin and Range fault system in a fraction of previous compute times.

65

CHROMOSPHERIC EVAPORATION IN AN M1.8 FLARE OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss observations of chromospheric evaporation for a complex flare that occurred on 2012 March 9 near 03:30 UT obtained from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode spacecraft. This was a multiple event with a strong energy input that reached the M1.8 class when observed by EIS. EIS was in raster mode and fortunately the slit was almost at the exact location of a significant energy input. Also, EIS obtained a full-CCD spectrum of the flare, i.e., the entire CCD was readout so that data were obtained for about the 500 lines identified in the EIS wavelength ranges. Chromospheric evaporation characterized by 150-200 km s{sup -1} upflows was observed in multiple locations in multi-million degree spectral lines of flare ions such as Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV, with simultaneous 20-60 km s{sup -1} upflows in million degree coronal lines from ions such as Fe XII-Fe XVI. The behavior of cooler, transition region ions such as O VI, Fe VIII, He II, and Fe X is more complex, but upflows were also observed in Fe VIII and Fe X lines. At a point close to strong energy input in space and time, the flare ions Fe XXII, Fe XXIII, and Fe XXIV reveal an isothermal source with a temperature close to 14 MK and no strong blueshifted components. At this location there is a strong downflow in cooler active region lines from ions such as Fe XIII and Fe XIV, on the order of 200 km s{sup -1}. We speculate that this downflow may be evidence of the downward shock produced by reconnection in the current sheet seen in MHD simulations. A sunquake also occurred near this location. Electron densities were obtained from density sensitive lines ratios from Fe XIII and Fe XIV. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used with JHelioviewer to obtain a qualitative overview of the flare. However, AIA data are not presented in this paper. In summary, spectroscopic data from EIS are presented that can be used for predictive tests of models of chromospheric evaporation as envisaged in the Standard Flare Model.

Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)] [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Identification of small-scale low and high permeability layers using single well forced-gradient tracer tests: Fluorescent dye imaging and modelling at the laboratory-scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Heterogeneity in aquifer permeability, which creates paths of varying mass flux and spatially complex contaminant plumes, can complicate the interpretation of contaminant fate and transport in groundwater. Identifying the location of high mass flux paths is critical for the reliable estimation of solute transport parameters and design of groundwater remediation schemes. Dipole flow tracer tests (DFTTs) and push-pull tests (PPTs) are single well forced-gradient tests which have been used at field-scale to estimate aquifer hydraulic and transport properties. In this study, the potential for \\{PPTs\\} and \\{DFTTs\\} to resolve the location of layered high- and low-permeability layers in granular porous media was investigated with a pseudo 2-D bench-scale aquifer model. Finite element fate and transport modelling was also undertaken to identify appropriate set-ups for in situ tests to determine the type, magnitude, location and extent of such layered permeability contrasts at the field-scale. The characteristics of flow patterns created during experiments were evaluated using fluorescent dye imaging and compared with the breakthrough behaviour of an inorganic conservative tracer. The experimental results show that tracer breakthrough during \\{PPTs\\} is not sensitive to minor permeability contrasts for conditions where there is no hydraulic gradient. In contrast, \\{DFTTs\\} are sensitive to the type and location of permeability contrasts in the host media and could potentially be used to establish the presence and location of high or low mass flux paths. Numerical modelling shows that the tracer peak breakthrough time and concentration in a DFTT is sensitive to the magnitude of the permeability contrast (defined as the permeability of the layer over the permeability of the bulk media) between values of 0.0120. \\{DFTTs\\} are shown to be more sensitive to deducing variations in the contrast, location and size of aquifer layered permeability contrasts when a shorter central packer is used. However, larger packer sizes are more likely to be practical for field-scale applications, with fewer tests required to characterise a given aquifer section. The sensitivity of \\{DFTTs\\} to identify layered permeability contrasts was not affected by test flow rate.

Gareth L. Barns; Steven F. Thornton; Ryan D. Wilson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

OVERVIEW OF SATURN LIGHTNING OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OVERVIEW OF SATURN LIGHTNING OBSERVATIONS G. Fischer* , U. A. Dyudina , W. S. Kurth , D. A. Gurnett The lightning activity in Saturn's atmosphere has been monitored by Cassini for more than six years favorably with imaging observa- tions of related cloud features as well as direct observations of flash

Gurnett, Donald A.

68

X6.9-CLASS FLARE-INDUCED VERTICAL KINK OSCILLATIONS IN A LARGE-SCALE PLASMA CURTAIN AS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present rare observational evidence of vertical kink oscillations in a laminar and diffused large-scale plasma curtain as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The X6.9-class flare in active region 11263 on 2011 August 9 induces a global large-scale disturbance that propagates in a narrow lane above the plasma curtain and creates a low density region that appears as a dimming in the observational image data. This large-scale propagating disturbance acts as a non-periodic driver that interacts asymmetrically and obliquely with the top of the plasma curtain and triggers the observed oscillations. In the deeper layers of the curtain, we find evidence of vertical kink oscillations with two periods (795 s and 530 s). On the magnetic surface of the curtain where the density is inhomogeneous due to coronal dimming, non-decaying vertical oscillations are also observed (period ? 763-896 s). We infer that the global large-scale disturbance triggers vertical kink oscillations in the deeper layers as well as on the surface of the large-scale plasma curtain. The properties of the excited waves strongly depend on the local plasma and magnetic field conditions.

Srivastava, A. K. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 002 (India); Goossens, M. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When maintained under hydrate-stable conditions, methane hydrate in laboratory samples is often considered a stable and immobile solid material. Currently, there do not appear to be any studies in which the long-term redistribution of hydrates in sediments has been investigated in the laboratory. These observations are important because if the location of hydrate in a sample were to change over time (e.g. by dissociating at one location and reforming at another), the properties of the sample that depend on hydrate saturation and pore space occupancy would also change. Observations of hydrate redistribution under stable conditions are also important in understanding natural hydrate deposits, as these may also change over time. The processes by which solid hydrate can move include dissociation, hydrate-former and water migration in the gas and liquid phases, and hydrate formation. Chemical potential gradients induced by temperature, pressure, and pore water or host sediment chemistry can drive these processes. A series of tests were performed on a formerly natural methane-hydrate-bearing core sample from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, in order to observe hydrate formation and morphology within this natural sediment, and changes over time using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Long-term observations (over several weeks) of methane hydrate in natural sediments were made to investigate spatial changes in hydrate saturation in the core. During the test sequence, mild buffered thermal and pressure oscillations occurred within the sample in response to laboratory temperature changes. These oscillations were small in magnitude, and conditions were maintained well within the hydrate stability zone.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Using Realistic MHD Simulations for Modeling and Interpretation of Quiet-Sun Observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar atmosphere is extremely dynamic, and many important phenomena develop on small scales that are unresolved in observations with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). For correct calibration and interpretation, it is very important to investigate the effects of small-scale structures and dynamics on the HMI observables, such as Doppler shift, continuum intensity, spectral line depth, and width. We use 3D radiative hydrodynamics simulations of the upper turbulent convective layer and the atmosphere of the Sun, and a spectro-polarimetric radiative transfer code to study observational characteristics of the Fe I 6173A line observed by HMI in quiet-Sun regions. We use the modeling results to investigate the sensitivity of the line Doppler shift to plasma velocity, and also sensitivities of the line parameters to plasma temperature and density, and determine effective line formation heights for observations of solar regions located at different dista...

Kitiashvili, Irina N; Lagg, Andreas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Astron. Nachr./AN 32X (2002) X, XXXXXX Imaging Magnetographs for High-Resolution Solar Observations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetograph (VIM) is basically a twin of IRIM for observations in the wavelength range from 550 nm to 700 nm goals of VIM and IRIM are high temporal and spatial resolution observations while maintaining moderate

72

LARGE-SCALE CORONAL PROPAGATING FRONTS IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS AS OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORYAN ENSEMBLE STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study of a large sample of global disturbances in the solar corona with characteristic propagating fronts as intensity enhancement, similar to the phenomena that have often been referred to as Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves. Now EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a significantly improved view of these large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs). Between 2010 April and 2013 January, a total of 171 LCPFs have been identified through visual inspection of AIA images in the 193 channel. Here we focus on the 138 LCPFs that are seen to propagate across the solar disk, first studying how they are associated with flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and type II radio bursts. We measure the speed of the LCPF in various directions until it is clearly altered by active regions or coronal holes. The highest speed is extracted for each LCPF. It is often considerably higher than EIT waves. We do not find a pattern where faster LCPFs decelerate and slow LCPFs accelerate. Furthermore, the speeds are not strongly correlated with the flare intensity or CME magnitude, nor do they show an association with type II bursts. We do not find a good correlation either between the speeds of LCPFs and CMEs in a subset of 86 LCPFs observed by one or both of the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft as limb events.

Nitta, Nariaki V.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Liu, Wei [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Dept/A021S, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Temperature and Density Structure of the Solar Corona. I. Observations of the Quiet Sun with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of the temperature and density structure of the solar corona provide critical constraints on theories of coronal heating. Unfortunately, the complexity of the solar atmosphere, observational uncertainties, and the limitations of current atomic calculations, particularly those for Fe, all conspire to make this task very difficult. A critical assessment of plasma diagnostics in the corona is essential to making progress on the coronal heating problem. In this paper, we present an analysis of temperature and density measurements above the limb in the quiet corona using new observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. By comparing the Si and Fe emission observed with EIS we are able to identify emission lines that yield consistent emission measure distributions. With these data we find that the distribution of temperatures in the quiet corona above the limb is strongly peaked near 1 MK, consistent with previous studies. We also find, however, that there is a tail in the emission measure distribution that extends to higher temperatures. EIS density measurements from several density sensitive line ratios are found to be generally consistent with each other and with previous measurements in the quiet corona. Our analysis, however, also indicates that a significant fraction of the weaker emission lines observed in the EIS wavelength ranges cannot be understood with current atomic data.

Harry P. Warren; David H. Brooks

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Direct Observation and Image-Based Simulation of Three-Dimensional Tortuous Crack Evolution inside Opaque Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a combined novel methodology to study the three-dimensional complex geometry of a tortuous crack and identify the essential features of the crack and its propagation inside a heterogeneous material. We find that some severe damage events occur unexpectedly below a local mode-I crack within the sample; we realize that the severe plastic zone of the local mode-I crack is shifted down by another unseen crack segment hidden behind, which is responsible for the unusual damage phenomenon observed. We also find that the crack grows fast at some locations but slowly at some other locations along the crack front; we recognize that the crack-tip fields are reduced by neighboring hidden crack segments, which accounts for the retarded propagation of some part of the crack front. The feasibility and power of the proposed methodology highlights the potential of a new way to study fracture mechanisms in real materials.

Lihe Qian; Hiroyuki Toda; Kentaro Uesugi; Masakazu Kobayashi; Toshiro Kobayashi

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Intergalactic Medium Emission Observations with the Cosmic Web Imager. II. Discovery of Extended, Kinematically Linked Emission around SSA22 Ly? Blob 2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intergalactic medium (IGM) is the dominant reservoir of baryons, delineates the large-scale structure of the universe at low to moderate overdensities, and provides gas from which galaxies form and evolve. Simulations of a cold-dark-matter- (CDM-) dominated universe predict that the IGM is distributed in a cosmic web of filaments and that galaxies should form along and at the intersections of these filaments. While observations of QSO absorption lines and the large-scale distribution of galaxies have confirmed the CDM paradigm, the cosmic web of IGM has never been confirmed by direct imaging. Here we report our observation of the Ly? blob2 (LAB2) in SSA22 with the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI). This is an integral field spectrograph optimized for low surface brightness, extended emission. With 22hr of total on- and off-source exposure, CWI has revealed that LAB2 has extended Ly? emission that is organized into azimuthal zones consistent with filaments. We perform numerous tests with simulations and the data to secure the robustness of this result, which relies on data with modest signal-to-noise ratios. We have developed a smoothing algorithm that permits visualization of data cube slices along image or spectral image planes. With both raw and smoothed data cubes we demonstrate that the filaments are kinematically associated with LAB2 and display double-peaked profiles characteristic of optically thick Ly? emission. The flux is 10-20times brighter than expected for the average emission from the IGM but is consistent with boosted fluorescence from a buried QSO or gravitation cooling radiation. Using simple emission models, we infer a baryon mass in the filaments of at least 1-4 ? 1011 M ?, and the dark halo mass is at least 2 ? 1012 M ?. The spatial-kinematic morphology is more consistent with inflow from the cosmic web than outflow from LAB2, although an outflow feature maybe present at one azimuth. LAB2 and the surrounding gas have significant and coaligned angular momentum, strengthening the case for their association.

D. Christopher Martin; Daphne Chang; Matt Matuszewski; Patrick Morrissey; Shahin Rahman; Anna Moore; Charles C. Steidel; Yuichi Matsuda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood....

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Well control procedures for extended reach wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been found to be critical to the success of ERD are torque and drag, drillstring design, wellbore stability, hole cleaning, casing design, directional drilling optimization, drilling dynamics and rig sizing.4 Other technologies of vital importance... are the use of rotary steerable systems (RSS) together with measurement while drilling (MWD) and logging while drilling (LWD) to geosteer the well into the geological target.5 Many of the wells drilled at Wytch Farm would not have been possible to drill...

Gjorv, Bjorn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

80

Plugging Abandoned Water Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is recommended that before you begin the process of plugging an aban- doned well that you seek advice from your local groundwater conservation district, a licensed water well driller in your area, or the Water Well Drillers Program with the Texas Department... hire a licensed water well driller or pump installer to seal and plug an abandoned well. Well contractors have the equipment and an understanding of soil condi- tions to determine how a well should be properly plugged. How can you take care...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Horizontal well IPR calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Underground Wells (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

83

Economic design of wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concepts and the general principles outlined...with wells of the general configuration shown...internal com- bustion engine. It is assumed that...analysis, consider a diesel- powered well of...modified to use either a general expression for performance...written in terms of diesel-powered wells...

R. F. Stoner; D. M. Milne; P. J. Lund

84

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

85

Well drilling apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A drill rig for drilling wells having a derrick adapted to hold and lower a conductor string and drill pipe string. A support frame is fixed to the derrick to extend over the well to be drilled, and a rotary table, for holding and rotating drill pipe strings, is movably mounted thereon. The table is displaceable between an active position in alignment with the axis of the well and an inactive position laterally spaced therefrom. A drill pipe holder is movably mounted on the frame below the rotary table for displacement between a first position laterally of the axis of the well and a second position in alignment with the axis of the well. The rotary table and said drill pipe holder are displaced in opposition to each other, so that the rotary table may be removed from alignment with the axis of the well and said drill pipe string simultaneously held without removal from said well.

Prins, K.; Prins, R.K.

1982-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI): Wind and Temperature Observations from the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI), an instrument designed to measure thermospheric wind and temperature as part of the...

Englert, Christoph R; Harlander, John Mark; Brown, Charles M; Stephan, Andrew W; Makela, Jonathan J; Marr, Kenneth D; Immel, Thomas J

87

well | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142280543 Varnish cache server well Dataset Summary Description The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the state of California. Source California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Date Released February 01st, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords California data gas geothermal oil well Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 1 wells (xls, 10.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 2 wells (xls, 4 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon California district 3 wells (xls, 3.8 MiB) application/zip icon California district 4 wells (zip, 11.2 MiB)

88

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia??s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

David Lim

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

David Lim

91

RAPID EVOLUTION OF THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF A MICROFLARE OBSERVED WITH THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ABOARD HINODE: HINTS OF CHROMOSPHERIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We obtained rapid cadence (11.2 s) EUV stare spectra of a solar microflare with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer aboard Hinode. The intensities of lines formed at temperatures too cool to be found in the corona brightened by factors around 16 early during this event, indicating that we observed a site of energy deposition in the chromosphere. We derive the density evolution of the flare plasma at temperature around 2 MK from the intensity ratio of Fe XIV lines at 264.789 and 274.204 . From both lines we removed the bright pre-flare quiescent emission, and from 274.204 we removed the blended emission of Si VII ?274.180 based on the Si VII ?274.180/275.361 intensity ratio, which varies only slightly with density. In this way the flare electron density is derived with emission from only the flare plasma. The density increased by an order of magnitude from its pre-flare quiescent average of (3.43 0.19) 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3} to its maximum impulsive phase value of (3.04 0.57) 10{sup 10} cm{sup 3} in 2 minutes. The fact that this rapid increase in density is not accompanied by systematic, large upward velocities indicates that the density increase is not due to the filling of loops with evaporated chromospheric material, but rather due to material being directly heated in the chromosphere, likely by magnetic reconnection. The density increase may be due to a progression of reconnection sites to greater depths in the chromosphere, where it has access to larger densities, or it may be due to compression of 2 MK plasma by the 10 MK plasma as it attempts to expand against the high-density chromospheric plasma.

Brosius, Jeffrey W., E-mail: Jeffrey.W.Brosius@nasa.gov [Catholic University of America at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

92

Phenomenal well-being  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rated against the experience of the individual?s other possible lives. Unlike well-being, PWB is guaranteed to track more robust experiential benefits that a person gets out of living a life. In this work, I discuss the concept of well-being, including...

Campbell, Stephen Michael

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class...

94

Shock Chlorination of Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S...

McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

VIMS images of the Huygens landing site on Titan: S. Rodriguez et al. Cassini/VIMS hyperspectral observations of the HUYGENS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIMS images of the Huygens landing site on Titan: S. Rodriguez et al. 1 Cassini/VIMS hyperspectral.N. Clark2 , B. Buratti3 , R.H. Brown4 , T.B. McCord5 , P.D. Nicholson6 , K.H. Baines3 and the VIMS science Number of Table(s): 1 Number of figure(s): 11 Running Head: VIMS images of the Huygens probe landing site

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

96

Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Dash, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dennis, Donald S. Dreesen, Leigh S. House, Hugh D. Murphy, Bruce A. Robinson, Morton C. Smith (1987) The US Hot Dry Rock Project Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

97

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, D.F.

1980-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Economic design of wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...year, c is the cost per lb of diesel fuel, and Co is the cost per...program was written in terms of diesel-powered wells, modifications...charac- teristics of pump-engine combinations and are again...water encountered. There is a fundamental difference between the design...

R. F. Stoner; D. M. Milne; P. J. Lund

100

Geothermal Well Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logging: Geological Wireline Logs and Fracture Imaging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Logging: Geological...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Intergalactic Medium Emission Observations with the Cosmic Web Imager. I. The Circum-QSO Medium of QSO 1549+19, and Evidence for a Filamentary Gas Inflow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Palomar Cosmic Web Imager (PCWI), an integral field spectrograph designed to detect and map low surface brightness emission, has obtained imaging spectroscopic maps of Ly? from the circum-QSO medium (CQM) of QSO HS1549+19 at redshift z= 2.843. Extensive extended emission is detected from the CQM, consistent with fluorescent and pumped Ly? produced by the ionizing and Ly? continuum of the QSO. Many features present in PCWI spectral images match those detected in narrow-band images. Filamentary structures with narrow line profiles are detected in several cases as long as 250-400 kpc. One of these is centered at a velocity redshifted with respect to the systemic velocity, and displays a spatially collimated and kinematically cold line profile increasing in velocity width approaching the QSO. This suggests that the filament gas is infalling onto the QSO, perhaps in a cold accretion flow. Because of the strong ionizing flux, the neutral column density is low, typically , and the line center optical depth is also low (typically ?0 M gas = 12.5 0.5) and the total (log M tot = 13.3 0.5). We can also calculate a kinematic mass from the total line profile (2 ? 1013 M ?), which agrees with the mass estimated from the gas emission. The intensity-binned spectrum of the CQM shows a progression in kinematic properties consistent with heirarchical structure formation.

D. Christopher Martin; Daphne Chang; Matt Matuszewski; Patrick Morrissey; Shahin Rahman; Anna Moore; Charles C. Steidel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Development and application of a transient well index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transient well index and the Peaceman well index were compared to analytical solutions. A good match was observed between simulated well tests using the proposed transient well index and the corresponding analytical solutions, even on coarse grids (e...

Yildiz, Tabiat Tan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Vision Statement Marketing at Kent State University should consist of centrally developed, well-managed, well-funded  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of centrally developed, well-managed, well-funded and strategically placed image, message support and involvement. The Kent State University "Brand" Marketing research requirements to building brand equity. While terms such as "brand," "branding

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

105

Global Lightning Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flash Rate Global distribution of lightning from a combined nine years of observations of the NASA OTDGlobal Lightning Observations #12;Optical Transient Detector ( launched April, 1995 ) Lightning Imaging Sensor ( launched November, 1997 ) Lightning Detection from Low Earth Orbit #12;LIS on TRMM #12

California at Berkeley, University of

106

Observation and Measurement of Temperature Rise and Distribution on GaAs Photo-cathode Wafer with a 532nm Drive Laser and a Thermal Imaging Camera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant temperature rise and gradient are observed from a GaAs photo-cathode wafer irradiated at various power levels with over 20W laser power at 532nm wavelength. The laser power absorption and dissipated thermal distribution are measured. The result shows a clear indication that proper removal of laser induced heat from the cathode needs to be considered seriously when designing a high average current or low quantum efficiency photo-cathode electron gun. The measurement method presented here provides a useful way to obtain information about both temperature and thermal profiles, it also applies to cathode heating study with other heating devices such as electrical heaters.

