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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch Freie Universit¨at Berlin, Institut f¨ur Experimentalphysik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin, Germany kuch@physik.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Imaging of magnetic domains has- ern techniques is used nowadays routinely for magnetic imaging of magnetic ma- terials

Kuch, Wolfgang

2

Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Mosher, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

An iterative technique for refinement of selective excitations for magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selective RF pulses are needed or many application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The desired excitation profile is omen used as the spectrum of the applied RF pulse; the modulation waveform of the RF pulse which approximately excites...

Lebsack, Eliot Todd

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Image compression technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

1997-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

RF Pulse Design for Parallel Excitation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel excitation is an emerging technique to improve or accelerate multi-dimensional spatially selective excitations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using multi-channel transmit arrays. The technique has potential in many applications...

Liu, Yinan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

6

Dissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Telluride Photovoltaics The goal of increasing the efficiency of solar cell devices is a universal oneDissertation Imaging as Characterization Techniques for Thin-Film Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics. Increased photovoltaic (PV) performance means an increase in competition with other energy tech- nologies

Sites, James R.

7

Chapter 20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and software training from Siemens Medical Solutions; research funding through the Siemens-MIT Alliance and Technology (HST). 2 Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany. #12;Chapter 20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Siemens Medical Solutions, Siemens-MIT Alliance, HST Martinos Catalyst Fund. Project Staff: Audrey P. Fan

8

Directed evolution of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for noninvasive imaging of dopamine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of molecular probes that allow in vivo imaging of neural signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution remains challenging. Here we applied directed evolution techniques to create magnetic ...

Shapiro, Mikhail G.

9

Techniques calm fear of imaging machine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic resonance imaging has become a valuable tool in diagnosing diseases, and the imaging devices are now used as often as 2 million times a year in the United States. But as many as 10 percent of patients advised to undergo the procedure cannot because they become overwhelmed with claustrophobialike fear triggered by having to lie motionless in the machine's tunnel-like cylinder for about 45 minutes. To counteract this fear, several hospitals now practice various techniques to help reduce the feelings of confinement. One popular method is to give a patient special eyeglasses that allow him to look beyond his feet and see the tunnel opening. Other glasses use mirrors to direct the patient's vision out the back of the unit to large wilderness photographs or murals that simulate a sense of spaciousness. Even a basic item like a set of headphones that plays music can often distract a patient, and technicians frequently hold a patient's hand or foot during the procedure. Another trick is to invite family members and friends to remain with the patient during the scan to provide company and reassurance.

Van Pelt, D.

1990-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging of Magnetic

11

Electronic imaging system and technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

Bolstad, J.O.

1984-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

Kraus, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Single echo acquisition magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dramatic improvement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan time over the past fifteen years through gradient-based methods that sample k-space more efficiently and quickly cannot be sustained, as thresholds regarding hardware and safety...

McDougall, Mary Preston

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The MPI value was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

Murase, Kenya, E-mail: murase@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Faculty of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

15

Instrumentation for parallel magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the art of parallel MR imaging. First, a low-cost desktop MR scanner was developed (2.54 cm fields-of view) at low magnetic field strengths (25 T). The performance of the prototype was verified through bench...

Brown, David Gerald

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

16

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold Flooding During Continuous Fuel Cell Operation. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold...

17

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging of

18

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging ofLensless

19

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging

20

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless ImagingLensless

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Low energy neutral atom imaging techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential scientific return from low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of the magnetosphere is extraordinary. The technical challenges of LENA detection include (1) removal of LENAs from the tremendous ambient UV without losing information of their incident trajectories, (2) quantification of their trajectories, and (3) obtaining high sensitivity measurements. Two techniques that have been proposed for this purpose are based on fundamentally different atomic interaction mechanisms between LENAs and a solid: LENA transmission through an ultrathin foil and LENA reflection from a solid surface. Both of these methods provide LENA ionization (for subsequent removal from the UV by electrostatic deflection) and secondary electron emission (for start pulse generation for time-of-flight and/or coincidence). We present a comparative study of the transmission and reflection techniques based on differences in atomic interactions with solids and surfaces. We show that transmission methods yield an order of magnitude greater secondary electron emission than reflection methods. Transmission methods are shown to be sufficient for LENA energies of approximately 1 keV to greater than 30 keV. Reflection methods using low work function surfaces could be employed for LENA ionization for energies less than several keV.

Funsten, H.O. McComas, D.J.; Scime, E.E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25?kHz and 20?mT/?{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (?). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2?kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52?mT/?{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Nel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (?H{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Ferguson, R. M. [LodeSpin Labs, P.O. Box 95632, Seattle, Washington 98145 (United States)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Detection August 05, 2013 Researcher Maria Cekanova analyzes the neutron radiographs of a canine breast...

24

Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

Hu, Yanle, E-mail: yhu@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Selective document image data compression technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel.--(235 words)

Fu, Chi-Yung (29 Cameo Way, San Francisco, CA 94131); Petrich, Loren I. (1674 Cordoba St., #4, Livermore, CA 94550)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Selective document image data compression technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel. 10 figs.

Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Madonne: Document Image Analysis Techniques for Cultural Heritage Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Madonne: Document Image Analysis Techniques for Cultural Heritage Documents Jean-Marc Ogier and Karl Tombre Abstract. This paper presents the Madonne project, a French initiative to use document image anal- ysis techniques for the purpose of preserving and exploiting heritage documents. 1

Boyer, Edmond

28

Special Section Guest Editorial Coherent Raman Imaging Techniques and Biomedical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special Section Guest Editorial Coherent Raman Imaging Techniques and Biomedical Applications. The combination of high resolution and molecular contrast has moved Raman techniques into the biomedical spotlight on biomedical imag- ing. The spontaneous Raman interaction is weak, yielding insufficient photons for fast

Potma, Eric Olaf

29

Identification of breast calcification using magnetic resonance imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MRI phase and magnitude images provide information about local magnetic field variation ({Delta}B{sub 0}), which can consequently be used to understand tissue properties. Often, phase information is discarded. However, corrected phase images are able to produce contrast as a result of magnetic susceptibility differences and local field inhomogeneities due to the presence of diamagnetic and paramagnetic substances. Three-dimensional (3D) susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) can be used to probe changes in MRI phase evolution and, subsequently, result in an alternate form of contrast between tissues. For example, SWI has been useful in the assessment of negative phase induced {Delta}B{sub 0} modulation due to the presence of paramagnetic substances such as iron. Very little, however, has been done to assess positive phase induced contrast changes resulting from the presence of diamagnetic substances such as precipitated calcium. As ductal carcinoma in situ, which is the precursor of invasive ductal cancer, is often associated with breast microcalcification, the authors proposed using SWI as a possible visualization technique. In this study, breast phantoms containing calcifications (0.4-1.5 mm) were imaged using mammography, computed tomography (CT), and SWI. Corrected phase and magnitude images acquired using SWI allowed identification and correlation of all calcifications seen on CT. As the approach is a 3D technique, it could potentially allow for more accurate localization and biopsy and maybe even reduce the use of gadolinium contrast. Furthermore, the approach may be beneficial to women with dense breast tissue where the ability to detect microcalcification with mammography is reduced.

Fatemi-Ardekani, Ali; Boylan, Colm; Noseworthy, Michael D. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Centre, Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Diagnostic Imaging, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada) and Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Imaging Research Centre, Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Diagnostic Imaging, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5 (Canada) and Electrical and Computer Engineering, and School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Magnetic resonance imaging of self-assembled biomaterial scaffolds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions and/or mixtures comprising peptide amphiphile compounds comprising one or more contrast agents, as can be used in a range of magnetic resonance imaging applications.

Bull, Steve R; Meade, Thomas J; Stupp, Samuel I

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA); Minard, Kevin R. (Kennewick, WA); Majors, Paul D. (Kennewick, WA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

32

Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging using parallel transmission at 7T  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), also known as phase-encoded (PE) chemical shift imaging (CSI), suffers from both low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the brain metabolites, as well as inflexible ...

Gagoski, Borjan Aleksandar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

CMOS passive pixel image design techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CMOS technology provides an attractive alternative to the currently dominant CCD technology for implementing low-power, low-cost imagers with high levels of integration. Two pixel configurations are possible in CMOS ...

Fujimori, Iliana L. (Iliana Lucia)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

EXPERIMENTAL IDENTIFICATION OF COHESIVE ZONE MODELS FROM THERMOMECHANICAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 EXPERIMENTAL IDENTIFICATION OF COHESIVE ZONE MODELS FROM THERMOMECHANICAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES S]. Although CZMs are becoming increasingly powerful, the identification of these models still remains of the ductile material into a purely elastoplastic behaviour related to the bulk response (hardening

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

35

Study of microfluidic measurement techniques using novel optical imaging diagnostics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is applied for a 3-D vector field mapping in a microscopic flow and a Brownian motion tracking of nanoparticles. This technique modifies OSSM system for a micro-fluidic experiment, and the imaging system captures a diffracted particle image having numerous...

Park, Jaesung

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

36

On the dynamics of magnetic fluids in magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hydrodynamics of magnetic fluids, often termed ferrofluids, has been an active area of research since the mid 1960s. However, it is only in the past twenty years that these fluids have begun to be used in magnetic ...

Cantillon-Murphy, Pdraig J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of green-state ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is the development of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques and technology applicable to the nondestructive characterization of green-state ceramics. To this end, a three-dimensional (3-D) NMR imaging technique has been developed, based on a back-projection acquisition protocol in combination with image reconstruction techniques that are based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. The method incorporates the experimental flexibility to overcome many of the difficulties associated with imaging of solid and semisolid broad-line materials, and also provides contiguously sampled data in three dimensions. This technique has been evaluated as a nondestructive characterizauon method for determining the spatial distribution of organic additves in green-state injection-molded cylindrical Si{sub 3}N{sup 4} tensile specimens. The technique has been evaluated on the basis of providing moderate image resolution over large sample volumes, high resolution over smaller specimen volumes, and sensitivity to variations in the concentration of organics. Resolution of 200{mu}m has been obtained with excellent sensitivity to concentration. A detailed account of the 3-D imaging results obtained from the study, a discussion of the difficulties and limitations of the imaging technique, and suggestions for technique and system improvements are included.

Dieckman, S.L.; Gopalsami, N.; Ford, J.M.; Raptis, A.C.; Ellingson, W.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rizo, P. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France). Lab. d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Informatique); Tracey, D.M.; Pujari, V.K. (Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

NMR imaging techniques and applications in the flow behavior of fluids in porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proton magnetic resonance technique can be used to determine the oil saturation in the pores of a rock. The NMR system can produce images of the molecules under investigation because the signals recorded are obtained directly from fluids contained... in liquids as well. This should enable us to obtain additional information about the fluids in the rock '4. Spin-spin relaxation has a characteristic time T~. T~ is the time constant for the decay of the precessing R-Zo component of the magnetization...

Halimi, Hassan I

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Solid-Cryogen Cooling Technique for Superconducting Magnets of NMR and MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes a solid-cryogen cooling technique currently being developed at the M.I.T. Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory for application to superconducting magnets of NMR and MRI. The technique is particularly ...

Iwasa, Yukikazu

40

Microfluidically Cryo-Cooled Planar Coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is typically required for higher resolution and faster speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Planar microcoils as receiver probes in MRI systems offer the potential to be configured into array elements for fast...

Koo, Chiwan

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A two-parameter computational model is proposed for the study of the regional motion of the left ventricle (LV) wall using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) data. In this model, the LV wall motion is mathematically ...

Alenezy, Mohammed D.

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

Improvements in magnetic resonance imaging excitation pulse design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the design of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radio-frequency (RF) excitation pulses, and its primary contributions are made through connections with the novel multiple-system single-output (MSSO) ...

Zelinski, Adam Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic...

44

A comparison of spotlight synthetic aperture radar image formation techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spotlight synthetic aperture radar images can be formed from the complex phase history data using two main techniques: (1) polar-to-cartesian interpolation followed by two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform (2DFFT), and (2) convolution backprojection (CBP). CBP has been widely used to reconstruct medical images in computer aided tomography, and only recently has been applied to form synthetic aperture radar imagery. It is alleged that CBP yields higher quality images because (1) all the Fourier data are used and (2) the polar formatted data is used directly to form a 2D Cartesian image and therefore 2D interpolation is not required. This report compares the quality of images formed by CBP and several modified versions of the 2DFFT method. We show from an image quality point of view that CBP is equivalent to first windowing the phase history data and then interpolating to an exscribed rectangle. From a mathematical perspective, we should expect this conclusion since the same Fourier data are used to form the SAR image. We next address the issue of parallel implementation of each algorithm. We dispute previous claims that CBP is more readily parallelizable than the 2DFFT method. Our conclusions are supported by comparing execution times between massively parallel implementations of both algorithms, showing that both experience similar decreases in computation time, but that CBP takes significantly longer to form an image.

Knittle, C.D.; Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

X-ray imaging of vortex cores in confined magnetic structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cores of magnetic vortices in micron-sized NiFe disk structures, with thicknesses between 150 and 50 nm, were imaged and analysed by high resolution magnetic soft X-ray microscopy. A decrease of the vortex core radius was observed, from #24; ~38 to 18 nm with decreasing disk thickness. By comparing with full 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the well-known barrel structure, we obtained excellent agreement taking into account instrumental broadening and a small perpendicular anisotropy. The proven magnetic spatial resolution of better than 25 nm was sufficient to identify a negative dip close to the vortex core, originating from stray fields of the core. Magnetic vortex structures can serve as test objects for evaluating sensitivity and spatial resolution of advanced magnetic microscopy techniques.

Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Kasai, S.; Yamada, K.; Ono, T.; Thiaville, A.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

46

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in...

47

Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D/sub 2/O in a solution with water.

Kehayias, J.J.; Joel, D.D.; Adams, W.H.; Stein, H.L.

1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

48

Application of Parallel Imaging to Murine Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This dissertation describes foundational level work to enable parallel imaging of mice on a 4.7 Tesla/40 cm bore research scanner. Reducing the size of the hardware setup associated with typical parallel imaging was an integral part of achieving the work, as animal...

Chang, Chieh-Wei 1980-

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

49

3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

50

Portable low-cost magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purpose: As the premiere modality for brain imaging, MRI could find wider applicability if lightweight, portable systems were available for siting in unconventional locations such as intensive care units (ICUs), physician ...

Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Parallel magnetic resonance imaging: characterization and comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Sodickson, 1997], GRAPPA [Griswold, 2002] and SPACE RIP [Kyriakos, 2000]; developed in the past decade have been studied, simulated and compared in this research. Because of the dependence of the parallel imaging methods on numerous factors such as receiver...

Rane, Swati Dnyandeo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the only logging technique available to estimate pore-size  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ABSTRACT Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the only logging technique available to estimate, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) logging has been used to assess a handful of key petrophysical parameters

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

53

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic resonance imaging findings and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic to evaluate white matter architecture after preterm birth. The goals were (1) to compare white matter if sex, gestational age, birth- weight, white matter injury score from conventional magnetic resonance

Grill-Spector, Kalanit

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced imaging techniques Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

techniques Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced imaging techniques Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Photogrammetric & LiDAR Data...

55

Original Research In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original Research In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Cervical Spinal Cord at 3 Tesla is feasible at 3 T. Key Words: MRI; 3 Tesla; cervical spinal cord; gradient echo; gray matter; white matter J, and pulsatile flow (9,10). Deficits in motor and sensory function from damage to the spinal cord are mainly due

Gorassini, Monica

56

Original Research Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Trans-Septal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vasculature. Key Words: interventional; magnetic resonance imaging; trans-septal catheterization; cardiac; MR with a pigtail catheter in the aorta and the use of His bundle/coronary sinus catheters (1), and, more recently from a percutaneous femoral vein ap- proach. MATERIALS AND METHODS Animal Model The Institutional

Atalar, Ergin

57

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect Imaging of

58

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect Imaging

59

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect ImagingDirect

60

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 1 A new global optimization algorithm and its application to a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 1 A new global optimization algorithm and its application to a Magnetic-cost, low-field multipolar magnet for Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a high field uniformity, the proposed method em- ploys, as local search engine, a derivative free procedure. Under reasonable

Neumaier, Arnold

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Overlap Technique for End-Cap Seals on Cylindrical Magnetic Shields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from studies of the effectiveness of an overlap technique for forming a magnetic seal across a gap at the boundary between a cylindrical magnetic shield and an end-cap. In this technique a thin foil of magnetic material overlaps the two surfaces, thereby spanning the gap across the cylinder and the end-cap, with the magnetic seal then formed by clamping the thin magnetic foil to the surfaces of the cylindrical shield and the end-cap on both sides of the gap. In studies with a prototype 31-cm diameter, 91-cm long, 0.16-cm thick cylindrical magnetic shield and flared end-cap, the magnetic shielding performance of our overlap technique is comparable to that obtained with the conventional method in which the end-cap is placed in direct lapped contact with the cylindrical shield via through bolts or screws.

Malkowski, S; Boissevain, J; Daurer, C; Filippone, B W; Hona, B; Plaster, B; Woods, D; Yan, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamentalmicroscopies Research of magnetism in low dimensions has notnanoscience [3]. Solid state magnetism is also a showcase in

Fischer, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

Frederick, B.deB. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Advanced measurements and techniques in high magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). High magnetic fields present a unique environment for studying the electronic structure of materials. Two classes of materials were chosen for experiments at the national high Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos: highly correlated electron systems and semiconductors. Magnetotransport and thermodynamic experiments were performed on the renormalized ground states of highly correlated electron systems (such as heavy fermion materials and Kondo insulators) in the presence of magnetic fields that are large enough to disrupt the many-body correlations. A variety of optical measurements in high magnetic fields were performed on semiconductor heterostructures including GaAs/AlGaAs single heterojunctions (HEMT structure), coupled double quantum wells (CDQW), asymmetric coupled double quantum wells (ACDQW), multiple quantum wells and a CdTe single crystal thin film.

Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lacerda, A.H. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kim, Y. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A Review of Image-based Rendering Techniques Heung-Yeung Shum and Sing Bing Kang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Review of Image-based Rendering Techniques Heung-Yeung Shum and Sing Bing Kang Microsoft Research hshum, sbkang @microsoft.com Abstract In this paper, we survey the techniques for image-based rendering. Unlike traditional 3D computer graphics in which 3D geometry of the scene is known, image-based rendering

Pang, Alex

66

Calculation of nuclear masses using image reconstruction techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been developed to calculate and predict nuclear masses over the last 70 years. The accuracy of the present state-of-the-art nuclear mass models is impressive, because these quantities can be calculated with an average 0.05 % precision. However this precision level is still insufficient to deal with nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, especially r-process ones. Different approaches exist to calculate nuclear masses, ranging from the simple Bethe-Weizsaecker Liquid Drop Formula (LDM) to the sophisticated Finite Range Droplet Model calculations or the microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliuvob techniques from first principles, using Skyrme or Gogny parametrizations of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Here we suggest a new method to calculate this fundamental property of the atomic nucleus, using a completely phenomenological point of view. Our method is based in the analysis of the differences between measured masses and LDM predictions, which contains information related to those ingredients not taken into account in the LDM formula, such as shell closures, nuclear deformations and residual nuclear interactions. The differences are arranged in a two dimensional plot which can be viewed as an incomplete image of the full chart of nuclides, equivalent to a product of the full image and a binary mask. In order to remove the distortions produced by this mask we employ an algorithm, well known in astronomy, used to remove artificial effects present in the astrophysical images collected through telescopes. This algorithm is called the CLEAN method. It is one of a number of methods which exists to deconvolve undesirable effects in images and to extrapolate or reconstruct missing parts in them. By using the CLEAN method we can fit measured masses with an r.m.s error of less than 100 keV. We have performed several checks and concluded that its utilization must be carried out carefully in order to obtain reliable results in the zone of unknown masses between the driplines. We also outline potential applications of the present approach.

Barea, J.; Frank, A.; Hirsch, J. G.; Lopez, J. C.; Morales, I.; Mendoza, J. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Velazquez, V. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy Frank Ludwig a , Hilke. Krishnan b,n a Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig

Krishnan, Kannan M.

68

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-6-2014_Imaging Techniques Applied to...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

solid (low thermal maturity), pendular (intermediate thermal maturity), or spongy (high thermal maturity). Examples of these pore types are shown in Figure 12. Imaging Techniques...

69

Evaluation of Four Imaging Techniques for the Electrical Characterization of Solar Cells (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The imaging techniques enable the possibility of higher-level quality control and defect analysis of solar cell materials in in-line production processes.

Johnston. S.; Berman, G.; Call, N.; Ahrenkiel, R.

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

70

USE OF ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES IN THE IMAGING OF...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data processing methods, which include Optim's proprietary nonlinear velocity optimization technique and pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The nonlinear optimization technique...

71

18th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in MIedicineand BiollogySociety, Amsterdam 1996 3.3.1: MR Imaging Systems and Reconstruction Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society, Amsterdam 1996 3.3.1: MR Imaging Systems and Reconstruction Techniques MEASURINGAC MAGNETIC FIELD is given in Fig.1. In the absence of an applied AC current, this pulse sequence is the same asthe one used by Maudsley A.A. et.al. to calculate the DC magnetic field inhomo se RP .,A_ II I f 0Gz I " v - who & - Fig.1

Ider, Yusuf Ziya

72

Experimental Test of Complementarity by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have tested complementarity for the ensemble-averaged spin states of nuclei $^{13}$C in the molecule of $^{13}$CHCl$_{3}$ by the use of the spin states of another nuclei $^{1}$H as the path marker. It turns out that the wave-particle duality holds when one merely measures the probability density of quantum states, and that the wave- and particle-like behavior is simultaneously observed with the help of measuring populations and coherence in a single nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) experiment. Effects of path-marking schemes and causes of the appearance and disappearance of the wave behavior are analysed.

Xiwen Zhu; Ximing Fang; Xinhua Peng; Mang Feng; Kelin Gao; Fei Du

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Download Select and View High Resolution Images to Download Learn More Fusion energy Fusion reactor design ITER Nuclear energy Plasma diagnostics Plasma physics Tokamaks...