Shukui Zhang, Stephen Benson, Carlos Hernandez-Garcia

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Well Permits (District of Columbia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

108

Observables of Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary

110

Well-pump alignment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

Camilli, Richard

112

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness Lutchmie Narine, Chair, 315-443-9630 426 The Department of Health and Wellness offers a 123-credit Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) in public health. Our graduates are prepared to work in community health education and health promotion in public health agencies

McConnell, Terry

113

Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well Exploratory Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Exploratory Well Details Activities (8) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(5) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Can provide core or cuttings Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify stratigraphy and structural features within a well Hydrological: -Water samples can be used for geochemical analysis -Fluid pressures can be used to estimate flow rates Thermal: -Temperatures can be measured within the hole -Information about the heat source Dictionary.png Exploratory Well: An exploratory well is drilled for the purpose of identifying the

114

ON THE CONTINUITY OF IMAGES BY TRANSMISSION IMAGING Abstract. Transmission imaging is an important imaging technique which is widely used in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE CONTINUITY OF IMAGES BY TRANSMISSION IMAGING CHUNLIN WU Abstract. Transmission imaging imaging principle is quite different from that of reflection imaging used in our everyday life. As well scholars studied the application of TV regularization to processing images generated by transmission

Soatto, Stefano

115

Flows and Non-thermal Velocities in Solar Active Regions Observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode: A Tracer of Active Region Sources of Heliospheric Magnetic Fields?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Doppler velocity maps of active regions constructed from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft we observe large areas of outflow (20-50 km/s) that can persist for at least a day. These outflows occur in areas of active regions that are faint in coronal spectral lines formed at typical quiet Sun and active region temperatures. The outflows are positively correlated with non-thermal velocities in coronal plasmas. The bulk mass motions and non-thermal velocities are derived from spectral line centroids and line widths, mostly from a strong line of Fe XII at 195.12 Angstroms. The electron temperature of the outflow regions estimated from an Fe XIII to Fe XII line intensity ratio is about 1.2-1.4 MK. The electron density of the outflow regions derived from a density sensitive intensity ratio of Fe XII lines is rather low for an active region. Most regions average around 7E10+8 cm(-3), but there are variations on pixel spatial scales of about a factor of 4. We discuss results in detail for two active regions observed by EIS. Images of active regions in line intensity, line width, and line centroid are obtained by rastering the regions. We also discuss data from the active regions obtained from other orbiting spacecraft that support the conclusions obtained from analysis of the EIS spectra. The locations of the flows in the active regions with respect to the longitudinal photospheric magnetic fields suggest that these regions might be tracers of long loops and/or open magnetic fields that extend into the heliosphere, and thus the flows could possibly contribute significantly to the solar wind.

G. A. Doschek; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; K. Muglach; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara; T Watanabe

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

Well Monitoring Systems for EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Well Monitoring Systems for EGS presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

117

Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager Development of a downhole wireline tool to characterize fractures in EGS wells in temperatures up to...

118

Well testing in coalbed methane (CBM) wells: An environmental remediation case history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, methane seepage was observed near coalbed methane wells in southwestern Colorado. Well tests were conducted to identify the source of the seeps. The well tests were complicated by two-phase flow, groundwater flow, and gas readsorption. Using the test results, production from the area was simulated. The cause of the seeps was found to be depressuring in shallow coal near the surface, and a remediation plan using water injection near the seep area was formulated.

Cox, D.P.; Young, G.B.C.; Bell, M.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells (Redirected from Development Wells) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir

120

Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells Production Wells Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Production Wells Details Activities (13) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(7) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Production Wells:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wellness Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Program Wellness Program Workers spend 200 hours per month at work, and keeping a healthy work-life balance is essential. The Headquarters Wellness Program provides support and assistance to DOE employees through a variety of programs and resources geared toward enhancing their mental and physical well-being. Wellness programs include: Accommodations, the Child Development Centers, the Employee Assistance Program (EAP), the Forrestal (FOHO) and Germantown (GOHO) Fitness Centers, the Occupational Health Clinics and the DOE WorkLife4You Program. Programs Disability Services Child Development Centers Headquarters Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Accommodation Program DOE Worklife4You Program Health Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Tips

122

Well Deepening | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Deepening Well Deepening Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Deepening Details Activities (5) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Development Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Development Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped. Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Well Deepening:

123

well records | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well records well records Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

124

Well Monitoring System for EGS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

125

One Mars Year: Viking Lander Imaging Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with the exception ofthe summer and winter solstices) the sun appears to pass through...might form atnight during the middle of winter but would not last through the day; Even...Cooley, D. Stuhr, and B. Vensel for typing the manuscript. This work was supported...

Kenneth L. Jones; Raymond E. Arvidson; Edward A. Guinness; Susan L. Bragg; Stephen D. Wall; Carl E. Carlston; Deborah G. Pidek

1979-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

126

Modern Imaging Technology: Recent Advances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 2-day conference is designed to bring scientist working in nuclear medicine, as well as nuclear medicine practitioners together to discuss the advances in four selected areas of imaging: Biochemical Parameters using Small Animal Imaging, Developments in Small Animal PET Imaging, Cell Labeling, and Imaging Angiogenesis Using Multiple Modality. The presentations will be on molecular imaging applications at the forefront of research, up to date on the status of molecular imaging in nuclear medicine as well as in related imaging areas. Experts will discuss the basic science of imaging techniques, and scheduled participants will engage in an exciting program that emphasizes the current status of molecular imaging as well as the role of DOE funded research in this area.

Welch, Michael J.; Eckelman, William C.

2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

127

Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in a Double Well Atomic Josephson Junction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observation of these Josephson junction resonances. 2.dressed Bose condensed Josephson junction Let us consider ain a Double Well Atomic Josephson Junction J.O. Weatherall

Weatherall, J. O.; Search, C. P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

1982 geothermal well drilling summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary lists all geothermal wells spudded in 1982, which were drilled to a depth of at least 2,000 feet. Tables 1 and 2 list the drilling information by area, operator, and well type. For a tabulation of all 1982 geothermal drilling activity, including holes less than 2,000 feet deep, readers are referred to the February 11, 1983, issue of Petroleum Information's ''National Geothermal Service.'' The number of geothermal wells drilled in 1982 to 2,000 feet or more decreased to 76 wells from 99 ''deep'' wells in 1981. Accordingly, the total 1982 footage drilled was 559,110 feet of hole, as compared to 676,127 feet in 1981. Most of the ''deep'' wells (49) completed were drilled for development purposes, mainly in The Geysers area of California. Ten field extension wells were drilled, of which nine were successful. Only six wildcat wells were drilled compared to 13 in 1980 and 20 in 1981, showing a slackening of exploration compared to earlier years. Geothermal drilling activity specifically for direct use projects also decreased from 1981 to 1982, probably because of the drastic reduction in government funding and the decrease in the price of oil. Geothermal power generation in 1982 was highlighted by (a) an increase of 110 Mw geothermal power produced at The Geysers (to a total of 1,019 Mw) by addition of Unit 17, and (b) by the start-up of the Salton Sea 10 Mw single flash power plant in the Imperial Valley, which brought the total geothermal electricity generation in this area to 31 Mw.

Parmentier, P.P.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Pressure analysis for horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents horizontal-well test design and interpretation methods. Analytical solutions are developed that can be handled easily by a desktop computer to carry out design as well as interpretation with semilog and log-log analysis. These analytical solutions point out the distinctive behavior of horizontal wells: (1) at early time, there is a circular radial flow in a vertical plane perpendicular to the well, and (2) at late time, there is a horizontal pseudoradial flow. Each type of flow is associated with a semilog straight line to which semilog analysis has to be adapted. The horizontal pseudoradial flow takes into account a pseudoskin depending on system geometry, which is a priori defined and estimated. Practical time criteria are proposed to determine the beginning and the end of each type of flow and to provide a guide to semilog analysis and well test design. The authors study the behavior of uniform-flux or infinite-conductivity horizontal wells, with wellbore storage and skin. The homogeneous reservoir is infinite or limited by impermeable or constant-pressure boundaries. A method is also outlined to transform all our solutions for homogeneous reservoirs into corresponding solutions for double-porosity reservoirs.

Davlau, F.; Mouronval, G.; Bourdarot, G.; Curutchet, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Category:Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Well Log Techniques page? For detailed information on Well Log Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Well Log Techniques Add.png Add a new Well Log Techniques Technique Pages in category "Well Log Techniques" The following 17 pages are in this category, out of 17 total. A Acoustic Logs C Caliper Log Cement Bond Log Chemical Logging Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log D Density Log F FMI Log G Gamma Log I Image Logs M Mud Logging N Neutron Log P Pressure Temperature Log R Resistivity Log Resistivity Tomography S Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Spontaneous Potential Well Log Stoneley Analysis

132

Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................24 3.4 Ideal Number of Transverse Fractures..........................................26 3.5 Constant Volume Transverse Fractures ........................................32 3.6... of a longitudinal fracture..............................................10 2.5 Example of horizontal well with longitudinal fracture performance .............11 2.6 DVS representation of transverse fractures...

Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Well record | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well record Well record Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains oil and gas drilling and permit records for February 2011. State oil and gas boards and commissions make oil and gas data and information open to the public. To view the full range of data contained at the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, visit http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/ Source Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Alaska Commission gas oil Well record Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon http://doa.alaska.gov/ogc/drilling/dindex.html (xls, 34.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Monthly Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

134

First use of a HyViSI H4RG for Astronomical Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first astronomical results from a 4K2 Hybrid Visible Silicon PIN array detector (HyViSI) read out with the Teledyne Scientific and Imaging SIDECAR ASIC. These results include observations of astronomical standards and photometric measurements using the 2.1m KPNO telescope. We also report results from a test program in the Rochester Imaging Detector Laboratory (RIDL), including: read noise, dark current, linearity, gain, well depth, quantum efficiency, and substrate voltage effects. Lastly, we highlight results from operation of the detector in window read out mode and discuss its potential role for focusing, image correction, and use as a telescope guide camera.

Simms, Lance M.; /SLAC; Figer, Donald F.; Hanold, Brandon J.; Kerr, Daniel J.; /Rochester Imaging Lab.; Gilmore, D.Kirk; Kahn, Steven M.; /SLAC; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC,

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Image Utility Assessment and a Relationship with Image Quality Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Image Utility Assessment and a Relationship with Image Quality Assessment David M. Rouse , Romuald information to humans, and this paper investigates the utility assessment task, where human observers evaluate the usefulness of a natural image as a surrogate for a reference. Current QA algorithms implicitly assess utility

Hemami, Sheila S.

136

Macroscopic observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study macroscopic observables defined as the total value of a physical quantity over a collection of quantum systems. We show that previous results obtained for an infinite ensemble of identically prepared systems lead to incorrect conclusions for finite ensembles. In particular, exact measurement of a macroscopic observable significantly disturbs the state of any finite ensemble. However, we show how this disturbance can be made arbitrarily small when the measurements are of finite accuracy. We demonstrate a general trade-off between state disturbance and measurement coarseness as a function of the size of the ensemble. Using this trade-off, we show that the histories generated by any sequence of finite accuracy macroscopic measurements always generate a consistent family in the absence of large-scale entanglement for sufficiently large ensembles. Hence, macroscopic observables behave 'classically' provided that their accuracy is coarser than the quantum correlation length scale of the system. The role of these observable is also discussed in the context of NMR quantum information processing and bulk ensemble quantum state tomography.

Poulin, David [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Macroscopic observables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study macroscopic observables defined as the total value of a physical quantity over a collection of quantum systems. We show that previous results obtained for an infinite ensemble of identically prepared systems lead to incorrect conclusions for finite ensembles. In particular, exact measurement of a macroscopic observable significantly disturbs the state of any finite ensemble. However, we show how this disturbance can be made arbitrarily small when the measurements are of finite accuracy. We demonstrate a general trade-off between state disturbance and measurement coarseness as a function of the size of the ensemble. Using this trade-off, we show that the histories generated by any sequence of finite accuracy macroscopic measurements always generate a consistent family in the absence of large-scale entanglement for sufficiently large ensembles. Hence, macroscopic observables behave classically provided that their accuracy is coarser than the quantum correlation length scale of the system. The role of these observable is also discussed in the context of NMR quantum information processing and bulk ensemble quantum state tomography.

David Poulin

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

Video Toroid Cavity Imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

A new well surveying tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

directional well was to tip the entire rig, then block up one side of the rotary table so as to incline the uppermost joint of the drill pipe. The accuracy obtained by this method left much to be desired. The technique of controlled directional drilling... by Surveying Device for S and 19 , N and 41 . 21 3. Comparison of Measured Angles and Angles Indicated by Surveying Device for NE snd 9 , W and 45 . . . . . . . ~ 22 ABSTRNl T Ever since the advent of rotary drilling the petroleum industry has been...

Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general wellbore flow model is presented to incorporate not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow. Influence of inflow or outflow on the wellbore pressure drop is analyzed. New friction factor correlations accounting for both inflow and outflow are also developed. The greatest source of uncertainty is reservoir description and how it is used in simulators. Integration of data through geostatistical techniques leads to multiple descriptions that all honor available data. The reality is never known. The only way to reduce this uncertainty is to use more data from geological studies, formation evaluation, high resolution seismic, well tests and production history to constrain stochastic images. Even with a perfect knowledge about reservoir geology, current models cannot do routine simulations at a fine enough scale. Furthermore, we normally don't know what scale is fine enough. Upscaling introduces errors and masks some of the physical phenomenon that we are trying to model. The scale at which upscaling is robust is not known and it is probably smaller in most cases than the scale actually used for predicting performance. Uncertainties in the well index can cause errors in predictions that are of the same magnitude as those caused by reservoir heterogeneities. Simplified semi-analytical models for cresting behavior and productivity predictions can be very misleading.

Khalid Aziz; Sepehr Arababi; Thomas A. Hewett

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Tiny images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human visual system is remarkably tolerant to degradations in image resolution: in a scene recognition task, human performance is similar whether $32 \\times 32$ color images or multi-mega pixel images are used. With ...

Torralba, Antonio

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

143

Category:Production Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Wells page? For detailed information on Production Wells, click here. Category:Production Wells Add.png Add a new Production Wells Technique Pages in category...

144

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

145

System for stabbing well casing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Apparatus for stabbing well casing to join casing sections to each other, includes a rotary table assembly for supporting a casing section in a well bore, a derrick over the rotary table assembly, a crown block at the top of the derrick, a first piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on one side of the derrick over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block for pivotation about a horizontal axis, a second piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on a second side of the derrick for pivotation about a horizontal axis. The second piston and cylinder subassembly is located over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block and extends substantially normal to the direction of extension of the first piston and cylinder subassembly. The cooperating casing clamping elements are carried on the piston rods of the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies, and counter balancing subassemblies are connected to the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies for pivoting the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies to a vertically extending inoperative position.

McArthur, J.R.

1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

NATURAL IMAGE UTILITY ASSESSMENT USING IMAGE CONTOURS David M. Rouse and Sheila S. Hemami  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL IMAGE UTILITY ASSESSMENT USING IMAGE CONTOURS David M. Rouse and Sheila S. Hemami Visual In the quality assessment task, observers evaluate a natural image based on its perceptual resemblance to a reference. For the utility assessment task, observers evaluate the usefulness of a natural image

Hemami, Sheila S.

147

High Spatial Resolution Observations of Loops in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determining how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in July 2012. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data for a subset of 79 of these loops and find that their temperature distributions are narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of proposed physical mechanisms.

Brooks, David H; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Winebarger, Amy R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Geologic and hydrologic records of observation wells, test holes, test wells, supply wells, springs, and surface water stations in the Los Alamos area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hundreds of holes have been drilled into the Pajarito Plateau and surrounding test areas of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the end of World War II. They range in depth from a few feet to more than 14,000 ft. The holes were drilled to provide geologic, hydrologic, and engineering information related to development of a water supply, to provide data on the likelihood or presence of subsurface contamination from hazardous and nuclear materials, and for engineering design for construction. The data contained in this report provide a basis for further investigations into the consequences of our past, present, and future interactions with the environment.

Purtymun, W.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

Dr Saeid Ghamaty

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

Visualizing motion in potential wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of potential-energy diagrams is of fundamental importance in the study of quantum physics. Yet students are rarely exposed to this powerful alternative description in introductory classes and thus have difficulty comprehending its significance when they encounter it in beginning-level quantum courses. We describe a learning unit that incorporates a sequence of computer-interfaced experiments using dynamics or air-track systems. This unit is designed to make the learning of potential-energy diagrams less abstract. Students begin by constructing the harmonic or square-well potential diagrams using either the velocity data and assuming conservation of energy or the force-displacement graph for the elasticinteraction of an object constrained by springs or bouncing off springy blocks. Then they investigate the motion of a rider magnetinteracting with a configuration of field magnets and plot directly the potential-energy diagrams using a magnetic field sensor. The ease of measurement allows exploring the motion in a large variety of potential shapes in a short duration class.

Pratibha Jolly; Dean Zollman; N. Sanjay Rebello; Albena Dimitrova

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fish embryo multimodal imaging by laser Doppler digital holography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A laser Doppler imaging scheme combined to an upright microscope is proposed. Quantitative Doppler imaging in both velocity norm and direction, as well as amplitude contrast of either...

Gross, Michel; Verrier, Nicolas; Picart, Pascal

153

Image Reconstruction for Prostate Specific Nuclear Medicine imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is increasing interest in the design and construction of nuclear medicine detectors for dedicated prostate imaging. These include detectors designed for imaging the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with single gamma as well as positron-emitting radionuclides. New detectors and acquisition geometries present challenges and opportunities for image reconstruction. In this contribution various strategies for image reconstruction for these special purpose imagers are reviewed. Iterative statistical algorithms provide a framework for reconstructing prostate images from a wide variety of detectors and acquisition geometries for PET and SPECT. The key to their success is modeling the physics of photon transport and data acquisition and the Poisson statistics of nuclear decay. Analytic image reconstruction methods can be fast and are useful for favorable acquisition geometries. Future perspectives on algorithm development and data analysis for prostate imaging are presented.

Mark Smith

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

154

ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Aerosol Observing System Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, using the ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System. Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven

155

People Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Images People Images Several hundred of the 1700 U.S. scientists contributing to the LHC accelerator and experiments gathered in June 2008 in CERN's building 40 CE0252 Joel...

156

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

157

Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microseismic imaging can be an important tool for characterizing geothermal reservoirs. Since microseismic sources occur more or less continuously both due to the operations of a geothermal field and the naturally occurring background seismicity, passive seismic monitoring is well suited to quantify the temporal variations in the vicinity of a

158

Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness � Taking care of your body Wellness � Taking care of what's around you 2Health andWellness Guide for Students #12;Physical Wellness � Communicate with your partner if you have questions or concerns � Meet with a Health Care Provider on campus

159

Descriptive image feature for object detection in medical images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Algorithms based on the local description of interest regions are well adapted to the task of detecting and matching equivalent points between two images. Classical descriptors such as SIFT or SURF are efficient when applied to regular images with rich ... Keywords: SURF, detection, feature, keypoint, vertebra

Fabian Lecron; Mohammed Benjelloun; Sad Mahmoudi

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil, Gas, . . 81 and Geothermal Well Tests (abstract) W.has been testing geothermal wells for about three years, andof Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Well Tests W. E. Brigham

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in determining the condition of your well, contact: S your local groundwater conservation dis- trict http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/permitting/ water_supply/groundwater/districts.html S a licensed water well driller in your area S the Water Well Drillers Program... are the steps in capping a well? The landowner, a licensed well driller or a licensed pump installer may cap a well. There are several steps involved. The well casing should extend above the ground surface to limit the risk of water entering the well...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

162

Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. |...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Abstract: Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and...

163

EPA - UIC Well Classifications | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Classifications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA - UIC Well Classifications Author Environmental Protection Agency Published...

164

Time-Encoded Imagers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

EBSD Images Theoretical Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivation EBSD Images Theoretical Background Defects in the Weld Grain Growth Low Speed Welding High Speed Welding Conclusion Heat-Affected Zone Observations Welding Experiments The low density in the transportation industries. Reproducibility and the low cost make welding a major large scale assembly process

Candea, George

167

Energy level spectroscopy of InSb quantum wells using quantum-well LED emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated the low-temperature optical properties of InSb quantum-well (QW) light-emitting diodes, with different barrier compositions, as a function of well width. Three devices were studied: QW1 had a 20 nm undoped InSb quantum well with a barrier composition of Al0.143In0.857Sb, QW2 had a 40 nm undoped InSb well with a barrier composition of Al0.077In0.923Sb, and QW3 had a 100 nm undoped InSb well with a barrier composition of Al0.025In0.975Sb. For QW1, the signature of two transitions (CB1-HH1 and CB1-HH2) can be seen in the measured spectrum, whereas for QW2 and QW3 the signature of a large number of transitions is present in the measured spectra. In particular transitions to HH2 can be seen, the first time this has been observed in AlInSb/InSb heterostructures. To identify the transitions that contribute to the measured spectra, the spectra have been simulated using an eight-band k.p calculation of the band structure together with a first-order time-dependent perturbation method (Fermi golden rule) calculation of spectral emittance, taking into account broadening. In general there is good agreement between the measured and simulated spectra. For QW2 we attribute the main peak in the experimental spectrum to the CB2-HH1 transition, which has the highest overall contribution to the emission spectrum of QW2 compared with all the other interband transitions. This transition normally falls into the category of forbidden transitions, and in order to understand this behavior we have investigated the momentum matrix elements, which determine the selection rules of the problem.

T. G. Tenev; A. Palyi; B. I. Mirza; G. R. Nash; M. Fearn; S. J. Smith; L. Buckle; M. T. Emeny; T. Ashley; J. H. Jefferson; C. J. Lambert

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

168

High speed imaging television system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A television system for observing an event which provides a composite video output comprising the serially interlaced images the system is greater than the time resolution of any of the individual cameras.

Wilkinson, William O. (Silver Spring, MD); Rabenhorst, David W. (Silver Spring, MD)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Thank you for joining: 360WELLNESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shortly. If you are experiencing technical difficulties with Adobe Connect, please call 1 March 22, 2012 12 pm ­ 1pm ET #12;360° WELLNESS: Achieving Wellness At Work And At Home Workshop & Self-Assessment © Joe Rosenlicht, Certified Coach 3 #12;8 Wellness Areas Wellness Nutrition Brain Power Fitness Sleep

Vertes, Akos

170

Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

171

Image Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mosaic of earth and sky images Mosaic of earth and sky images Image Resources Free image resources covering energy, environment, and general science. Here are some links to energy- and environment-related photographic databases. Berkeley Lab Photo Archive Berkeley Lab's online digital image collection. National Science Digital Library (NSDL) NSDL is the Nation's online library for education and research in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. The World Bank Group Photo Library A distinctive collection of over 11,000 images that illustrate development through topics such as Agriculture, Education, Environment, Health, Trade and more. Calisphere Compiles the digital collections of libraries, museums, and cultural heritage organizations across California, and organizes them by theme, such

172

PynPoint Code for Exoplanet Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We announce the public release of PynPoint, a Python package that we have developed for analysing exoplanet data taken with the angular differential imaging observing technique. In particular, PynPoint is designed to model the point spread function of the central star and to subtract its flux contribution to reveal nearby faint companion planets. The current version of the package does this correction by using a principal component analysis method to build a basis set for modelling the point spread function of the observations. We demonstrate the performance of the package by reanalysing publicly available data on the exoplanet beta Pictoris b, which consists of close to 24,000 individual image frames. We show that PynPoint is able to analyse this typical data in roughly 1.5 minutes on a Mac Pro, when the number of images is reduced by co-adding in sets of 5. The main computational work parallelises well as a result of a reliance on SciPy and NumPy functions. For this calculation the peak memory load is 6Gb, ...

Amara, Adam; Akeret, Joel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Definition: Artesian Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Well Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Artesian Well An artesian well is a water well that doesn't require a pump to bring water to the surface; this occurs when there is enough pressure in the aquifer. The pressure causes hydrostatic equilibrium and if the pressure is high enough the water may even reach the ground surface in which case the well is called a flowing artesian well.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition See Great Artesian Basin for the water source in Australia. An artesian aquifer is a confined aquifer containing groundwater under positive pressure. This causes the water level in a well to rise to a point where hydrostatic equilibrium has been reached. This type of well is called an artesian well. Water may even reach the ground surface if the natural

174

Identification of coronal holes and filament channels in SDO/AIA 193\\r{A} images via geometrical classification methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, we describe and evaluate shape measures for distinguishing between coronal holes and filament channels as observed in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images of the Sun. For a set of well-observed coronal hole and filament channel regions extracted from SDO/AIA 193\\r{A} images we analyze their intrinsic morphology during the period 2011 to 2013, by using well known shape measures from the literature and newly developed geometrical classification methods. The results suggest an asymmetry in the morphology of filament channels giving support for the sheared arcade or weakly twisted flux rope model for filaments. We find that the proposed shape descriptors have the potential to reduce coronal hole classification errors and are eligible for screening techniques in order to improve the forecasting of solar wind high-speed streams from coronal hole observations in solar EUV images.

Reiss, M; Rotter, T; Hofmeister, S J; Veronig, A M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Airborne observations of the kinematics and statistics of breaking waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

v 3 Observations of wave breaking kinematics in fetch-crest length . . . . . C.6 Wave elevation . . . . . . . .breaking waves in the images . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.3

Kleiss, Jessica M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

EMSL - Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

imaging en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrolytes

177

New well control companies stress planning, engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology for capping a blowing well has not changed during the last 50 years. Still, operators are finding new ways of using well control companies' expertise to help avoid potentially disastrous situations. This trend is especially critical given the current environmentally sensitive and cost-cutting times facing the oil industry. While regulatory agencies world-wide continue to hinder well control efforts during an offshore event, well control companies are focusing on technologies to make their job easier. Some of the most exciting are the hydraulic jet cutter, which gained fame in Kuwait, and electromagnetic ranging for drilling more accurate relief wells. With the number of subsea wells increasing, subsea intervention is a major target for future innovations. Well control companies are experiencing a change in their role to the offshore oil industry. Well control professionals discuss this expanded responsibility as well as other aspects of offshore blowouts including regulatory hindrances, subsea intervention and future technologies.

Bell, S.; Wright, R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Direct Observations of Plasma Upflows and Condensation in a Catastrophically Cooling Solar Transition Region Looop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models, as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the {\\it EUV Imaging Spectrometer} (EIS) onboard {\\it Hinode}, we observe fast upflows ($v_\\lambda$\\,$\\le$\\,$-$10 km s$^{-1}$) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8\\,$\\le$\\,$\\log T$\\,$\\le$ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop ($\\log T$\\,$\\le$\\,6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of $+$\\,5 km s$^{-1}$ and $-$\\,60 km s$^{-1}$ are observed at footpoint sites. These flows speeds and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at site of upflows only) derived from the {\\it Solar Dynamics Observatory}'s (SDOs) { \\it Helioseismic Magnetic Imager}'s (HMI) line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30\\% mass in-flux at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic coo...

Orange, N B; Oluseyi, H M; Hesterly, K; Patel, M; Champey, P R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Image Logs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Image Logs Image Logs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Image Logs Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify different lithological layers, rock composition, grain size, mineral, and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: -Fault and fracture identification -Rock texture, porosity, and stress analysis -determine dip, thickness, and geometry of rock strata in vicinity of borehole -Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Locate zones of aquifer inflow/outflow Thermal:

180

Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Log Techniques Well Log Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: depth and thickness of formations; lithology and porosity can be inferred Stratigraphic/Structural: reservoir thickness, reservoir geometry, borehole geometry Hydrological: permeability and fluid composition can be inferred Thermal: direct temperature measurements; thermal conductivity and heat capacity Dictionary.png Well Log Techniques: Well logging is the measurement of formation properties versus depth in a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal(Redirected from Well Field) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (45) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques

183

Data Image  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data image refers to the sum of all information 74/100,000 available in all datasets linked to aspecific name; to all those who have access to databases that name is actually the data image of the real person...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Spin transfer and coherence in coupled quantum wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spin dynamics of optically excited electrons confined in asymmetric coupled quantum wells are investigated through time-resolved Faraday rotation experiments. The interwell coupling is shown to depend on applied electric field and barrier thickness. We observe three coupling regimes: independent spin precession in isolated quantum wells, incoherent spin transfer between single-well states, and coherent spin transfer in a highly coupled system. Relative values of the interwell tunneling time, the electron-spin lifetime, and the Larmor precession period appear to govern this behavior.

M. Poggio, G. M. Steeves, R. C. Myers, N. P. Stern, A. C. Gossard, and D. D. Awschalom

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

screened intervals (415421 m and 689695 m; Figure 2) in the observations wells will be useful  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies.We thank Bayshore Concrete and Ray Otten of the Sustainable Technology Park for access Chesapeake Bay Crater,522 pp.,Springer-Verlag, New York. Rieke,H.H.,and G.V.Chilingarian (1974),Compaction.Edwards,and Jean M. Self-Trail,USGS,Reston,Va.; and Roger H.Morin, USGS,Lakewood,Colo. For additional information

Sprintall, Janet

186

Geothermal/Well Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Well Field Geothermal/Well Field < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Well Fields and Reservoirs General Techniques Tree Techniques Table Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (42) Geothermal energy plant at The Geysers near Santa Rosa in Northern California, the world's largest electricity-generating hydrothermal geothermal development. Copyright © 1995 Warren Gretz Geothermal Well Fields discussion Groups of Well Field Techniques There are many different techniques that are utilized in geothermal well field development and reservoir maintenance depending on the region's geology, economic considerations, project maturity, and other considerations such as land access and permitting requirements. Well field

187

RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

188

Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

Fay, Noah

189

Essays on Well-Being in Japan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation is comprised of four papers on well-being in Japan and aims to examine three important measures of well-being: perceptions of job insecurity, self-reported (more)

Kuroki, Masanori

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method for the magnetization of well casing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A well casing is magnetized by traversing an internal magnetizer along and within the well casing while periodically reversing the direction of the magnetic field of the magnetizer to create a plurality of magnetic flux leakage points along the well casing.

Hoehn, G.L. Jr.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Calculator program aids well cost management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A TI-59 calculator program designed to track well costs on daily and weekly bases can dramatically facilitate the task of monitoring well expenses. The program computes the day total, cumulative total, cumulative item-row totals, and day-week total. For carrying these costs throughout the drilling project, magnetic cards can store the individual and total cumulative well expenses.

Doyle, C.J.

1982-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

192

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Analyses of 8,000 offshore wells in the Gulf of Mexico show that 1112% of wells developed pressure in the outer...underground gas storage, and even geothermal energy (1620). We...to learn about how often wells fail, when and why they...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Observation of objects under intense plasma background illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on the observation of a brightness-amplified image of an object through a masking arc discharge are presented. The copper-vapor laser active medium was used as an image brightness amplifier. It is shown that the image quality does not worsen under plasma background illumination.

Buzhinsky, R. O.; Savransky, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Natural Science Center, Prokhorov Institute of General Physics (Russian Federation); Zemskov, K. I.; Isaev, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Buzhinsky, O. I. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

X-ray Imaging Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory October 8-9, 2002 Organizers: John Miao & Keith Hodgson A workshop on "X-ray Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future" was held on October 8-9, 2002. This workshop, organized by John Miao (SSRL) and Keith Hodgson (SSRL) provided a forum to discuss the scientific applications of a variety of imaging and spectro-microscopic techniques, including photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), coherent diffraction imaging, x-ray microscopy, micro-tomography, holographic imaging, and x-ray micro-probe. Twelve invited speakers discussed the important scientific applications of these techniques, and also predicted the future scientific directions with the advance of instrumentation and x-ray sources. The workshop was well attended with over fifty registered attendees.

195

Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential Well Log Spontaneous Potential Well Log Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Spontaneous Potential Well Log Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: SP technique originally applied to locating sulfide ore-bodies. Stratigraphic/Structural: -Formation bed thickness and boundaries -Detection and tracing of faults -Permeability and porosity Hydrological: Determination of fluid flow patterns: electrochemical coupling processes due to variations in ionic concentrations, and electrokinetic coupling processes due to fluid flow in the subsurface.

197

Regulations of Wells (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) Regulations of Wells (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water management districts

198

CRISPRED: A data pipeline for the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of science-ready data from major solar telescopes requires expertise beyond that of the typical observer. This is a consequence of the increasing complexity of instruments and observing sequences, which require calibrations and corrections for instrumental and seeing effects that are not only difficult to measure, but are also coupled in ways that require careful analysis in the design of the correction procedures. Modern space-based telescopes have data-processing pipelines capable of routinely producing well-characterized data products. High-resolution imaging spectropolarimeters at ground-based telescopes need similar data pipelines. The purpose of this paper is to document a procedure that forms the basis of current state of the art processing of data from the CRISP imaging spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST). By collecting, implementing, and testing a suite of computer programs, we have defined a data reduction pipeline for this instrument. This pipeline, CRISPRED, ...

Rodrguez, J de la Cruz; Stterlin, P; Hillberg, T; van der Voort, L Rouppe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

THE 2012 HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD (UDF12): OBSERVATIONAL OVERVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128 orbit Cycle 19 Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at extending previous Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%, as well as adding an extremely deep parallel field with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in the F814W filter with a total exposure time of 128 orbits. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at z ?> 8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at z ? 7-8, facilitate the construction of new samples of z ? 9-10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to z ? 12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky. In this paper we present the observational overview of the project and describe the procedures used in reducing the data as well as the final products that were produced. We present the details of several special procedures that we implemented to correct calibration issues in the data for both the WFC3/IR observations of the main UDF field and our deep 128 orbit ACS/WFC F814W parallel field image, including treatment for persistence, correction for time-variable sky backgrounds, and astrometric alignment to an accuracy of a few milliarcseconds. We release the full, combined mosaics comprising a single, unified set of mosaics of the UDF, providing the deepest near-infrared blank-field view of the universe currently achievable, reaching magnitudes as deep as AB ? 30 mag in the near-infrared, and yielding a legacy dataset on this field.

Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V.; Targett, T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Stark, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Charlot, Stephane [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014, Paris (France); Furlanetto, Steven R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Step-out Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Step-out Well Step-out Well Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Step-out Well Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Drill cuttings are analyzed to determine lithology and mineralogy Stratigraphic/Structural: Fractures, faults, and geologic formations that the well passes through are identified and mapped Hydrological: Identify aquifers, reservoir boundaries, flow rates, fluid pressure, and chemistry Thermal: Direct temperature measurements from within the reservoir Dictionary.png Step-out Well: A well drilled outside of the proven reservoir boundaries to investigate a

202

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Well purge and sample apparatus and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

204

Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Well Completion Tests Geothermal Well Completion Tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Well Completion Tests Abstract This paper reviews the measurements that are typically made in a well immediately after drilling is completed - the Completion Tests. The objective of these tests is to determine the properties of the reservoir, and of the reservoir fluid near the well. A significant amount of information that will add to the characterisation of the reservoir and the well, can only be obtained in the period during and immediately after drilling activities are completed. Author Hagen Hole Conference Petroleum Engineering Summer School; Dubrovnik, Croatia; 2008/06/09 Published N/A, 2008 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

205

Introduction of heat map to fidelity assessment of compressed CT images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study aimed to introduce heat map, a graphical data presentation method widely used in gene expression experiments, to the presentation and interpretation of image fidelity assessment data of compressed computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: The authors used actual assessment data that consisted of five radiologists' responses to 720 computed tomography images compressed using both Joint Photographic Experts Group 2000 (JPEG2000) 2D and JPEG2000 3D compressions. They additionally created data of two artificial radiologists, which were generated by partly modifying the data from two human radiologists. Results: For each compression, the entire data set, including the variations among radiologists and among images, could be compacted into a small color-coded grid matrix of the heat map. A difference heat map depicted the advantage of 3D compression over 2D compression. Dendrograms showing hierarchical agglomerative clustering results were added to the heat maps to illustrate the similarities in the data patterns among radiologists and among images. The dendrograms were used to identify two artificial radiologists as outliers, whose data were created by partly modifying the responses of two human radiologists. Conclusions: The heat map can illustrate a quick visual extract of the overall data as well as the entirety of large complex data in a compact space while visualizing the variations among observers and among images. The heat map with the dendrograms can be used to identify outliers or to classify observers and images based on the degree of similarity in the response patterns.

Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Bohyoung; Seo, Jinwook; Park, Seongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine and Seoul National University Medical Research Center, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

MIMO Control during Oil Well Drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A drilling system consists of a rotating drill string, which is placed into the well. The drill fluid is pumped through the drill string and exits through the choke valve. An important scope of the drill fluid is to maintain a certain pressure gradient along the length of the well. Well construction is a complex job in which annular pressures must be kept inside the operational window (limited by fracture and pore pressure). Monitoring bottom hole pressure to avoid fluctuations out of operational window limits is an extremely important job, in order to guarantee safe conditions during drilling. Under a conventional oil well drilling task, the pore pressure (minimum limit) and the fracture pressure (maximum limit) define mud density range and pressure operational window. During oil well drilling, several disturbances affect bottom hole pressure; for example, as the length of the well increases, the bottom hole pressure varies for growing hydrostatic pressure levels. In addition, the pipe connection procedure, performed at equal time intervals, stopping the drill rotation and mud injection, mounting a new pipe segment, restarting the drill fluid pump and rotation, causes severe fluctuations in well fluids flow, changing well pressure. Permeability and porous reservoir pressure governs native reservoir fluid well influx, affecting flow patterns inside the well and well pressure. In this work, a non linear mathematical model (gas-liquid-solid), representing an oil well drilling system, was developed, based on mass and momentum balances. Besides, for implementing classic control (PI), alternative control schemes were analyzed using mud pump flow rate, choke opening index and weight on bit as manipulated variables in order to control annulus bottomhole pressure and rate of penetration. Classic controller tuning was performed for servo and regulatory control studies, under MIMO frameworks.

Mrcia Peixoto Vega; Marcela Galdino de Freitas; Andr Leibsohn Martins

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

208

Spatially-resolved Energetic Electron Properties for the 21 May 2004 Flare from Radio Observations and 3D Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate in detail the 21 May 2004 flare using simultaneous observations of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radiopolarimeters, Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The flare images in different spectral ranges reveal the presence of a well-defined single flaring loop in this event. We have simulated the gyrosynchrotron microwave emission using the recently developed interactive IDL tool GX Simulator. By comparing the simulation results with the observations, we have deduced the spatial and spectral properties of the non-thermal electron distribution. The microwave emission has been found to be produced by the high-energy electrons ($>100$ keV) with a relatively hard spectrum ($\\delta\\simeq 2$); the electrons were strongly concentrated near the loop top. At the same time, the number of high-energy electrons near the footpoints was too low to be detected in the RHESSI images and spatially unresolved data. The SOHO Extreme-ultra...

Kuznetsov, Alexey

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Well Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Testing Techniques Well Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(17) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enable estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters Stratigraphic/Structural: Fracture distribution, formation permeability, and ambient tectonic stresses Hydrological: provides information on permeability, location of permeable zones recharge rates, flow rates, fluid flow direction, hydrologic connections, storativity, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling.

210

Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

Stephen Wolhart

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Well Construction & Pump Installation Standards Webpage Abstract This webpage provides...

212

Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

213

Quantum Imaging Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past three decades, quantum mechanics has allowed the development of technologies that provide unconditionally secure communication. In parallel, the quantum nature of the transverse electromagnetic field has spawned the field of quantum imaging that encompasses technologies such as quantum ghost imaging and high-dimensional quantum key distribution (QKD). The emergence of such quantum technologies also highlights the need for the development of methods for characterizing the elusive quantum state itself. In this document, we describe new technologies that use the quantum properties of light for security. The first is a technique that extends the principles behind QKD to the field of imaging. By applying the polarization-based BB84 protocol to individual photons in an active imaging system, we obtained images that are secure against intercept-resend jamming attacks. The second technology presented in this article is based on an extension of quantum ghost imaging. We used a holographic filtering technique to build a quantum ghost image identification system that uses a few pairs of photons to identify an object from a set of known objects. The third technology addressed in this document is a high-dimensional QKD system that uses orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) modes of light for encoding. Moving to a high-dimensional state space in QKD allows one to impress more information on each photon, as well as introduce higher levels of security. We discuss the development of two OAM-QKD protocols based on the BB84 and Ekert QKD protocols. The fourth and final technology presented in this article is a relatively new technique called direct measurement that uses sequential weak and strong measurements to characterize a quantum state. We use this technique to characterize the quantum state of a photon with a dimensionality of d=27, and measure its rotation in the natural basis of OAM.

Mehul Malik; Robert W. Boyd

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013 #12;HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS UPDATE ON SAFETY PROGRAMS The professionals working in the Health and Safety team and Rehabilitation Services group have had a very successful year in supporting individuals to take accountability for their own safety and health

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

215

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Record geothermal well drilled in hot granite ... Researchers there have completed the second of two of the deepest and hottest geothermal wells ever drilled. ... It may become the energy source for a small electrical generating power station serving nearby communities in New Mexico. ...

1981-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

217

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Abstract No abstract available. Author Bureau of Land Management Published U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management, Carson City Field Office, Nevada, 09/14/2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Citation Bureau of Land Management. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) [Internet]. 09/14/2009. Carson City, NV. U.S. Department of the Interior- Bureau of Land Management,

218

Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

John, C.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells GRR/Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells 19-WA-f - Water Well NOI for Replacement or Additional Wells.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 90.44.100 Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well in a different location than a previous well, drill an additional well at an existing location, or drill a replacement well at the same

220

The Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) is an instrument designed to make images of the cosmic microwave background radiation and to measure its statistical properties on angular scales from about 3 arc minutes to one degree (spherical harmonic scales from l ~ 4250 down to l ~ 400). The CBI is a 13-element interferometer mounted on a 6 meter platform operating in ten 1-GHz frequency bands from 26 GHz to 36 GHz. The instantaneous field of view of the instrument is 45 arcmin (FWHM) and its resolution ranges from 3 to 10 arcmin; larger fields can be imaged by mosaicing. At this frequency and resolution, the primary foreground is due to discrete extragalactic sources, which are monitored at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory and subtracted from the CBI visibility measurements. The instrument has been making observations since late 1999 of both primordial CMB fluctuations and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in clusters of galaxies from its site at an altitude of 5080 meters near San Pedro de Atacama, in northern Chile. Observations will continue until August 2001 or later. We present preliminary results from the first few months of observations.