74

An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images Valliappa and are not transferrable between different types of geospatial images. Yet, with the multitude of remote sensing on different types of geospatial radar and satel- lite images. Pointers are provided on the effective choice

Lakshmanan, Valliappa

75

THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

A REAL TIME 3D VISUALIZATION PROTOTYPE FOR INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A REAL TIME 3D VISUALIZATION PROTOTYPE FOR INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING JENS FISCHER.weiss@pfh.research.philips.com HEIDRUN SCHUMANN University of Rostock, Computer Science Department, D­18051 Rostock,Germany schumann radiologists during invasive and non­invasive magnetic resonance imaging. We use pre­acquired and real time

Schumann, Heidrun

79

Development of imaging bolometers for magnetic fusion reactors (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imaging bolometers utilize an infrared (IR) video camera to measure the change in temperature of a thin foil exposed to the plasma radiation, thereby avoiding the risks of conventional resistive bolometers related to electric cabling and vacuum feedthroughs in a reactor environment. A prototype of the IR imaging video bolometer (IRVB) has been installed and operated on the JT-60U tokamak demonstrating its applicability to a reactor environment and its ability to provide two-dimensional measurements of the radiation emissivity in a poloidal cross section. In this paper we review this development and present the first results of an upgraded version of this IRVB on JT-60U. This upgrade utilizes a state-of-the-art IR camera (FLIR/Indigo Phoenix-InSb) (3-5 {mu}m, 256x360 pixels, 345 Hz, 11 mK) mounted in a neutron/gamma/magnetic shield behind a 3.6 m IR periscope consisting of CaF{sub 2} optics and an aluminum mirror. The IRVB foil is 7 cmx9 cmx5 {mu}m tantalum. A noise equivalent power density of 300 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} is achieved with 40x24 channels and a time response of 10 ms or 23 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} for 16x12 channels and a time response of 33 ms, which is 30 times better than the previous version of the IRVB on JT-60U.

Peterson, Byron J.; Parchamy, Homaira; Ashikawa, Naoko [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kawashima, Hisato; Konoshima, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Kostryukov, Artem Yu.; Miroshnikov, Igor V. [St. Petersburg State Technical University, St. Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Seo, Dongcheol [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Omori, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Synthetic aperture focusing techniques for ultrasonic imaging of solid objects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the NDE and medical SAFT implementations are performed using a delay-and-sum (DAS) processing in time in NDE and medical ap- plications. Most SAFT implementations are based on a very simpli- fied model). Unfortunately, this is not always valid in ultra- sonic imaging, especially in the high frequency NDE ap

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Digital signal processing techniques for optical coherence tomography : OCT and OCT image enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digital signal processing (DSP) techniques were developed to improve the flexibility, functionality, and image quality of ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. To reduce the dependence of OCT ...

Adler, Desmond Christopher, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

Campbell, Ann. N. (13170-B Central SE #188, Albuquerque, NM 87123); Anderson, Richard E. (2800 Tennessee NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (2116 White Cloud NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits are disclosed. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits. 17 figs.

Campbell, A.N.; Anderson, R.E.; Cole, E.I. Jr.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Quantification of Dopant Concentrations in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors using Ion Beam Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has recently been demonstrated that magnetically doped TiO2 and SnO2 show ferromagnetism at room-temperature and Curie temperatures above room temperature. However, accurate knowledge of dopant concentrations is necessary to quantify magnetic moments in these materials. Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry (RBS) is one of the powerful techniques to quantify magnetic transition metal dopant concentrations in these materials. However, in some cases, the interference of RBS signals for different dopants and substrate elements in these materials makes analysis difficult. In this work, we demonstrate that particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) can be successfully used to quantify the magnetic transition element dopants in several room temperature ferromagnetic materials synthesized using three different synthesis methods: oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy, ion implantation and wet chemical methods.

Shutthanandan, V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Droubay, Timothy C.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Punnoose, Alex; Hays, Jason; Chambers, Scott A.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

Nishimura, K., E-mail: nishim11@nuclear.es.kit.ac.jp; Sanpei, A., E-mail: sanpei@kit.ac.jp; Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling of magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective of this project is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. If neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress can be measured via changes in magnetic properties, this should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. This first-year report addresses the issue of using magnetic property changes to detect neutron embrittlement. The magnetic measurements were all done on irradiated specimens previously broken in two in a Charpy test to determine their embrittlement. The magnetic properties of the broken charpy specimens from D.C. Cook did not correlate well with fluence or embrittlement parameters, possible due to metallurgical reasons. correlation was better with Indian Point 2 specimens, with the nonlinear harmonic amplitudes showing the best correlation (R[sup 2][approximately]0.7). However, correlation was not good enough. It is recommended that tests be done on unbroken irradiated Charpy specimens, for which magnetic characterization data prior to irradiation is available, if possible.

Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G.L.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.G.

1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Mathematics of the Imaging Techniques of MEG, CT, PET and SPECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mathematics of the Imaging Techniques of MEG, CT, PET and SPECT A.S. Fokas, V. Marinakis), of positron emission tomography (PET) and of single photon emission computed to­ mography (SPECT) are reviewed techniques of positron emission tomography (PET) and of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT

Fokas, A. S.

88

Developing novel polymer architectures for applications In magnetic resonance imaging and self-assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macromolecular scaffolds for drug delivery, self-assembly, and imaging applications have attracted significant attention over the last several decades. As polymerization techniques become more sophisticated, it becomes ...

McCombs, Jessica R. (Jessica Rose)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Technique Recovers Atomic Resolution in Spectrum Images | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR8,Materials Characterization Technique Recovers

90

Abstract-In this study, imaging of electrical current density in conducting objects, which contain nuclear magnetic resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) active nuclei is planned using 0.15T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI at each cycle within the object. The applied current pulse creates a measurable magnetic flux density. The component of magnetic flux density parallel to the main magnetic field accumulates an additional phase

Eybolu, Murat

91

Pulmonary Hemorrhage: Imaging with a New Magnetic Resonance Blood Pool Agent in Conjunction with Breathheld Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Angiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe the three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA) imaging appearance of the pulmonary arteries following administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent to human volunteers, and to demonstrate in an animal model (pigs) how this technique can be used to detect pulmonary parenchymal hemorrhage. Methods: Two volunteers were examined following the intravenous administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent (NC100150 Injection, Nycomed Amersham Imaging, Wayne, PA, USA). T1-weighted 3D gradient recalled echo (GRE) image sets (TR/TE 5.1/1.4 msec, flip angle 30 deg.) were acquired breathheld over 24 sec. To assess the detectability of pulmonary bleeding with intravascular MR contrast, pulmonary parenchymal injuries were created in two animals under general anesthesia, and fast T1-weighted 3D GRE image sets collected before and after the injury. Results: Administration of the intravascular contrast in the two volunteers resulted in selective enhancement of the pulmonary vasculature permitting complete visualization and excellent delineation of central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Following iatrogenic injury in the two animals, pulmonary hemorrhage was readily detected on the 3D image sets. Conclusion: The data presented illustrate that ultrafast 3D GRE MR imaging in conjunction with an intravenously administered intravascular blood pool agent can be used to perform high-quality pulmonary MRA as well as to detect pulmonary hemorrhage.

Weishaupt, Dominik; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Schmidt, Michaela; Debatin, Joerg F. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Integrated Imaging and Vision Techniques for Industrial Inspection: A Special Issue on Machine Vision and Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imaging- and vision-based techniques play an important role in industrial inspection. The sophistication of the techniques assures high- quality performance of the manufacturing process through precise positioning, online monitoring, and real-time classification. Advanced systems incorporating multiple imaging and/or vision modalities provide robust solutions to complex situations and problems in industrial applications. A diverse range of industries, including aerospace, automotive, electronics, pharmaceutical, biomedical, semiconductor, and food/beverage, etc., have benefited from recent advances in multi-modal imaging, data fusion, and computer vision technologies. Many of the open problems in this context are in the general area of image analysis methodologies (preferably in an automated fashion). This editorial article introduces a special issue of this journal highlighting recent advances and demonstrating the successful applications of integrated imaging and vision technologies in industrial inspection.

Liu, Zheng; Ukida, H.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Forsyth, D. S.

2010-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Optimization Digital Image Watermarking Technique for Patent Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid development of multimedia and internet allows for wide distribution of digital media data. It becomes much easier to edit, modify and duplicate digital information besides that, digital documents are also easy to copy and distribute, therefore it will be faced by many threats. It is a big security and privacy issue. Another problem with digital document and video is that undetectable modifications can be made with very simple and widely available equipment, which put the digital material for evidential purposes under question With the large flood of information and the development of the digital format, it become necessary to find appropriate protection because of the significance, accuracy and sensitivity of the information, therefore multimedia technology and popularity of internet communications they have great interest in using digital watermarks for the purpose of copy protection and content authentication. Digital watermarking is a technique used to embed a known piece of digital data within a...

Elnajjar, Mahmoud; Zaidan, B B; Sharif, Mohamed Elhadi M; Alanazi, Hamdan O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Accelerating magnetic resonance imaging by unifying sparse models and multiple receivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an increasingly versatile diagnostic tool for a variety of medical purposes. During a conventional MRI scan, samples are acquired along a trajectory in the spatial Fourier transform ...

Weller, Daniel (Daniel Stuart)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Highly Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Fourth Gradient Channel for Compensation of RF Phase Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fourth gradient channel was implemented to provide slice dependent RF coil phase compensation for arrays in dual-sided or "sandwich" configurations. The use of highly parallel arrays for single echo acquisition magnetic resonance imaging allows...

Bosshard, John 1983-

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging used to detect coagulative necrosis in tissue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to prevent unnecessary collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. This research focuses on using T2*-weighted FLASH magnetic resonance imaging to detect irreversible changes in i . n vitro bovine liver tissue and tissuesimulating polyacrylamide gel...

Van Hyfte, John Bruce

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Eight-Channel Head Array and Control System for Parallel Transmit/Receive Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interest in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high fields strengths (3 Tesla and above) is driven by the associated improvements in signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution. In practice, however, technical challenges prevent these benefits...

Moody, Katherine

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

A 16-Channel Receive Array Insert for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast at 7T  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among females in the United States. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful tool for detecting and evaluating the disease, with notable advantages over other modalities...

By, Samantha

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge ...

Gollub, Randy L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Multimodal neuroimaging with simultaneous electroencephalogram and high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) is an important emerging tool in functional neuroimaging with the potential to reveal new mechanisms for brain function ...

Purdon, Patrick L. (Patrick Lee), 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with 2D spectroscopy for the detection of brain metabolites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) derives its signal from protons in water, additional biochemical compounds are detectable in vivo within the proton spectrum. The detection and mapping of these much weaker signals ...

Kok, Trina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The development of magnetic resonance imaging for the determination of porosity in reservoir core samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR THE DETERMINATION OF POROSITY IN RESERVOIR CORE SAMPLES A Thesis by BYRON BLAKE SHERMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR THE DETERMINATION OF POROSITY IN RESERVOIR CORE SAMPLES A Thesis by BYRON BLAKE SHERMAN Approved...

Sherman, Byron Blake

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Application of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to fluids in porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY TO FLUIDS IN POROUS MEDIA A Thesis by SHANTHI SREE MANDAVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY TO FLUIDS IN POROUS MEDIA A Thesis by SHANTHI SREE MANDAVA Approved as to style and content by: A. Ted...

Mandava, Shanthi Sree

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Atom interferometric techniques for measuring gravitational acceleration and constant magnetic field gradients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss two techniques for probing the effects of a homogeneous force acting on cold atoms, such as that due to gravity or a constant magnetic field gradient, using grating echo-type atom interferometers. A comprehensive theoretical description of signals generated by both two-pulse and three-pulse interferometers, accounting for magnetic sub-levels in the atomic ground state, is shown to agree with experimental results. Laser-cooled samples of $^{85}$Rb with temperatures as low as 2.4 $\\mu$K have been achieved in a relatively large glass cell with well-suppressed magnetic fields. Using transit time limited interferometer signals, we demonstrate sensitivity to externally applied magnetic gradients as small as $\\sim 4$ mG/cm. With these timescales we estimate that precision measurements of the gravitational acceleration, $g$, are possible with both the two-pulse and three-pulse echo interferometers. Whereas the two-pulse signal is a position-sensitive technique to measure the absolute value of $g$, the thre...

Barrett, B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Developments in limited data image reconstruction techniques for ultrahigh-resolution x-ray tomographic imaging of microchips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of soft x-ray (about 1.8 KeV) nanotomography techniques for the evaluation and failure mode analysis of microchips was investigated. Realistic numerical simulations of the imaging process were performed and a specialized approach to image reconstruction from limited projection data was devised. Prior knowledge of the structure and its component materials was used to eliminate artifacts in the reconstructed images so that defects and deviations from the original design could be visualized. Simulated data sets were generated with a total of 21 projections over three different angular ranges: -50 to +50, - 80 to +80 and -90 to +90 degrees. In addition, a low level of illumination was assumed. It was shown that sub-micron defects within one cell of a microchip (< 10 pm3) could be imaged in 3-D using such an approach.

Haddad, W.S.; Trebes, J.E.

1997-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

Magnetism at spinel thin film interfaces probed through soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism at spinel thin ?lm interfaces probed through softachievable in bulk form. Magnetism at the interface regionand the origin of the magnetism from multiple magnetic

Chopdekar, R.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ?}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ?} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ?}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ?} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and improved signal difference in the lesion.

Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 286 (2005) 324328 Light-free magnetic resonance force microscopy for studies of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 286 (2005) 324­328 Light-free magnetic resonance force for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD, USA Available online 4 November 2004 Abstract Magnetic resonance force microscopy is a scanned probe technique capable of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Its

110

Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. Interaction between experiment and modeling should suggest efficient magnetic measurement procedures for determining neutron embrittlement biaxial stress. This should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. In the first six months of this first year study, magnetic measurements were made on steel surveillance specimens from the Indian Point 2 and D.C. Cook 2 reactors. The specimens previously had been characterized by Charpy tests after specified neutron fluences. Measurements now included: (1) hysteresis loop measurement of coercive force, permeability and remanence, (2) Barkhausen noise amplitude; and (3) higher order nonlinear harmonic analysis of a 1 Hz magnetic excitation. Very good correlation of magnetic parameters with fluence and embrittlement was found for specimens from the Indian Point 2 reactor. The D.C. Cook 2 specimens, however showed poor correlation. Possible contributing factors to this are: (1) metallurgical differences between D.C. Cook 2 and Indian Point 2 specimens; (2) statistical variations in embrittlement parameters for individual samples away from the stated men values; and (3) conversion of the D.C. Cook 2 reactor to a low leakage core configuration in the middle of the period of surveillance. Modeling using a magnetomechanical hysteresis model has begun. The modeling will first focus on why Barkhausen noise and nonlinear harmonic amplitudes appear to be better indicators of embrittlement than the hysteresis loop parameters.

Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

NREL scientists develop near-field optical microscopy techniques for imaging solar cell junctions and identify  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Characterization team examined local junction breakdown in silicon and thin-film solar cells by electroluminescenceNREL scientists develop near-field optical microscopy techniques for imaging solar cell junctions is an increasingly important issue for silicon solar cells. The issue has taken center stage now that the solar

112

Image-Based Modeling and Rendering Techniques: A Survey Manuel M. Oliveira1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Image-Based Modeling and Rendering Techniques: A Survey Manuel M. Oliveira1 Resumo: A recente denominadas modelagem e rendering baseados em imagens (MRBI). Modelagem baseada em imagens se refere ao processo de utilizao de imagens para reconstruo de modelos geomtricos 3D. Rendering baseado em imagens

Oliveira, Manuel M.

113

ON THE CONTINUITY OF IMAGES BY TRANSMISSION IMAGING Abstract. Transmission imaging is an important imaging technique which is widely used in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE CONTINUITY OF IMAGES BY TRANSMISSION IMAGING CHUNLIN WU Abstract. Transmission imaging imaging principle is quite different from that of reflection imaging used in our everyday life. As well scholars studied the application of TV regularization to processing images generated by transmission

Soatto, Stefano

114

Simultaneous Electroencephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of General Anesthesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been long appreciated that anesthetic drugs induce stereotyped changes in electroencephalogram (EEG), but the relationships between the EEG and underlying brain function remain poorly understood. Functional imaging ...

Purdon, Patrick Lee

115

Uncooled thin film infrared imaging device with aerogel thermal isolation: Deposition and planarization techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have successfully integrated a thermally insulating silica aerogel thin film into a new uncooled monolithic thin film infrared (IR) imaging device. Compared to other technologies (bulk ceramic and microbridge), use of an aerogel layer provides superior thermal isolation of the pyroelectric imaging element from the relatively massive heat sinking integrated circuit. This results in significantly higher thermal and temporal resolutions. They have calculated noise equivalent temperature differences of 0.04--0.10 C from a variety of Pb{sub x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PZT) and Pb{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PLZT) pyroelectric imaging elements in monolithic structures. In addition, use of aerogels results in an easier, less expensive fabrication process and a more robust device. Fabrication of these monolithic devices entails sol-gel deposition of the aerogel, sputter deposition of the electrodes, and solution chemistry deposition of the pyroelectric imaging elements. Uniform pyroelectric response is achieved across the device by use of appropriate planarization techniques. These deposition and planarization techniques are described. Characterization of the individual layers and monolithic structure using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Byer-Roundy techniques also is discussed.

Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A.; Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sriram, C.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Bullington, J.A. [AMMPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Phase distribution measurements in narrow rectangular channels using image-processing techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase distribution of air-water flow in a narrow rectangular channel is examined using image-processing techniques. Ink is added to the water, and clear channel walls were used to allow high-speed, still photographs and video tape to be taken of the air-water flow field. Flow field images are digitized and stored in a Macintosh IIci computer using a frame grabber board. Local grey levels are related to liquid thickness in the flow channel using a calibration fixture. Image-processing shareware is used to calculate the spatially averaged liquid thickness from the image of the flow field. Time-averaged spatial liquid distributions are calculated using image calculation algorithms. The spatially averaged liquid distribution is calculated from the time-averaged spatial liquid distribution to formulate the combined temporally and spatially averaged liquid fraction values. The temporally and spatially averaged liquid fractions measured using this technique compare well to those predicted from pressure gradient measurements at zero superficial liquid velocity. 11 refs.

Bentley, C.L.; Ruggles, A.E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 {micro}T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz{sup -1/2} referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm{sup 3} resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm{sup 3} images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm{sup 3} in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T{sub 1}) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T{sub 1} of ex vivo normal and cancerous prostate tissue differ significantly at 132 {micro}T. A single-sided MRI system designed for prostate imaging could achieve 3 x 3 x 5 mm{sup 3} resolution in 8 minutes. Existing SQUID-based magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems could be used as microtesla MRI detectors. A commercial 275-channel MEG system could acquire 6-minute brain images with (4 mm){sup 3} resolution and SNR 16.

Myers, Whittier R.

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

120

Design of a scanning Josephson junction microscope for submicron-resolution magnetic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a magnetic field scanning instrument designed to extend the spatial resolution of scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscopy into the submicron regime. This instrument, the scanning Josephson junction microscope, scans a single Josephson junction across the surface of a sample, detecting the local magnetic field by the modulation of the junction critical current. By using a submicron junction and a scanning tunneling microscope feedback system to maintain close proximity to the surface, magnetic field sensitivity of 10 {mu}G with a spatial resolution of 0.3 {mu}m should be attainable, opening up new opportunities for imaging vortex configurations and core structure in superconductors and magnetic domains in magnetic materials. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Plourde, B.L.; Van Harlingen, D.J. [Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of polytropic gas with specific heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimen...

Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Bobra, Monica G; Sun, Xudong D; Norton, Aimee A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Near to the Brain: Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Lightweight Brain Imaging Technique for Visualization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near to the Brain: Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Lightweight Brain Imaging Technique the use of cumbersome or expensive brain imaging equipment. In recent years, functional near-infrared near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging technology for brain imaging being developed

Tomkins, Andrew

123

Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Characterization of beam dynamics in the APS injector rings using time-resolved imaging techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Images taken with streak cameras and gated intensified cameras with both time (longitudinal) and spatial (transverse) resolution reveal a wealth of information about circular accelerators. The authors illustrate a novel technique by a sequence of dual-sweep streak camera images taken at a high dispersion location in the booster synchrotron, where the horizontal coordinate is strongly correlated with the particle energy and the {open_quotes}top-view{close_quotes} of the beam gives a good approximation to the particle density distribution in the longitudinal phase space. A sequence of top-view images taken fight after injection clearly shows the beam dynamics in the phase space. We report another example from the positron accumulator ring for the characterization of its beam compression bunching with the 12th harmonic rf.

Yang, B.X.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Borland, M. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

GPU-accelerated denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The raw computational power of GPU accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. In practice, applying these filtering operations requires setting multiple parameters. This study was designed to provide better guidance to practitioners for choosing the most appropriate parameters by answering two questions: what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? And what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? To answer the first question, we use two different metrics, mean squared error (MSE) and mean structural similarity (MSSIM), to compare denoising quality against a reference image. Surprisingly, the best improvement in structural similarity with the bilateral filter is achieved with a small stencil size that lies within the range of real-time execution on an NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU. Moreover, inappropriate choices for parameters, especially scaling parameters, can yield very poor denoising performance. To answer the second question, we perform an autotuning study to empirically determine optimal memory tiling on the GPU. The variation in these results suggests that such tuning is an essential step in achieving real-time performance. These results have important implications for the real-time application of denoising to MR images in clinical settings that require fast turn-around times.

Howison, Mark; Wes Bethel, E.

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

126

" Rotating, In Plane Magnetization and Magneto-Optic Imaging of Cracks in Thick-Section Steel Under Stainless-Steel Cladding".  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nondestructive inspection (NDI) of thick-section steel nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV'S) is rendered difficult by rough stainless steel cladding. Because the cladding condition is poorly known in most RPV's, an NDI technique that is unaffected by cladding roughness would be a major advance. Magneto-optic imaging is one such technique. The purpose of this project was to develop a novel method to induce rotating, in-plane magnetization, and to combine this capability with magneto-optic imaging to produce a self-contained inspection system. Imaging of cracks under thick cladding (0.250 inches) was demonstrated using a system capable, in principle, of performing robotic inspections, both inside & outside a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) RPV. This report, together publications listed, constitutes a comprehensive account of this work.

Gerald Fitzpatrick & Richard Skaugset

2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

127

Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ?1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States); He, Bin, E-mail: binhe@umn.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-6-2014_Imaging Techniques Applied to Shales_20141202.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMappingENVIRONMENTALHYDROPOWERFebruarySave the1AddendumImaging Techniques

130

Evaluation of Hydatid Disease of the Heart with Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two patients with cardiac involvement of hydatid disease are presented: one with hydatid cyst of the interventricular septum and pulmonary arteries and the other with multiple pulmonary cysts associated with intracardiac and pericardial cysts. The ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide a global view of cardiac anatomy in any plane with high contrast between flowing blood and soft tissue ensures it an important role in the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of hydatid disease of the heart.

Kotoulas, Grigoris K.; Magoufis, George L.; Gouliamos, Athanasios D.; Athanassopoulou, Alexandra K.; Roussakis, Arcadios C.; Koulocheri, Dimitra P.; Kalovidouris, Angelos; Vlahos, Labros [Department of Radiology, CT-MRI Unit, Areteion Hospital, University of Athens, 76 Vas. Sophias Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece)

1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

Hassan, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Construction of a two-parameter empirical model of left ventricle wall motion using cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

visualized using cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) covering the contraction and relaxation phases. Based on the characteristics of the overall dynamics of the LV wall, its motion was represented by a combination of two components - radial...