T. J. Pearson; B. S. Mason; S. Padin; A. C. S. Readhead; M. C. Shepherd; J. Sievers; P. S. Udomprasert; J. K. Cartwright

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Interference well testingvariable fluid flow rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At present when conducting an interference well test a constant flow rate (at the 'active' well) is utilized and the type-curve matching technique (where only 23 values of pressure drops are matched) is used to estimate the porositytotal compressibility product and formation permeability. For oil and geothermal reservoirs with low formation permeability the duration of the test may require a long period of time and it can be difficult to maintain a constant flow rate. The qualitative term 'long' period of time means that (at a given distance between the 'active' and 'observational' well) more test time (for low permeability formations) is needed to obtain tangible pressure drops in the 'observational' well. In this study we present working equations which will allow us to process field data when the flow rate at the 'active' well is a function of time. The shut-in period is also considered. A new method of field data processing, where all measured pressure drops are utilized, is proposed. The suggested method allows us to make use of the statistical theory to obtain error estimates on the regression parameters. It is also shown that when high precision (resolution) pressure gauges are employed the pressure time derivative equations can be used for the determination of formation hydraulic diffusivity. An example is presented to demonstrate the data processing procedure.

I M Kutasov; L V Eppelbaum; M Kagan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Production-systems analysis for fractured wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production-systems analysis has been in use for many years to design completion configurations on the basis of an expected reservoir capacity. The most common equations used for the reservoir calculations are for steady-state radial flow. Most hydraulically fractured wells require the use of an unsteady-state production simulator to predict the higher flow rates associated with the stimulated well. These high flow rates may present problems with excessive pressure drops through production tubing designed for radial-flow production. Therefore, the unsteady-state nature of fractured-well production precludes the use of steady-state radial-flow inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to calculate reservoir performance. An accurate prediction of fractured-well production must be made to design the most economically efficient production configuration. It has been suggested in the literature that a normalized reference curve can be used to generate the IPR's necessary for production-systems analysis. However, this work shows that the reference curve for fractured-well response becomes time-dependent when reservoir boundaries are considered. A general approach for constructing IPR curves is presented, and the use of an unsteady-state fractured-well-production simulator coupled with the production-systems-analysis approach is described. A field case demonstrates the application of this method to fractured wells.

Hunt, J.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Multi-Well Experiment MWX-3 As-Built Report DISCLAIMER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Multi-Well Experiment MWX-3 Multi-Well Experiment MWX-3 As-Built Report DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Category No. UC-92a SAND84-7132 Unlimited Distribution Printed May 1984 MULTI-WELL EXPERIMENT MWX-3 AS-BUILT REPORT Contract Sponsor: SANDIA CORPORATION Division 6253 Albuquerque, N M 871 85 Multi-Well Experiment Project Contract Number: 6 1-3428 Prepared By: CER CORPORATION 2225 E. Flamingo Rd, Suite 300 Las Vegas, NV 89 109 February 1984 ABSTRACT The Multi-Well Experiment, sponsored by the Department o f Energy, has two overall objectives: (1) characterize low-permeability lenticular gas sands and (2) develop and evaluate technology for the production of natural gas from them. The third well o

224

Chaos in a well : Effects of competing length scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A discontinuous generalization of the standard map, which arises naturally as the dynamics of a periodically kicked particle in a one dimensional infinite square well potential, is examined. Existence of competing length scales, namely the width of the well and the wavelength of the external field, introduce novel dynamical behaviour. Deterministic chaos induced diffusion is observed for weak field strengths as the length scales do not match. This is related to an abrupt breakdown of rotationally invariant curves and in particular KAM tori. An approximate stability theory is derived wherein the usual standard map is a point of ``bifurcation''.

R. Sankaranarayanan; A. Lakshminarayan; V. B. Sheorey

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

226

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

227

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

228

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

229

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

230

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

231

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

232

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

233

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

234

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

235

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

236

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

237

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

238

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

239

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

240

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

242

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

243

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

244

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

245

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

246

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

247

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

248

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

249

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

250

Method of gravel packing a subterranean well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of gravel packing a well bore penetrating a subterranean formation. It comprises blocking a first group of apertures in a liner with an immobile gel; positioning the liner within the well bore thereby defining a first annulus between the liner and the well bore; transporting a slurry comprised of gravel suspended in a fluid into the first annulus, the fluid flowing through a second group of apertures in the liner while the gravel is deposited within the first annulus to form a gravel pack; and thereafter removing substantially all of the gel from the first group of apertures.

Not Available

1991-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

251

Discussion of productivity of a horizontal well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors of this paper has been using several of the analytical equations and numerical simulation to evaluate the productivity of horizontal wells that have near-wellbore damage. Through this evaluation, the author found that here are inconsistencies in the way the skin factor is introduced into the analytical equations. This discussion shows the corrections needed in various analytical equations to obtain consistency with numerical simulation. In the numerical simulation shown here, skin factor is simulated by assignment of a reduced permeability to nodes near the well. The author would appreciate any comments Babu and Odeh could make on this aspect of horizontal wells.

Gilman, J.R. (Marathon Oil Company (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

253

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

254

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 2008 - 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Vulcan increased exploration efforts in the summer and fall of 2008, during which time the company drilled two temperature gradient holes (86-15 O on Pad 1 and 17-16 O on Pad 3); conducted seismic, gravity and magnetotelluric surveys; and drilled deep exploration wells at Pads 6 and 8 and binary wells at Pads 1, 2, 4, and 7. Notes Data from these wells is proprietary, and so were unavailable for inclusion

255

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well GRR/Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well 19-WA-e - Water Well Notice of Intent for New Well.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Washington State Department of Ecology Regulations & Policies Revised Code of Washington 18.104.048 Washington Administrative Code 173-160-151 Triggers None specified A developer seeking to use ground water for an activity may need to drill a new well to access the ground water. When a developer needs to drill a new well, the developer must complete the Notice of Intent (NOI) to Drill a Well form and submit the form to the Washington State Department of Ecology

256

History Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History Images History Images Los Alamos History in Images Los Alamos has a proud history and heritage of almost 70 years of science and innovation. The people of the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best scientific and engineering solutions to many of the nation's most crucial security challenges. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Back in the day Back in the day LA bridge in Los Alamos LA bridge in Los Alamos 1945 Army-Navy "E" Award 1945 Army-Navy "E" Award Louis Rosen Louis Rosen Bob Van Ness Robert Kuckuck and Michael Anastasio Bob Van Ness Robert Kuckuck and Michael Anastasio TA-18 TA-18 Elmer Island TU-4 assembly area Elmer Island TU-4 assembly area

257

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

258

Maazama Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maazama Well Geothermal Area Maazama Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maazama Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8965,"lon":-121.9865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Geothermal Area Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Willow Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.6417,"lon":-150.095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

260

Wellness & Additional Benefits | Careers | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working at ORNL Working at ORNL Benefits Wellness and Other Incentives View Open Positions View Postdoctoral Positions Create A Profile Internal applicants please apply here View or update your current application or profile. External applicants Internal applicants Internet Explorer Browser preferred for ORNL applicants. Chrome is not currently supported. For more information about browser compatibility please refer to the FAQs. If you have difficulty using the online application system or need an accommodation to apply due to a disability, please email ORNLRecruiting@ornl.gov or phone 1-866-963-9545 Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Working at ORNL | Wellness and Other Incentives SHARE Wellness & Additional Benefits Wellness Program Employees have many opportunities to maintain and improve their health

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

6981 well-provided recreation facility [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

recr. (Well-provisioned recreation installation and equipment);sinstalacin [f] de recreo intensivo (Equipamiento recreacional de gran variedad y de gran calidad);fquipement [m] de loisirs lourd (...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Two-phase flow in horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow in horizontal wells and two-phase flow interaction with the reservoir were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Two-phase flow behavior has been recognized as one of the most important problems in production engineering. The authors designed and constructed a new test facility suitable for acquiring data on the relationship between pressure drop and liquid holdup along the well and fluid influx from the reservoir. For the theoretical work, an initial model was proposed to describe the flow behavior in a horizontal well configuration. The model uses the inflow-performance-relationship (IPR) approach and empirical correlations or mechanistic models for wellbore hydraulics. Although good agreement was found between the model and experimental data, a new IPR apart from the extension of Darcy`s law must be investigated extensively to aid in the proper design of horizontal wells.

Ihara, Masaru [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan); Yanai, Koji [Nippon Kokan Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Yanai, Koji

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Well Record or History | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Well Record or HistoryLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2013...

264

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Groundwater well with reactive filter pack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

266

Polariton dispersion of periodic quantum well structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the polariton dispersion relations of a periodic quantum-well structure with a period in the vicinity of half the exciton resonance wavelength, i.e., the Bragg structure. We classified polariton mod...

A. V. Mintsev; L. V. Butov; C. Ell; S. Mosor

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geological well log analysis. Third ed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

Pirson, S.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

California Water Well Standards | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legal Document- OtherOther: California Water Well StandardsLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2104 Legal Citation Not provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

269

Slim wells for exploration purposes in Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To invest in the construction of wells with definitive designs considerably increases the cost of a geothermal electric project in its analysis and definition stage. The Federal Commission for Electricity (Comision Federal de Electricidad, CFE) has concentrated on the task to design wells which casing and cementing programs would provide the minimum installation necessary to reach the structural objective, to confirm the existence of geothermal reservoirs susceptible to commercial exploitation, to check prior geological studies, to define the stratigraphic column and to obtain measurements of pressure, temperature and permeability. Problems of brittle, hydratable and permeable formations with severe circulation losses, must be considered within the design and drilling programs of the wells. This work explains the slim wells designs used in the exploration of three geothermal zones in Mexico: Las Derrumbadas and Acoculco in the State of Puebla and Los Negritos in the State of Michoacan.

Vaca Serrano, J.M.E.; Soto Alvarez, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

UV-BRIGHT NEARBY EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES OBSERVED IN THE MID-INFRARED: EVIDENCE FOR A MULTI-STAGE FORMATION HISTORY BY WAY OF WISE AND GALEX IMAGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the local universe, 10% of massive elliptical galaxies are observed to exhibit a peculiar property: a substantial excess of ultraviolet emission than what is expected from their old, red stellar populations. Several origins for this ultraviolet excess (UVX) have been proposed including a population of hot young stars and a population of old, blue horizontal branch or extended horizontal branch (BHB or EHB) stars that have undergone substantial mass loss from their outer atmospheres. We explore the radial distribution of UVX in a selection of 49 nearby E/S0-type galaxies by measuring their extended photometry in the UV through mid-infrared (mid-IR) with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We compare UV/optical and UV/mid-IR colors with the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis models, which allow for the inclusion of EHB stars. We find that combined WISE mid-IR and GALEX UV colors are more effective in distinguishing models than optical colors, and that the UV/mid-IR combination is sensitive to the EHB fraction. There are strong color gradients, with the outer radii bluer than the inner half-light radii by {approx}1 mag. This color difference is easily accounted for with an increase in the BHB fraction of 0.25 with radius. We estimated that the average ages for the inner and outer radii are 7.0 {+-} 0.3 Gyr, and 6.2 {+-} 0.2 Gyr, respectively, with the implication that the outer regions are likely to have formed {approx}1 Gyr after the inner regions. Additionally, we find that metallicity gradients are likely not a significant factor in the color difference. The separation of color between the inner and outer regions, which agrees with a specific stellar population difference (e.g., higher EHB populations), and the {approx}0.5-2 Gyr age difference suggests multi-stage formation. Our results are best explained by inside-out formation: rapid star formation within the core at early epochs (>4 Gyr ago) and at least one later stage starburst event coinciding with z {approx} 1.

Petty, S. M.; Farrah, D. G. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Neill, J. D.; Bridge, C. R. [Division of Physics, Math, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Jarrett, T. H.; Tsai, C.-W. [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Blain, A. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Rich, R. M.; Lake, S. E.; Wright, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Benford, D. J. [NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Masci, F. J. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

NETL: E&P Technologies - Improved Recovery - Stripper Well Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exploration & Production Technologies Improved Recovery - Stripper Well Technology image of a well linking to Stripper Well Consortium “Stripper well" is a term used to describe wells that produce natural gas or oil at very low rates—less than 10 barrels per day of oil or less than 60 thousand cubic feet per day of gas. Despite their small output, stripper oil and gas wells make a significant contribution to the Nation’s energy supply—and they are the lifeblood of thousands of small, independent oil and gas operating companies. About 80 percent of the roughly 500,000 producing oil wells in the United States are classified as stripper wells. Despite their small volumes, they add up. The >400,000 stripper oil wells in the United States produce, in aggregate, nearly 1 million barrels per day of oil, which represents almost 19% of domestic oil production.

272

Project management improves well control events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a well control operation, the efficient use of personnel and equipment, through good project management techniques, contributes to increased safety and ensures a quality project. The key to a successful blowout control project is to use all resources in the most efficient manner. Excessive use of resources leads to unnecessary expenditures and delays in bringing the project under control. The Kuwait well control project, which involved more than 700 blowouts, was accomplished in a much shorter time (8 months) than first estimated (5 years). This improvement partly resulted from the application of sound project management techniques. These projects were prime examples of the need for a formal project management approach to handling wild well projects. There are many examples of projects that were successful in controlling wells but were economic disasters. Only through the effective application of project management can complex well control projects be completed in reasonable time frames at reasonable cost. The paper describes team management, project scope, organizational structures, scheduling, tracking models, critical path method, and decision trees.

Oberlender, G.D. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Abel, L.W. [Wild Well Control Inc., Spring, TX (United States)

1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

Snubdrilling a new well in Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new well was successfully drilled using a snubbing jack. The drill bit was rotated using a rotary table, downhole motors and combination of the two. Expected high-pressure zones prompted this use of ``snubdrilling.`` The primary objective was to drill a vertical well through underlying sands and gain information about formation pressures. This data would aid in the drilling of a relief well using a conventional drilling rig. The secondary objective was to relieve pressure by putting this new well on production. In addition to special high-pressure drilling jobs, there are other drilling applications where snubbing jacks are a feasible alternative to conventional rotary drilling rigs or coiled tubing units. Slimhole, underbalanced and flow drilling, and sidetracking of existing wells are excellent applications for snubdrilling. Advantages of snubdrilling vs. coiled tubing drilling, include ability to rotate drillstrings, use high-torque downhole motors, pump at high rates and pressures, apply significant overpull in case of stuck pipe, and run casing and liners without rigging down. Shortcomings of drilling with snubbing jacks compared to coiled tubing are the need to stop circulation while making new connections and inability to run continuous cable inside workstrings.

Aasen, J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

275

Thermal extraction analysis of five Los Azufres production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal energy extraction from five wells supplying 5-MWe wellhead generators in three zones of the Los Azufres geothermal field has been examined from production and chemical data compiled over 14-years of operation. The data, as annual means, are useful in observing small-scale changes in reservoir performance with continuous production. The chemical components are chloride for quality control and the geothermometer elements for reservoir temperatures. The flowrate and fluid enthalpy data are used to calculate the thermal extraction rates. Integration of these data provides an estimate of the total energy extracted from the zone surrounding the well. The combined production and chemical geothermometer data are used to model the produced fluid as coming from just-penetrating wells for which the annual produced mass originates from a series of concentric hemispheric shells moving out into the reservoir. Estimates are made of the drawdown distance into the reservoir and the far-field conditions.

Kruger, Paul; Quijano, Luis

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous recording microearthquake monitoring networks have been established around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal design wells in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas since summer 1980 to assess the effects well development may have had on subsidence and growth-fault activation. This monitoring has shown several unusual characteristics of Gulf Coast seismic activity. The observed activity is classified into two dominant types, one with identifiable body phases (type 1) and the other with only surface-wave signatures (type 2). During this reporting period no type 1 or body-wave events were reported. A total of 230 type 2 or surface-wave events were recorded. Origins of the type 2 events are still not positively understood; however, little or no evidence is available to connect them with geopressured-geothermal well activity. We continue to suspect sonic booms from military aircraft or some other human-induced source. 37 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Project Salt Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Salt Wells Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.580833333333°, -118.33444444444° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.580833333333,"lon":-118.33444444444,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

278

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

279

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

280

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

GeoWells International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoWells International GeoWells International Jump to: navigation, search Name GeoWells International Place Nairobi, Kenya Sector Geothermal energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Kenya-based geothermal driller. The company also supplies and installs wind and solar units. Coordinates -1.277298°, 36.806261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-1.277298,"lon":36.806261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

283

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

284

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

285

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

286

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

287

Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Grand Junction, Colorado Date Sampled: April 3, 2013 Background: Project Rulison was the second underground nuclear test under the Plowshare Program to stimulate natural-gas recovery from deep, low-permeability formations. On September 10, 1969, a 40-kiloton-yield nuclear device was detonated 8,426 feet (1.6 miles) below the ground surface in the Williams Fork Formation, at what is now the Rulison, Colorado, Site. Following the detonation, a series of production tests were conducted. Afterward, the site was shut down and then remediated, and the emplacement well (R-E) and the reentry well (R-Ex) were plugged. Purpose: As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) mission

288

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

289

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

290

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

291

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

292

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

293

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

294

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

295

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

296

Downhole Temperature Prediction for Drilling Geothermal Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unusually high temperatures are encountered during drilling of a geothermal well. These temperatures affect every aspect of drilling, from drilling fluid properties to cement formulations. Clearly, good estimates of downhole temperatures during drilling would be helpful in preparing geothermal well completion designs, well drilling plans, drilling fluid requirements, and cement formulations. The thermal simulations in this report were conducted using GEOTEMP, a computer code developed under Sandia National Laboratories contract and available through Sandia. Input variables such as drilling fluid inlet temperatures and circulation rates, rates of penetration, and shut-in intervals were obtained from the Imperial Valley East Mesa Field and the Los Alamos Hot Dry Rock Project. The results of several thermal simulations are presented, with discussion of their impact on drilling fluids, cements, casing design, and drilling practices.

Mitchell, R. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Well-test data from geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive well testing in geothermal resources has been carried out throughout the western United States and in northern Mexico since 1975. Each resource tested and each well test conducted by LBL during the eight-year period are covered in brief. The information, collected from published reports and memoranda, includes test particulars, special instrumentation, data interpretation when available, and plots of actual data. Brief geologic and hydrologic descriptions of the geothermal resources are also presented. The format is such that well test descriptions are grouped, in the order performed, into major sections according to resource, each section containing a short resource description followed by individual test details. Additional information regarding instrumentation is provided. Source documentation is provided throughout to facilitate access to further information and raw data.

Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Apparatus for stringing well pipe of casing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for use in running a string of threaded well pipe or casing in a vertical configuration in a deep well bore which is adapted to convert a top head drive drilling rig for use in running each length of pipe into the well bore. A drive spindle adaptor is provided which may be securely attached in a removably mounted manner to the rotary drive spindle or sub of a top head drive drilling rig. The drive spindle includes a pair of opposing, outwardly extending lugs disposed at a right angle to the axial direction of the spindle and a true centering guide means. A collar is included which is provided with frictional gripping members for removably securing the collar to one end of a length of conventional pipe and a pair of axially extending, spaced ears which cooperate upon engagement with said lugs on said spindle adaptor to transfer rotary motion of said spindle to said length of pipe.

Sexton, J.L.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

Apparatus for rotating and reciprocating well pipe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an apparatus for simultaneously rotating and reciprocating well pipe, having an upper end, and mechanically utilizing a rotary table attached to a drilling rig, comprising: a rotating pipe clamp assembly having an irregular cross-sectional mid-member and clamp members for releasably gripping the well pipe connected to the ends of the mid-member for rotation therewith; a square block for fitting to the rotary table square and having a selected grooved interior configuration; a torque transmitting means fitted into the grooves having openings therethrough having the same irregular cross-section as the mid-member cross-section; and a torque limiting means connecting the torque transmitting means and the block for limiting torque applied through the well pipe via the clamp assembly and the torque transmitting means.

Davis, K.D.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

302

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

303

Definition: Multispectral Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Multispectral Imaging Multispectral surveys image the earth in an average of ten wide bands over a wide spectral range. Multispectral sensors measure the electromagnetic spectrum in discrete, discontinuous bands (unlike the continuous hyperspectral image). Multispectral sensors are capable of relative material delineation. The thermal wavelength range of the multispectral survey senses heat energy from the Earth's surface. It can be used to sense surface temperature, including anomalies associated with active geothermal or volcanic systems. Both multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing observations are available. This range can also be used to map mineralogy associate with common rock-forming silicates.[1]

304

Fish embryo multimodal imaging by laser Doppler digital holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A laser Doppler imaging scheme combined to an upright microscope is proposed. Quantitative Doppler imaging in both velocity norm and direction, as well as amplitude contrast of either zebrafish flesh or vasculature is demonstrated.

Verrier, Nicolas; Picart, Pascal; Gross, Michel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

Choi, K. K., E-mail: kwong.k.choi.civ@mail.mil; Sun, J.; Olver, K. [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)] [Electro-Optics and Photonics Division, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States); Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A. [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [Instrument Systems and Technology Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Recent Cosmic Inflation Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent background imaging of cosmic extragalactic polarization (BICEP2) observations are believed as an evidence for the cosmic inflation. BICEP2 provided a first direct evidence for the inflation, determined its energy scale and debriefed witnesses for the quantum gravitational processes. The ratio of scalar-to-tensor fluctuations $r$ which is the canonical measurement of the gravitational waves, was estimated as $r=0.2_{-0.05}^{+0.07}$. Apparently, this value agrees well with the upper bound value corresponding to PLANCK $r\\leq 0.012$ and to WMAP9 experiment $r=0.2$. It is believed that the existence of a minimal length is one of the greatest predictions leading to modifications in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle or a GUP at the Planck scale. In the present work, we investigate the possibility of interpreting recent BICEP2 observations through quantum gravity or GUP. We estimate the slow-roll parameters, the tensorial and the scalar density fluctuations which are characterized by the scalar field $\\phi$. Taking into account the background (matter and radiation) energy density, $\\phi$ is assumed to interact with the gravity and with itself. We first review the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) Universe and then suggest modification in the Friedmann equation due to GUP. By using a single potential for a chaotic inflation model, various inflationary parameters are estimated and compared with the PLANCK and BICEP2 observations. While GUP is conjectured to break down the expansion of the early Universe (Hubble parameter and scale factor), two inflation potentials based on certain minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model result in $r$ and spectral index matching well with the observations. Corresponding to BICEP2 observations, our estimation for $r$ depends on the inflation potential and the scalar field. A power-law inflation potential does not.

Abdel Nasser Tawfik; Abdel Magied Diab

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

307

Optimization of Performance Qualifiers during Oil Well Drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An optimization analysis of the drilling process constitutes a powerful tool for operating under desired pressure levels (inside operational window) and, simultaneously, maximizing the rate of penetration, which must be harmonized with the conflicting objective of minimizing the specific energy. The drilling efficiency is improved as the rate of penetration is increased, however, there are conflicts with performance qualifiers, such as down hole tool life, footage, vibrations control, directional effectiveness and hydraulic scenarios. Concerning hydraulic effects, the minimization of the specific energy must be constrained by annulus bottom hole pressure safe region, using the operational window, placed above porous pressure and below fracture pressure. Under a conventional oil well drilling task, the pore pressure (minimum limit) and the fracture pressure (maximum limit) define mud density range and pressure operational window. During oil well drilling, several disturbances affect bottom hole pressure; for example, as the length of the well increases, the bottom hole pressure varies for growing hydrostatic pressure levels. In addition, the pipe connection procedure, performed at equal time intervals, stopping the drill rotation and mud injection, mounting a new pipe segment, restarting the drill fluid pump and rotation, causes severe fluctuations in well fluids flow, changing well pressure. Permeability and porous reservoir pressure governs native reservoir fluid well influx, affecting flow patterns inside the well and well pressure. The objective being tracked is operating under desired pressure levels, which assures process safety, also reducing costs. In this scenario, optimization techniques are important tools for narrow operational windows, commonly observed at deepwater and pre-salt layer environments. The major objective of this paper is developing an optimization methodology for minimizing the specific energy, also assuring safe operation (inside operational window), despite the inherent process disturbances, under a scenario that maximization of ROP (rate of penetration) is a target.

Mrcia Peixoto Vega; Marcela Galdino de Freitas; Andr Leibsohn Martins

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Solar coronal observations at high frequencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) is a simple and extremely fast, high-resolution imaging instrument designed for studies of the solar corona. Light from the corona (during, for example, a total solar eclipse) is reflected off a heliostat and passes via a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and beam splitter to two CCD cameras capable of imaging at 60 frames a second. The cameras are attached via SCSI connections to a purpose-built PC that acts as the data acquisition and storage system. Each optical channel has a different filter allowing observations of the same events in both white light and in the green line (Fe XIV at 5303 A). Wavelet analysis of the stabilized images has revealed high frequency oscillations which may make a significant contribution on the coronal heating process. In this presentation we give an outline of the instrument and its future development.

A. C. Katsiyannis; M. Mathioudakis; K. J. H. Phillips; D. R. Williams; F. P. Keenan

2001-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

Economic evaluation of smart well technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. At this pivotal time the role of emerging technologies is of at most importance. Smart or intelligent well technology is one of the up and coming technologies that have been developed to assist improvements in field development outcome. In this paper a...

Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION Health, Wellness and Recreation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION Health, Wellness and Recreation 5 July 1.00pm ­ 4.00pm Attendees: Louise and recreation for UBC. Anticipating this `work in progress' outcome from our initial discussion, the approach and recreation as it is currently structured? 2 Closer attention to level/degree of competition vs other drivers

Handy, Todd C.

311

Well performance under solutions gas drive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fully implicit black-oil simulator was written to predict the drawdown and buildup responses for a single well under Solution Gas Drive. The model is capable of handling the following reservoir behaviors: Unfractured reservoir, Double-Porosity system, and Double Permeability-Double Porosity model of Bourdet. The accuracy of the model results is tested for both single-phase liquid flow and two-phase flow. The results presented here provide a basis for the empirical equations presented in the literature. New definitions of pseudopressure and dimensionless time are presented. By using these two definitions, the multiphase flow solutions correlate with the constant rate liquid flow solution for both transient and boundary-dominated flow. For pressure buildup tests, an analogue for the liquid solution is constructed from the drawdown pseudopressure, similar to the reservoir integral of J. Jones. The utility of using the producing gas-oil ration at shut in to compute pseudopressures and pseudotimes is documented. The influence of pressure level and skin factor on the Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) of wells producing solution gas drive systems is examined. A new definition of flow efficiency that is based on the structure of the deliverability equations is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the presently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells. The need for using pseudopressures to analyze well test data for fractured reservoirs is shown. Expressions to compute sandface saturations for fractured systems are presented.

Camacho-Velazquez, R.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Flow tests of the Willis Hulin well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hulin well was tested between 20,100 and 20,700 feet down in layers of brine-saturated clean sand with occasional intervening layers of shale. The characteristics of the brine and gas were determined in this interval and an initial determination of the reservoir properties were made.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The integrity of oil and gas wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil and natural gas wells passing through drinking-water aquifers (14). In PNAS, Ingraffea et al. (5) examine one of...Jackson RB ( 2014 ) The environmental costs and benefits of fracking. Annu Rev Environ Resour, in press . 12 Nicot JP Scanlon...

Robert B. Jackson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

T2WELL/ECO2N  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002966IBMPC00 T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water http:..esd.lbl.gov/tough/licensing.html

315

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Details Activities (14) Areas (13) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Identify different lithological layers, rock composition, mineral, and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: -Fault and fracture identification -Rock texture, porosity, and stress analysis -determine dip and structural features in vicinity of borehole -Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water

316

Fracturing pressures and near-well fracture geometry of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydraulic fracturing of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is made challenging by the far more complicated near-well fracture geometry compared to that of conventional vertical wells. This geometry is important both for hydraulic fracture propagation and the subsequent post-treatment well performance. Fracture tortuosity of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is likely to cause large initiation pressures and reduction in the fracture widths. This paper presents a comprehensive study of the effects of important variables, including the principal stresses, wellbore orientation, and perforation configuration on fracture geometry. Initiation pressures, the contact between arbitrarily oriented wells and the fracture plane, and the near-well fracture geometry are determined and discussed. This study also shows that because of the near-well stress concentration the fracture width at the wellbore is always smaller than the maximum fracture width. This can have important consequences during hydraulic fracturing.

Chen, Z.; Economides, M.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic (Majer, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Single-Well And Cross-Well Seismic Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The goal of this work is to evaluate the most promising methods and approaches that may be used for improved geothermal exploration and reservoir assessment. It is not a comprehensive review of all seismic methods used to date in geothermal environments. This work was motivated by a need to assess current and developing seismic technology that if applied in geothermal cases may greatly improve the chances for locating new

318

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resources, LLC drilled one of the first operating wells, Industrial Production Well PW-2, in the spring of 2005 under geothermal project area permit #568. Notes The well was completed to a depth of 143.6 m and a peak temperature of 145°C, as indicated by static temperature surveys. Wellhead temperatures at PW-2 were 140°C at a flow rate of 157.7 liters per minute, and no

319

Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis IAN MARIE BERTHELOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS by JAN MARIE BERTIIELOT Appmved...

Berthelot, Jan Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

320

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Wurden, G.A.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lalamilo Wells Wind Farm Facility Lalamilo Wells Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Hawaiian Electric Light Co. Developer Lalamilo Ventures Energy Purchaser Hawaii Electric Light Co. Location Big Island HI Coordinates 19.9875°, -155.765556° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":19.9875,"lon":-155.765556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

323

Lost Circulation Experience in Geothermal Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lost circulation during drilling and cementing in geothermal wells is a problem common to most geothermal areas. Material and rig time costs due to lost circulation often represent one fourth or more of the total well cost. Assessment of the general drilling and completion practices commonly used for handling lost circulation have been surveyed and evaluated under a study sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories. Results of this study, including interviews with geothermal production companies and with drilling fluid service companies, are reported in the paper. Conclusions and recommendations are presented for control of lost circulation during geothermal operations. Recent improvements in lost circulation materials and techniques and potential equipment solutions to the lost circulation problem are discussed. Research needs are also identified.

Goodman, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

John K. Godwin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Recent developments in well test analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis of pressure transient data in terms of model parameter values is part of the reservoir description process and must be regarded as complementary to other branches of this activity. The advantage of transient pressure data is the depth of investigation achieved by the propagating pressure disturbance. However, the problem of an interpretation`s lack of uniqueness always exists. The objective of well test analysis is to help increase the understanding of the reservoir structure so that ultimate recovery can be improved. This pressure transient analysis review summarizes the major developments that have occurred since the derivative technique was introduced in 1982. This is the first in a series that discusses recent and future developments in well test analysis.

Stewart, G. [Edinburgh Petroleum Services Ltd. (United Kingdom)]|[Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Drop pressure optimization in oil well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this research work we are interested in minimizing losses existing when drilling an oil well. This would essentially improve the load losses by acting on the rheological parameters of the hydraulic and drilling mud. For this rheological tests were performed using a six-speed rotary viscometer (FANN 35). We used several rheological models to accurately describe the actual rheological behavior of drilling mud oil-based according to the Pearson's coefficient and to the standard deviation. To model the problem we established a system of equations that describe the essential to highlight purpose and various constraints that allow for achieving this goal. To solve the problem we developed a computer program that solves the obtained equations in Visual Basic language system. Hydraulic and rheological calculation was made for in situ application. This allowed us to estimate the distribution of losses in the well.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gas well operation with liquid production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prediction of liquid loading in gas wells is discussed in terms of intersecting tubing or system performance curves with IPR curves and by using a more simplified critical velocity relationship. Different methods of liquid removal are discussed including such methods as intermittent lift, plunger lift, use of foam, gas lift, and rod, jet, and electric submersible pumps. Advantages, disadvantages, and techniques for design and application of the methods of liquid removal are discussed.

Lea, J.F.; Tighe, R.E.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy loss rate in disordered quantum well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the effect of dynamically screened deformation potential on the electron energy loss rate in disordered semiconductor quantum well. Interaction of confined electrons with bulk acoustic phonons has been considered in the deformation coupling. The study concludes that the dynamically screened deformation potential coupling plays a significant role as it substantially affects the power dependency of electron relaxation on temperature and mean free path.

Tripathi, P.; Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Centre of Excellence in Nanomaterials, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Hasan, S. T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Sibli National College, Azamgarh-276128 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Program solves for gas well inflow performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Windows-based program, GasIPR, can solve for the gas well inflow performance relationship (IPR). The program calculates gas producing rates at various pressures and is applicable for both turbulent and non-turbulent flow. It also has the following capabilities: computes PVT properties {gamma}{sub g}, P{sub c}, T{sub c}, heating value, Z, {mu}{sub g}, B{sub g}, and {rho}{sub g} from input gas composition data; calculates the Reynolds number (N{sub Re}) and shows the gas flow rates at the sandface at which the turbulence effect must be considered; helps the user to optimize the net perforation interval (h{sub p}) so that the turbulence effect can be minimized; and helps the user to evaluate the sensitivity of formation permeability on gas flow rate for a new play. IPR is a critical component in forecasting gas well deliverability. IPRs are used for sizing optimum tubing configurations and compressors, designing gravel packs, and solving gas well loading problems. IPR is the key reference for nodal analysis.

Engineer, R. [AERA Energy LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Grillete, G. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

Method of drilling and casing a well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A well drilling rig having a rotary table for driving a drill string rotatively and having jacking mechanism for lowering casing into the well after drilling, with the jacking mechanism including fluid pressure actuated piston and cylinder means which may be left in the rig during drilling and which are positioned low enough in the rig to avoid interference with operation of the rotary table. The jacking mechanism also includes a structure which is adapted to be connected to the piston and cylinder means when the casing or other well pipe is to be lowered and which is actuable upwardly and downwardly and carries one of two pipe gripping units for progressively jacking the pipe downwardly by vertical reciprocation of that structure. The reciprocating structure may take the form of a beam extending between two pistons and actuable thereby, with a second beam being connected to cylinders within which the pistons are contained and being utilized to support the second gripping element. In one form of the invention, the rotary table when in use is supported by this second beam.

Boyadjieff, G.I.; Campbell, A.B.

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

333

Vibration of Generalized Double Well Oscillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have applied the Melnikov criterion to examine a global homoclinic bifurcation and transition to chaos in a case of a double well dynamical system with a nonlinear fractional damping term and external excitation. The usual double well Duffing potential having a negative square term and positive quartic term has been generalized to a double well potential with a negative square term and a positive one with an arbitrary real exponent $q > 2$. We have also used a fractional damping term with an arbitrary power $p$ applied to velocity which enables one to cover a wide range of realistic damping factors: from dry friction $p \\to 0$ to turbulent resistance phenomena $p=2$. Using perturbation methods we have found a critical forcing amplitude $\\mu_c$ above which the system may behave chaotically. Our results show that the vibrating system is less stable in transition to chaos for smaller $p$ satisfying an exponential scaling low. The critical amplitude $\\mu_c$ as an exponential function of $p$. The analytical results have been illustrated by numerical simulations using standard nonlinear tools such as Poincare maps and the maximal Lyapunov exponent. As usual for chosen system parameters we have identified a chaotic motion above the critical Melnikov amplitude $\\mu_c$.

Grzegorz Litak; Marek Borowiec; Arkadiusz Syta

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Remote down-hole well telemetry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

ALMA's high-cadence imaging capabilities for solar observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array offers an unprecedented view of our Sun at sub-/millimeter wavelengths. The high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution facilitates the measurement of gas temperatures and magnetic fields in the solar chromosphere with high precision. The anticipated results will revolutionize our understanding of the solar atmosphere and may in particular result in major steps towards solving the coronal heating problem. Based on state-of-the-art 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we calculate the emergent continuum intensity (and thus brightness temperature maps) in the wavelength range accessed by ALMA and simulate instrumental effects for different array configurations. First results show that the local gas temperature can be closely mapped with ALMA and that much of the complex small-scale chromospheric pattern can be resolved.

Wedemeyer, Sven

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Coronal shock waves observed in images H. S. Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that filaments, not shown on this diagram, represent high-beta inclusions in the low corona. WAVE DRIVERS (see discussion below), even with a long history of MHD model development (e.g., [4]) for flares

Hudson, Hugh

337

Observing molecular dynamics with timed Coulomb explosion imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...femtosecond pulses can replace accelerators as a means of initiating...through a nozzle into a vacuum chamber maintained at...Ellert and others nuclear axis aligned to the...oriented with inter- nuclear axis perpendicular to...dynamics of molecular nuclear wave packets. Preprint...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Substorm triggering by new plasma intrusion: THEMIS allsky imager observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetosphereionosphere system that release large amounts of solar wind energy accumulated in the magnetotail [e

California at Berkeley, University of

339

Simplified image processing system for softcopy presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based i, echniques for its particular application. In the field of astronomy, digital image processing techniques are used to process images acquired through earth-based telescopes as well as earth orbiting outward- looking satellites jfij, I7j, j8... and analysis is being used to support computerized axial tomography and ultrasound scanning systems ]9]. Typical digital techniques used in biomedical applications include image enhancement, geometric transformation, edge detection, color and pseudo color...

Corleto-Mena, Jose Gilberto

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Precursors to radiopharmaceutical agents for tissue imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A class of radiolabeled compounds to be used in tissue imaging that exhibits rapid brain uptake, good brain:blood radioactivity ratios, and long retention times. The imaging agents are more specifically radioiodinated aromatic amines attached to dihydropyridine carriers, that exhibit heart as well as brain specificity. In addition to the radiolabeled compounds, classes of compounds are also described that are used as precursors and intermediates in the preparation of the imaging agents.

Srivastava, Prem C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Preliminary Results from the Cosmic Background Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) is a 13-element interferometer designed to image intrinsic anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on arcminute scales. A review of the capabilities of the instrument is presented, together with a discussion of observations which have been taken over the past 9 months from the Atacama desert of Chile. We present preliminary high-resolution mosaiced images of the CMB obtained from recent CBI data and discuss topics which the CBI will address in the near future.

B. S. Mason; J. K. Cartwright; S. Padin; T. J. Pearson; A. C. S. Readhead; M. Shepherd; J. Sievers; P. Udomprasert

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

HAWC Observatory captures first image  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April » April » HAWC Observatory captures first image HAWC Observatory captures first image The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. April 30, 2013 The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction. HAWC is under construction inside the Parque Nacional Pico de Orizaba, a Mexican national park. An international team of researchers, including scientists from Los Alamos, has taken the first image of the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or HAWC. The facility is designed to detect cosmic rays and the highest energy gamma rays ever observed from astrophysical sources. HAWC is under

343

Imaging Genetics --Towards Discovery Neuroscience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variants that influence measures derived from anatomical or functional brain im- ages, which are in turn related to brain-related illnesses or fundamental cognitive, emotional and behavioral processes a tremendous growth in brain imaging as well as an enor- mous explosion of interest and success in genomics

Feng, Jianfeng

344

Observing dynamos in cool stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main aim of this paper is to introduce the most important observables that help us to investigate stellar dynamos and compare those to the modeling results. We give an overview of the available observational methods and data processing techniques that are suitable for such purposes, with touching upon examples of inadequate interpretations as well. Stellar observations are compared to the solar data in such a way, which ensures that the measurements are comparable in dimension, wavelength, and timescale. A brief outlook is given to the future plans and possibilities. A thorough review of this topic was published nearly a decade ago (Berdyugina 2005), now we focus on the experience that have been gathered since that time.

Kovari, Zsolt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Gas Leakage Detection Using Thermal Imaging Technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas leakage is one of the hazards that can cause major incidents to human injuries, fires as well as high impact on economic. To avoid such situation, a preventive inspection is paramount important. Since gas leakage is unseen by naked eyes due to the ... Keywords: gas leakage, image processing, infrared image

Mohd Shawal Jadin, Kamarul Hawari Ghazali

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

Collett, T.S.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: Laboratory studies Mathematical modeling Sonic tool design and development Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Treating paraffin deposits in producing oil wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paraffin deposition has been a problem for operators in many areas since the beginning of petroleum production from wells. An extensive literature search on paraffin problems and methods of control has been carried out, and contact was made with companies which provide chemicals to aid in the treatment of paraffin problems. A discussion of the nature of paraffins and the mechanisms of this deposition is presented. The methods of prevention and treatment of paraffin problems are summarized. Suggested procedures for handling paraffin problems are provided. Suggestions for areas of further research testing are given.

Noll, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Apparatus for use in rejuvenating oil wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sub incorporating a check valve is connected into the lower end of a well pipestring. This valve will pass hot steam injected down the pipestring to the formations to loosen up the thick crude oil. The check valve prevents back flow and thus will hold the high pressure steam. To resume production, the production pump can then be lowered through the pipestring. The pump itself is provided with an extended probe member which will unseat the check valve when the pump is in proper position so that production pumping can resume.

Warnock, C.E. Sr.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

351

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title CNCC Craig Campus Geothermal Program: 82-well closed loop GHP well field to provide geothermal energy as a common utility for a new community college campus. Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description This "geothermal central plant" concept will provide ground source loop energy as a utility to be shared by the academic and residential buildings on the soon-to-be-constructed campus.