Shi, Jack J; Alenezy, Mohammed D.; Smirnova, Irina V.; Bilgen, Mehmet

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian cells. New rotational information was obtained: (1) during endocytosis, cargoes lost their rotation freedom at the late stage of internalization; (2) cargoes performed train-like motion when they were transported along the microtubule network by motor proteins inside live cells; (3) During the pause stage of fast axonal transport, cargoes were still bound to the microtubule tracks by motor proteins. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is another non-invasive and far-field optical imaging technique. Because of its near-field illumination mechanism, TIRFM has better axial resolution than epi-fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy. In this work, an auto-calibrated, prism type, angle-scanning TIRFM instrument was built. The incident angle can range from subcritical angles to nearly 90{sup o}, with an angle interval less than 0.2{sup o}. The angle precision of the new instrument was demonstrated through the finding of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angle of metal film coated glass slide. The new instrument improved significantly the precision in determining the axial position. As a result, the best obtained axial resolution was {approx} 8 nm, which is better than current existing instruments similar in function. The instrument was further modified to function as a pseudo TIRF microscope. The illumination depth can be controlled by changing the incident angle of the excitation laser beam or adjusting the horizontal position of the illumination laser spot on the prism top surface. With the new technique, i.e., variable-illumination-depth pseudo TIRF microscopy, the whole cell body from bottom to top was scanned.

Sun, Wei

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal magnetic resonance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between men and women at rest and during lower Summary: resonance-compatible exercise bicycle, magnetic resonance imaging techniques, and custom data processing... at all. We have...

136

K-space reconstruction of magnetic resonance inverse imaging (K-InI) of human visuomotor systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MRI InI Visual MRI Neuroimaging K-InI Inverse solution MEG EEG Electroencephalography channels of a radio-frequency coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) can achieve ultra. Mathematically, the InI reconstruction is a generalization of parallel MRI (pMRI), which includes image space

137

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid materials entails numerous problems from short longitudinal relaxation (T2) times to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Solid-State STRAFI NMR Probe for Material Imaging of Quadrupolar Nuclei, J. Magn. Reson. httpMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid materials entails numerous problems from short for broadband tuning, sample translation along z-axis, and electrodes for in situ battery studies. An Alderman

Weston, Ken

138

Noise-Produced Patterns in Images Constructed from Magnetic Flux Leakage Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic flux leakage measurements help identify the position, size and shape of corrosion-related defects in steel casings used to protect boreholes drilled into oil and gas reservoirs. Images constructed from magnetic flux leakage data contain patterns related to noise inherent in the method. We investigate the patterns and their scaling properties for the case of delta-correlated input noise, and consider the implications for the method's ability to resolve defects. The analytical evaluation of the noise-produced patterns is made possible by model reduction facilitated by large-scale approximation. With appropriate modification, the approach can be employed to analyze noise-produced patterns in other situations where the data of interest are not measured directly, but are related to the measured data by a complex linear transform involving integrations with respect to spatial coordinates.

Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Levesley, Jeremy; Elkington, Peter; Bacciarelli, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Methods for characterizing magnetic footprints of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the magnetic footprints, along with some of its dynamic features in recording process, of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads have been characterized by using three different techniques. Those techniques are the spin-stand stationary footprint technique, the spin-stand dynamic footprint technique, and the coherent writing technique combined with magnetic force microscope imaging method. The characteristics of those techniques have been compared to one another. It was found experimentally that the spin-stand stationary method could not precisely catch some peculiar recording dynamics of the write heads in certain conditions. The advantages and disadvantages among all those techniques are also examined and discussed in detail.

Li, Shaoping, E-mail: shaoping.li@wdc.com; Lin, Ed; George, Zach; Terrill, Dave; Mendez, H.; Santucci, J.; Yie, Derek [Western Digital Corp., 44100 Osgood Road, Fremont, California 94539 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A new technique for tritium imaging and profiling using a computer aided--video enhanced microscope system for metallographic analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in image enhancement and image processing have made ultra-low-light microscopy a reality. Currently available instrumentation allows imaging of ''individual'' photons with a tremendous dynamic range of one to 10/sup 9/ photons/mm/sup 2//sec. This capability allows for the development of tritium imaging techniques based on different basic principles than previously employed. Previous autoradiographic techniques for this purpose used photographic emulsions which are chemically reactive with many metals and for good resolution required in-situ processing in chemical solutions which can also chemically affect the samples or emulsion characteristics. The new technique makes use of optically transparent thin films of relatively chemically inert scintillating compounds applied to metallographically prepared samples. The light given off by these scintillating compounds can now be imaged and quantified using the new Video Intensified Microscope (VIM) System. This allows the location of the tritium to be imaged as well as the corresponding microstructure. In addition, special containers have been designed and built to allow highly radioactive or pyrophoric samples with high levels of off-gassing to be evaluated. 5 refs., 10 figs.

Downs, G.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Preliminary tests using magnetic resonance imaging of two-phase flow patterns and transitions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of preliminary tests used to establish the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine and quantitatively characterize two-phase flow patterns and flow transitions. These tests were performed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine MRI Center as a collaborative research effort with Oregon State University (OSU). Special scanning sequences designed by UCSF for flow imaging were implemented in the tests. UCSF operated the MRI facility, and OSU constructed and operated a cocurrent air-water flow loop consisting of a 1-in.-diam test section capable of producing air superficial velocities j[sub g] ranging from 0.3 to 14 m/s, and water superficial velocities j[sub l] ranging from 0.08 to 1.3 m/s.

Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Lafi, A.Y. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)); Saloner, D. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

A novel millimeter-wave beam-steering technique using a dielectric-image-line-fed grating film  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND TECHNIQUE A. Leaky Waves B. Grating Antenna Theory C. Novel Beam-Steering Technique . . . III DIELECTRIC MAGE LINE ANALYSIS. . . 13 A Background B. Effective Dielectric Constant Calculation . . . C. Ka-Band Image Line Design... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 14 21 IV SCANNING ANTENNA DESIGN . . . V MEASUREMENT . A Measurement Procedure . B Beam-Steering Performance. . . C. Measured Radiation Patterns. . 31 36 CHAPTER Page D. Summary VI SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE 42 STUDIES...

Rodenbeck, Christopher Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Imaging and spectroscopic observations of magnetic reconnection and chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfv\\'{e}n speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of greatly redshifted ($\\sim$125 km s$^{-1}$ along line of sight) Fe {\\sc{xxi}} 1354.08\\AA{} emission line with a $\\sim$100 km s$^{-1}$ nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe {\\sc{xxi}} feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-Ray source observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) also...

Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K; Raymond, John C; Guo, Fan; Liu, Wei; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fielding the magnetically applied pressure-shear technique on the Z accelerator (completion report for MRT 4519).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recently developed Magnetically Applied Pressure-Shear (MAPS) experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms was fielded on August 16, 2013 on shot Z2544 utilizing hardware set A0283A. Several technical and engineering challenges were overcome in the process leading to the attempt to measure the dynamic strength of NNSA Ta at 50 GPa. The MAPS technique relies on the ability to apply an external magnetic field properly aligned and time correlated with the MHD pulse. The load design had to be modified to accommodate the external field coils and additional support was required to manage stresses from the pulsed magnets. Further, this represents the first time transverse velocity interferometry has been applied to diagnose a shot at Z. All subsystems performed well with only minor issues related to the new feed design which can be easily addressed by modifying the current pulse shape. Despite the success of each new component, the experiment failed to measure strength in the samples due to spallation failure, most likely in the diamond anvils. To address this issue, hydrocode simulations are being used to evaluate a modified design using LiF windows to minimize tension in the diamond and prevent spall. Another option to eliminate the diamond material from the experiment is also being investigated.

Alexander, C. Scott; Haill, Thomas A.; Dalton, Devon Gardner; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Lamppa, Derek C.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Developing in-spectrometer photochemistry and integration of molecular imaging techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and integration of molecular imaging techniques: Probing photo-induced electronic structure variations in dye-sensitized layers on surfaces as applicable to solar cells, sensors, and contaminant reduction. This would the adsorbed ruthenium (Ru)-based dye molecules on the TiO2 surface. This would disclose the nature

148

Understanding the Fe I Line Measurements Returned by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observes the Sun at the Fe I 6173 {\\AA} line and returns full-disk maps of line-of-sight (LOS) observables including the magnetic flux density, velocities, Fe I line width, line depth, and continuum intensity. These data are estimated through an algorithm (the MDI-like algorithm, hereafter), which combines observables obtained at six wavelength positions within the Fe I 6173 {\\AA} line. To properly interpret such data it is important to understand any effects of the instrument and the pipeline that generates these data products. We tested the accuracy of the line width, line depth, and continuum intensity returned by the MDI-like algorithm using various one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere models. It was found that HMI estimates of these quantities are highly dependent on the shape of the line, therefore on the LOS angle and the magnetic flux density associated with the model, and less to line shifts with respect to the central ...

Cohen, Daniel P; Farris, Laurel; Tritschler, Alexandra

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

(110) Orientation growth of magnetic metal nanowires with face-centered cubic structure using template synthesis technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A template-assisted assembly technique has been used to synthesize magnetic metal nanowire arrays. Fe, Co, Ni nanowires are fabricated using direct-current electrodeposition in the pores of anodic alumina membranes. The morphology and the crystal structure of the samples are characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometer. The results indicate that Fe, Co, and Ni nanowires all have face-centered cubic (FCC) structure and a preferred orientation along the [110] direction. The ability to prepare well-defined orientation growth of magnetic metal nanowires with FCC structure opens up new opportunities for both fundamental studies and nanodevice applications. - Research Highlights: {yields} Fe, Co, and Ni nanowires are fabricated in the AAM templates by electrodeposition. {yields} Well-defined orientation growth of the nanowires with FCC structure were investigated. {yields} The electrodeposition parameters affect the crystal structure and growth orientation.

Wang Xuewei, E-mail: xwwang@tjut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Tianjin Key Lab for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, Tianjin 300384 (China); Yuan Zhihao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Key Laboratory of Display Materials and Photoelectric Devices (Tianjin University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li Jushan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Probing nonlinear magnetization dynamics in Fe/MgO(001) film by all optical pump-probe technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An all-optical pump-probe technique has been employed to investigate the nonlinear magnetization dynamics of a 10?nm Fe/MgO(001) thin film in time domain. The magnetization precession was excited by pump-laser pulses and modulated by laser fluence variations. With increasing the laser fluence up to 7.1 mJ/cm{sup 2}, in addition to the uniform precession mode, a second harmonic signal was detected. The time evolution of the second harmonic signal was obtained in time-frequency domain. Based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, the numerical simulation was performed to reproduce the observed the frequency doubling behaviors in Fe/MgO(001) film.

He, Wei; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Cheng, Zhao-Hua, E-mail: zhcheng@iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhan, Qing-Feng [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Design-Oriented Framework to Determine the Parasitic Parameters of High Frequency Magnetics in Switching Power Supplies using Finite Element Analysis Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A DESIGN-ORIENTED FRAMEWORK TO DETERMINE THE PARASITIC PARAMETERS OF HIGH FREQUENCY MAGNETICS IN SWITCING POWER SUPPLIES USING FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES A Thesis by MOHAMMAD BAGHER SHADMAND Submitted to the Office... to Determine the Parasitic Parameters of High Frequency Magnetics in Switching Power Supplies using Finite Element Analysis Techniques Copyright 2012 Mohammad Bagher Shadmand A DESIGN-ORIENTED FRAMEWORK TO DETERMINE THE PARASITIC PARAMETERS OF HIGH...

Shadmand, Mohammad

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

A 200-MHz fully-differential CMOS front-end with an on-chip inductor for magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 200-MHZ FULLY-DIFFERENTIAL CMOS FRONT-END WITH AN ON-CHIP INDUCTOR FOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING A Thesis by JULIO ENRIQUE AYALA II Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2005 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering A 200-MHZ FULLY-DIFFERENTIAL CMOS FRONT-END WITH AN ON-CHIP INDUCTOR FOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING A Thesis by JULIO ENRIQUE AYALA II Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Ayala, Julio Enqrique, II

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Comparison of Image Quality Evaluation Techniques for Transmission X-Ray Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beamline 6-2c at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is capable of Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) at 30 nm resolution. Raw images from the microscope must undergo extensive image processing before publication. Since typical data sets normally contain thousands of images, it is necessary to automate the image processing workflow as much as possible, particularly for the aligning and averaging of similar images. Currently we align images using the 'phase correlation' algorithm, which calculates the relative offset of two images by multiplying them in the frequency domain. For images containing high frequency noise, this algorithm will align noise with noise, resulting in a blurry average. To remedy this we multiply the images by a Gaussian function in the frequency domain, so that the algorithm ignores the high frequency noise while properly aligning the features of interest (FOI). The shape of the Gaussian is manually tuned by the user until the resulting average image is sharpest. To automatically optimize this process, it is necessary for the computer to evaluate the quality of the average image by quantifying its sharpness. In our research we explored two image sharpness metrics, the variance method and the frequency threshold method. The variance method uses the variance of the image as an indicator of sharpness while the frequency threshold method sums up the power in a specific frequency band. These metrics were tested on a variety of test images, containing both real and artificial noise. To apply these sharpness metrics, we designed and built a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) called 'Blur Master.' We found that it is possible for blurry images to have a large variance if they contain high amounts of noise. On the other hand, we found the frequency method to be quite reliable, although it is necessary to manually choose suitable limits for the frequency band. Further research must be performed to design an algorithm which automatically selects these parameters.

Bolgert, Peter J; /Marquette U. /SLAC

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Magnetic Field Effect: An Efficient Tool To Investigate The Mechanism Of Reactions Using Laser Flash Photolysis Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic field effect combined with laser flash photolysis technique have been used to study the mechanism of interactions between two drug-like quinone molecules, Menadione (1,4-naphthoquinone, MQ) and 9, 10 Anthraquinone (AQ) with one of the DNA bases, Adenine in homogeneous acetonitrile/water and heterogeneous micellar media. A switchover in reaction mode from electron transfer to hydrogen abstraction is observed with MQ on changing the solvent from acetonitrile/water to micelle; whereas, AQ retains its mode of interaction towards Adenine as electron transfer in both the media due to its bulky structure compared to MQ.

Basu, Samita; Bose, Adity; Dey, Debarati [Chemical Sciences Division, S aha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata--700 064 (India)

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

155

ANALYSIS OF FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING DATA USING SIGNAL PROCESSING TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parents. Without their encourangement and endless toil, the opportunities for this journey would be lost for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy December 2002 #12;- ii - To my parents and Abigail. #12;- iii

156

Calculation methods and detection techniques for electric and magnetic fields from power lines with measurement verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energized conductors requires accurate analysis of the electric and magnetic fields around the conductors. Such issues as polarization, orientation, magnitude, penetration, shielding, and The journal model is IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control... series of measurenients have been performed for electric fields (17] Verv few studies were concerned with the fields in the direct vicimtv of conduc tars high above the ground. Distances in the range of several feet from the energized conductors have...

Mamishev, Alexander V

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Development of a Navigator and Imaging Techniques for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project contributes to the detection of flaws in the germanium detectors for the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Specifically, after imaging the detector surface with a precise imaging and measuring device, they developed software to stitch the resulting images together, applying any necessary rotations, offsets, and averaging, to produce a smooth image of the whole detector that can be used to detect flaws on the surface of the detector. These images were also tiled appropriately for the Google Maps API to use as a navigation tool, allowing viewers to smoothly zoom and pan across the detector surface. Automated defect identification can now be implemented, increasing the scalability of the germanium detector fabrication.

Wilen, Chris; /Carleton Coll. /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

Abstract--Conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging is mainly qualitative in nature. While conventional imaging techniques,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and assessment of thermal therapy on solid tumors. Index Terms--Backscatter coefficients, envelope statistics including spectral-based parameterization, elastography, flow estimation and envelope statistics will be discussed in this paper. Specifically, spectral-based techniques and envelope statistics at clinical

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

159

A 64-channel personal computer based image reconstruction system and applications in single echo acquisition magnetic resonance elastography and ultra-fast magnetic resonance imaging.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, this value is 2? x 42.5759 MHz/Tesla. This translates to a Larmor frequency of 200.238 MHz for the 4.7T magnet situated in the Magnetic Resonance Systems Lab (MRSL). In the presence of the static ????the proton population aligns itself according...

Yallapragada, Naresh

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

One dimensional electron spin imaging for single spin detection and manipulation using a gradient field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetic field gradients. These fabricated devices are used to demonstrate this subwavelength imaging technique by imaging single electron spins of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond. In this demonstration, multiple NV defects, unresolved in a...

Shin, Chang-Seok

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

How to Find More Supernovae with Less Work: Object Classification Techniques for Difference Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How to Find More Supernovae with Less Work: Object Classi?methods: statistical supernovae: general techniques:for objects such as supernovae, active galactic nuclei,

Bailey, Stephen; Aragon, Cecilia; Romano, Raquel; Thomas, Rollin C.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Wong, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques used in osteoporosis Received: 10 December 2009vertebral fracture in osteoporosis. Osteoporos Int 5.for postmenopausal osteoporosis: a review of the evidence

Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

2-D Stellar Evolution Code Including Arbitrary Magnetic Fields. I. Mathematical Techniques and Test Cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-precision two-dimensional stellar evolution code has been developed for studying solar variability due to structural changes produced by varying internal magnetic fields of arbitrary configurations. Specifically, we are interested in modeling the effects of a dynamo-type field on the detailed internal structure and on the global parameters of the Sun. The high precision is required both to model very small solar changes (of order of $10^{-4}$) and short time scales (or order of one year). It is accomplished by using the mass coordinate to replace the radial coordinate, by using fixed and adjustable time steps, a realistic stellar atmosphere, elements diffusion, and by adjusting the grid points. We have also built into the code the potential to subsequently include rotation and turbulence. The current code has been tested for several cases, including its ability to reproduce the 1-D results.

L. H. Li; P. Ventura; S. Basu; S. Sofia; P. Demarque

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Capabilities and limitations of Phase Contrast Imaging techniques with X-rays and neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) was studied with the goal of understanding its relevance and its requirements. Current literature does not provide insight on the effect of a relaxation in coherence requirements on the PCI ...

Damato, Antonio Leonardo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Automatic Landmarking of Magnetic Resonance brain Images Camille Izard*a,b, Bruno M. Jedynaka,b and Craig E.L. Starkc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic Landmarking of Magnetic Resonance brain Images Camille Izard*a,b, Bruno M. JedynakaDepartment of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD ABSTRACT Landmarking MR images is crucial in registering brain structures from different images. It consists in locating the voxel

Jedynak, Bruno M.

166

13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006. The size of each also use transparent paper or film, overlay the paper on each image, and mark the locations carefully

167

Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which could aid in individualizing therapy, particularly for patients at risk for liver injury after RT.

Cao Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang Hesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Johnson, Timothy D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pan, Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hussain, Hero [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 20-year Survivors of Mediastinal Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The recognition of the true prevalence of cardiac toxicity after mediastinal radiotherapy requires very long follow-up and a precise diagnostic procedure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits excellent quantification of cardiac function and identification of localized myocardial defects and has now been applied to a group of 20-year Hodgkin's disease survivors. Methods and materials: Of 143 patients treated with anterior mediastinal radiotherapy (cobalt-60, median prescribed dose 40 Gy) for Hodgkin's disease between 1978 and 1985, all 53 survivors were invited for cardiac MRI. Of those, 36 patients (68%) presented for MRI, and in 31 patients (58%) MRI could be performed 20-28 years (median, 24) after radiotherapy. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5-T MRI: transversal T1-weighted TSE and T2-weighted half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, a steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine sequence in the short heart axis and in the four-chamber view, SSFP perfusion sequences under rest and adenosine stress, and a SSFP inversion recovery sequence for late enhancement. The MRI findings were correlated with previously reconstructed doses to cardiac structures. Results: Clinical characteristics and reconstructed doses were not significantly different between survivors undergoing and not undergoing MRI. Pathologic findings were reduced left ventricular function (ejection fraction <55%) in 7 (23%) patients, hemodynamically relevant valvular dysfunction in 13 (42%), late myocardial enhancement in 9 (29%), and any perfusion deficit in 21 (68%). An association of regional pathologic changes and reconstructed dose to cardiac structures could not be established. Conclusions: In 20-year survivors of Hodgkin's disease, cardiac MRI detects pathologic findings in approximately 70% of patients. Cardiac MRI has a potential role in cardiac imaging of Hodgkin's disease patients after mediastinal radiotherapy.

Machann, Wolfram; Beer, Meinrad [Department of Radiology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Breunig, Margret; Stoerk, Stefan; Angermann, Christiane [Department of Cardiology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Seufert, Ines; Schwab, Franz; Koelbl, Oliver; Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Vordermark, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.vordermark@medizin.uni-halle.d [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling techniques.J = NI/A C . 5.1.2. Cooling techniques The first polarizingI call this technique internal cooling as opposed to

Myers, Whittier R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A STEREO-BASED TECHNIQUE FOR THE REGISTRATION OF COLOR AND LADAR IMAGES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In many remote robotic tasks involving tele-operation, operator performance is enhanced by integrating difficulty in designing such a multi-sensor system is the development of methods for combining the various position in the Imaging, Robotics and Intelligent Systems laboratory and to Dr. R. C. Gonzales for choosing

Abidi, Mongi A.

171

Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Lu, Fred G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Lerch, Jason P. [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada) [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Nieman, Brian J., E-mail: bjnieman@phenogenomics.ca [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Sears, Jr., Jesse A. (Kennewick, WA); Hoyt, David W. (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

173

Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael (Brooktondale, NY) [Brooktondale, NY

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

175

Application of topological sensitivity toward tissue elasticity imaging using magnetic resonance data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and brain degeneration imaging (Green et al., 2008) with promising results. Specifically, the MRE estimates

Guzina, Bojan

176

Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry. Final report, September 1988--November 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

Hassan, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Techniques for High Contrast Imaging in Multi-Star Systems I: Super-Nyquist Wavefront Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extra-solar planets direct imaging is now a reality with the deployment and commissioning of the first generation of specialized ground-based instruments (GPI, SPHERE, P1640 and SCExAO). These systems allow of planets $ 10 ^ 7 $ times fainter than their host star. For space-based missions (EXCEDE, EXO-C, EXO-S, WFIRST), various teams have demonstrated laboratory contrasts reaching $ 10 ^ { -10 } $ within a few diffraction limits from the star. However, all of these current and future systems are designed to detect faint planets around a single host star or unresolved multiples, while most non M-dwarf stars such as Alpha Centauri belong to multi-star systems. Direct imaging around binaries/multiple systems at a level of contrast allowing Earth-like planet detection is challenging because the region of interest is contaminated by the hosts star companion as well as the host Generally, the light leakage is caused by both diffraction and aberrations in the system. Moreover, the region of interest usually falls ou...

Thomas, Sandrine J; Bendek, Eduardo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling of magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress. First year report, June 1991--June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective of this project is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. If neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress can be measured via changes in magnetic properties, this should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. This first-year report addresses the issue of using magnetic property changes to detect neutron embrittlement. The magnetic measurements were all done on irradiated specimens previously broken in two in a Charpy test to determine their embrittlement. The magnetic properties of the broken charpy specimens from D.C. Cook did not correlate well with fluence or embrittlement parameters, possible due to metallurgical reasons. correlation was better with Indian Point 2 specimens, with the nonlinear harmonic amplitudes showing the best correlation (R{sup 2}{approximately}0.7). However, correlation was not good enough. It is recommended that tests be done on unbroken irradiated Charpy specimens, for which magnetic characterization data prior to irradiation is available, if possible.

Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Burkhardt, G.L.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.G.

1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

High-speed spiral imaging technique for an atomic force microscope using a linear quadratic Gaussian controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates a high-speed spiral imaging technique for an atomic force microscope (AFM). As an alternative to traditional raster scanning, an approach of gradient pulsing using a spiral line is implemented and spirals are generated by applying single-frequency cosine and sine waves of slowly varying amplitudes to the X and Y-axes of the AFMs piezoelectric tube scanner (PTS). Due to these single-frequency sinusoidal input signals, the scanning process can be faster than that of conventional raster scanning. A linear quadratic Gaussian controller is designed to track the reference sinusoid and a vibration compensator is combined to damp the resonant mode of the PTS. An internal model of the reference sinusoidal signal is included in the plant model and an integrator for the system error is introduced in the proposed control scheme. As a result, the phase error between the input and output sinusoids from the X and Y-PTSs is reduced. The spirals produced have particularly narrow-band frequency measures which change slowly over time, thereby making it possible for the scanner to achieve improved tracking and continuous high-speed scanning rather than being restricted to the back and forth motion of raster scanning. As part of the post-processing of the experimental data, a fifth-order Butterworth filter is used to filter noises in the signals emanating from the position sensors and a Gaussian image filter is used to filter the images. A comparison of images scanned using the proposed controller (spiral) and the AFM PI controller (raster) shows improvement in the scanning rate using the proposed method.

Habibullah, H., E-mail: h.habib@student.adfa.edu.au; Pota, H. R., E-mail: h.pota@adfa.edu.au; Petersen, I. R., E-mail: i.petersen@adfa.edu.au [School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of New South Wales, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 2612 (Australia)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Final Report on Development of Optimized Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Formation Techniques for Magnetized Target Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of New Mexico (UNM) proposed a collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop and test methods for improved formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas relevant to magnetized target fusion (MTF) energy research. MTF is an innovative approach for a relatively fast and cheap path to the production of fusion energy that utilizes magnetic confinement to assist in the compression of a hot plasma to thermonuclear conditions by an external driver. LANL is currently pursing demonstration of the MTF concept via compression of an FRC plasma by a metal liner z-pinch in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM. A key physics issue for the FRC's ultimate success as an MTF target lies in the initial pre-ionization (PI) stage. The PI plasma sets the initial conditions from which the FRC is created. In particular, the PI formation process determines the amount of magnetic flux that can be trapped to form the FRC. A ringing theta pinch ionization (RTPI) technique, such as currently used by the FRX-L device at LANL, has the advantages of high ionization fraction, simplicity (since no additional coils are required), and does not require internal electrodes which can introduce impurities into the plasma. However RTPI has been shown to only trap #24;50% of the initial bias flux at best and imposes additional engineering constraints on the capacitor banks. The amount of trapped flux plays an important role in the FRC's final equilibrium, transport, and stability properties, and provides increased ohmic heating of the FRC through induced currents as the magnetic field decays. Increasing the trapped flux also provides the route to greatest potential gains in FRC lifetime, which is essential to provide enough time to translate and compress the FRC effectively. In conjunction with LANL we initially planned to develop and test a microwave break- down system to improve the initial PI plasma formation. The UNM team would design the microwave optics and oversee the fabrication and assembly of all components and assist with integration into the FRX-L machine control system. LANL would provide a preexisting 65 kW X-band microwave source and some associated waveguide hardware. Once constructed and installed, UNM would take the lead in operating the microwave breakdown system and conducting studies to optimize its use in FRC PI formation in close cooperation with the needs of the LANL MTF team. In conjunction with our LANL collaborators, we decided after starting the project to switch from a microwave plasma breakdown approach to a plasma gun technology to use for enhanced plasma formation in the FRX-L field-reversed configuration experiment at LANL. Plasma guns would be able to provide significantly higher density plasma with greater control over its distribution in time and space within the experiment. This would allow greater control and #12;ne-tuning of the PI plasma formed in the experiment. Multiple plasma guns would be employed to fill a Pyrex glass test chamber (built at UNM) with plasma which would then be characterized and optimized for the MTF effort.

Lynn, Alan

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Spectro-polarimetric Imaging Reveals Helical Magnetic Fields in Solar Prominence Feet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar prominences are clouds of cool plasma levitating above the solar surface and insulated from the million-degree corona by magnetic fields. They form in regions of complex magnetic topology, characterized by non-potential fields, which can evolve abruptly, disintegrating the prominence and ejecting magnetized material into the heliosphere. However, their physics is not yet fully understood because mapping such complex magnetic configurations and their evolution is extremely challenging, and must often be guessed by proxy from photometric observations.Using state-of-the-art spectro-polarimetric data, we reconstruct the structure of the magnetic field in a prominence. We find that prominence feet harbor helical magnetic fields connecting the prominence to the solar surface below.

Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Ramos, A Asensio; Beck, C; Rodriguez, J de la Cruz; Diaz, A J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

Fukushima, Eiichi (Los Alamos, NM); Roeder, Stephen B. W. (La Mesa, CA); Assink, Roger A. (Albuquerque, NM); Gibson, Atholl A. V. (Bryan, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images Xiaojun Qi Computer Science present prediction-based image compression techniques take advantage of either intra- or inter function. The prediction-based compression technique has been applied on some magnetic resonance (MR) brain

Qi, Xiaojun

184

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Osseous Biopsy in Children With Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the safety and diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MRI)-guided core biopsy of osseous lesions in children with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) that were visible on MRI but were occult on radiography and computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of MRI-guided osseous biopsy performed in seven children (four girls and three boys; mean age 13 years (range 11 to 14) with CRMO was performed. Indication for using MRI guidance was visibility of lesions by MRI only. MRI-guided procedures were performed with 0.2-Tesla (Magnetom Concerto; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; n = 5) or 1.5-T (Magnetom Espree; Siemens; n = 2) open MRI systems. Core needle biopsy was obtained using an MRI-compatible 4-mm drill system. Conscious sedation or general anesthesia was used. Parameters evaluated were lesion visibility, technical success, procedure time, complications and microbiology, cytology, and histopathology findings. Results: Seven of seven (100%) targeted lesions were successfully visualized and sampled. All obtained specimens were sufficient for histopathological analysis. Length of time of the procedures was 77 min (range 64 to 107). No complications occurred. Histopathology showed no evidence of malignancy, which was confirmed at mean follow-up of 50 months (range 28 to 78). Chronic nonspecific inflammation characteristic for CRMO was present in four of seven (58%) patients, and edema with no inflammatory cells was found in three of seven (42%) patients. There was no evidence of infection in any patient. Conclusion: MRI-guided osseous biopsy is a safe and accurate technique for the diagnosis of pediatric CRMO lesions that are visible on MRI only.

Fritz, Jan, E-mail: jfritz9@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Tzaribachev, Nikolay [University Children's Hospital, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology (Germany); Thomas, Christoph [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Wehrmann, Manfred [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Pathology (Germany); Horger, Marius S. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Carrino, John A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Koenig, Claudius W.; Pereira, Philippe L. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. Provides in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for ...

Gollub, Randy L.

186

HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. Provides in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for ...

Gollub, Randy L.

187

Imaging and Spectroscopic Diagnostics on the Formation of Two Magnetic Flux Ropes Revealed by SDO/AIA and IRIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of corona mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) high temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the \\textit{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} Si IV, C II, and Mg II lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare p...

Cheng, X; Fang, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions: Muscles of both the suprahyoid and the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle groups are active in swallowing, and both swallowing exercises effectively target muscles elevating the hyolaryngeal complex. mfMRI is useful in testing swallowing muscle function.

Pearson, William G., E-mail: bp1@bu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hindson, David F. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Langmore, Susan E. [Department of Otolaryngology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Otolaryngology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Speech and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zumwalt, Ann C. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging using deuterum as a contrast agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D.sub.2 O in a solution with water.

Kehayias, Joseph J. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Joel, Darrel D. (Setauket, NY); Adams, William H. (Eastport, NY); Stein, Harry L. (Glen Head, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANNUAL REPORT RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

191

Transmit field pattern control for high field magnetic resonance imaging with integrated RF current sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in units of radians/tesla and B is the magnetic flux density of the applied field, expressed in units of tesla. The hydrogen nucleus, which consists of a single proton, is the most abundantly present in tissue and is most widely used for MRI...

Kurpad, Krishna Nagaraj

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress. Progress report, June 1991--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. Interaction between experiment and modeling should suggest efficient magnetic measurement procedures for determining neutron embrittlement biaxial stress. This should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. In the first six months of this first year study, magnetic measurements were made on steel surveillance specimens from the Indian Point 2 and D.C. Cook 2 reactors. The specimens previously had been characterized by Charpy tests after specified neutron fluences. Measurements now included: (1) hysteresis loop measurement of coercive force, permeability and remanence, (2) Barkhausen noise amplitude; and (3) higher order nonlinear harmonic analysis of a 1 Hz magnetic excitation. Very good correlation of magnetic parameters with fluence and embrittlement was found for specimens from the Indian Point 2 reactor. The D.C. Cook 2 specimens, however showed poor correlation. Possible contributing factors to this are: (1) metallurgical differences between D.C. Cook 2 and Indian Point 2 specimens; (2) statistical variations in embrittlement parameters for individual samples away from the stated men values; and (3) conversion of the D.C. Cook 2 reactor to a low leakage core configuration in the middle of the period of surveillance. Modeling using a magnetomechanical hysteresis model has begun. The modeling will first focus on why Barkhausen noise and nonlinear harmonic amplitudes appear to be better indicators of embrittlement than the hysteresis loop parameters.

Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

An analysis of the PERL Magnetic Resonance Imaging theory and implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of PERL MRI in its most basic form is single shot imaging without the need to rapidly switch gradients to encode spatial information into the signal. PERL MRI incorporates the application of the PERL field into the standard spin echo...

Kremkus, Mark Christian

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fast and contrast-enhanced phase-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

two signals if the resonance frequencies are close. For example, in MR mammography, it is difficult to separate silicone breast implants signals (4.0 ppm) from fat signals (3.5 ppm); (2) the signal dynamic range of images acquired using Dixon...

Son, Jong Bum

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Assessment of Wall Shear Stress Changes in Arteries and Veins of Arteriovenous Polytetrafluoroethylene Grafts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to determine simultaneously the temporal changes in luminal vessel area, blood flow, and wall shear stress (WSS) in both the anastomosed artery (AA) and vein (AV) of arteriovenous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. PTFE grafts were placed from the iliac artery to the ipsilateral iliac vein in 12 castrated juvenile male pigs. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiograpgy with cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging was performed. Luminal vessel area, blood flow, and WSS in the aorta, AA, AV, and inferior vena cava were determined at 3 days (D3), 7 days (D7), and 14 days (D14) after graft placement. Elastin von Gieson staining of the AV was performed. The average WSS of the AA was highest at D3 and then decreased by D7 and D14. In contrast, the average WSS and intima-to-media ratio of the AV increased from D3 to D7 and peaked by D14. Similarly, the average area of the AA was highest by D7 and began to approximate the control artery by D14. The average area of the AV had decreased to its lowest by D7. High blood flows through the AA causes a decrease in average WSS and increase in the average luminal vessel area, whereas at the AV, the average WSS and intima-to-media ratio both increase while the average luminal vessel area decreases.

Misra, Sanjay, E-mail: Misra.sanjay@mayo.edu; Woodrum, David A. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Homburger, Jay [Medical College of Georgia, Department of Vascular Surgery (United States); Elkouri, Stephane [Centre Hospitalier de I'Universite de Montreal, Department of Vascular Surgery (Canada); Mandrekar, Jayawant N. [Mayo Clinic, Division of Biostatistics (United States); Barocas, Victor [University of Minnesota, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Glockner, James F. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Rajan, Dheeraj K. [Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Canada); Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata [Mayo Clinic, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Prediction of the reversibility of the ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using passive cavitation detection with magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cavitation detection with magnetic resonance imaging validation Tao Sun1 , Gesthimani Samiotaki1 and Elisa E (diameters: 1-2, 4-5, or 6-8 m). A 10-MHz passive cavitation detector was used to acquire cavitation signals that the stable cavitation dose increased with the number of days required for closing while it reached a plateau

Konofagou, Elisa E.

197

Intensity inhomogeneity correction for magnetic resonance imaging of human brain at 7T  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the performance and efficacy for intensity inhomogeneity correction of various sequences of the human brain in 7T MRI using the extended version of the unified segmentation algorithm. Materials: Ten healthy volunteers were scanned with four different sequences (2D spin echo [SE], 3D fast SE, 2D fast spoiled gradient echo, and 3D time-of-flight) by using a 7T MRI system. Intensity inhomogeneity correction was performed using the New Segment module in SPM8 with four different values (120, 90, 60, and 30 mm) of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in Gaussian smoothness. The uniformity in signals in the entire white matter was evaluated using the coefficient of variation (CV); mean signal intensities between the subcortical and deep white matter were compared, and contrast between subcortical white matter and gray matter was measured. The length of the lenticulostriate (LSA) was measured on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images in the original and corrected images. Results: In all sequences, the CV decreased as the FWHM value decreased. The differences of mean signal intensities between subcortical and deep white matter also decreased with smaller FWHM values. The contrast between white and gray matter was maintained at all FWHM values. LSA length was significantly greater in corrected MIP than in the original MIP images. Conclusions: Intensity inhomogeneity in 7T MRI can be successfully corrected using SPM8 for various scan sequences.

Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Higuchi, Satomi; Ito, Kenji; Sasaki, Makoto [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan)] [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Kudo, Kohsuke, E-mail: kkudo@huhp.hokudai.ac.jp; Goodwin, Jonathan; Harada, Taisuke [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694, Japan and Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8648 (Japan)] [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694, Japan and Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8648 (Japan); Ogawa, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures by X-ray Spectro-Holography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless ImagingLensless4 J.

199

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-Ray Imaging

200

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-Ray ImagingX-Ray

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-RayX-Ray Imaging of

202

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-RayX-Ray Imaging

203

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore than 20X-RayX-Ray Imaging

204

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-Ray Imaging of the

205

Classification of brain compartments and head injury lesions by neural networks applied to magnetic resonance images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the limitation that they carry no infor- mation regarding the relative position of pixels with respect to each other [14] . The gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) method is a "direct approach" to texture analysis using low-level features of the image... by matrices [20]. The transformation matrices are based on the training samples and then applied to the testing samples. Given an original feature vector, x, and an f x f transformation matrix, A, the transformed vector, y, is given by [20]: ~A. E, (13...

Kischell, Eric Robert

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Prospective Study of the Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Determining Candidacy for Partial Breast Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Retrospective data have demonstrated that breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may change a patient's eligibility for partial breast irradiation (PBI) by identifying multicentric, multifocal, or contralateral disease. The objective of the current study was to prospectively determine the frequency with which MRI identifies occult disease and to establish clinical factors associated with a higher likelihood of MRI prompting changes in PBI eligibility. Methods and Materials: At The University of Chicago, women with breast cancer uniformly undergo MRI in addition to mammography and ultrasonography. From June 2009 through May 2011, all patients were screened prospectively in a multidisciplinary conference for PBI eligibility based on standard imaging, and the impact of MRI on PBI eligibility according to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0413 entry criteria was recorded. Univariable analysis was performed using clinical characteristics in both the prospective cohort and in a separate cohort of retrospectively identified patients. Pooled analysis was used to derive a scoring index predictive of the risk that MRI would identify additional disease. Results: A total of 521 patients were screened for PBI eligibility, and 124 (23.8%) patients were deemed eligible for PBI based on standard imaging. MRI findings changed PBI eligibility in 12.9% of patients. In the pooled univariable analysis, tumor size ?2 cm on mammography or ultrasonography (P=.02), age <50 years (P=.01), invasive lobular histology (P=.01), and HER-2/neu amplification (P=.01) were associated with a higher likelihood of MRI changing PBI eligibility. A predictive score was generated by summing the number of significant risk factors. Patients with a score of 0, 1, 2, and 3 had changes to eligibility based on MRI findings in 2.8%, 13.2%, 38.1%, and 100%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: MRI identified additional disease in a significant number of patients eligible for PBI, based on standard imaging. Clinical characteristics may be useful in directing implementation of MRI in the staging of PBI candidates.

Dorn, Paige L.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Haq, Farah; Goldberg, Mira [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Abe, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hasan, Yasmin [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chmura, Steven J., E-mail: schmura@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

Bucourt, Maximilian de, E-mail: mdb@charite.de; Streitparth, Florian, E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Collettini, Federico [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Guettler, Felix [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Teichgraeber, U. K. [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Clinical Evaluation of Spatial Accuracy of a Fusion Imaging Technique Combining Previously Acquired Computed Tomography and Real-Time Ultrasound for Imaging of Liver Metastases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the spatial accuracy of matching volumetric computed tomography (CT) data of hepatic metastases with real-time ultrasound (US) using a fusion imaging system (VNav) according to different clinical settings. Methods: Twenty-four patients with one hepatic tumor identified on enhanced CT and US were prospectively enrolled. A set of three landmarks markers was chosen on CT and US for image registration. US and CT images were then superimposed using the fusion imaging display mode. The difference in spatial location between the tumor visible on the CT and the US on the overlay images (reviewer no. 1, comment no. 2) was measured in the lateral, anterior-posterior, and vertical axis. The maximum difference (Dmax) was evaluated for different predictive factors.CT performed 1-30 days before registration versus immediately before. Use of general anesthesia for CT and US versus no anesthesia.Anatomic landmarks versus landmarks that include at least one nonanatomic structure, such as a cyst or a calcificationResultsOverall, Dmax was 11.53 {+-} 8.38 mm. Dmax was 6.55 {+-} 7.31 mm with CT performed immediately before VNav versus 17.4 {+-} 5.18 with CT performed 1-30 days before (p < 0.0001). Dmax was 7.05 {+-} 6.95 under general anesthesia and 16.81 {+-} 6.77 without anesthesia (p < 0.0015). Landmarks including at least one nonanatomic structure increase Dmax of 5.2 mm (p < 0.0001). The lowest Dmax (1.9 {+-} 1.4 mm) was obtained when CT and VNav were performed under general anesthesia, one immediately after the other. Conclusions: VNav is accurate when adequate clinical setup is carefully selected. Only under these conditions (reviewer no. 2), liver tumors not identified on US can be accurately targeted for biopsy or radiofrequency ablation using fusion imaging.

Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com; Deschamps, Frederic; Garcia Marques de Carvalho, Enio; Teriitehau, Christophe; Auperin, Anne; De Baere, Thierry [Gustave Roussy Institute (France)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

Wichlas, Florian, E-mail: florian.wichlas@charite.de; Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Rump, Jens [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Chopra, Sascha S. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M. [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bail, Hermann J. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign In About |Imaging Imaging Print

212

Technique and application of a non-invasive three dimensional image matching method for the study of total shoulder arthroplasty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knowledge of in-vivo glenohumeral joint biomechanics after total shoulder arthroplasty are important for the improvement of patient function, implant longevity and surgical technique. No data has been published on the ...

Massimini, Daniel Frank

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Bacterial protein complexes studied by single-molecule imaging and single-cell micromanipulation techniques in microfluidic devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological systems of bacteria were investigated at the single-cell and single-molecule level. Additionally, aspects of the techniques employed were studied. A unifying theme in each project is the reliance on optical ...

Reuter, Marcel

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development and application of a high speed digital data acquisition technique to study steam bubble collapse using particle image velocimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

John Poston ( Head of Department ) ABSTRACT Development anil Appl&cat&on of a. H&vh Speed D&g&tal Data A?qu&s&t&on Techn&que to Study Steam Bubble & 'ollapse us&ng Part&cle Image L'elo imetry I August 1090) K&)liam Dan&el Schr&n Jl. B S . 1&nited... vnth the practical applicatloils of the hardware used in this prelect. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION I 1 Background I 9 Background for Pulsed Laser Velocimetry I 3 tlethodnlogy for Particle Image Velocimetry 14 Background...

Schmidl, William Daniel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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216

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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217

Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Exploring the magnetic topologies of cool stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic fields of cool stars can be directly investigated through the study of the Zeeman effect on photospheric spectral lines using several approaches. With spectroscopic measurement in unpolarised light, the total magnetic flux averaged over the stellar disc can be derived but very little information on the field geometry is available. Spectropolarimetry provides a complementary information on the large-scale component of the magnetic topology. With Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI), this information can be retrieved to produce a map of the vector magnetic field at the surface of the star, and in particular to assess the relative importance of the poloidal and toroidal components as well as the degree of axisymmetry of the field distribution. The development of high-performance spectropolarimeters associated with multi-lines techniques and ZDI allows us to explore magnetic topologies throughout the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram, on stars spanning a wide range of mass, age and rotation period. These observations b...

Morin, J; Petit, P; Albert, L; Auriere, M; Cabanac, R; Catala, C; Delfosse, X; Dintrans, B; Fares, R; Forveille, T; Gastine, T; Jardine, M; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Lanoux, J; Lignieres, F; Morgenthaler, A; Paletou, F; Velez, J C Ramirez; Solanki, S K; Theado, S; Van Grootel, V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Simulations of magnetic nanoparticle Brownian motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic nanoparticles are useful in many medical applications because they interact with biology on a cellular level thus allowing microenvironmental investigation. An enhanced understanding of the dynamics of magnetic particles may lead to advances in imaging directly in magnetic particle imaging (MPI) or through enhanced MRI contrast and is essential for nanoparticle sensing as in magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion (MSB). Moreover, therapeutic techniques like hyperthermia require information about particle dynamics for effective, safe, and reliable use in the clinic. To that end, we have developed and validated a stochastic dynamical model of rotating Brownian nanoparticles from a Langevin equation approach. With no field, the relaxation time toward equilibrium matches Einstein's model of Brownian motion. In a static field, the equilibrium magnetization agrees with the Langevin function. For high frequency or low amplitude driving fields, behavior characteristic of the linearized Debye approximation is reproduced. In a higher field regime where magnetic saturation occurs, the magnetization and its harmonics compare well with the effective field model. On another level, the model has been benchmarked against experimental results, successfully demonstrating that harmonics of the magnetization carry enough information to infer environmental parameters like viscosity and temperature.

Daniel B Reeves; John B Weaver

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

Design and construction of a magnetic force microscope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ............................................. 11 II. USES OF MFM....................................................................................... 16 A. Overview...................................................................................... 16 B. MFM on superconductors... the sample and the tip is useful to ensure the dominance of magnetic force term. The other popular method to ensure that this is the case is called ?Plane Scan?. One of the first uses of this technique was to image vortices in YBCO superconductors.11...