352

Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Salt Wells Area (Edmiston & Benoit, 1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Exploratory Well Activity Date 1980 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The blind Salt Wells geothermal system was first identified when Anadarko Petroleum Corporation drilled slim hole and geothermal exploration wells at the site in 1980. Two reports detail the results of this drilling activity. This paper seeks to (1) describe several moderate-temperature (150-200°C) geothermal systems discovered and drilled during the early 1980s that had not been documented previously in the literature, (2) summarize and compare

353

Definition: Image Logs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Image Logs Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Image Logs Well logging techniques which create images of the inside of a borehole. A 360° view camera is used that can be lowered into a borehole via logging cable. The camera's purpose is to provide live images of the borehole walls. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Well logging, also known as borehole logging is the practice of making a detailed record (a well log) of the geologic formations penetrated by a borehole. The log may be based either on visual inspection of samples brought to the surface (geological logs) or on physical measurements made by instruments lowered into the hole (geophysical logs). Well logging can

354

RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of anatomical feature #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion Types of Data to be Registered Anatomic CT, MRI, US DigitizedRSNA 2002: Image Fusion Image Fusion: Introduction to the Technology Charles A. Pelizzari, Ph.D. Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology The University of Chicago #12;RSNA 2002: Image Fusion "Fusion

Pelizzari, Charles A.

355

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by... Professor growing field which has provided for nanometric optical imaging in the near-field. Even though a variety of techniques are being developed with nanometric optical imaging potential, near-field optics remains the most

356

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

before and after hydraulic fracturing. Temperature databefore and after hydraulic fracturing of the Elba Quartzitebefore and after hydraulic fracturing of the Lower Narrows

Freifeld, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Direct-to-video holographic 3-D imaging using photorefractive multiple quantum well devices: errata  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to an oversight during the revision process, one of the authors was not mentioned in this paper. The author list should read: R. Jones, M. Tziraki, D. Parsons Karavassilis, P. M....

Jones, R; Tziraki, M; French, P M; Kwolek, K; Nolte, D; Melloch, M

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Third invitational well-testing symposium: well testing in low permeability environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The testing of low permeability rocks is common to waste disposal, fossil energy resource development, underground excavation, and geothermal energy development. This document includes twenty-six papers and abstracts, divided into the following sessions: opening session, case histories and related phenomena, well test design in low permeability formations, analysis and interpretation of well test data, and instrumentation for well tests. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 of the 16 papers; the remaining paper has been previously abstracted. (DLC)

Doe, T.W.; Schwarz, W.J. (eds.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Slide no. 4 Offshore wind resource assessment through satellite images Charlotte Bay Hasager images for offshore wind ressource assessment in lieu of in-situ mast observations #12;4 Slide no Hasager, Dellwik, Nielsen and Furevik, 2004, Validation of ERS-2 SAR offshore wind-speed maps in the North

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Well injection valve with retractable choke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An injection valve is described for use in a well conduit consisting of: a housing having a bore, a valve closure member in the bore moving between open and closed positions, a flow tube telescopically movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means for biasing the flow tube in a direction for allowing the valve closure member to move to the closed position, an expandable and contractible fluid restriction connected to the flow tube and extending into the bore for moving the flow tube to the open position in response to injection fluid, but allowing the passage of well tools through the valve, the restriction contractible in response to fluid flow, the restriction includes, segments movable into and out of the bore, and biasing means yieldably urging the segments into the bore, a no-go shoulder on the flow tube, and releasable lockout means between the flow tube and the housing for locking the flow tube and valve in the open position.

Pringle, R.E.

1986-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

362

Monitoring polymer properties in production wells of Chateaurenard oilfield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A polymer flooding test was conducted in the Chateaurenard field (France) from 1985 to 1989. The test was run on a ten-acre inverted five-spot. A total of 240,000 m{sup 3} of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide at a concentration of 1000 ppm was injected followed by an equal volume of solution but at a tapered concentration. A strong response in oil recovery for three of the four producers was observed. This paper reports on an original methodology that was designed for sampling and analyzing the polymer in the effluents of the producing wells. Concentrations and main characteristics of produced polyacrylamide were determined versus injected volume. No degradation of the polymer was detected. A molecular weight fractionation during polymer slug propagation into the reservoir due to adsorption/retention chromatography was observed. The low-polymer concentration of the effluents could be explained by a strong retention of the polymer in the low permeability zones of the reservoir.

Putz, A.G. (Elf Aquitaine, Avenue Larribau, Pau (FR)); Lecourtier, J. (Inst. Francais du Petrole, Avenue Bois-Preau, 92500 Rueil-Malmaison (FR))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Well correction factors for three-dimensional reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with no formation damage, a fine grid radial simulation model with r-z geometry was run with different fractions of well penetration. The model was used to calculate accurate reference values of flowing bottomhole pressure, Pwf ~ The results are tabulated... equals the steady-state flowing pressure at a radial distance r 0 0. 2 ax, where ax is the dimension of a square cell. Based on this observation, Peaceman derived a new equation for the build-up time at' to be used in the matching process (see Fig. 6...

Fjerstad, Paul Albert

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Coherence Length of Cold Exciton Gases in Coupled Quantum Wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Mach-Zehnder interferometer with spatial and spectral resolution was used to probe spontaneous coherence in cold exciton gases, which are implemented experimentally in the ring of indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells. A strong enhancement of the exciton coherence length is observed at temperatures below a few Kelvin. The increase of the coherence length is correlated with the macroscopic spatial ordering of excitons. The coherence length at the lowest temperature corresponds to a very narrow spread of the exciton momentum distribution, much smaller than that for a classical exciton gas.

Sen Yang, A. T. Hammack, M. M. Fogler, L. V. Butov, and A. C. Gossard

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

A catalog of digital images of 113 nearby galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a digital catalog of images of 113 galaxies in this paper. These galaxies are all nearby, bright, large and well resolved. All images were recorded with charge coupled devices (CCDs) at the Palomar Observatory with the 1.5 meter telescope and at the Lowell Observatory with the 1.1 meter telescope. At Palomar we used the Thuan--Gunn g, r and i photometric bands to take 3 images each of 31 spiral galaxies; at Lowell we used the B_J and R bands (2 images per galaxy) of the photometric system by Gullixson et al. (1995) to observe 82 spirals and ellipticals. The galaxies were selected to span the Hubble classification classes. All data are photometrically calibrated with foreground stars removed. Important data on these galaxies published in the "Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies" (RC3) are recorded in the FITS file headers. All files are available through anonymous FTP from ftp://astro.princeton.edu/, through WWW at http://astro.princeton.edu/~frei/galaxy_catalog.html, and Princeton University...

Frei, Z; Gunn, J E; Tyson, J A; Frei, Zsolt; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gunn, James E; Tyson, J Anthony

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Catalog of Digital Images of 113 Nearby Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a digital catalog of images of 113 galaxies in this paper. These galaxies are all nearby, bright, large and well resolved. All images were recorded with charge coupled devices (CCDs) at the Palomar Observatory with the 1.5 meter telescope and at the Lowell Observatory with the 1.1 meter telescope. At Palomar we used the Thuan--Gunn g, r and i photometric bands to take 3 images each of 31 spiral galaxies; at Lowell we used the B_J and R bands (2 images per galaxy) of the photometric system by Gullixson et al. (1995) to observe 82 spirals and ellipticals. The galaxies were selected to span the Hubble classification classes. All data are photometrically calibrated with foreground stars removed. Important data on these galaxies published in the "Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies" (RC3) are recorded in the FITS file headers. All files are available through anonymous FTP from ftp://astro.princeton.edu/, through WWW at http://astro.princeton.edu/~frei/galaxy_catalog.html, and Princeton University Press will soon publish the data on CD-ROM.

Zsolt Frei; Puragra Guhathakurta; James E. Gunn; J. Anthony Tyson

1995-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

367

Methoden Wetenschappelijk and Observational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methoden Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Fact-free and Observational Science #12;Data · Part of modern science is based on observation ­How do we do this? ­And what are the pitfalls? · Knowing how to observe is an important step in experimental design #12;Three kinds of science · There are (in my view) three ways

Steels, Luc

368

ARM - News from the Biomass Burn Observation Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project (BBOP)News from the Biomass Burn Observation Project Related Links BBOP Home Outreach News & Press Backgrounder (PDF, 2.1MB) Images ARM flickr site ARM Data Discovery...

369

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: The recent surge in spot prices at the Henry Hub are well above a typical range for 1998-1999 (in this context, defined as the average, +/- 2 standard deviations). Past price surges have been of short duration. The possibility of a downward price adjustment before the end of next winter is a source of considerable risk for storage operators who acquire gas at recent elevated prices. Storage levels in the Lower 48 States were 7.5 percent below the 5-year average (1995-1999) by mid-August (August 11), although the differential is only 6.4 percent in the East, which depends most heavily on storage to meet peak demand. Low storage levels are attributable, at least in part, to poor price incentives: high current prices combined with only small price

371

PSA_Well_Completion_Report.book  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Restoration Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Project U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area Churchill County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 September 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1166 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge

372

CNTA_Well_Installation_Report.book  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Security Administration Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration Division Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada Revision No.: 0 January 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1102 Uncontrolled When Printed Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from:

373

New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the drilling of the main horizontal well and it is cemented together with the main horizontal section. The pressure and structural integrity of these junctions is critical requirement. This integrity does not have to be compromised by any additional... with 15 horizontal lateral model Case 1 Case 6 CMG Results Eclipse Results CMG Results K v/Kh J STBD/psi J STBD/psi J(Case6)/J(Case 1) J STBD/psi J(Case6)/J(Case1) 1 13.85 12.95 93.5% 13.06 94% 0.1 5.73 5.14 89.7% 5.37 93.7% 0.01 1.93 1...

Jia, Hongqiao

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Remote system for subsea wells tested  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At its experimental submarine station in the Grondin field offshore the West African state of Gabon, Societe Nationale Elf-Aquitaine has run a series of inspection, repair, and maintenance tests on two producing wells using a robot controlled from the surface. Designed for water depths beyond the range of divers, the TIM robot has a pair of manipulator arms and a rotating telescopic crane installed on a 14 by 7.6 ft carriage. Five television cameras fitted at various spots on the robot allow surface operators to direct TIM in such tasks as (1) installing a jumper pipe between a Christmas tree and the manifold, (2) connecting a jumper electric cable and hydraulic hose, (3) locally operating a safety valve, and (4) removing a guide line. During 104 hr of seabed experience, TIM outperformed divers, particularly in jobs requiring great strength.

Vielvoye, R.

1981-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

Kuwait poised for massive well kill effort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that full scale efforts to extinguish Kuwait's oil well fires are to begin. The campaign to combat history's worst oil fires, originally expected to begin in mid-March, has been hamstrung by logistical problems, including delays in equipment deliveries caused by damage to Kuwait's infrastructure. Meantime, production from a key field off Kuwait--largely unaffected by the war--is expected to resume in May, but Kuwaiti oil exports will still be hindered by damaged onshore facilities. In addition, Kuwait is lining up equipment and personnel to restore production from its heavily damaged oil fields. Elsewhere in the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia reports progress in combating history's worst oil spills but acknowledges a continuing threat.

Not Available

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Drilling of wells with top drive unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well drilling apparatus including a top drive drilling assembly having a motor driven stem adapted to be attached to the upper end of a drill string and drive it during a drilling operation, a torque wrench carried by the top drive assembly and movable upwardly and downwardly therewith and operable to break a threated connection between the drill string and the stem, and an elevator carried by and suspended from the top drive assembly and adapted to engage a section of drill pipe beneath the torque wrench in suspending relation. The torque wrench and elevator are preferably retained against rotation with the rotary element which drives the drill string, but may be movable vertically relative to that rotary element and relative to one another in a manner actuating the apparatus between various different operating conditions.

Boyadjieff, G.I.

1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

Catching sparks from well-forged neutralinos  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a new search technique for electroweakinos, the superpartners of electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons, based on final states with missing transverse energy, a photon, and a dilepton pair, ?+??+?+ET. Unlike traditional electroweakino searches, which perform best when m?2,30?m?10,m??m?10>mZ, our search favors nearly degenerate spectra; degenerate electroweakinos typically have a larger branching ratio to photons, and the cut m???mZ effectively removes on shell Z boson backgrounds while retaining the signal. This feature makes our technique optimal for well-tempered scenarios, where the dark matter relic abundance is achieved with interelectroweakino splittings of ?2070??GeV. Additionally, our strategy applies to a wider range of scenarios where the lightest neutralinos are almost degenerate, but only make up a subdominant component of the dark mattera spectrum we dub well forged. Focusing on bino-Higgsino admixtures, we present optimal cuts and expected efficiencies for several benchmark scenarios. We find bino-Higgsino mixtures with m?2,30?190??GeV and m?2,30?m?10?30??GeV can be uncovered after roughly 600??fb?1 of luminosity at the 14TeV LHC. Scenarios with lighter states require less data for discovery, while scenarios with heavier states or larger mass splittings are harder to discriminate from the background and require more data. Unlike many searches for supersymmetry, electroweakino searches are one area where the high luminosity of the next LHC run, rather than the increased energy, is crucial for discovery.

Joseph Bramante; Antonio Delgado; Fatemeh Elahi; Adam Martin; Bryan Ostdiek

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co's well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. Author(s): Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.;

379

Post-Perihelion HST Observations of Comet HaleBopp (C/1995 O1)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Post-perihelion observations of Comet HaleBopp (C/1995 O1) were made with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on 27 August 1997 (r=2.48 AU; ?=2.99 AU), 11 November 1997 (r=3.38 AU; ?=3.31 AU), and 19 February 1998 (r=4.44 AU; ?=4.40 AU) using the newly installed Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The STIS CCD was used to image the comet, and useful spectroscopy was obtained between 2000 and 3190 using the G230LB, G230MB, and G230L gratings. The morphology of the images closely resembled that obtained at similar heliocentric distances preperihelion, but the dust production rates may have been slightly lower post-perihelion. We find no evidence for any companions to the nucleus in the STIS images, but fairly bright objects (up to ?20% of the brightness of the main nucleus) could be easily hidden within the strong coma jets. Emissions from OH and CS were observed in the spectra and were used to derive production rates for H2O and CS2. As with the dust, the gas production rates appear to be somewhat smaller post-perihelion than preperihelion. The two-dimensional STIS data allowed us to map the spatial distribution of the OH emission with a spatial resolution of ?0.?1, and the ?6- spectral resolution of the G230MB grating permitted a detailed examination of the OH excitation. The relative intensities of the rotational lines in the OH(0,0) band are fairly well matched by a standard fluorescence excitation model. The OH spatial brightness profile was slightly asymmetric (?20% brightness differences when comparing two different directions), and the intensity peak was offset by ?3200 km from the continuum peak for both the August and November 1997 observations. Perhaps this offset may be explained by asymmetric ejection of H2O molecules from the nucleus, but we have not attempted to model this effect. Except for this offset, conventional models for the spatial distribution of OH provide a good match to the data from November 1997. The observed spatial profile for the August 1997 observation is well matched by our model at large cometocentric distances but is considerably flatter near the nucleus (within ?2? of the continuum peak) than predicted. The available evidence strongly suggests that an optical depth effect, rather than the production of OH from a population of icy grains in the coma, is responsible for the observed flattening of the OH spatial brightness profile.

H.A. Weaver; P.D. Feldman; M.F. A'Hearn; C. Arpigny; J.C. Brandt; S.A. Stern

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could make SSR surveying considerably more efficient and less expensive, particularly when geophone intervals of 25 cm or less are required. The most recent research analyzed the difference in seismic response of the geophones with variable geophone spike length and geophones attached to various steel media. Experiments investigated the azimuthal dependence of the quality of data relative to the orientation of the rigidly attached geophones. Other experiments designed to test the hypothesis that the data are being amplified in much the same way that an organ pipe amplifies sound have so far proved inconclusive. Taken together, the positive results show that SSR imaging within a few meters of the earth's surface is possible if the geology is suitable, that SSR imaging can complement GPR imaging, and that SSR imaging could be made significantly more cost effective, at least in areas where the topography and the geology are favorable. Increased knowledge of the Earth's shallow subsurface through non-intrusive techniques is of potential benefit to management of DOE facilities. Among the most significant problems facing hydrologists today is the delineation of preferential permeability paths in sufficient detail to make a quantitative analysis possible. Aquifer systems dominated by fracture flow have a reputation of being particularly difficult to characterize and model. At chemically contaminated sites, including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and others at Department of Defense (DOD) installations worldwide, establishing the spatial extent of the contamination, along with the fate of the contaminants and their transport-flow directions, is essential to the development of effective cleanup strategies. Detailed characterization of the shallow subsurface is important not only in environmental, groundwater, and geotechnical engineering applications, but also in neotectonics, mining geology, and the analysis of petroleum reservoir analogs. Near-surface seismology is in the vanguard of non-intrusive approaches to increase knowledge of the shallow subsurface; our

Steeples, Don W.

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

382

Split image optical display  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

383

Flow in geothermal wells: Part III. Calculation model for self-flowing well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical model described predicts the temperature, pressure, dynamic dryness fraction, and void fraction along the vertical channel of two-phase flow. The existing data from operating wells indicate good agreement with the model. (MHR)

Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.; Michaelides, E.E.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Observational learning in horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

Baer, Katherine Louise

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Gamma-ray Imaging Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Atomic Collapse Observed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

387

Hot Pot Field Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hot Pot Field Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

389

Pressure and temperature drawdown well testing: similarities and differences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Temperature and pressure are the most frequently observed physical parameters in boreholes. The same differential diffusivity equation describes the transient flow of incompressible fluid in porous media and heat conduction in solids. The similarities and differences in the techniques of pressure and temperature well testing are discussed. It is shown that the mathematical model of pressure well tests based on the presentation of the borehole as an infinitely long linear source with a constant fluid flow rate in an infinite-acting homogeneous reservoir cannot be used in temperature well testing. A new technique has been developed for the determination of the formation thermal conductivity, initial temperature, skin factor and contact thermal resistance. It is assumed that the volumetric heat capacity of formations is known and the instantaneous heater's wall temperature and time data are available for a cylindrical probe with a constant heat flow rate placed in a borehole. A semi-analytical equation is used to approximate the dimensionless wall temperature of the heater. A simulated example is presented to demonstrate the data processing procedure.

L V Eppelbaum; I M Kutasov

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Cerro Prieto cold water injection: effects on nearby production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liquid-dominated Cerro Prieto geothermal field of northern Baja California, Mexico has been under commercial exploitation since 1973. During the early years of operation, all waste brines were sent to an evaporation pond built west of the production area. In 1989, cooled pond brines began to be successfully injected into the reservoir along the western boundary of the geothermal system. The injection rate varied over the years, and is at present about 20% of the total fluid extracted. As expected under the continental desert conditions prevailing in the area, the temperature and salinity of the pond brines change with the seasons, being higher during the summer and lower during the winter. The chemistry of pond brines is also affected by precipitation of silica, oxidation of H{sub 2}S and reaction with airborne clays. Several production wells in the western part of the field (CP-I area) showed beneficial effects from injection. The chemical (chloride, isotopic) and physical (enthalpy, flow rate) changes observed in producers close to the injectors are reviewed. Some wells showed steam flow increases, in others steam flow decline rates flattened. Because of their higher density, injected brines migrated downward in the reservoir and showed up in deep wells.

Truesdell, A.H.; Lippmann, M.J.; De Leon, J.; Rodriguez, M.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

High-resolution crosswell imaging of a west Texas carbonate reservoir. Part 1: Project summary and interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carbon dioxide flood pilot is being conducted in a section of Chevron`s McElroy field in Crane County, west Texas. Prior to CO{sub 2} injection, two high-frequency crosswell seismic profiles were recorded to investigate the use of seismic profiling for high-resolution reservoir delineation and CO{sub 2} monitoring. These preinjection profiles provide the baseline for time-lapse monitoring. Profile {number_sign}1 was recorded between an injector well and an offset observation well at a nominal well-to-well distance of 184 ft (56 m). Profile {number_sign}2 was recorded between a producing well and the observation well at a nominal distance of 600 ft (183 m). The combination of traveltime tomography and stacked CDP reflection amplitudes demonstrates how high-frequency crosswell seismic data can be used to image both large and small scale heterogeneity between wells: transmission traveltime tomography is used to image the large scale velocity variations; CDP reflection imaging is then used to image smaller scale impedance heterogeneities. The results of this integrated study demonstrate (1) the use of crosswell seismic profiling to produce a high-resolution reservoir delineation and (2) the possibility for successful monitoring of CO{sub 2} in carbonate reservoirs. The crosswell data were acquired with a piezoelectric source and a multilevel hydrophone array. Both profiles, nearly 80,000 seismic traces, were recorded in approximately 80 hours using a new acquisition technique of shooting on-the-fly. This paper presents the overall project summary and interpretation of the results from the near-offset profile.

Harris, J.M.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R.C.; Van Schaack, M.; Lazaratos, S.K.; Rector, J.W. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Langan, R.T. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)] [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Geophysics Dept.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Color Appearance and the Digital Imaging Pipeline Brian A. Wandell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Color Appearance and the Digital Imaging Pipeline Brian A. Wandell Psychology Department Stanford reproduction pipeline, spanning image capture, processing and display, must be designed to account for the properties of the human observer. In designing an image pipeline, three principles of human vision

Wandell, Brian A.