Khandekar, Sameer Sudhakar

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Magnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanos EnergyM CommunicationsGDC

222

Development of radiohalogenated muscarinic ligands for the in vivo imaging of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alterations in the density of acetylcholinergic muscarinic receptors (m-AChR) have been observed in various dementias. This has spurred interest in the development of radiohalogenated ligands which can be used for the non-invasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques. We have developed a new ligand 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ({alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP,12) which demonstrates high affinity for the muscarinic receptor. When labeled with radioiodine it has been shown to be selective and specific for m-ACHR. Initial studies on the separation and in vivo evaluation of the various isomers of IQNP have shown that the stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the configuration around the double bond play an important role in m-AChR subtype specificity. In vivo evaluation of these stereoisomers demonstrate that E-(R,R)-IQNP has a high affinity for the M{sub 1} muscarinic subtype while Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrate a high affinity for M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} receptor subtypes. These data demonstrate IQNP (12) has potential for use in the non-evasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A brominated analogue, ``BrQNP,`` in which the iodine has been replaced by a bromine atom, has also been prepared and was shown to block the in vivo uptake of IQNP in the brain and heart and therefore has potential for positron emission tomographic (PET) studies of m-AChR.

McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Near-electrode imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Magnetic Stereoscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The space mission STEREO will provide images from two viewpoints. An important aim of the STEREO mission is to get a 3D view of the solar corona. We develop a program for the stereoscopic reconstruction of 3D coronal loops from images taken with the two STEREO spacecraft. A pure geometric triangulation of coronal features leads to ambiguities because the dilute plasma emissions complicates the association of features in image 1 with features in image 2. As a consequence of these problems the stereoscopic reconstruction is not unique and multiple solutions occur. We demonstrate how these ambiguities can be resolved with the help of different coronal magnetic field models (potential, linear and non-linear force-free fields). The idea is that, due to the high conductivity in the coronal plasma, the emitting plasma outlines the magnetic field lines. Consequently the 3D coronal magnetic field provides a proxy for the stereoscopy which allows to eliminate inconsistent configurations. The combination of stereoscopy and magnetic modelling is more powerful than one of these tools alone. We test our method with the help of a model active region and plan to apply it to the solar case as soon as STEREO data become available.

Thomas Wiegelmann; Bernd Inhester

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

Neuroimaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T: Comparison of Oxygenation-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and becomes a larger fraction of the total noise at 3.0 T. Activation of the primary motor and visual cortex a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla (T) seems to represent a good compromise. Functional MRI (f

Glover, Gary H.

226

Development of accelerator based spatially resolved ion beam analysis techniques for the study of plasma materials interactions in magnetic fusion devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma-material interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices pose significant scientific and engineering challenges for the development of steady-state fusion power reactors. Understanding PMI is crucial for the develpment ...

Barnard, Harold Salvadore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pellet imaging techniques on ASDEX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a USDOE/ASDEX collaboration, a detailed examination of pellet ablation in ASDEX with a variety of diagnostics has allowed a better understanding of a number of features of hydrogen ice pellet ablation in a plasma. In particular, fast gated photos with an intensified Xybion CCD video camera allow in-situ velocity measurements of the pellet as it penetrates the plasma. With time resolution of typically 100 nanoseconds and exposures every 50 microseconds, the evolution of each pellet in a multi-pellet ASDEX tokamak plasma discharge can be followed. When the pellet cloud track has striations, the light intensity profile through the cloud is hollow (dark near the pellet), whereas at the beginning or near the end of the pellet trajectory the track is typically smooth (without striations) and has a gaussian-peaked light emission profile. New, single pellet Stark broadened D{sub {alpha}}D{sub {beta}}, and D{sub {gamma}} spectra, obtained with a tangentially viewing scanning mirror/spectrometer with Reticon array readout, are consistent with cloud densities of 2 {times} 10{sup 17}cm{sup {minus}3} or higher in the regions of strongest light emission. A spatially resolved array of D{sub {alpha}} detectors shows that the light variations during the pellet ablation are not caused solely by a modulation of the incoming energy flux as the pellet crosses rational q-surfaces, but instead are a result of a dynamic, non-stationary, ablation process. 20 refs., 4 figs.

Wurden, G.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Buechl, K.; Hofmann, J.; Lang, R.; Loch, R.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications: Progress and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic nanoparticles present unique properties that make them suitable for applications in biomedical field such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia and drug delivery systems. Magnetic hyperthermia involves heating the cancer cells by using magnetic particles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The cell temperature increases due to the thermal propagation of the heat induced by the nanoparticles into the affected region. In order to increase the effectiveness of the treatment hyperthermia can be combined with drug delivery techniques. As a spectroscopic technique MRI is used in medicine for the imaging of tissues especially the soft ones and diagnosing malignant or benign tumors. For this purpose Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1?x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles with x between 0 and 1 have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The cristallite size was determined by X-ray diffraction, while the transmission electron microscopy illustrates the spherical shape of the nanoparticles. Magnetic characterizations of the nanoparticles were carried out at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured by calorimetric method at different frequencies and it has been observed that this value depends on the chemical formula, the applied magnetic fields and the frequency. The study consists of evaluating the images, obtained from an MRI facility, when the nanoparticles are dispersed in agar phantoms compared with the enhanced ones when Omniscan was used as contrast agent. Layer-by-layer technique was used to achieve the necessary requirement of biocompatibility. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was modified by coating it with oppositely charged polyelectrolites, making it possible for the binding of a specific drug.

Doaga, A.; Cojocariu, A. M.; Constantin, C. P.; Caltun, O. F. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol I. Nr. 11, Iasi, 700506 (Romania); Hempelmann, R. [Physical Chemistry Department, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrcken (Germany)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

229

Real-Time Color-Flow Magnetic ResonanceImaging of Congenital Heart Disease E. De La Pena-Almaguer, K. S. Nayak, M. Terashima, P.C. Yang,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-Time Color-Flow Magnetic ResonanceImaging of Congenital Heart Disease E. De La Pena used for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD), although it has limitations. Conventional MRI flow pulse sequence.A low flip- angle water selective spectral-spatial excitation is followed

Southern California, University of

230

Use of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve sheath to detect raised intracranial pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is accurate at measuring ONSD [27,28] and has been proposed to detect raised ICP in idiopathic hydrocephalus and to diagnose shunt malfunction [12,14,29,30]. On T2-weighted sequences, water (and CSF) exhibits a high signal (white). Fat and grey matter appear... as light grey, and white matter as dark grey. The perioptic CSF is surrounded by orbital fat. Contrast between CSF and orbital fat can be improved with fat suppression, increasing the image resolution for the ONSD measurement [12,13]. We have con- firmed...

Geeraerts, Thomas; Newcombe, Virginia F J; Coles, Jonathan P; Abate, Maria Giulia; Perkes, Iain E; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Outtrim, Jo G; Chatfield, Dot A; Menon, David K

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

A tomographic technique for the simultaneous imaging of temperature, chemical species, and pressure in reactive flows using absorption spectroscopy with frequency-agile lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper proposes a technique that can simultaneously retrieve distributions of temperature, concentration of chemical species, and pressure based on broad bandwidth, frequency-agile tomographic absorption spectroscopy. The technique holds...

Cai, Weiwei; Kaminski, Clemens F.

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

232

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by... Professor growing field which has provided for nanometric optical imaging in the near-field. Even though a variety of techniques are being developed with nanometric optical imaging potential, near-field optics remains the most

233

Image 2006 DESY A Beamline Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precise #12;Image © 2006 DESY A Zero Schematic BPM BPM BPM BPM BPM Yellow Magnet Kicker Corrector Magnet Spectrometer Magnet 1 2 3 4 5 BPM: Beam Position Monitor Yellow Magnet: Not part of experiment, suppose · BPM resolution · Time step · Yellow Magnet field strength · Kicker field strength · Corrector Magnet

Gollin, George

234

Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via...

235

Dual Plane Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a technique called Dual Plane Imaging which should significantly improve images which would otherwise be blurred due to atmospheric turbulence. The technique involves capturing all the spatial, directional and temporal information about the arriving photons and processing the data afterwards to produce the sharpened images. The technique has particular relevance for imaging at around 400-1000nm on extremely large telescopes (ELTs).

Parry, Ian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Processing gravity gradiometer data using an equivalent source technique Gravity and Magnetics Research Consortium, Department of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processing gravity gradiometer data using an equivalent source technique Yaoguo Li Gravity The inherent relationship among the different components of gravity gradiometer data requires filtering operation on the constructed equivalent source. Introduction Gravity gradiometer data measure

237

Nondestructive NMR technique for moisture determination in radioactive materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report focuses on experimental and computational studies used to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting, quantifying, and monitoring hydrogen and other magnetically active nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) in Spent nuclear fuels and packaging materials. The detection of moisture by using a toroid cavity NMR imager has been demonstrated in SiO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} systems. The total moisture was quantified by means of {sup 1}H NMR detection of H{sub 2}O with a sensitivity of 100 ppm. In addition, an MRI technique that was used to determine the moisture distribution also enabled investigators to discriminate between bulk and stationary water sorbed on the particles. This imaging feature is unavailable in any other nondestructive assay (NDA) technique. Following the initial success of this program, the NMR detector volume was scaled up from the original design by a factor of 2000. The capacity of this detector exceeds the size specified by DOE-STD-3013-96.

Aumeier, S.; Gerald, R.E. II; Growney, E.; Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.

1998-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

238

Real-time high-resolution X-ray imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the hydration of pure and Na-doped C3A in the presence of sulfates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study details the differences in real-time hydration between pure tricalcium aluminate (cubic C{sub 3}A or 3CaO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Na-doped tricalcium aluminate (orthorhombic C{sub 3}A or Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 8}Al{sub 6}O{sub 18}), in aqueous solutions containing sulfate ions. Pure phases were synthesized in the laboratory to develop an independent benchmark for the reactions, meaning that their reactions during hydration in a simulated early age cement pore solution (saturated with respect to gypsum and lime) were able to be isolated. Because the rate of this reaction is extremely rapid, most microscopy methods are not adequate to study the early phases of the reactions in the early stages. Here, a high-resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging technique operating in the X-ray water window, combined with solution analysis by {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to capture information regarding the mechanism of C{sub 3}A hydration during the early stages. There are differences in the hydration mechanism between the two types of C{sub 3}A, which are also dependent on the concentration of sulfate ions in the solution. The reactions with cubic C{sub 3}A (pure) seem to be more influenced by higher concentrations of sulfate ions, forming smaller ettringite needles at a slower pace than the orthorhombic C{sub 3}A (Na-doped) sample. The rate of release of aluminate species into the solution phase is also accelerated by Na doping.

Kirchheim,, A. P.; Dal Molin, D.C.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Provis, J.L.; Fischer, P.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 {mu}g/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N{sub 2}O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures.

Testylier, Guy [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France)]. E-mail: guytestylier@crssa.net; Lahrech, Hana [Inserm, UMR-S 836-Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Montigon, Olivier [Inserm, UMR-S 836-Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Foquin, Annie [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Delacour, Claire [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Bernabe, Denis [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Segebarth, Christoph [Inserm, UMR-S 836-Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Dorandeu, Frederic [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Carpentier, Pierre [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Reversible integer-to-integer (ITI) wavelet transforms are studied in the context of image coding. Considered are matters such as transform frameworks, transform design techniques, the utility of transforms for image coding, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the utility of transforms for image coding, and numerous practical issues related to transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii List of Figures

Adams, Michael D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Use of Non-Invasive Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Estimation of Atrial Septal Defect Size and Morphology: A Comparison with Transesophageal Echo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a trusted method of sizing atrial septal defect (ASD) prior to percutaneous closure but is invasive, uncomfortable, and may carry a small risk of morbidity and mortality. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be useful non-invasive alternative in such patients who refuse or are unable to tolerate TEE and may provide additional information on the shape of the A0SD. Purpose: To validate the accuracy of ASD sizing by MRI compared with TEE.Method: Twelve patients (mean age 30 years; range 11-60 years) scheduled for ASD closure underwent TEE, cine balanced fast field echo MRI (bFFE-MRI) in four-chamber and sagittal views and phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) with reconstruction using the two orthogonal planes of T2-weighted images as planning. The average of the three longest measurements for all imaging modalities was calculated for each patient. Results: Mean maximum ASD length on TEE was 18.8 {+-} 4.6 mm, mean length by bFFE-MRI was 20.0 {+-} 5.0 mm, and mean length by PC-MRI was 18.3 {+-} 3.6 mm. The TEE measurement was significantly correlated with the bFFE-MRI and PC-MRI measurements (Pearson r = 0.69, p = 0.02 and r = 0.59, p = 0.04, respectively). The mean difference between TEE and bFFE-MRI measurements was -1.2mm (95% CI: -3.7, 1.3) and between TEE and PC-MRI was 0.5 mm (95% CI: -1.9, 2.9). Bland-Altman analysis also determined general agreement between both MRI methods and TEE. The ASDs were egg-shaped in two cases, circular in 1 patient and oval in the remaining patients. Conclusion: ASD sizing by MRI using bFFE and phase-contrast protocols correlated well with TEE estimations. PC-MRI provided additional information on ASD shapes and proximity to adjacent structures.

Piaw, Chin Sze; Kiam, Ong Tiong [Sarawak General Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Malaysia); Rapaee, Annuar [University of Malaysia Sarawak (Malaysia)], E-mail: rannuar@fmhs.unimas.myp; Khoon, Liew Chee; Bang, Liew Houng; Ling, Chan Wei [Sarawak General Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Malaysia); Samion, Hasri [National Heart Institute, Pediatric of Cardiology (Malaysia); Hian, Sim Kui [Sarawak General Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Malaysia)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Ultra-high-resolution Observations of MHD Waves in Photospheric Magnetic Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we review the recent progress made in the detection, examination, characterisation and interpretation of oscillations manifesting in small-scale magnetic elements in the solar photosphere. This region of the Sun's atmosphere is especially dynamic, and importantly, permeated with an abundance of magnetic field concentrations. Such magnetic features can span diameters of hundreds to many tens of thousands of km, and are thus commonly referred to as the `building blocks' of the magnetic solar atmosphere. However, it is the smallest magnetic elements that have risen to the forefront of solar physics research in recent years. Structures, which include magnetic bright points, are often at the diffraction limit of even the largest of solar telescopes. Importantly, it is the improvements in facilities, instrumentation, imaging techniques and processing algorithms during recent years that have allowed researchers to examine the motions, dynamics and evolution of such features on the smallest spatial and temporal ...

Jess, David B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heusler intermetallics Mn{sub 2}Y Ga and X{sub 2}MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X{sub 2}MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn{sub 2}Y Ga to the logical Mn{sub 3}Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co{sub 2}FeSi (Appendix B).

Jenkins, C.A.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Fiber-Optic Stethoscope: A Cardiac Monitoring and Gating System for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the distortion of the ECG due to electromagnetic interference

245

Ground Magnetics At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date 2011 - 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Magnetic surveys were conducted to gain a better...

246

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

velocity Relates Elastic modulus to speed of sound Assumes Concrete heterogeneous Can be affected by steel Modulus related to speed of sound Strength of concrete related to modulus Location of flaws structure In both cases procedure is destructive Systems to monitor concrete modulus Ultra-sonic pulse

Burgoyne, Chris

247

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N I

248

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL SEMINARImaging of

249

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL SEMINARImaging

250

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL SEMINARImagingLensless

251

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL

252

activation analysis technique: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

253

activation analysis techniques: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Remote...

254

Tunable exchange bias-like effect in patterned hard-soft two-dimensional lateral composites with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patterned hard-soft 2D magnetic lateral composites have been fabricated by e-beam lithography plus dry etching techniques on sputter-deposited NdCo{sub 5} thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Their magnetic behavior is strongly thickness dependent due to the interplay between out-of-plane anisotropy and magnetostatic energy. Thus, the spatial modulation of thicknesses leads to an exchange coupled system with hard/soft magnetic regions in which rotatable anisotropy of the thicker elements provides an extra tool to design the global magnetic behavior of the patterned lateral composite. Kerr microscopy studies (domain imaging and magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry) reveal that the resulting hysteresis loops exhibit a tunable exchange bias-like shift that can be switched on/off by the applied magnetic field.

Hierro-Rodriguez, A., E-mail: ahierro@fc.up.pt; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Martn, J. I.; Alameda, J. M. [Departamento de Fsica, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Centro de Investigacin en Nanomateriales y NanotecnologaCINN (CSICUniversidad de OviedoPrincipado de Asturias), Parque Tecnolgico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera (Spain); Teixeira, J. M. [IN-IFIMUP, Departamento de Fsica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Cincias, Universidade do Porto, Rua Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Vlez, M. [Departamento de Fsica, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite particles. The overall goal of this project is to understand the mechanism of magnetite particle synthesis in the presence of the biomineralization proteins, mms6 and C25. Previous work has hypothesized that the mms6 protein helps to template magnetite and cobalt ferrite particle synthesis and that the C25 protein templates cobalt ferrite formation. However, the effect of parameters such as the protein concentration on the particle formation is still unknown. It is expected that the protein concentration significantly affects the nucleation and growth of magnetite. Since the protein provides iron-binding sites, it is expected that magnetite crystals would nucleate at those sites. In addition, in the previous work, the reaction medium after completion of the reaction was in the solution phase, and magnetic particles had a tendency to fall to the bottom of the medium and aggregate. The research presented in this thesis involves solid Pluronic gel phase reactions, which can be studied readily using small-angle x-ray scattering, which is not possible for the solution phase experiments. In addition, the concentration effect of both of the proteins on magnetite crystal formation was studied.

David, Anand

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

256

The magnetic resonance force microscope: A new microscopic probe of magnetic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) marries the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), to produce a three-dimensional imaging instrument with high, potentially atomic-scale, resolution. The principle of the MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in numerous experiments. By virtue of its unique capabilities the MRFM shows promise to make important contributions in fields ranging from three-dimensional materials characterization to bio-molecular structure determination. Here the authors focus on its application to the characterization and study of layered magnetic materials; the ability to illuminate the properties of buried interfaces in such materials is a particularly important goal. While sensitivity and spatial resolution are currently still far from their theoretical limits, they are nonetheless comparable to or superior to that achievable in conventional MRI. Further improvement of the MRFM will involve operation at lower temperature, application of larger field gradients, introduction of advanced mechanical resonators and improved reduction of the spurious coupling when the magnet is on the resonator.

Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Midzor, M.; Roukes, M.L. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Wigen, P.E. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Childress, J.R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1997-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

On the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy B.E., Electrical and Electronic EngineeringOn the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial fulfillment

258

angiographic image segmentation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Image segmentation is very essential and critical to image processing and pattern recognition. This survey provides a summary of color image segmentation techniques...

259

Direct torsional actuation of microcantilevers using magnetic excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Torsional mode dynamic force microscopy can be used for a wide range of studies including mapping lateral contact stiffness, torsional frequency or amplitude modulation imaging, and dynamic friction measurements of various materials. Piezo-actuation of the cantilever is commonly used, but it introduces spurious resonances, limiting the frequency range that can be sampled, and rendering the technique particularly difficult to apply in liquid medium where the cantilever oscillations are significantly damped. Here, we demonstrate a method that enables direct torsional actuation of cantilevers with high uniformity over wide frequency ranges by attaching a micrometer-scale magnetic bead on the back side of the cantilever. We show that when beads are magnetized along the width of the cantilever, efficient torsional actuation of the cantilevers can be achieved using a magnetic field produced from a solenoid placed underneath the sample. We demonstrate the capability of this technique by imaging atomic steps on graphite surfaces in tapping mode near the first torsional resonance of the cantilever in dodecane. The technique is also applied to map the variations in the lateral contact stiffness on the surface of graphite and polydiacetylene monolayers.

Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Nalam, Prathima C.; Tam, Qizhan; Carpick, Robert W., E-mail: carpick@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Exarhos, Annemarie L.; Kikkawa, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Dismantling techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the dismantling techniques used in a Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D) project are taken from conventional demolition practices. Some modifications to the techniques are made to limit exposure to the workers or to lessen the spread of contamination to the work area. When working on a D and D project, it is best to keep the dismantling techniques and tools as simple as possible. The workers will be more efficient and safer using techniques that are familiar to them. Prior experience with the technique or use of mock-ups is the best way to keep workers safe and to keep the project on schedule.

Wiese, E.

1998-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Writing magnetic patterns with surface acoustic waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel patterning technique that creates magnetization patterns in a continuous magnetostrictive film with surface acoustic waves is demonstrated. Patterns of 10??m wide stripes of alternating magnetization and a 3??m dot of reversed magnetization are written using standing and focusing acoustic waves, respectively. The magnetization pattern is size-tunable, erasable, and rewritable by changing the magnetic field and acoustic power. This versatility, along with its solid-state implementation (no moving parts) and electronic control, renders it as a promising technique for application in magnetic recording, magnonic signal processing, magnetic particle manipulation, and spatial magneto-optical modulation.

Li, Weiyang; Buford, Benjamin; Jander, Albrecht; Dhagat, Pallavi, E-mail: dhagat@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Small Scale Magnetic Particle Relaxometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a newly found imaging modality. It utilizes superparamagnetic materials as tracers in the blood stream to obtain very high resolutions. MPI promises to have high sensitivity, high spatial resolution...

El Ghamrawy, Ahmed

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - axial translation technique Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 38 Wireless Control of Magnetic Helical Microrobots using a Rotating-Permanent-Magnet Manipulator Summary: to a helical microrobot. Using this technique, there are...

264

Full-Volume, Three-Dimensional, Transient Measurements of Bubbly Flows Using Particle Tracking Velocimetry and Shadow Image Velocimetry Coupled with Pattern Recognition Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Develop a state-of-the-art non-intrusive diagnostic tool to perform simultaneous measurements of both the temporal and three-dimensional spatial velocity of the two phases of a bubbly flow. These measurements are required to provide a foundation for studying the constitutive closure relations needed in computational fluid dynamics and best-estimate thermal hydraulic codes employed in nuclear reactor safety analysis and severe accident simulation. Such kinds of full-field measurements are not achievable through the commonly used point-measurement techniques, such as hot wire, conductance probe, laser Doppler anemometry, etc. The results can also be used in several other applications, such as the dynamic transport of pollutants in water or studies of the dispersion of hazardous waste.

Yassin Hassan

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cancellation of TorqueRipple Due to Nonidealitiesof PermanentMagnet SynchronousMachine Drives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-magnet synchronous application than the predecessors. Further, the technique is machine (PMSM) drives dictates

Chapman, Patrick

266

Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

Efficient MR image reconstruction for compressed MR imaging Junzhou Huang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be very powerful for the MR image reconstruction. First, we decompose the original problem into L1 and TV.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging has been widely used in medical. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used in practical MR image

Huang, Junzhou

268

Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for com- pressed MR image reconstruction. 1 [1][2] show that it is possi- ble to accurately reconstruct the Magnetic Resonance (MR) images from for real MR images. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used

Huang, Junzhou

269

Category:Magnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind FarmAdd a newISGAN

270

Imaging and sensing based on muon tomography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons for imaging applications. Subtraction techniques are described to enhance the processing of the muon tomography data.

Morris, Christopher L; Saunders, Alexander; Sossong, Michael James; Schultz, Larry Joe; Green, J. Andrew; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Smith, Richard A; Colthart, James M; Klugh, David C; Scoggins, Gary E; Vineyard, David C

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

Imaging with Scattered Neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-resolution images by scattered neutron radiography and tomography are presented.

H. Ballhausen; H. Abele; R. Gaehler; M. Trapp; A. Van Overberghe

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Three-dimensional medical image analysis using local dynamic algorithm selection on a multiple-instruction, multiple-data architecture. Doctoral thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dissertation outlines development of a medical imaging machine which renders 3D images from voxel data within a MIMD multiprocessor architecture at interactive rates. Interactive performance is achieved using local dynamic selection of the optimum adaptive recursive hidden-surface removal algorithm. A survey of the medical imaging, graphics, and medical imaging modality literature is provided. A description of Computerized Technology, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography, and Ultrasound imaging modalities is presented Previous work in 3D volume rendering graphics techniques and data models is introduced. Eleven medical imaging machines are examined with emphasis on characterization of the major innovation(s) and performance of each machine. A five stage image processing pipeline is described.

Stytz, M.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

Jansen, Jacobus F.A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Schoeder, Heiko [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stambuk, Hilda E. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wang Ya [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fury, Matthew G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Patel, Senehal G. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pfister, David G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shah, Jatin P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shukla-Dave, Amita, E-mail: davea@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern science, ranging from large-scale structures and dynamics of polymers and biological systems, to electronic properties of today's technological materials. Neutron scattering developed into a vast field, encompassing many different experimental techniques aimed at exploring different aspects of matter's atomic structure and dynamics. Modern magnetic neutron scattering includes several specialized techniques designed for specific studies and/or particular classes of materials. Among these are magnetic reflectometry aimed at investigating surfaces, interfaces, and multilayers, small-angle scattering for the large-scale structures, such as a vortex lattice in a superconductor, and neutron spin-echo spectroscopy for glasses and polymers. Each of these techniques and many others offer exciting opportunities for examining magnetism and warrant extensive reviews, but the aim of this chapter is not to survey how different neutron-scattering methods are used to examine magnetic properties of different materials. Here, we concentrate on reviewing the basics of the magnetic neutron scattering, and on the recent developments in applying one of the oldest methods, the triple axis spectroscopy, that still is among the most extensively used ones. The developments discussed here are new and have not been coherently reviewed. Chapter 2 of this book reviews magnetic small-angle scattering, and modern techniques of neutron magnetic reflectometry are discussed in Chapter 3.

ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Methods for functional brain imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the potential for non-invasive mapping of structure and function (fMRI) in the human brain. In this thesis, we propose a series of methodological developments towards ...

Witzel, Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications.

MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

277

Electrochemical Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Video Toroid Cavity Imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANLs pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Argonne scientists discover new magnetic phase in iron-based...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neutron diffraction image giving evidence for the new magnetic phase in iron-based superconductors discovered by Argonne scientists. It shows the scattering results from a sample...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

arthritis magnetic resonance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the distortion of the ECG due to electromagnetic interference cardiac activity that, unlike the ECG, is immune to electromagnetic...

282

Magnetic Field Measurement System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar [Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States); Dunn, Jonathan Hunter [MAX-lab, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Image Charge Differential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Image Charge Differential Amplifier FT 0 Crude Oil Time (s) 543210 Frequency (kHz) m/z m q B f Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) uses the frequency of cyclotron motion of the ions in a static magnetic field to determine the mass-to-charge ratio, which is then used

Weston, Ken

284

A laser speckle based position sensing technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the design and development of a novel laser-speckle-based position sensing technique. In our prototype implementation, a He-Ne laser beam is directed at the surface of an air-bearing spindle. An imaging ...

Shilpiekandula, Vijay, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Image Forensic of Glare Feature for Improving Image Retrieval Using Benford's Law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Image Forensic of Glare Feature for Improving Image Retrieval Using Benford's Law Ghulam Qadir proposed technique is novel and has a potential to be an image forensic tool for quick image analysis. I. INTRODUCTION The field of digital image forensics is striving hard to restore the lost trust in digital content

Doran, Simon J.

286

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (SD) of 12.33 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 0.02, 2.05 0.66 cm, and 0.78 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 0.03, 1.91 0.65 cm, and 0.7 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Magnetic investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA); Baldwin, M.J. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Mercury, NV (USA)

1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Magnetic Barcoded Hydrogel Microparticles for Multiplexed Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic polymer particles have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from targeting and separation to diagnostics and imaging. Current synthesis methods have limited these particles to spherical or deformations ...

Bong, Ki Wan

289

Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Geothermal Prospecting Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Use of Geophysical Techniques...

290

Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ?4?nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

Li, Wenxian, E-mail: wl240@uowmail.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Solar Energy Technologies, School of Computing, Engineering, and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW 2751 (Australia); Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Tian, Dongliang [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and the Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

291

Strange Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analytic and parameter-free expression for the momentum dependence of the strange magnetic form factor of the nucleon and its corresponding radius which has been derived in Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory. We also discuss a model-independent relation between the isoscalar magnetic and the strange magnetic form factors of the nucleon based on chiral symmetry and SU(3) only. These limites are used to derive bounds on the strange magnetic moment of the proton from the recent measurement by the SAMPLE collaboration.

Thomas R. Hemmert; Ulf-G. Meissner; Sven Steininger

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

McQuade, D. Tyler

293

Image Mining by Matching Exemplars Using Entropy Clark F. Olson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different sensors (e.g. CCD versus FLIR). Current matching techniques are effi- cient for single images

Olson, Clark F.

294

Image fusion for a nighttime driving display  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation into image fusion for a nighttime driving display application was performed. Most of the image fusion techniques being investigated in this application were developed for other purposes. When comparing the ...

Herrington, William Frederick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Magnetic shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

296

Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM); Flynn, Edward R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Magnetic nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

Matsui, Hiroshi (Glen Rock, NJ); Matsunaga, Tadashi (Tokyo, JP)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nanoscale NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging of Multiple Nuclear Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well-established techniques that provide valuable information in a diverse set of disciplines but are currently limited to macroscopic sample volumes. Here we demonstrate nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging under ambient conditions of samples containing multiple nuclear species, using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond as sensors. With single, shallow NV centres in a diamond chip and samples placed on the diamond surface, we perform NMR spectroscopy and one-dimensional MRI on few-nanometre-sized samples containing $^1$H and $^{19}$F nuclei. Alternatively, we employ a high-density NV layer near the surface of a diamond chip to demonstrate wide-field optical NMR spectroscopy of nanoscale samples containing $^1$H, $^{19}$F, and $^{31}$P nuclei, as well as multi-species two-dimensional optical MRI with sub-micron resolution. For all diamond samples exposed to air, we identify a ubiquitous $^1$H NMR signal, consistent with a $\\sim 1$ nm layer of adsorbed hydrocarbons or water on the diamond surface and below any sample placed on the diamond. This work lays the foundation for nanoscale NMR and MRI applications such as studies of single proteins and functional biological imaging with subcellular resolution, as well as characterization of thin films with sub-nanometre resolution.

Stephen J. DeVience; Linh M. Pham; Igor Lovchinsky; Alexander O. Sushkov; Nir Bar-Gill; Chinmay Belthangady; Francesco Casola; Madeleine Corbett; Huiliang Zhang; Mikhail Lukin; Hongkun Park; Amir Yacoby; Ronald L. Walsworth

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Microporous Magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining porosity and magnetic ordering in a single material presents a significant challenge since magnetic exchange generally requires short bridges between the spin carriers, whereas porosity usually relies on the use of long diamagnetic connecting ligands. Despite this apparent incompatibility, notable successes have been achieved of late in generating truly microporous solids with high magnetic ordering temperatures. In this critical review, we give an overview of this emerging class of multifunctional materials, with particular emphasis on synthetic strategies and possible routes to new materials with improved properties (149 references).

Dechambenoit, Pierre; Long, Jeffrey R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Image compression/decompression based on mathematical transform, reduction/expansion, and image sharpening  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An image represented in a first image array of pixels is first decimated in two dimensions before being compressed by a predefined compression algorithm such as JPEG. Another possible predefined compression algorithm can involve a wavelet technique. The compressed, reduced image is then transmitted over the limited bandwidth transmission medium, and the transmitted image is decompressed using an algorithm which is an inverse of the predefined compression algorithm (such as reverse JPEG). The decompressed, reduced image is then interpolated back to its original array size. Edges (contours) in the image are then sharpened to enhance the perceptual quality of the reconstructed image. Specific sharpening techniques are described. 22 figs.

Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

1997-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Low dimensional magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism in Ultracold Gases 4 Magnetic phase diagram of aMagnetism . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Magnetism in condensedIntroduction 1 Brief introduction to magnetism 1.1 Classic

Kjall, Jonas Alexander

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

128 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 25, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 Unwrapping of MR Phase Images Using a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

128 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 25, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 Unwrapping of MR Phase of blood flow [1], [2]. Extracting the phase image from its measured complex MR image is nontrivial because, phase unwrapping. I. INTRODUCTION A. Background Magnetic resonance (MR) phase images often contain

Koetter, Ralf

303

106 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2010 Feature Based Nonrigid Brain MR Image Registration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

106 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2010 Feature Based Nonrigid Brain MR Image Registration With Symmetric Alpha Stable Filters Shu Liao* and Albert C. S. Chung Abstract--A new feature based nonrigid image registration method for magnetic resonance (MR) brain images

Chung, Albert C. S.

304

Polarization transfer NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

Sillerud, Laurel O. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Test Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

306

Controlling Magnetism at the Nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manipulation of Magnetism - External148 Conclusion A The Magnetism Cheat Sheet A.1 Magnetic157 A.2 Magnetism Unit Conversion

Wong, Jared

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The effect of diffusion in internal gradients on nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work we study the internal gradient effects on diffusion attenuation of the echo train appearing in the well-known Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) technique, extensively used for transverse relaxation measurements. Our investigations are carried out on two porous ceramics, prepared with the same amount of magnetic impurities (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) but different pore sizes. It is shown that diffusion effects on the CPMG echo train attenuation are strongly influenced by the pore size for the same magnetic susceptibility of the two samples. The experimental results were compared with a theoretical model taking into account the limit of free or restricted diffusion on echo train attenuation. The NMR experiments were performed on water filled samples using a low-field NMR instrument. The porous ceramics were prepared using both the replica technique and the powder compression technique. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicated close values of the susceptibility constant for the two samples whereas the SEM images indicated different pore sizes. The results reported here may have impact in the interpretation of NMR relaxation measurements of water in soils or concrete samples.

Muncaci, S.; Ardelean, I. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Boboia, S. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

Adjustable permanent magnet assembly for NMR and MRI  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

System and methods for designing and using single-sided magnet assemblies for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are disclosed. The single-sided magnet assemblies can include an array of permanent magnets disposed at selected positions. At least one of the permanent magnets can be configured to rotate about an axis of rotation in the range of at least +/-10 degrees and can include a magnetization having a vector component perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The single-sided magnet assemblies can further include a magnet frame that is configured to hold the permanent magnets in place while allowing the at least one of the permanent magnets to rotate about the axis of rotation.

Pines, Alexander; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Bouchard, Louis S; Blumich, Bernhard

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

309

Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector has been developed to facilitate the location of shorted turns in magnet coils. Finding these shorted turns is necessary to determine failure modes that are a necessary step in developing future production techniques. Up to this point, coils with shorted turns had the insulation burned off without the fault having been located. This disassembly process destroyed any chance of being able to find the fault. In order to maintain a flux balance in a coupled system such as a magnet coil, the current in a shorted turn must be opposed to the incident current. If the direction of the current in each conductor can be measured relative to the incident current, then the exact location of the short can be determined. In this device, an AC voltage is applied to the magnet under test. A small hand held B-dot pickup coil monitors the magnetic field produced by current in the individual magnet conductors. The relative phase of this pickup coil voltage is compared to a reference signal derived from the input current to detect a current reversal as the B-dot pickup coil is swept over the conductors of the coil under test. This technique however, is limited to only those conductors that are accessible to the hand held probe.

Dinkel, J.A.; Biggs, J.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Image Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recognition Image Analysis and Recognition Snapshot1498121slicesqResedison Fibers permeating imaged material (Courtesy: Bale, Loring, Perciano and Ushizima) Imagery coming from...

311

Image texture analysis of elastograms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated elastograms to obtain effective texture features. Four image analysis techniques, co-occurrence statistics, wavelet decomposition, fractal analysis and granulomeay are used to extract a number of features from each image. The inclusions...-RESOLUTION FRACTAL ANALYSIS . . . . . . E. GRANULOMETRIC FEATURES . . F. DATA NORMALIZATION . G. SEPARABILITY MEASURE 13 13 . . . . . 14 . . . . . 20 . . . . . 29 33 36 36 IV TEXTURE ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED ELASTOGRAMS. . . . . . . . . . . 38 A. SIMULATION...

Hussain, Fasahat

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Next Generation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. A. ; MacRenaris, K. W. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Ho,R. ; Eckermann, A. L. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Meade,E. A. ; MacRenaris, K. W. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Ho,

Klemm, Piper Julia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubes

314

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect

315

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel prices top

316

Neutrino magnetic moment in a magnetized plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contribution of a magnetized plasma to the neutrino magnetic moment is calculated. It is shown that only part of the additional neutrino energy in magnetized plasma connecting with its spin and magnetic field strength defines the neutrino magnetic moment. It is found that the presence of magnetized plasma does not lead to the considerable increase of the neutrino magnetic moment in contrast to the results presented in literature previously.

N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

Confidence-Driven Image Co-matting Linbo Wanga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the task of estimating accurate foreground opacity from a given image, is a severely ill stack than applying state-of-the-art single image matting techniques individually on each image fore- ground opacity from natural images. Specifically, given an input image I, it estimates

Wang, Jue

318

Array combination for parallel imaging in Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................103 Figure 51. Diagram of geometry used...........................................................................104 Figure 52. 64 element 8x8 grid array SNR map using 64 receivers. ............................105 Figure 53. 64 element 8x8 grid...-factor maps for point combined array......................................................117 Figure 63. SENSE reconstructions using point combined array...................................118 Figure 64. Grid array geometry used for simulation...

Spence, Dan Kenrick

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

319

Phase-space representation of digital holographic and light field imaging with application to two-phase flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, two computational imaging techniques used for underwater research, in particular, two-phase flows measurements, are presented. The techniques under study, digital holographic imaging and light field imaging, ...

Tian, Lei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Patterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, opens up new opportunities for engineering innovative magnetic materials and devices, developing ultra of magnetic nanostructures as small as 10 nm; 2) engineering of unique magnetic properties (such as domainPatterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks STEPHEN Y. CHOU Invited Paper

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Petroglyphs, Lighting, and Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1950 Electricity and Magnetism: Theory and Applications.I Petroglyphs, Lightning, and Magnetism | Walker Figure 8.I Petroglyphs, Lightning, and Magnetism | Walker Figure IL

Walker, Merle F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Turbulence in the Solar Atmosphere: Manifestations and Diagnostics via Solar Image Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intermittent magnetohydrodynamical turbulence is most likely at work in the magnetized solar atmosphere. As a result, an array of scaling and multi-scaling image-processing techniques can be used to measure the expected self-organization of solar magnetic fields. While these techniques advance our understanding of the physical system at work, it is unclear whether they can be used to predict solar eruptions, thus obtaining a practical significance for space weather. We address part of this problem by focusing on solar active regions and by investigating the usefulness of scaling and multi-scaling image-processing techniques in solar flare prediction. Since solar flares exhibit spatial and temporal intermittency, we suggest that they are the products of instabilities subject to a critical threshold in a turbulent magnetic configuration. The identification of this threshold in scaling and multi-scaling spectra would then contribute meaningfully to the prediction of solar flares. We find that the fractal dimension of solar magnetic fields and their multi-fractal spectrum of generalized correlation dimensions do not have significant predictive ability. The respective multi-fractal structure functions and their inertial-range scaling exponents, however, probably provide some statistical distinguishing features between flaring and non-flaring active regions. More importantly, the temporal evolution of the above scaling exponents in flaring active regions probably shows a distinct behavior starting a few hours prior to a flare and therefore this temporal behavior may be practically useful in flare prediction. The results of this study need to be validated by more comprehensive works over a large number of solar active regions.

Manolis K. Georgoulis

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Understanding User Intentions in Vertical Image Search  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proposed for solving the image matching problem and object location problem in crowded scenes. Such method was further developed in [Stricker and Orengo, 1995] with improved indexing techniques to color information in dig- ital images. In [Huang et al...-tree, R-tree and its variant R+-tree and R?-tree, are usually not scalable to dimensions higher than 20 [White and Jain, 1996]. 2.2 Image annotation Image annotation or image tagging is an area closely related to image retrieval. Image anno- tation...

Chen, Yuxin

324

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Magnetic Catalysis vs Magnetic Inhibition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the fate of chiral symmetry in an extremely strong magnetic field B. We investigate not only quark fluctuations but also neutral meson effects. The former would enhance the chiral-symmetry breaking at finite B according to the Magnetic Catalysis, while the latter would suppress the chiral condensate once B exceeds the scale of the hadron structure. Using a chiral model we demonstrate how neutral mesons are subject to the dimensional reduction and the low dimensionality favors the chiral-symmetric phase. We point out that this effect, the Magnetic Inhibition, can be a feasible explanation for recent lattice-QCD data indicating the decreasing behavior of the chiral-restoration temperature with increasing B.

Kenji Fukushima; Yoshimasa Hidaka

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

Technique for ship/wake detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An automated ship detection technique includes accessing data associated with an image of a portion of Earth. The data includes reflectance values. A first portion of pixels within the image are masked with a cloud and land mask based on spectral flatness of the reflectance values associated with the pixels. A given pixel selected from the first portion of pixels is unmasked when a threshold number of localized pixels surrounding the given pixel are not masked by the cloud and land mask. A spatial variability image is generated based on spatial derivatives of the reflectance values of the pixels which remain unmasked by the cloud and land mask. The spatial variability image is thresholded to identify one or more regions within the image as possible ship detection regions.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Seeing the magnetic monopole through the mirror of topological surface states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existence of the magnetic monopole is compatible with the fundamental laws of nature, however, this illusive particle has yet to be detected experimentally. In this work, we show that an electric charge near the topological surface state induces an image magnetic monopole charge due to the topological magneto-electric effect. The magnetic field generated by the image magnetic monopole can be experimentally measured, and the inverse square law of the field dependence can be determined quantitatively. We propose that this effect can be used to experimentally realize a gas of quantum particles carrying fractional statistics, consisting of the bound states of the electric charge and the image magnetic monopole charge.

Qi, Xiao-Liang; Li, Rundong; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Zang, Jiadong; /Fudan U.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fudan U.

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

329

Simplified image processing system for softcopy presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based i, echniques for its particular application. In the field of astronomy, digital image processing techniques are used to process images acquired through earth-based telescopes as well as earth orbiting outward- looking satellites jfij, I7j, j8... and analysis is being used to support computerized axial tomography and ultrasound scanning systems ]9]. Typical digital techniques used in biomedical applications include image enhancement, geometric transformation, edge detection, color and pseudo color...

Corleto-Mena, Jose Gilberto

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Superconducting Magnet Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting Magnet Division DOE NP Program Review - July 06 1 Brookhaven Magnet Division - Nuclear Physics Program Support Activities Superconducting Magnet Program RHIC Operations Support Spin Summary Peter Wanderer, DOE review, July 25, 2006 Acting Head, Superconducting Magnet Division #12

331

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSVOLUME 11 N0.1 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSVOLUME 11 N0.1 2004 OPERATED BY: FLORIDA STATE R E V I E W BIOLOGY BIOCHEMISTRY CHEMISTRY CRYOGENICS ENGINEERING MATERIALS GEOCHEMISTRY INSTRUMENTATION KONDO/HEAVY FERMION SYSTEMS MAGNET TECHNOLOGY MAGNETIC RESONANCE TECHNIQUES MAGNETISMAND MAGNETIC

Weston, Ken

332

People Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

People Images People Images Several hundred of the 1700 U.S. scientists contributing to the LHC accelerator and experiments gathered in June 2008 in CERN's building 40 CE0252 Joel...

333

Image alignment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

Dowell, Larry Jonathan

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

334

Magnetic Reconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

Image processing applications in NDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nondestructive examination (NDE) can be defined as a technique or collection of techniques that permits one to determine some property of a material or object without damaging the object. There are a large number of such techniques and most of them use visual imaging in one form or another. They vary from holographic interferometry where displacements under stress are measured to the visual inspection of an objects surface to detect cracks after penetrant has been applied. The use of image processing techniques on the images produced by NDE is relatively new and can be divided into three general categories: classical image enhancement; mensuration techniques; and quantitative sensitometry. An example is discussed of how image processing techniques are used to nondestructively and destructively test the product throughout its life cycle. The product that will be followed is the microballoon target used in the laser fusion program. The laser target is a small (50 to 100 ..mu..m - dia) glass sphere with typical wall thickness of 0.5 to 6 ..mu..m. The sphere may be used as is or may be given a number of coatings of any number of materials. The beads are mass produced by the millions and the first nondestructive test is to separate the obviously bad beads (broken or incomplete) from the good ones. After this has been done, the good beads must be inspected for spherocity and wall thickness uniformity. The microradiography of the glass, uncoated bead is performed on a specially designed low-energy x-ray machine. The beads are mounted in a special jig and placed on a Kodak high resolution plate in a vacuum chamber that contains the x-ray source. The x-ray image is made with an energy less that 2 keV and the resulting images are then inspected at a magnification of 500 to 1000X. Some typical results are presented.

Morris, R.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Imaging diffusion with non-uniform B{sub 1} gradients.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rotating-frame imaging with the mathematically well-defined, non-constant magnetic field gradient of toroid cavity detectors represents a new technique to evaluate diffusion in solids, fluids or mixed-phase systems. While conventional NMR methods to measure diffusion utilize constant magnetic field gradients and, therefore, constant k-space wave numbers across the sample volume, the hyperbolic B{sub 1} fields of toroid cavity detectors exhibit large ranges of wave numbers radially distributed around the central conductor. As a consequence, signal amplitudes decay depending on the radial distance from the center axis of the torus. Applying a numerical finite-difference procedure to solve partial differential transport equations makes it possible not only to determine diffusion in toroid detectors to a high precision but also to include and accurately reproduce transport phenomena at or through singularities, such as phase transitions, membranes or impermeable boundaries.

Woelk, K.