393

The Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches is by drilling horizontal wells and hydraulically fracturing the formation. Once the formation is fractured, different flow patterns will occur. The dominant flow regime observed in the shale gas formation is the linear flow or the transient...

Almarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

millionImaging research infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Centre for Imaging Technology Commercialization, led by Aaron Fenster $34 million Hybrid imaging infrastructureimaging #12;IMAGING Investment $100 millionImaging research infrastructure Formation

Denham, Graham

395

Well completion report on installation of horizontal wells for in-situ remediation tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project to drill and install two horizontal vapor extraction/air-injection wells at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina, was performed in September and October of 1988. This study was performed to test the feasibility of horizontal drilling technologies in unconsolidated sediments and to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air stripping of volatile organics from the ground water and unsaturated soils. A tremendous amount of knowledge was obtained during the drilling and installation of the two test wells. Factors of importance to be considered during design of another horizontal well drilling program follow. (1) Trips in and out of the borehole should be minimized to maintain hole stability. No reaming to enlarge the hole should be attempted. (2) Drilling fluid performance should be maximized by utilizing a low solids, low weight, moderate viscosity, high lubricity fluid. Interruption of drilling fluid circulation should be minimized. (3) Well materials should possess adequate flexibility to negotiate the curve. A flexible guide should be attached to the front of the well screen to guide the screen downhole. (4) Sands containing a minor amount of clay are recommended for completion targets, as better drilling control in the laterals was obtained in these sections.

Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.; Corey, J.C.; Wright, L.M.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

OBSERVATIONS AND MAGNETIC FIELD MODELING OF A SOLAR POLAR CROWN PROMINENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations and magnetic field modeling of the large polar crown prominence that erupted on 2010 December 6. Combination of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and STEREO{sub B}ehind/EUVI allows us to see the fine structures of this prominence both at the limb and on the disk. We focus on the structures and dynamics of this prominence before the eruption. This prominence contains two parts: an active region part containing mainly horizontal threads and a quiet-Sun part containing mainly vertical threads. On the northern side of the prominence channel, both AIA and EUVI observe bright features which appear to be the lower legs of loops that go above then join in the filament. Filament materials are observed to frequently eject horizontally from the active region part to the quiet-Sun part. This ejection results in the formation of a dense-column structure (concentration of dark vertical threads) near the border between the active region and the quiet Sun. Using the flux rope insertion method, we create nonlinear force-free field models based on SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager line-of-sight magnetograms. A key feature of these models is that the flux rope has connections with the surroundings photosphere, so its axial flux varies along the filament path. The height and location of the dips of field lines in our models roughly replicate those of the observed prominence. Comparison between model and observations suggests that the bright features on the northern side of the channel are the lower legs of the field lines that turn into the flux rope. We suggest that plasma may be injected into the prominence along these field lines. Although the models fit the observations quiet well, there are also some interesting differences. For example, the models do not reproduce the observed vertical threads and cannot explain the formation of the dense-column structure.

Su Yingna; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan, E-mail: ynsu@head.cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

ARSENIC IN PRIVATE WELLS IN NH YEAR 1 FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performed geospatial analysis of the well water arsenic estimates and survey results and produced the maps .................................................................................................. 7 Well water quality...................................................................................................... 7 Well water testing

Bucci, David J.

398

Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Exploration Technique Well Log Data Activity Date - 1988 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The study reports well log data from five wells...

399

Image Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Image Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2011) Image Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Image Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Image Logs Activity Date 2011 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine crustul stress heterogeneity Notes Borehole induced structures in image logs of wells from the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF) record variation in the azimuth of principal stress. Image logs of these structures from five wells were analyzed to quantify the stress heterogeneity for three geologically distinct locations: two wells within the CGF (one in an actively produced volume), two on the margin of the CGF and outside the production area, and a control well several tens of km

400

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) is a powerful imaging modality having a range of important applications to medicine and industry. The basic principles of NMRI are reviewed in...

Rothwell, William P

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Quantum-secured imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have built an imaging system that uses a photon's position or time-of-flight information to image an object, while using the photon's polarization for security. This ability allows us to obtain an image which is secure against an attack in which the object being imaged intercepts and resends the imaging photons with modified information. Popularly known as "jamming," this type of attack is commonly directed at active imaging systems such as radar. In order to jam our imaging system, the object must disturb the delicate quantum state of the imaging photons, thus introducing statistical errors that reveal its activity.

Mehul Malik; Omar S. Magaa-Loaiza; Robert W. Boyd

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

402

An IMAGE Satellite Guide to Exploring the Earth's Magnetic Field 1 An IMAGE Satellite Guide to Exploring the Earth's Magnetic Field 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observed by the IMAGE, HENA instrument. Some representative magnetic field lines are shown in whiteAn IMAGE Satellite Guide to Exploring the Earth's Magnetic Field 1 #12;An IMAGE Satellite Guide to Exploring the Earth's Magnetic Field 2 Dr. James Burch IMAGE Principal Investigator Dr. William Taylor Dr

403

Spatial Corrections of ROSAT HRI Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray observations with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) often have spatial smearing on the order of 10 arcsec (Morse 1994). This degradation of the intrinsic resolution of the instrument (5 arcsec) can be attributed to errors in the aspect solution associated with the wobble of the space craft or with the reacquisition of the guide stars. We have developed a set of IRAF/PROS and MIDAS/EXSAS routines to minimize these effects. Our procedure attempts to isolate aspect errors that are repeated through each cycle of the wobble. The method assigns a 'wobble phase' to each event based on the 402 second period of the ROSAT wobble. The observation is grouped into a number of phase bins and a centroid is calculated for each sub-image. The corrected HRI event list is reconstructed by adding the sub-images which have been shifted to a common source position. This method has shown approx. 30% reduction of the full width half maximum (FWHM) of an X-ray observation of the radio galaxy 3C 120. Additional examples are presented.

D. E. Harris; J. D. Silverman; G. Hasinger; I. Lehmann

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geologic Results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a deep well in the center of a major Quaternary caldera, the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) provides a new perspective on the relationship between hydrothermal circulation and a large crustal magma chamber. It also provides an important test of models for the subsurface structure of active continental calderas. Results will impact geothermal exploration, assessment, and management of the Long Valley resource and should be applicable to other igneous-related geothermal systems. Our task is to use the cuttings and core from LVEW to interpret the evolution of the central caldera region, with emphasis on evidence of current hydrothermal conditions and circulation. LVEW has reached a depth of 2313 m, passing through post-caldera extrusives and the intracaldera Bishop Tuff to bottom in the Mt. Morrison roof pendant of the Sierran basement. The base of the section of Quaternary volcanic rocks related to Long Valley Caldera was encountered at 1800 m of which 1178 m is Bishop Tuff. The lithologies sampled generally support the classic view of large intercontinental calderas as piston-cylinder-like structures. In this model, the roof of the huge magma chamber, like an ill-fitting piston, broke and sank 2 km along a ring fracture system that simultaneously and explosively leaked magma as Bishop Tuff. Results from LVEW which support this model are the presence of intact basement at depth at the center of the caldera, the presence of a thick Bishop Tuff section, and textural evidence that the tuff encountered is not near-vent despite its central caldera location. An unexpected observation was the presence of rhyolite intrusions within the tuff with a cumulative apparent thickness in excess of 300 m. Chemical analyses indicate that these are high-silica, high-barium rhyolites. Preliminary {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses determined an age of 626 {+-} 38 ka (this paper). These observations would indicate that the intrusions belong to the early post-collapse episode of volcanism and are contemporaneous with resurgence of the caldera floor. If they are extensive sills rather than dikes, a possibility being investigated through relogging of core from neighboring wells, they were responsible for resurgence. A {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 769 {+-} 14 ka from Bishop Tuff at 820 m depth conforms with tuff ages from outside the caldera and indicates an absence of shallow hydrothermal activity (>300 C) persisting after emplacement. Work is proceeding on investigating hydrothermal alteration deeper in the well. This alteration includes sulfide+quartz fracture fillings, calcite+quartz replacement of feldspars, and disseminated pyrite in both the tuff and basement. Electron microprobe analysis of phases are being conducted to determine initial magmatic and subsequent hydrothermal conditions.

McConnell, Vicki S.; Eichelberger, John C.; Keskinen, Mary J.; Layer, Paul W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

Uncertainty Quantification and Calibration in Well Construction Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or to individual cost components. Application of the methodology to estimation of well construction costs for horizontal wells in a shale gas play resulted in well cost estimates that were well calibrated probabilistically. Overall, average estimated...

Valdes Machado, Alejandro

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cement fatigue and HPHT well integrity with application to life of well prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to keep up with the worlds energy demands, oil and gas producing companies have taken the initiative to explore offshore reserves or drill deeper into previously existing wells. The consequence of this, however, has to deal with the high...

Ugwu, Ignatius Obinna

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

408

Phonon-drag thermopower in anisotropic AlAs quantum wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work we have developed a generalized theory of phonon-drag thermopower ?{sup g} for a highly anisotropic two-dimensional electron gas. For electrons confined in AlAs quantum wells we calculate ?{sup g} as function of temperature. We show that ?{sup g} exhibits a strong anisotropic behavior depending on valley occupancy which can be tuned by well width and strain. Also a great enhancement of ?{sup g} is observed compared to GaAs quantum wells.

Lehmann, Dietmar [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Technische Universitt Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Tsaousidou, Margarita [Materials Science Department, University of Patras, Patras 26 504 (Greece); Kubakaddi, Shrishail [Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad-580 003 (India)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

409

Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems Under Well-Controlled Temperature Condition. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems...

410

Altering Reservoir Wettability to Improve Production from Single Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured and typically produce less than 10% original oil in place during primary recovery. Spontaneous imbibition has proven an important mechanism for oil recovery from fractured reservoirs, which are usually weak waterflood candidates. In some situations, chemical stimulation can promote imbibition of water to alter the reservoir wettability toward water-wetness such that oil is produced at an economic rate from the rock matrix into fractures. In this project, cores and fluids from five reservoirs were used in laboratory tests: the San Andres formation (Fuhrman Masho and Eagle Creek fields) in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico; and the Interlake, Stony Mountain, and Red River formations from the Cedar Creek Anticline in Montana and South Dakota. Solutions of nonionic, anionic, and amphoteric surfactants with formation water were used to promote waterwetness. Some Fuhrman Masho cores soaked in surfactant solution had improved oil recovery up to 38%. Most Eagle Creek cores did not respond to any of the tested surfactants. Some Cedar Creek anticline cores had good response to two anionic surfactants (CD 128 and A246L). The results indicate that cores with higher permeability responded better to the surfactants. The increased recovery is mainly ascribed to increased water-wetness. It is suspected that rock mineralogy is also an important factor. The laboratory work generated three field tests of the surfactant soak process in the West Fuhrman Masho San Andres Unit. The flawlessly designed tests included mechanical well clean out, installation of new pumps, and daily well tests before and after the treatments. Treatments were designed using artificial intelligence (AI) correlations developed from 23 previous surfactant soak treatments. The treatments were conducted during the last quarter of 2006. One of the wells produced a marginal volume of incremental oil through October. It is interesting to note that the field tests were conducted in an area of the field that has not met production expectations. The dataset on the 23 Phosphoria well surfactant soaks was updated. An analysis of the oil decline curves indicted that 4.5 lb of chemical produced a barrel of incremental oil. The AI analysis supports the adage 'good wells are the best candidates.' The generally better performance of surfactant in the high permeability core laboratory tests supports this observation. AI correlations were developed to predict the response to water-frac stimulations in a tight San Andres reservoir. The correlations maybe useful in the design of Cedar Creek Anticline surfactant soak treatments planned for next year. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scans of dolomite cores to measure porosity and saturation during the high temperature laboratory work were acquired. The scans could not be correlated with physical measurement using either conventional or AI methods.

W. W. Weiss

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

NMR imaging of materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in the area of NMR imaging has been driven by the widespread success of medical imaging. John M. Listerud of the Pendergrass Diagnostic Research Laboratories, Steven W. Sinton of Lockheed, and Gary P. Drobny of the University of Washington describe the principal image reconstruction methods, factors limiting spatial resolution, and applications of imaging to the study of materials.

Listerud, J.M.; Sinton, S.W.; Drobny, G.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are included in appendices: field test data, field non-edited data, raw data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, analysis of solids samples from primary zone, chemical analysis procedures, scale and corrosion evaluation, laboratory report on scale deposits, and sand detector strip charts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

414

Manhattan Project: Trinity Images  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

IMAGES IMAGES Trinity Test Site (July 16, 1945) Resources > Photo Gallery The first 0.11 seconds of the Nuclear Age These seven photographs of the Trinity test were taken by time-lapse cameras. The last is 109 milliseconds, or 0.109 seconds, after detonation. Scroll down to view each individual image. The photographs are courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory, via the Federation of American Scientists web site. The animation is original to the Office of History and Heritage Resources. The dawn of the Nuclear Age (Trinity image #1) The dawn of the Nuclear Age Trinity image #2 Trinity image #3 Trinity image #4 Trinity image #5 Trinity, 0.09 seconds after detonation (Trinity image #6) Trinity, 0.09 seconds after detonation Trinity, 0.11 seconds after detonation (Trinity image #7)

415

A model, a heuristic and a decision support system to solve the scheduling problem of an earth observing satellite constellation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

China plans to launch four small optical satellites and four small SAR satellites to form a natural disaster monitoring constellation. Data can be obtained by the constellation in all weather conditions for disaster alert and environmental damage analysis. The scheduling problem for the constellation consists of selecting and timetabling the observation activities to acquire the requested images of the earth surface and scheduling the download activities to transmit the image files to a set of ground stations. The scheduling problem is required to be solved every day in a typical 1-day horizon and it must respect complex satellite operational constraints as well as request preferences, such as visibility time windows, transition time between consecutive observations or downloads, memory capacity, energy capacity, polygon target requests and priorities. The objective is to maximize the rewards of the images taken and transmitted. We present a nonlinear model of the scheduling problem, develop a priority-based heuristic with conflict-avoided, limited backtracking and download-as-needed features, which produces satisfactory feasible plans in a very short time. A decision support system based on the model and the heuristic is also provided. The system performance shows a significant improvement with respect to faster and better scheduling of an earth observing satellite constellation.

Pei Wang; Gerhard Reinelt; Peng Gao; Yuejin Tan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Polarization imaging apparatus with auto-calibration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polarization imaging apparatus measures the Stokes image of a sample. The apparatus consists of an optical lens set, a first variable phase retarder (VPR) with its optical axis aligned 22.5.degree., a second variable phase retarder with its optical axis aligned 45.degree., a linear polarizer, a imaging sensor for sensing the intensity images of the sample, a controller and a computer. Two variable phase retarders were controlled independently by a computer through a controller unit which generates a sequential of voltages to control the phase retardations of the first and second variable phase retarders. A auto-calibration procedure was incorporated into the polarization imaging apparatus to correct the misalignment of first and second VPRs, as well as the half-wave voltage of the VPRs. A set of four intensity images, I.sub.0, I.sub.1, I.sub.2 and I.sub.3 of the sample were captured by imaging sensor when the phase retardations of VPRs were set at (0,0), (.pi.,0), (.pi.,.pi.) and (.pi./2,.pi.), respectively. Then four Stokes components of a Stokes image, S.sub.0, S.sub.1, S.sub.2 and S.sub.3 were calculated using the four intensity images.

Zou, Yingyin Kevin; Zhao, Hongzhi; Chen, Qiushui

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Chapter 18 - Correlation of the Same Fields Imaged in the TEM, Confocal, LM, and MicroCT by Image Registration: From Specimen Preparation to Displaying a Final Composite Image  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Correlated imaging is the process of imaging a specimen with two complementary modalities and then registering and overlaying the fields obtained in each modality to create a composite view. One of the images is made somewhat transparent, allowing detail in the underlying image to be visible and assisting in the registration of the two images. As an example, an image localizing a specific tissue component by fluorescence may be overlaid atop a TEM image of the same field. The resulting composite image would demonstrate specific ultrastructural features in the high-resolution TEM field, which are colorized in the overlay. Other examples include composites from MicroCT or soft X-ray images overlaid atop light microscopy or TEM images. Automated image registration may be facilitated by a variety of sophisticated computer programs utilized by high-throughput laboratories. This chapter is meant for the more occasional user wishing to align images manually. ImageJ is a public domain, image processing program developed at the National Institutes of Health and is available to anyone as a free download. ImageJ performs marvelously well for the purpose of image registration; therefore, step-by-step instructions are included here. Specimen handling, including fixation and choice of embedding media, is not straightforward for correlative imaging. A step-by-step description of the protocols which work in our laboratory is included for simultaneous localization in LM, EM and micro-CT, as well as maintaining GFP emission in tissue embedded for TEM.

Douglas R. Keene; Sara F. Tufa; Melissa H. Wong; Nicholas R. Smith; Lynn Y. Sakai; William A. Horton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Investigation of heterodyne performance of quantum-well detectors. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc., (Contractor) and Martin Marietta Electronic Missles (Participant) is the determination of the heterodyne characteristics of quantum-well detectors. The Participant has developed a quantum-well infrared imaging video detector with very low light level characteristics. A further improvement in low-level infrared detection could be achieved if this device can be operated in the coherent or heterodyne mode. A major program in the Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) presently uses individual heterodyne infrared detectors in a system under development for fusion diagnostics. An imaging infrared heterodyne detector would represent a major breakthrough in this area and would have major implications for other plasma diagnostic programs. The Participant is also studying the application of this device in the area of laser radar.

Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Calabretta, J. [Martin Marietta Electronic Missles (United States)

1994-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

Improving image segmentation by learning region affinities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We utilize the context information of other regions in hierarchical image segmentation to learn new regions affinities. It is well known that a single choice of quantization of an image space is highly unlikely to be a common optimal quantization level for all categories. Each level of quantization has its own benefits. Therefore, we utilize the hierarchical information among different quantizations as well as spatial proximity of their regions. The proposed affinity learning takes into account higher order relations among image regions, both local and long range relations, making it robust to instabilities and errors of the original, pairwise region affinities. Once the learnt affinities are obtained, we use a standard image segmentation algorithm to get the final segmentation. Moreover, the learnt affinities can be naturally unutilized in interactive segmentation. Experimental results on Berkeley Segmentation Dataset and MSRC Object Recognition Dataset are comparable and in some aspects better than the state-of-art methods.

Prasad, Lakshman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Xingwei [TEMPLE UNIV.; Latecki, Longin J [TEMPLE UNIV.

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Image Artifacts Resulting from Gamma-Ray Tracking Algorithms Used with Compton Imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For Compton imaging it is necessary to determine the sequence of gamma-ray interactions in a single detector or array of detectors. This can be done by time-of-flight measurements if the interactions are sufficiently far apart. However, in small detectors the time between interactions can be too small to measure, and other means of gamma-ray sequencing must be used. In this work, several popular sequencing algorithms are reviewed for sequences with two observed events and three or more observed events in the detector. These algorithms can result in poor imaging resolution and introduce artifacts in the backprojection images. The effects of gamma-ray tracking algorithms on Compton imaging are explored in the context of the 4? Compton imager built by the University of Michigan.

Seifert, Carolyn E.; He, Zhong

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

Greg Ruskauff

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Image registration method for medical image sequences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Image registration of low contrast image sequences is provided. In one aspect, a desired region of an image is automatically segmented and only the desired region is registered. Active contours and adaptive thresholding of intensity or edge information may be used to segment the desired regions. A transform function is defined to register the segmented region, and sub-pixel information may be determined using one or more interpolation methods.

Gee, Timothy F.; Goddard, James S.

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

423

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

424

Exciton pattern generation in GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple quantum wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exciton photoluminescence pattern generation is investigated in multiple quantum wells. High-contrast outer rings and localized bright spots are generated using efficient field-assisted upconversion of laser light whose photon energy lies below the energy of the luminescing quantum well transition. Time-resolved images of the bright spots reveal unexpected dynamics that are not explained by two-dimensional rate equations for generation and diffusion. This behavior can be understood as a result of three-dimensional transport in the vertically extended samples.

B. Fluegel, K. Alberi, L. Bhusal, A. Mascarenhas, D. W. Snoke, G. Karunasiri, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. West

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

OBSERVED DAMPING OF THE SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC MODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectroscopic and stereoscopic imaging observations of slow magnetoacoustic wave propagation within a coronal loop are investigated to determine the decay length scale of the slow magnetoacoustic mode in three dimensions and the density profile within the loop system. The slow wave is found to have an e-folding decay length scale of 20,000{sup +4000}{sub -3000} km with a uniform density profile along the loop base. These observations place quantitative constraints on the modeling of wave propagation within coronal loops. Theoretical forward modeling suggests that magnetic field line divergence is the dominant damping factor and thermal conduction is insufficient, given the observed parameters of the coronal loop temperature, density, and wave mode period.