1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

337

artery magnetic resonance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Whole Brain Isotropic Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a transgenic mouse...

338

Sub-surface characterization and three dimensional profiling of semiconductors by magnetic resonance force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project successfully developed a magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) instrument to mechanically detect magnetic resonance signals. This technique provides an intrinsically subsurface, chemical-species-specific probe of structure, constituent density and other properties of materials. As in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an applied magnetic field gradient selects a well defined volume of the sample for study. However mechanical detection allows much greater sensitivity, and this in turn allows the reduction of the size of the minimum resolvable volume. This requires building an instrument designed to achieve nanometer-scale resolution at buried semiconductor interfaces. High-resolution, three-dimensional depth profiling of semiconductors is critical in the development and fabrication of semiconductor devices. Currently, there is no capability for direct, high-resolution observation and characterization of dopant density, and other critical features of semiconductors. The successful development of MRFM in conjunction with modifications to improve resolution will enable for the first time detailed structural and electronic studies in doped semiconductors and multilayered nanoelectronic devices, greatly accelerating the current pace of research and development.

Hammel, P.C.; Moore, G.; Roukes, M.; Zhenyong Zhang

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ?10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (?10{sup ?10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (?10{sup 28}m{sup ?3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

Lynn, Alan G., E-mail: lynn@ece.unm.edu; Gilmore, Mark [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

High throughput 3D optical microscopy : from image cytometry to endomicroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical microscopy is an imaging technique that allows morphological mapping of intracellular structures with submicron resolution. More importantly, optical microscopy is a technique that can readily provide images with ...

Choi, Heejin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Assessor Training Assessment Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

342

Magnetic excitations and polarized neutrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the historical development of polarized beam techniques for studies of condensed matter physics. In particular we describe, in some detail, the recent advance of the triple axis technique with polarization analysis. It is now possible to carry out quantitative characterization of magnetic cross sections S(Q,..omega..), in absolute units, for a wide range of energy and momentum transfers. We will discuss some examples of recent inelastic measurements on 3d ferromagnets and heavy Fermions. 35 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Shirane, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Semi-Automatic Image Annotation Using Event and Torso Identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Semi-Automatic Image Annotation Using Event and Torso Identification Bongwon Suh, Benjamin B. Bulk annotation, where multiple images are annotated at once, is a desired feature for image management for automatically creating meaningful image clusters for efficient bulk annotation. These techniques are not perfect

Golbeck, Jennifer

344

In Vivo Imaging with a Cell-Permeable Porphyrin-Based MRI Contrast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

Lee, Taekwan

345

In vivo imaging with a cell-permeable porphyrin-based MRI contrast agent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

Lee, Taekwan

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative imaging modality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: traditional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US... detection and characterization of breast cancer pathology...

347

The HERMES dual-radiator ring imaging Cerenkov detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging Cerenkov(RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasizes measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C4F10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet.

Akopov, N Z; Bailey, K; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Cisbani, E; De Leo, R; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Filippone, B W; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Hansen, J O; Hommez, B; Iodice, M; Jackson, H E; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kowalczyk, R; Lagamba, L; Maas, A; Muccifora, V; Nappi, E; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; O'Connor, T; O'Neill, T G; Potterveld, D H; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, F; Schwind, A; Shibata, T A; Suetsugu, K; Thomas, E; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van de Kerckhove, K; Van de Vyver, R; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G; Zhang, L F

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the alpha-particle spectrometer concept, and outlines challenges involved in the magnetic field design. Tagged photon interrogation: We investigated a method for discriminating fissile from benign cargo-material response to an energy-tagged photon beam. The method relies upon coincident detection of the tagged photon and a photoneutron or photofission neutron produced in the target material. The method exploits differences in the shape of the neutron production cross section as a function of incident photon energy in order to discriminate photofission yield from photoneutrons emitted by non-fissile materials. Computational tests of the interrogation method as applied to material composition assay of a simple, multi-layer target suggest that the tagged-photon information facilitates precise (order 1% thickness uncertainty) reconstruction of the constituent thicknesses of fissile (uranium) and high-Z (Pb) constituents of the test targets in a few minutes of photon-beam exposure. We assumed an 18-MeV endpoint tagged photon beam for these simulations. The report addresses several candidate design and data analysis issues for beamline infrastructure required to produce a tagged photon beam in a notional AI-dedicated facility, including the accelerator and tagging spectrometer.

Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

Zhang, Song

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

Knowledge discovery using data mined from Nuclear Magnetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knowledge discovery using data mined from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectral images William J cyberinfrastructure Method Solid State ab initio calculations Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Support Vector refined (and/or relaxed) structure, perform Self-Consistent Field calculation for electronic structure

Narasayya, Vivek

351

A magnetically switched kicker for proton extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of magnetic current amplification and switching techniques to the generation of precise high current pulses for switching magnets is described. The square loop characteristic of Metglas tape wound cores at high excitation levels provides excellent switching characteristics for microsecond pulses. The rugged and passive nature of this type pulser makes it possible to locate the final stages of amplification at the load for maximum efficiency. 12 refs., 8 figs.

Dinkel, J.; Biggs, J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Applications of Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers for optical coherence tomography imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a micrometer-resolution imaging technique that produces cross-sectional images of sample microstructure by measuring the amplitude and echo time delay of backscattered light. OCT imaging ...

Adler, Desmond Christopher, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ultrasonic flow imaging system: A feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the feasibility and potential problems in developing a real-time ultrasonic flow imaging instrument for on-line monitoring of mixed-phased flows such as coal slurries. State-of-the-art ultrasonic imaging techniques are assessed for this application. Reflection and diffraction tomographies are proposed for further development, including image-reconstruction algorithms and parallel processing systems. A conventional ultrasonic C-scan technique is used to demonstrate the feasibility of imaging the particle motion in a solid/water flow. 13 refs., 11 figs.

Sheen, S.H.; Lawrence, W.P.; Chien, H.T.; Raptis, A.C.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive filtering techniques Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adaptive filtering techniques Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Applications of the Fourier Transform in Imaging Highpass and Lowpass Filters Summary: in the frequency domain. We present...

356

advanced x-ray techniques: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a new X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogels used as radiator in proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors. To obtain...

357

Computing Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computing Images The interior of an automated tape library in Brookhaven's RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility. Brookhaven engineers in the RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility....

358

Multispectral Imaging At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Columbus Salt Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful...

359

Interface Magnetism in Multiferroics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.2.1 Magnetism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.2domain walls . . . . . 3 Magnetism of domain walls in BiFeOof electrical control of magnetism in mixed phase BiFeO 3

He, Qing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Nanostructured magnetic materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

Chan, Keith T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Ground Magnetics At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity...

362

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Magnetized Fusion Technique Produces  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik SpoerkeSolarCybernetics:2PIntroduction ofSignificant Results

363

Quadrupole Magnetic Center Definition Using the Hall Probe Measurement Technique  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedlesAdvancedJanuary 13,PuttingEnergy QER1 2Quadrupole

364

Multiphase imaging of gas flow in a nanoporous material usingremote detection NMR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pore structure and connectivity determine how microstructured materials perform in applications such as catalysis, fluid storage and transport, filtering, or as reactors. We report a model study on silica aerogel using a recently introduced time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance imaging technique to characterize the flow field and elucidate the effects of heterogeneities in the pore structure on gas flow and dispersion with Xe-129 as the gas-phase sensor. The observed chemical shift allows the separate visualization of unrestricted xenon and xenon confined in the pores of the aerogel. The asymmetrical nature of the dispersion pattern alludes to the existence of a stationary and a flow regime in the aerogel. An exchange time constant is determined to characterize the gas transfer between them. As a general methodology, this technique provides new insights into the dynamics of flow in porous media where multiple phases or chemical species may be present.

Harel, Elad; Granwehr, Josef; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pines, Alex

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

365

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of the BPA Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storagefor a Utility Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storagefor a Lnrge Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Advantages and Limitations of the RICH Technique for Particle Identification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technique for hadronic particle identification (PID) is described. The advantages and limitations of RICH PID counters are compared with those of other classic PID techniques, such as threshold Cherenkov counters, ionization loss (dE/dx) in tracking devices, and time of flight (TOF) detectors.

Ratcliff, Blair N.; /SLAC

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Magnetite-Loaded Polymeric Micelles as Ultrasensitive Magnetic-Resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetite-Loaded Polymeric Micelles as Ultrasensitive Magnetic-Resonance Probes** By Hua Ai* Polymeric micelles offer a powerful multifunctional plat- form for drug delivery and diagnostic imaging- tions, polymeric micelles have also received increasing atten- tion in diagnostic imaging applications

Gao, Jinming

369

FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

Authors, Various

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Efficient implementation schemes for image enhancement filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized median filtering techniques that have appeared in previous literature suffer from some severe disadvantages. They are not only hardware intensive and time consuming but also tend to smear image edges. These shortcomings can be overcome...

Yusuf, Khadem Mahmud

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Wetpaint: Scraping Through Multi-Layered Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a technique for exploring multi-layered images by scraping arbitrary areas to determine meaningful relationships. Our system, called Wetpaint, uses perceptual depth cues to help users intuitively navigate ...

Bonanni, Leonardo Amerigo

372

Segmentation of medical images under topological constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major advances in the field of medical imaging over the past two decades have provided physicians with powerful, non-invasive techniques to probe the structure, function, and pathology of the human body. This increasingly ...

Sgonne, Florent, 1976-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Particle transport as a result of resonant magnetic perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field of plasma physics with a particular focus on particlewe will focus on localized measurements at the plasma edgefocuses on the Magnetic confinement technique utilizing a Tokamak [91]. The goal of a burning plasma,

Mordijck, Saskia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Contamination Control Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

EBY, J.L.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

Simultaneous multislice spiral and EPI chemical shift imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current prominent excitation methods of 3D slabs used for MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) include long dead times in each TR. This dead time is necessary for magnetization moments' longitudinal relaxation, and so a good ...

Abuhashem, Obaidah Anees

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A practical acceleration algorithm for real-time imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A practical acceleration algorithm for real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presented. Neither separate training scans nor embedded training samples are used. The Kalman filter based algorithm provides a fast and ...

Sumbul, Uygar

377

New techniques for the scientific visualization of three-dimensional multi-variate and vector fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume rendering allows us to represent a density cloud with ideal properties (single scattering, no self-shadowing, etc.). Scientific visualization utilizes this technique by mapping an abstract variable or property in a computer simulation to a synthetic density cloud. This thesis extends volume rendering from its limitation of isotropic density clouds to anisotropic and/or noisy density clouds. Design aspects of these techniques are discussed that aid in the comprehension of scientific information. Anisotropic volume rendering is used to represent vector based quantities in scientific visualization. Velocity and vorticity in a fluid flow, electric and magnetic waves in an electromagnetic simulation, and blood flow within the body are examples of vector based information within a computer simulation or gathered from instrumentation. Understand these fields can be crucial to understanding the overall physics or physiology. Three techniques for representing three-dimensional vector fields are presented: Line Bundles, Textured Splats and Hair Splats. These techniques are aimed at providing a high-level (qualitative) overview of the flows, offering the user a substantial amount of information with a single image or animation. Non-homogenous volume rendering is used to represent multiple variables. Computer simulations can typically have over thirty variables, which describe properties whose understanding are useful to the scientist. Trying to understand each of these separately can be time consuming. Trying to understand any cause and effect relationships between different variables can be impossible. NoiseSplats is introduced to represent two or more properties in a single volume rendering of the data. This technique is also aimed at providing a qualitative overview of the flows.

Crawfis, R.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

Impedance matching techniques for ethernet communication systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_LS2L18 Magnetic................................................................. 12 8 Dummy Magnetic Schematic......................................................................................... 13 9 Dummy RJ45 Connector sans Magnetic- Internal... View 1.............................................. 13 10 Dummy RJ45 Connector sans Magnetic- Internal View 2............................................ 14 11 Magnetic Test Setup...

Kamprath, Richard Alan

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

380

Reaction product imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

P Proteomics Experimental techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ maximally thousands. Observed tens of thousands · Gas chromatography · Mass Spectroscopy · Nuclear Magnetic error Correlation between traits Life stage and environmental dependencies? Special Traits: Fitness dependent on few positions · Causative for the trait Epistasis: The effect of one locus depends on the state

Goldschmidt, Christina

382

Superconducting Magnet Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting Magnet Division Ramesh Gupta 20T Target Solenoid with HTS Insert Solenoid Capture Laboratory New York, USA http://www.bnl.gov/magnets/staff/gupta #12;Superconducting Magnet Division Ramesh of HTS may significantly reduce the amount of Tungsten shielding · Summary #12;Superconducting Magnet

McDonald, Kirk

383

A Radiographic Technique With Heavy Ion Microbeams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we introduce a new technique to perform densitometric and multielemental analysis of samples at the same time using a simple detector with heavy ion micro-beams. It consists in the simultaneous analysis of X-rays induced in the sample and in a secondary target arranged behind the specimen. The X-rays originated in the secondary target are attenuated when crossing the specimen producing a radiographic image with a monochromatic source.

Muscio, J. [ECyT, UNSAM, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Valda, A. A. [ECyT, UNSAM, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); U.A. Fisica, Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, A. J. [U.A. Fisica, Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); ECyT, UNSAM, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Kesque, J. M.; Minsky, D. M. [U.A. Fisica, Laboratorio TANDAR, CNEA, 1650 San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

Ultrasonic techniques for process monitoring and control.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrasonic techniques have been applied successfully to process monitoring and control for many industries, such as energy, medical, textile, oil, and material. It helps those industries in quality control, energy efficiency improving, waste reducing, and cost saving. This paper presents four ultrasonic systems, ultrasonic viscometer, on-loom, real-time ultrasonic imaging system, ultrasonic leak detection system, and ultrasonic solid concentration monitoring system, developed at Argonne National Laboratory in the past five years for various applications.

Chien, H.-T.

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS) method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20??m and 150?nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

Okuda, Mitsunobu, E-mail: okuda.m-ky@nhk.or.jp; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto [NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

Khalvati, Farzad, E-mail: farzad.khalvati@uwaterloo.ca; Tizhoosh, Hamid R. [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)] [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada)] [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

Valmianski, Ilya, E-mail: ivalmian@ucsd.edu; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Image Fusion for MR Bias Stochastic Systems Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We can target T1 and T2 through appropriate selection of TE and TR. #12;Image Reconstruction The MRImage Fusion for MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group Joint work with W. Wells, J. Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, A. Willsky, B. Mulkern #12;Magnetic Resonance The magnetic resonance (MR

Willsky, Alan S.

389

Method for the detection of a magnetic field utilizing a magnetic vortex  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The determination of the strength of an in-plane magnetic field utilizing one or more magnetically-soft, ferromagnetic member, having a shape, size and material whereas a single magnetic vortex is formed at remanence in each ferromagnetic member. The preferred shape is a thin circle, or dot. Multiple ferromagnetic members can also be stacked on-top of each other and separated by a non-magnetic spacer. The resulting sensor is hysteresis free. The sensor's sensitivity, and magnetic saturation characteristics may be easily tuned by simply altering the material, size, shape, or a combination thereof to match the desired sensitivity and saturation characteristics. The sensor is self-resetting at remanence and therefore does not require any pinning techniques.

Novosad, Valentyn (Chicago, IL); Buchanan, Kristen (Batavia, IL)

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

390

LOD-Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering Baoquan Chen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOD-Sprite Technique for Accelerated Terrain Rendering Baoquan Chen1 SUNY at Stony Brook J. Edward present a new rendering technique, termed LOD-sprite render- ing, which uses a combination of a level-of-detail (LOD) represen- tation of the scene together with reusing image sprites (previously rendered images

Chen, Baoquan

391

Child Guidance Techniques.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TDOC Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1314 Child Guidance Techniques The Texas MM University System ~ Texas Agricultural Extension Service DMia! C. Pfannstiel . Director College Station B-1314 ... 2 Contents Helpful Guidance T echniques...

Fraiser, Roberta C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Co-Funding for the Conference on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The XXIst International Conference on Magnetic Resonance in Biological Systems (ICMRBS 2005), '60th anniversary of the discovery of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance,' was held between 16 and 21 January 2005 in Hyderabad, India. The meeting focused on a broad range of magnetic resonance methods as applied to studies of biological processes related to human health. The biennial ICMRBS has become the major venue for discussion of advances in nuclear and electron magnetic resonance (NMR & EMR/EPR) studies of the structure, dynamics, and chemical properties of important classes of biomolecules. Magnetic resonance has become an established tool in structural biology, and its special importance derives from its ability to provide atomic level information. It is becoming increasingly evident that the dynamic features of biomolecules, their intermolecular interactions, and accessible conformations in solution are data of key importance in understanding molecular recognition and function. NMR, which is already contributing to approximately 25% of the new structures being deposited with the Protein Data Bank, is destined to be a major player in the post genomic structure age with its emphasis on structure and function. In-vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results shed light on human metabolic processes and on the cellular ramifications of cancer, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and other pathologies. New methodologies in metabonomics may lead to development of new drugs and medical diagnosis. The ICMRBS is the one conference that brings together experts from high-resolution NMR, solid state NMR, EPR, in-vivo MRS and MRI, and developers of instrumentation, techniques, software, and databases. Symposia at this ICMRBS are designed to continue the fruitful cross-fertilization of ideas that has been so successful in driving the spectacular advances in this field. ICMRBS 2005 maintained the traditional format of poster sessions, and plenary lectures that highlight major advances in each of the major areas, and three parallel symposia that focused on particular biological systems, interfacial applications of magnetic resonance, and rapidly advancing technology. Funds provided partial travel support for 33 younger scientists from the U.S. (graduate students, postdoctoral research associates, and beginning faculty), selected from those who submitted accepted posters; 12 of these were invited to contribute oral presentations. Those receiving travel support were selected by a committee composed of the U.S. members of the International Advisory Committee for the meeting. Particular emphasis was placed on facilitating participation of minority and women scientists.

Alan McLaughlin, Ph.D., Director, Division of Applied Science & Technology, NIBIB, NIH

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Modeling, Pattern Analysis and Feature-Based Retrieval on Retinal Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling techniques on the rotational contrast transform (RCT) of image pixels, we do a quantified reasoning of the transitional Figure 1: Proposed analytical framework on retinal image. 3 properties of vessel pixels from center-line vessel... visualization technique called daisy graph representation developed in our previous work [71] to approach the physical property of image pixel. Daisy graph representation results from the technique of rotational contrast transform (RCT) [71] of 21 image...

Ying, Huajun

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

394

Magnetic Activity in Stars, Discs and Quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although magnetic fields in interstellar matter were postulated almost fifty years ago, magnetohydrodynamic theory was then much hampered by our inability to see what the magnetic field configurations were like and, after a decade of innovative development, cynics, not without some justification, began to claim that anything can happen when magnetism and an imaginative theorist get together. Thus cosmic lightning in particular received a bad press. More recently great advances in observational techniques that we shall hear of from Title, Beck, Moran and Mirabel have enabled us to see not only the sun's magnetic field with unprecedented clarity but the fields in galaxies, quasars and microquasars are now measured and not merely figments of fertile imaginations.

Donald Lynden-Bell

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

395

Magnetic infrasound sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

396

Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc.; Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc.

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ju,X. Nebel,J.C. Siebert,J.P. Photonics Asia 2004, Proceedings of SPIE, Vol. 5640-46, 8-12 November 2004, Beijing, China pp 5640-46 Society of photo optical instrumentation engineers

Ju, X.

398

Microcomposition of Human Urinary Calculi Using Advanced Imaging Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-XANES XAS microfocused XAS XRD microfocused XRD XRF microfocused XRF CT computerized tomography FTIR Fourier XRD x-ray diffraction XRF x-ray fluorescence Accepted for publication September 18, 2012. Supported

399

A technique for extracting depth from stereo images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mage left togs gnt noge \\ snip I 0 I 4 output nope type ~ accept IYPO occepl type ~ 0 cool 2 morn I Iypc ~ accept IYP oct Ip I I YD c pi Enter . dn Ente , dms* Er ltf , m E It (otq) E le (046) E It (o46) m ninmm d spo ty... the Io g sl c stol o the 0 Ip I mage ao eee s-e. izy ao eee fs-e. iZI get 0 template from left ge. calculate stol sl cal p op* I es Is n 8 Iso 8 do 5 I s s+ da 5 Il IS. IS+ Itl t- s. rl-fs) I( I, jl) Isu Is +I( t. rli tsq Isq +I( I. fl) 2 co...

Marcellin, Michael W

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

400

Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Methane Absorbance in the Infrared Range (Source: webbook.nist.gov) ...... 34 Figure 4. Water Absorbance in the Infrared Range (Source: webbook.nist.gov) .......... 35 Figure 5. Carbon Dioxide Absorbance in the Infrared Range (Source: webbook....nist.gov) ............................................................................................ 36 Figure 6. Emissivity of Carbon Dioxide as a Function of Optical Length at 298 K (Adapted from Malkmus, 1963) ...................................................................... 37 Figure 7. Emissivity of Water Vapor as a Function...

Safitri, Anisa

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007Transmission toBeamN u

402

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling the plasma  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Libraryornl.gov

403

Techniques on Analysis of Photo Phase Shift Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and DKFZ Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany (e-mail: s.woerz@dkfz.de). H. von Tengg-Kobligk and H.-U. Kauczor are with the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany (e-mail: h....vontengg@dkfz-heidelberg.de; hans-ulrich. kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de). V. Henninger and F. Rengier are with the Department of Radiology, Ger- man Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany (e-mail: v.henninger@dkfz-heidelberg.de; f...

Terry, Robin 1990-

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

404

Thermal Imaging Technique for Measuring Mixing of Fluids - Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1 Members ThemeTherapeuticInnovation Portal

405

Postpartum Hemorrhage Treated with Gelfoam Slurry Embolization Using the Superselective Technique: Immediate Results and 1-Month MRI Follow-up  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of superselective embolization of the uterine arteries in a postpartum hemorrhage. Between November 2004 and January 2011, a total of 44 consecutive women (median {+-} standard deviation age 34 {+-} 3 years, range 23-41 years) were referred to our institution for postpartum intractable hemorrhage management. All patients were embolized with a microcatheter that was placed deep into the uterine arteries upstream of the cervical arteries. The embolic agent was a mixture of contrast medium and 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm pieces of gelfoam (Gelita-Spon) modified into a gelatin emulsion as follows: rapid mixing through a three-way stopcock with two 2.5-ml syringes. A 1-ml syringe was used for injection. One month after embolization, all patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging and clinical examination. Technical and clinical success was obtained in all cases. Thirty-five patients experienced bleeding related to poor retraction of the uterus, 7 patients because of a tear of the cervix and 2 because of a vaginal hematoma. Pre- and postembolization red blood cell transfusions were (mean {+-} standard deviation [SD]) 6 {+-} 1.2 (range 3-8) U and 2 {+-} 0.7 (range 2-4) U, respectively. One-month magnetic resonance imaging follow-up revealed no sign of ischemic myometrium or necrosis, and no instances of uterine rupture and no pelvic vein thrombosis. Incidental findings included two small intramyometrial hematic collections. All uterine arteries were patent via magnetic resonance angiography. Seventeen patients had concomitant fibroids, all of which appeared hypovascular. This technique permits good, safe clinical results with no marked damage to the uterine arteries or the uterus itself.