Marsh, M. S.; Walsh, R. W. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); De Moortel, I., E-mail: mike.s.marsh@gmail.com, E-mail: mmarsh@uclan.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Wednesday, 28 March 2012 00:00 Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

427

Natural geometric representation for electron local observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

Minogin, V.G., E-mail: minogin@isan.troitsk.ru

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of Devonian shale reservoir using multi-well pressure transient testing data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-well test program designed to study the gas production mechanisms of the eastern Devonian shale reservoirs was completed. Two offset wells were drilled as observation wells in Meigs County, OH. The results indicated a complete anisotropic, layered reservoir system which implies directional gas flow and orientation of natural fractures. This study has provided an insight into the production behavior of reservoirs. It will aid future development of shale gas by optimizing well spacing and understanding of the gas release mechanisms of the Devonian shalings. 33 refs.

Lee, B.O.; Alam, J.; Sawyer, W.K.; Horan, K.; Frohne, K.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Observations of spheromak equilibria which differ from the minimum-energy state and have internal kink distortions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental spheromak magnetic equilibria are measured which differ significantly from the minimum-energy state, and are well described by a numerical model where j?/B has a linear dependence on the poloidal flux function. Equilibria are determined in a nonperturbing manner by the combination of measurements of flux-conserver image currents with calculations from this model. These equilibria are corroborated by the observation of nondisruptive rotating internal kink distortions (with toroidal mode numbers n=1, 2, and 3), coupled with theoretical thresholds for the onset of these modes.

S. O. Knox; Cris W. Barnes; G. J. Marklin; T. R. Jarboe; I. Henins; H. W. Hoida; B. L. Wright

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Colorado | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Use of Wells, "Geothermal Well" means a well that is constructed for the purpose of exploration, use of a geothermal resource, or reinjection of a geothermal fluid. A permit...

431

Property:WellFieldParasiticConsump | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name WellFieldParasiticConsump Property Type Number Description Well-Field Parasitic Consumption (MWh). Pages using the property "WellFieldParasiticConsump" Showing 2 pages using...

432

Economic viability of multiple-lateral horizontal wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizontal wells are gaining popularity throughout the petroleum industry as a means to increase well productivity and enhance incremental economics. Horizontal wells provide greater reservoir exposure and are useful in intersecting additional pay...

Smith, Christopher Jason

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

Masco Home Services/WellHome | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WellHome Jump to: navigation, search Name: Masco Home ServicesWellHome Place: Taylor, MI Website: http:www.mascohomeserviceswe References: Masco Home ServicesWellHome1...

434

Science and Technology for Sustainable Well-Being  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to well-being and sustainability, before turning...Well-Being and Sustainability Human well-being rests on a foundation of three pillars, the preservation...to the challenge of sustainability for ocean systems and...

John P. Holdren

2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

435

Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

well Deep Blue No. 1. Notes Well log data was collected in Deep Blue No. 1 upon its completion. The logging was conducted by Welaco Well Analysis Corporation. Temperature,...

436

RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Utah | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

if they meet the requirements of Section 73-3-8, they will be approved by the State Engineer on a well-to-well basis or as a group of wells which comprise an operating unit and...

437

Sky Cover from MFRSR Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their model clear-sky counterparts are two main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumulus clouds. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumulus clouds. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

395. Notes Among these wells were exploration and monitoring wells drilled near the Fish Hatchery Springs in preparation for the siting of a second binary geothermal power...

439

RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/California | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& Well Field Permit Agency: California Department of Conservation, Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources Drilling & Well Field Permit Before drilling can commense,...

440

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydraulics and Well Testing of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sustainability Assessment of Workforce Well-Being and Mission...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sustainability Assessment of Workforce Well-Being and Mission Readiness Sustainability Assessment of Workforce Well-Being and Mission Readiness Presentation by Dr. Jodi Jacobsen,...

442

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

443

NMOSE-Proof of Completion of Well | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Citation NMOSE-Proof of Completion of Well (2014). Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleNMOSE-ProofofCompletionofWell&oldid727378" Categories: References...

444

ELIMINATING THE WELLBORE RESPONSE IN TRANSIENT WELL TEST ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam-Water Flow in Geothermal Wells", J. Pet. Tech. , ~, p.Storage Effects in Geothermal Wells," Soc. Pet. Eng. J. ,

Miller, C.W.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Definition: Stepout-Deepening Wells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stepout-Deepening Wells Stepout-Deepening Wells Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stepout-Deepening Wells A well drilled at a later time over remote, undeveloped portions of a partially developed continuous reservoir rock. A deepening well is reentering a well and drilling to a deeper reservoir. Often referred to as an "infield exploration well" in the oil and gas industry.[1] Also Known As delayed development well References ↑ http://www.answers.com/topic/step-out-well Ste LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. p-out-well: a well drilled in the expected extent of a reservoir that is being developed but at a significant distance, usually two or more drilling and spacing units, from the nearest producer in that reservoir. A step-out

446

Simulating AIA observations of a flux rope ejection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. Observations now show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. These observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities. To fully understand CMEs we need to compare equivalent quantities derived from both observations and theoretical models. To this end we aim to produce synthesised AIA observations from simluations of a flux rope ejection. To carry this out we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. We perform a simulation where a flux rope is ejected from the solar corona. From the density and temperature of the plasma in the simulation we synthesise AIA observations. The emission is then integrated along the...

Pagano, Paolo; Poedts, Stefaan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Lightning and radar observations of hurricane Rita landfall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) owns and operates an array of Very-Low Frequency (VLF) sensors that measure the Radio-Frequency (RF) waveforms emitted by Cloud-to-Ground (CG) and InCloud (IC) lightning. This array, the Los Alamos Sferic Array (LASA), has approximately 15 sensors concentrated in the Great Plains and Florida, which detect electric field changes in a bandwidth from 200 Hz to 500 kHz (Smith et al., 2002). Recently, LANL has begun development of a new dual-band RF sensor array that includes the Very-High Frequency (VHF) band as well as the VLF. Whereas VLF lightning emissions can be used to deduce physical parameters such as lightning type and peak current, VHF emissions can be used to perform precise 3d mapping of individual radiation sources, which can number in the thousands for a typical CG flash. These new dual-band sensors will be used to monitor lightning activity in hurricanes in an effort to better predict intensification cycles. Although the new LANL dual-band array is not yet operational, we have begun initial work utilizing both VLF and VHF lightning data to monitor hurricane evolution. In this paper, we present the temporal evolution of Rita's landfall using VLF and VHF lightning data, and also WSR-88D radar. At landfall, Rita's northern eyewall experienced strong updrafts and significant lightning activity that appear to mark a transition between oceanic hurricane dynamics and continental thunderstorm dynamics. In section 2, we give a brief overview of Hurricane Rita, including its development as a hurricane and its lightning history. In the following section, we present WSR-88D data of Rita's landfall, including reflectivity images and temporal variation. In section 4, we present both VHF and VLF lightning data, overplotted on radar reflectivity images. Finally, we discuss our observations, including a comparison to previous studies and a brief conclusion.

Henderson, Bradley G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Suszcynsky, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamlin, Timothy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeffery, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiens, Kyle C [TEXAS TECH U.; Orville, R E [TEXAS A& M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Velocity and concentration studies of flowing suspensions by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Final report, October 7, 1994--October 6, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques were developed to study concentrated suspension flows. The tasks completed were: (1) materials selection for imaging of both particle and fluid components, (2) pipe flow measurements, and (3) flows in complex geometries. The partially completed task is the development of rapid imaging techniques by analog compensation of eddy currents, generated by the gradient pulses, and real-time image reconstruction from the data. The best combination of materials found is pharmaceutical beads in silicon oil. Their relaxation times T{sub 1} are sufficiently different to permit imaging the two components separately. The pipe flow experiment used 3 mm, neutrally buoyant, plastic particles, up to 40% by volume, in 80--90W transmission oil flowing in a 5 cm diameter pipe. Distances ranging from 60 cm to 6 m downstream from a commercial mixer was studied. The flow is fully developed at 6 m and the concentration and velocity profiles agree with earlier lower resolution experiments. The eddy current compensation scheme works well for two channels and is being extended to eight channels. The authors have also built a rapid reconstruction hardware that processes and displays images in a fraction of a second. They studied the flow of neutrally buoyant concentrated suspension past a step expansion and contraction in a cylindrical pipe. Interesting transition is observed at the expansion whereby the high fluids-fraction outer layer spreads to become the outer layer in the larger pipe.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Real-time flare detection in ground-based H$\\alpha$ imaging at Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kanzelh\\"ohe Observatory (KSO) regularly performs high-cadence full-disk imaging of the solar chromosphere in the H$\\alpha$ and CaIIK spectrallines as well as the solar photosphere in white-light. In the frame of ESA's Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme, a new system for real-time H$\\alpha$ data provision and automatic flare detection was developed at KSO. The data and events detected are published in near real-time at ESA's SSA Space Weather portal (http://swe.ssa.esa.int/web/guest/kso-federated). In this paper, we describe the H$\\alpha$ instrument, the image recognition algorithms developed, the implementation into the KSO H$\\alpha$ observing system and present the evaluation results of the real-time data provision and flare detection for a period of five months. The H$\\alpha$ data provision worked in $99.96$% of the images, with a mean time lag between image recording and online provision of 4s. Within the given criteria for the automatic image recognition system (at least three H$\\alpha$ images a...

Ptzi, Werner; Riegler, Gernot; Amerstorfer, Ulrike; Pock, Thomas; Temmer, Manuela; Polanec, Wolfgang; Baumgartner, Dietmar J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

ULTRADEEP K{sub S} IMAGING IN THE GOODS-N  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an ultradeep K{sub S} -band image that covers 0.5 x 0.5 deg{sup 2} centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N). The image reaches a 5{sigma} depth of K{sub S,AB}=24.45 in the GOODS-N region, which is as deep as the GOODS-N Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) 3.6 {mu}m image. We present a new method of constructing IRAC catalogs that uses the higher spatial resolution K{sub S} image and catalog as priors and iteratively subtracts fluxes from the IRAC images to estimate the IRAC fluxes. Our iterative method is different from the {chi}{sup 2} approach adopted by other groups. We verified our results using data taken in two different epochs of observations, as well as by comparing our colors with the colors of stars and with the colors derived from model spectral energy distributions of galaxies at various redshifts. We make available to the community our WIRCam K{sub S} -band image and catalog (94,951 objects in 0.25 deg{sup 2}), the Interactive Data Language pipeline used for reducing the WIRCam images, and our IRAC 3.6-8.0 {mu}m catalog (16,950 objects in 0.06 deg{sup 2} at 3.6 {mu}m). With this improved K{sub S} and IRAC catalog and a large spectroscopic sample from our previous work, we study the color-magnitude and color-color diagrams of galaxies. We compare the effectiveness of using K{sub S} and IRAC colors to select active galactic nuclei and galaxies at various redshifts. We also study a color selection of z = 0.65-1.2 galaxies using the K{sub S} , 3.6 {mu}m, and 4.5 {mu}m bands.

Wang, W.-H.; Ting, H.-C. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, PO Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Keenan, Ryan C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

Gambhir, Sanjiv (Portola Valley, CA); Pritha, Ray (Mountain View, CA)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Measuring well hydraulic connectivity in fractured bedrock using periodic slug tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Periodic hydraulic experiments were conducted in a five-spot well cluster completed in a single bedding plane fracture. Tests were performed by using a winch-operated slug (submerged solid cylinder) to create a periodic head disturbance in one well and observing the phase shift and attenuation of the head response in the remaining wells. Transmissivity (T) and storativity (S) were inverted independently from head response. Inverted T decreased and S increased with oscillation period. Estimated S was more variable among well pairs than T, suggesting S may be a better estimator of hydraulic connectivity among closely spaced wells. These estimates highlighted a zone of poor hydraulic connection that was not identified by a constant rate test conducted in the same wells. Periodic slug tests appear to be a practical and effective technique for establishing local scale spatial variability in hydraulic parameters.

Eric Guiltinan; Matthew W. Becker

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Cost analysis of oil, gas, and geothermal well drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper evaluates current and historical drilling and completion costs of oil and gas wells and compares them with geothermal wells costs. As a starting point, we developed a new cost index for US onshore oil and gas wells based primarily on the API Joint Association Survey 19762009 data. This index describes year-to-year variations in drilling costs and allows one to express historical drilling expenditures in current year dollars. To distinguish from other cost indices we have labeled it the Cornell Energy Institute (CEI) Index. This index has nine sub-indices for different well depth intervals and has been corrected for yearly changes in drilling activity. The CEI index shows 70% higher increase in well cost between 2003 and 2008 compared to the commonly used Producer Price Index (PPI) for drilling oil and gas wells. Cost trends for various depths were found to be significantly different and explained in terms of variations of oil and gas prices, costs, and availability of major well components and services at particular locations. Multiple methods were evaluated to infer the cost-depth correlation for geothermal wells in current year dollars. In addition to analyzing reported costs of the most recently completed geothermal wells, we investigated the results of the predictive geothermal well cost model WellCost Lite. Moreover, a cost database of 146 historical geothermal wells has been assembled. The CEI index was initially used to normalize costs of these wells to current year dollars. A comparison of normalized costs of historical wells with recently drilled ones and WellCost Lite predictions shows that cost escalation rates of geothermal wells were considerably lower compared to hydrocarbon wells and that a cost index based on hydrocarbon wells is not applicable to geothermal well drilling. Besides evaluating the average well costs, this work examined economic improvements resulting from increased drilling experience. Learning curve effects related to drilling multiple similar wells within the same field were correlated.

Maciej Z. Lukawski; Brian J. Anderson; Chad Augustine; Louis E. Capuano Jr.; Koenraad F. Beckers; Bill Livesay; Jefferson W. Tester

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Forward observer: stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Stephen King and, quite sincerely, Peter Straub, who even now I regard to be one of the finest of American novelists, his repute shackled by his dedication to what is often perceived to be a distasteful genre) as well as those others trafficking... thing to have, nice for day-trips and the like, but. . . Their verbal ellipses brought back the old sales-department pressure to lvtfke's knuckles and recalled from retirement the fuck-'em-all pugnacity that had sent him hurtling up the ladder back...

Carpenter, Christopher Lee

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Image Segmentation and Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Presents the first unified theory of image segmentation, written by the winners of the 1985 Pattern Recognition Society medal. Until now, image processing algorithms have always been beset by uncertainties, no one method proving completely ...

Roland 1949- Wilson; Michael Spann

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Estimation theoretical image restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we have developed an extensive study to evaluate image restoration from a single image, colored or monochromatic. Using a mixture of Gaussian and Poisson noise process, we derived an objective function to ...

Dolne, Jean J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

459

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

460

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging observation wells" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

462

Video image position determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

Christensen, Wynn (Los Alamos, NM); Anderson, Forrest L. (Bernalillo, NM); Kortegaard, Birchard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Dual Plane Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a technique called Dual Plane Imaging which should significantly improve images which would otherwise be blurred due to atmospheric turbulence. The technique involves capturing all the spatial, directional and temporal information about the arriving photons and processing the data afterwards to produce the sharpened images. The technique has particular relevance for imaging at around 400-1000nm on extremely large telescopes (ELTs).

Parry, Ian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Minisuperspaces: Observables and Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A canonical transformation is performed on the phase space of a number of homogeneous cosmologies to simplify the form of the scalar (or, Hamiltonian) constraint. Using the new canonical coordinates, it is then easy to obtain explicit expressions of Dirac observables, i.e.\\ phase space functions which commute weakly with the constraint. This, in turn, enables us to carry out a general quantization program to completion. We are also able to address the issue of time through ``deparametrization'' and discuss physical questions such as the fate of initial singularities in the quantum theory. We find that they persist in the quantum theory {\\it inspite of the fact that the evolution is implemented by a 1-parameter family of unitary transformations}. Finally, certain of these models admit conditional symmetries which are explicit already prior to the canonical transformation. These can be used to pass to quantum theory following an independent avenue. The two quantum theories --based, respectively, on Dirac observables in the new canonical variables and conditional symmetries in the original ADM variables-- are compared and shown to be equivalent.

Abhay Ashtekar; Ranjeet S. Tate; Claes Uggla

1993-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

465

Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch Freie Universit¨at Berlin, Institut f¨ur Experimentalphysik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin, Germany kuch@physik.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Imaging of magnetic domains has- ern techniques is used nowadays routinely for magnetic imaging of magnetic ma- terials

Kuch, Wolfgang

466

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

Rambaut, Andrew

467

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

Rambaut, Andrew

468

Near-electrode imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Medical imaging systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

Frangioni, John V

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

470

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Overview and Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) began near-continuous full-disk solar measurements on 1 May 2010 from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). An automated processing pipeline keeps pace with observations to produce observable quantities, including the photospheric vector magnetic field, from sequences of filtergrams. The primary 720s observables were released in mid 2010, including Stokes polarization parameters measured at six wavelengths as well as intensity, Doppler velocity, and the line-of-sight magnetic field. More advanced products, including the full vector magnetic field, are now available. Automatically identified HMI Active Region Patches (HARPs) track the location and shape of magnetic regions throughout their lifetime. The vector field is computed using the Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector (VFISV) code optimized for the HMI pipeline; the remaining 180 degree azimuth ambiguity is resolved with the Minimum Energy (ME0) code. The Milne-Eddington inversion is performed on all full-di...

Hoeksema, J Todd; Hayashi, Keiji; Sun, Xudong; Schou, Jesper; Couvidat, Sebastien; Norton, Aimee; Bobra, Monica; Centeno, Rebecca; Leka, K D; Barnes, Graham; Turmon, Michael J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Nanotechnology for Molecular Imaging and Image-Guided Surgery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent development in bioconjugated nanoparticles opens new opportunities for in-vivo molecular imaging and image-guided cancer surgery.

Nie, Shuming

472

Automation in image cytometry : continuous HCS and kinetic image cytometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Automation in Image Cytometry:xiv Abstract of Dissertation Automation in Image Cytometry:

Charlot, David J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Results from laboratory tests of the two-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of laboratory experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the feasibility of two dimensional time-encoded imaging. A prototype two-dimensional time encoded imaging system was designed and constructed. Results from imaging measurements of single and multiple point sources as well as extended source distributions are presented. Time encoded imaging has proven to be a simple method for achieving high resolution two-dimensional imaging with potential to be used in future arms control and treaty verification applications.

Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik; Gerling, Mark D; Le Galloudec, Nathalie Joelle

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Peering into a Quantum Well | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Peering into a Quantum Well Peering into a Quantum Well Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 09.01.11 Peering into a Quantum Well Supercomputer simulation illuminates mysterious "droop" in solid-state lighting. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Gallium nitride light-emitting diode. Image courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Gallium nitride light-emitting diode. Despite being cool, ultra-efficient, and long-lasting, solid-state lighting has yet to conquer the general lighting market partly due to a problem called "efficiency droop." New findings from simulations carried out at

475

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Distribution and Production of Oil and Gas Wells by State Release date: January 7, 2011 | Next Release Date: To be determined Distribution tables of oil and gas wells by production rate for all wells, including marginal wells, are now available for most states for the years 1995 to 2009. Graphs displaying historical behavior of well production rate are also available. To download data for all states and all years, including years prior to 1995, in an Excel spreadsheet XLS (4,000 KB). The quality and completeness of data is dependent on update lag times and the quality of individual state and commercial source databases. Undercounting of the number of wells occurs in states where data is sometimes not available at the well level but only at the lease level. States not listed below will be added later as data becomes available.

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Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Online Nevada Encyclopedia, 2009 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat Citation Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Salt Wells, Eight Mile Flat [Internet]. 2009. Online Nevada Encyclopedia. [updated 2009/03/24;cited 2013/08/07]. Available from: http://www.onlinenevada.org/articles/salt-wells-eight-mile-flat Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Salt Wells Geothermal Area

477

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation between wells is also presented. Analyses from multiple boreholes show fluid stratigraphy that correlates from well to well. The wells include large producers, small to moderate producers, problem producers, injectors, and non producers Author(s): Dilley, L.M.; Newman, D.L. ; McCulloch, J.; Wiggett, G. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2005, 1/1/2005

478

Observations of Edge Turbulence  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edge Turbulence Edge Turbulence near the X-point of Alcator C-Mod APS-2007 (1) J.L. Terry, S.J. Zweben*, B. LaBombard, I. Cziegler, O. Grulke + , D.P. Stotler* MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center *Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory + MPI for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Assoc., Greifswald, Germany American Physical Society - Div. of Plasma Physics Orlando, FL Nov. 12 - Nov. 16, 2007 APS-2007 (2) Background and Motivation for "Xpt-region" View Strong edge turbulence has been observed in nearly all magnetic confinement devices. Desire predictive capability Most previous measurements made near outboard midplane where the turbulence has the following main features: - generation is ballooning-like (absent at inboard midplane, etc.) - filaments/blobs moves radially outward with some poloidal motion

479

Effect of image quality on calcification detection in digital mammography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study aims to investigate if microcalcification detection varies significantly when mammographic images are acquired using different image qualities, including: different detectors, dose levels, and different image processing algorithms. An additional aim was to determine how the standard European method of measuring image quality using threshold gold thickness measured with a CDMAM phantom and the associated limits in current EU guidelines relate to calcification detection. Methods: One hundred and sixty two normal breast images were acquired on an amorphous seleni