Pellerin, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.pellerin@egp.aphp.fr [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris - Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France, Interventional Radiology Department (France)] [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris - Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Bats, Anne-Sophie [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris - Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France, Gynecologic and Oncologic Surgery Department (France)] [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris - Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France, Gynecologic and Oncologic Surgery Department (France); Primio, Massimiliano Di; Palomera-Ricco, Ana [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris - Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France, Interventional Radiology Department (France)] [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris - Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Pinot de Villechenon, Gabrielle [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris - Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France, Anesthesia and Surgical Intensive Care Unit (France)] [Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine - Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris - Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Paris, France, Anesthesia and Surgical Intensive Care Unit (France); and others

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Vertebrate heart development: Lessons learnt from live imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertebrate heart development: Lessons learnt from live imaging California Institute of Technology employing different imaging techniques. Sub resolution imaging of beating zebrafish heart has however remained a challenge owing Embryonic heart is a 100 moving quasi-periodically at few Hertz frequency, over

Shyamasundar, R.K.

407

Video and Image Processing in Multimedia Systems (Video Processing)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COT 6930 Video and Image Processing in Multimedia Systems (Video Processing) Instructor: Borko. Content-based image and video indexing and retrieval. Video processing using compressed data. Course concepts and structures 4. Classification of compression techniques 5. Image and video compression

Furht, Borko

408

Control of magnetization reversal in oriented strontium ferrite thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oriented Strontium Ferrite films with the c axis orientation were deposited with varying oxygen partial pressure on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition technique. The angle dependent magnetic hysteresis, remanent coercivity, and temperature dependent coercivity had been employed to understand the magnetization reversal of these films. It was found that the Strontium Ferrite thin film grown at lower (higher) oxygen partial pressure shows Stoner-Wohlfarth type (Kondorsky like) reversal. The relative importance of pinning and nucleation processes during magnetization reversal is used to explain the type of the magnetization reversal with different oxygen partial pressure during growth.

Roy, Debangsu, E-mail: debangsu@physics.iisc.ernet.in; Anil Kumar, P. S. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ultrasensitive Magnetometry and Imaging with NV Diamond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-size wire structure to sit directly on the surface of millimeter-scale diamond plate. In contrast to conventional magnetic resonance imaging pulsed ESR was used to measure the Rabi oscillations. From the beating of Rabi oscillations from a "double NV...

Kim, Changdong

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

On the validation of magnetic resonance velocimetry in single-phase turbulent pipe flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nuclear magnetic resonance imaging technique is used to measure velocity distributions in turbulent pipe flows up to Re = 24580. While turbulent intensity is usually determined from signal attenuation, we deduce turbulent intensity from velocity distribution with no need to suppose a Gaussian distribution for velocity fluctuations. Skewness and flatness measurements are also presented in this paper. Comparison with DNS show good agreement and we show that NMR data is sufficiently accurate to provide turbulent viscosity profile. The low field system used in this study allow the suppression of susceptibility artifacts and thus open its use for studying two-phase flows. We postulate that the method used here could be applied to two-phase flows and would thus provide valuable information on turbulent viscosity models. (authors)

Jullien, P.; Lemonnier, H. [CEA Grenoble, DTN LITA SE2T, F-38054 Grenoble 9, (France)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP) are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

Small IV, W; Gjersing, E; Herberg, J L; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis Ronne L. Surface2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Whole Slide Image Analysis Quantification using Aperio Digital Imaging in a Mouse Lung Metastasis, Indiana University School of Medicine Digital whole slide imaging is the technique of digitizing a microscope slide at the highest resolution to produce a "digital virtual microscope slide". This digital

Zhou, Yaoqi

413

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials ] (  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetic properties were measured with a vibrating sample magnetometer. The mass-specific power loss.40.Rs Keywords: Nanocrystalline alloys; Amorphous alloys; Field annealing; Power loss; Soft magnets the hysteretic power loss while maintaining high-temperature operability [4]. Other goals have included studies

McHenry, Michael E.

414

Recent lunar magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The magnetization of young lunar samples (magnetic fields (e.g. core dynamo and long-lived impact plasma fields) have not been present within the last 1.5 Ga. To better ...

Buz, Jennifer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Magnetic assisted statistical assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to develop a process using magnetic forces to assemble micro-components into recesses on silicon based integrated circuits. Patterned SmCo magnetic thin films at the bottom of recesses are ...

Cheng, Diana I

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Interactive image processing console A6471  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many system designs and implementations of image processors have been published and discussed to which the authors add another one promising a good compromise between speed, flexibility, and costs. Its main components are programmable semiconductor image refresh memories and a fast parallel processor both acting at TV scan velocity. They are embedded in a 16-bit microcomputer system which interfaces them to the user and the programmer. Special features are the possibility to share the image memories between some systems and a crossconnection between image processor and graphic data. A glance onto the programming techniques is given. Prototypes of such a system are operating in remote sensing and biomedical applications. 6 references.

Kempe, V.; Rebel, B.; Wilhelmi, W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Nondestructive Technique Survey for Assessing Integrity of Composite Firing Vessel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The repeated use and limited lifetime of a composite tiring vessel compel a need to survey techniques for monitoring the structural integrity of the vessel in order to determine when it should be retired. Various nondestructive techniques were researched and evaluated based on their applicability to the vessel. The methods were visual inspection, liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, surface mounted strain gauges, thermal inspection, acoustic emission, ultrasonic testing, radiography, eddy current testing, and embedded fiber optic sensors. It was determined that embedded fiber optic sensor is the most promising technique due to their ability to be embedded within layers of composites and their immunity to electromagnetic interference.

Tran, A.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Magnetic susceptibility in QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic susceptibility in the deconfined phase of QCD is calculated in a closed form using a recent general expression for the quark gas pressure in magnetic field. Quark selfenergies are entering the result via Polyakov line factors and ensure the total paramagnetic effect, increasing with temperature. A generalized form of magnetic susceptibility in nonzero magnetic field suitable for experimental and lattice measurements is derived, showing a good agreement with available lattice data.

V. D. Orlovsky; Yu. A. Simonov

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thermal and high magnetic field treatment of materials and associated apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for altering characteristics, such as can include structural, magnetic, electrical, optical or acoustical characteristics, of an electrically-conductive workpiece utilizes a magnetic field within which the workpiece is positionable and schemes for thermally treating the workpiece by heating or cooling techniques in conjunction with the generated magnetic field so that the characteristics of the workpiece are effected by both the generated magnetic field and the thermal treatment of the workpiece.

Kisner, Roger A.; Wilgen, John B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Jaramillo, Roger A.; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

420

Thermal and high magnetic field treatment of materials and associated apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for altering characteristics, such as can include structural, magnetic, electrical, optical or acoustical characteristics, of an electrically-conductive workpiece utilizes a magnetic field within which the workpiece is positionable and schemes for thermally treating the workpiece by heating or cooling techniques in conjunction with the generated magnetic field so that the characteristics of the workpiece are effected by both the generated magnetic field and the thermal treatment of the workpiece.

Kisner, Roger A.; Wilgen, John B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Jaramillo, Roger A.; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH J.H . Park et al. #12;'s of FeinCsm e tal The chargeandorbitalordering geom etryin YB a C o 2 O 5 S. K. Kwon etal .Magnetism Theory

Min, Byung Il

422

Galaxy Redshifts: Improved Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper analyses the effects of random noise in determining errors and confidence levels for galaxy redshifts obtained by cross-correlation techniques. The main finding is that confidence levels have previously been overestimated, and errors inaccurately calculated in certain applications. New formul\\ae\\ are presented.

A. F. Heavens

1993-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

423

Infrared Inspection Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. By means of a TV monitor tube, a thermal picture is formed where lighter parts represent areas with higher temperatures. Absolute temperature levels of objects can be measured with this technique from -300C to +20000C. A conventional camera is attached...

Hill, A. B.; Bevers, D. V.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

Laughlin, Robert B.

425

Magnetic nanohole superlattices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic material is disclosed including a two-dimensional array of carbon atoms and a two-dimensional array of nanoholes patterned in the two-dimensional array of carbon atoms. The magnetic material has long-range magnetic ordering at a temperature below a critical temperature Tc.

Liu, Feng

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

426

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

MEASURING THERMOMECHANICAL DISPLACEMENTS OF SOLAR CELLS IN LAMINATES USING DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, is necessary in the usual process of module manufacturing. DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION TECHNIQUE The methodMEASURING THERMOMECHANICAL DISPLACEMENTS OF SOLAR CELLS IN LAMINATES USING DIGITAL IMAGE and the polymers. We demonstrate that the digital image correlation technique (DIC) is capable of measuring

428

Permanent magnet with MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconductors with persistent zero-resistance currents serve as permanent magnets for high-field applications requiring a strong and stable magnetic field, such as magnetic resonance imaging. The recent global helium shortage has quickened research into high-temperature superconductors (HTSs)materials that can be used without conventional liquid-helium cooling to 4.2?K. Herein, we demonstrate that 40-K-class metallic HTS magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) makes an excellent permanent bulk magnet, maintaining 3?T at 20?K for 1 week with an extremely high stability (<0.1 ppm/h). The magnetic field trapped in this magnet is uniformly distributed, as for single-crystalline neodymium-iron-boron. Magnetic hysteresis loop of the MgB{sub 2} permanent bulk magnet was determined. Because MgB{sub 2} is a simple-binary-line compound that does not contain rare-earth metals, polycrystalline bulk material can be industrially fabricated at low cost and with high yield to serve as strong magnets that are compatible with conventional compact cryocoolers, making MgB{sub 2} bulks promising for the next generation of Tesla-class permanent-magnet applications.

Yamamoto, Akiyasu, E-mail: yamamoto@appchem.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Ishihara, Atsushi; Tomita, Masaru [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38 Hikari, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

Gamma-ray Imaging Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

2006-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

430

Query Optimization Techniques Class Hierarchies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Query Optimization Techniques Exploiting Class Hierarchies Sophie Cluet 1 Guido Moerkotte 2 1 INRIA Since the introduction of object base management systems (OBMS), many query optimization techniques tailored for object query languages have been proposed. They adapt known optimization techniques

Mannheim, Universität

431

Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Pore-structure determinations of silica aerogels by {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy and imaging.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silica aerogels represent a new class of open-pore materials with pore dimensions on a scale of tens of nanometers, and are thus classified as mesoporous materials. In this work, we show that the combination of NMR spectroscopy and chemical-shift selective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can resolve some of the important aspects of the structure of silica aerogels. The use of xenon as a gaseous probe in combination with spatially resolved NMR techniques is demonstrated to be a powerful, new approach for characterizing the average pore structure and steady-state spatial distributions of xenon atoms in different physicochemical environments. Furthermore, dynamic NMR magnetization transfer experiments and pulsed-field gradient (PFG) measurements have been used to characterize exchange processes and diffusive motion of xenon in samples at equilibrium. In particular, this new NMR approach offers unique information and insights into the nanoscopic pore structure and microscopic morphology of aerogels and the dynamical behavior of occluded adsorbates. MRI provides spatially resolved information on the nature of the flaw regions found in these materials. Pseudo-first-order rate constants for magnetization transfer among the bulk and occluded xenon phases indicate xenon-exchange rate constants on the order of 1 s-1 for specimens having volumes of 0.03 cm3. PFG diffusion measurements show evidence of anisotropic diffusion for xenon occluded within aerogels, with nominal self-diffusivity coefficients on the order of D= 10-3cm2/s.

Gregory, D. M.; Gerald, R. E., II; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Millimeter Scale Alignment of Magnetic Nanoparticle Functionalized Microtubules in Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, transporting cargo up to a meter in biological systems.1 Harnessing the unique properties of this motor direction of the cargo-laden motors and potentially enable the assembly of complex nanostruc- tures. To date techniques,4 by viscous forces,5 or by strong magnetic or electric fields applied during tubule

Hancock, William O.

434

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Wurden, G.A.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

436

Magnetically attached sputter targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

MAGNETIC LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the fine structure of magnetic fields in the atmosphere of the quiet Sun. We use photospheric magnetic field measurements from SUNRISE/IMaX with unprecedented spatial resolution to extrapolate the photospheric magnetic field into higher layers of the solar atmosphere with the help of potential and force-free extrapolation techniques. We find that most magnetic loops that reach into the chromosphere or higher have one footpoint in relatively strong magnetic field regions in the photosphere. Ninety-one percent of the magnetic energy in the mid-chromosphere (at a height of 1 Mm) is in field lines, whose stronger footpoint has a strength of more than 300 G, i.e., above the equipartition field strength with convection. The loops reaching into the chromosphere and corona are also found to be asymmetric in the sense that the weaker footpoint has a strength B < 300 G and is located in the internetwork (IN). Such loops are expected to be strongly dynamic and have short lifetimes, as dictated by the properties of the IN fields.

Wiegelmann, T.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Borrero, J. M.; Schmidt, W. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstr. 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Pillet, V. MartInez; Bonet, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de Astronomia y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: wiegelmann@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

438

High-Energy Composite Permanent Magnets: High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing permanent magnets that contain less rare earth material and produce twice the energy of the strongest rare earth magnets currently available. The University of Delaware is creating these magnets by mixing existing permanent magnet materials with those that are more abundant, like iron. Both materials are first prepared in the form of nanoparticles via techniques ranging from wet chemistry to ball milling. After that, the nanoparticles must be assembled in a 3-D array and consolidated at low temperatures to form a magnet. With small size particles and good contact between these two materials, the best qualities of each allow for the development of exceptionally strong composite magnets.

None

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Integrating an automatic classification method into the medical image retrieval process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the performance of the University at Buffalo Medical Text and Images Retrieval System (UBMedTIRS). This paper classification process was performed using the Image Retrieval for Medical Application (IRMA) codes3 employed to acquire the image such as x-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance measurement, nuclear medicine

Ruiz, Miguel E.

440

Dynamic Surface Reconstruction from 4D-MR Images Matthias Fenchel1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Surface Reconstruction from 4D-MR Images Matthias Fenchel1 , Stefan Gumhold2 , Hans approach is applied to 4D-MR images of a human heart in motion. 1 Introduction Image segmentation-Peter Seidel3 1 Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Magnetic Resonance, Karl-Schall-Str. 4, 91052 Erlangen 2 TU

Gumhold, Stefan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

An Integrated Method of Adaptive Enhancement for Unsupervised Segmentation of MRI Brain Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Integrated Method of Adaptive Enhancement for Unsupervised Segmentation of MRI Brain Images of the adaptive enhancement for an unsupervised global-to-local segmentation of brain tissues in three-dimensional (3-D) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) images. Three brain tissues are of interest: CSF (Cerebro

Pizurica, Aleksandra

442

TRACKING TONGUE MOTION IN THREE DIMENSIONS USING TAGGED MR IMAGES Xiaofeng Liu1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRACKING TONGUE MOTION IN THREE DIMENSIONS USING TAGGED MR IMAGES Xiaofeng Liu1 , Maureen Stone3 and strain analysis of tagged magnetic res- onance (MR) imaging [1]. It was originally applied to car- diac This research was supported by NIH grants R01 HL047405 and R01 DC001758 (a) (b) Fig. 1. (a) A tagged MR image

Prince, Jerry L.

443

Resin infiltration transfer technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

444

Magnetic field measurements on the sun and implications for stellar magnetic field observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of solar magnetic field measurements in plages, sunspot umbrae, and sunspot penumbrae using high spectral resolution, unpolarized infrared H band spectral data are presented. A Fourier deconvolution analysis scheme similar to that utilized for stellar magnetic field measurements is adopted. As an example, a field strength of 3240 + or - 450 G is determined in a sunspot umbra combined with a value of 2000 + or - 180 G in the associated penumbra. These values are compared with a direct measurement of the spot umbra and penumbra field strengths based on the observed separation of the Zeeman components of the magnetically sensitive lines. Possible origins for the discrepancy between the results inferred by these two different techniques are discussed. The Fourier analysis results confirm the widespread occurrence of kilogauss level fields in the solar photosphere. The implications of the solar results for stellar magnetic field measurements are considered. 45 references.

Sun, W.H.; Giampapa, M.S.; Worden, S.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Soviet image pattern recognition research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an assessment of the published Soviet image pattern recognition (IPR) research and was written by a panel of six US academic experts in that research field. Image pattern recognition is a set of technological research topics involving automatic or interactive computer processing of pictorial information, utilizing optical, electronic, and computer technologies. This report focuses on IPR system configuration (optical, hybrid, digital), and current research. The topical chapter headings are Image Processing Hardware and Software Preprocessing, Statistical Pattern Recognition, Computer Vision, and Optical Techniques and Systems. Soviet research in all areas of IPR is strong in theory, but limited by poor availability of equipment for generating and handling digital images, and digital computer hardware and software. Nevertheless, some Soviet IPR achievements compare favorably with those of the West. There is strong Soviet research in statistical pattern recognition, where fundamental relationships related to the factors determining error rates in classification of images are being developed. There has been good Soviet work in enhancement and restoration of images (visible and radar) of the surface of Venus. There is a strong Soviet development program in optics and optical processing related to IPR. Nevertheless, the state of Soviet research in computer vision is ten to fifteen years behind the West, because of the lack of adequate hardware and software. The Soviet scientists in the area appear competent and knowledgeable of Western work, so that any improvement in their research output would be derived from access to more capable equipment. 402 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

McKenney, B.L.; McGrain, M. (eds.) (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA). Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center); Klinger, A. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Aggarwal, J.K. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA)); George, N.J. (Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Inst. of Optics); Haralick, R.M. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA). Dept. of Electric

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Development of novel high-performance six-axis magnetically levitated instruments for nanoscale applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the sample. While working in noncontact mode the AFM tip does not touch the sample but gets the topographic image of sample from attractive force [13]. The AFM have resolution up to 10 pm. The basic working principle of AFM is very much like a record...-earth permanent-magnet-biased magnetic-bearing suspension [48]. The permanent magnet provides bias flux and the electromagnet can increase or reduce flux of the permanent magnet. The flux path of the electromagnet does not pass through the permanent magnet so...

Verma, Shobhit

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Permanent magnet steam generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a system for magnetic heating of a fluid by motor rotation of a permanent magnet rotor adjacent an assembly of ferro-magnetic condensing plate and of copper heat absorber plate with protrusions through the ferro-magnetic condensing plate into an enclosure with the fluid therein and having fluid inlet and fluid outlet. The assembly has a first shaft and a second shaft coaxially spaced therefrom, a respective the motor connected to the outer end of each shaft, and a respective the permanent magnet rotor connected to the inner end of each shaft, adjacent a the heat absorber plate. The improvement described here comprises: the enclosure including a steel boiler with a first the ferro-magnetic condensing plate closing off a first end thereof and a second the ferro-magnetic condensing plate closing off a second end thereof, a the copper heat absorbing plate affixed on each ferro-magnetic plate; means, free of pockets, for promoting turbulent flow of the fluid with uniformly good heat transfer including the protrusion being a plurality of heat sinks, each heat sink of the plurality of heat sinks comprising an integral elongate member with an alternately large diameter and smaller diameter portions regularly spaced therealong. The elongate members through the first the ferro-magnetic condensing plate are coaxially aligned with the elongate members through the second the ferro-magnetic condensing plate.

Gerard, F.; Gerard, F.J.

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Autofluorescence detection and imaging of bladder cancer realized through a cystoscope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence and utilizing interior examination techniques and equipment are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and/or tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

Demos, Stavros G. (Livermore, CA); deVere White, Ralph W. (Sacramento, CA)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

Performing temperature feedback controlled tissue photo-coagulation using magnetic resonance thermometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlled photo-coagulation using magnetic resonance imaging as the non-invasive means of temperature feedback. The desired coagulation depth was controlled at a constant temperature of 40 degrees for different amounts of time and the actual coagulation...

Sampath, Smita

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Brass plasmoid in external magnetic field at different air pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of expanding brass plasmoid generated by 266 nm wavelength of Nd:YAG laser in nonuniform magnetic field at different air pressures has been examined using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging of plasma plumes. The splitting of the plasma plumes and enhancement of intensity of Cu I at 510.5 nm in the presence of magnetic field at lower pressures are discussed. The threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines through the plasmoid are correlated with the ambient pressure. The stoichiometry of the plasma plume is not significantly influenced by the magnetic field; however, the abundance of neutral to ionic species of Cu and Zn is greatly influenced by the magnetic field.

Patel, D. N.; Thareja, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, UP 208016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, UP 208016 (India); Pandey, Pramod K. [WCI-Center for Quantum-Beam Based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daojeon (Korea, Republic of)] [WCI-Center for Quantum-Beam Based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daojeon (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Design and engineering of low-cost centimeter-scale repeatable and accurate kinematic fixtures for nanomanufacturing equipment using magnetic preload and potting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper introduces a low-cost, centimeter-scale kinematic coupling fixture for use in nanomanufacturing equipment. The fixture uses magnetic circuit design techniques to optimize the magnetic preload required to achieve ...

Watral, Adrienne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Applied Science/Techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mailRadioimmunotherapy ofevolvedApplied Science/Techniques

454

Imaging system for cardiac planar imaging using a dedicated dual-head gamma camera  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cardiac imaging system employing dual gamma imaging heads co-registered with one another to provide two dynamic simultaneous views of the heart sector of a patient torso. A first gamma imaging head is positioned in a first orientation with respect to the heart sector and a second gamma imaging head is positioned in a second orientation with respect to the heart sector. An adjustment arrangement is capable of adjusting the distance between the separate imaging heads and the angle between the heads. With the angle between the imaging heads set to 180 degrees and operating in a range of 140-159 keV and at a rate of up to 500kHz, the imaging heads are co-registered to produce simultaneous dynamic recording of two stereotactic views of the heart. The use of co-registered imaging heads maximizes the uniformity of detection sensitivity of blood flow in and around the heart over the whole heart volume and minimizes radiation absorption effects. A normalization/image fusion technique is implemented pixel-by-corresponding pixel to increase signal for any cardiac region viewed in two images obtained from the two opposed detector heads for the same time bin. The imaging system is capable of producing enhanced first pass studies, bloodpool studies including planar, gated and non-gated EKG studies, planar EKG perfusion studies, and planar hot spot imaging.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Morgantown, VA); Umeno, Marc M. (Woodinville, WA)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

Multi-scale texture analysis of remote sensing images using gabor filter banks and wavelet transforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to texture information extraction and utilization. This research focuses on the use of multi-scale image texture analysis techniques using Gabor filter banks and Wavelet transformations. Gabor filter banks model texture as irradiance patterns in an image over...

Ravikumar, Rahul

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

4D dynamic imaging of the eye using ultrahigh speed SS-OCT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent advances in swept-source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) technology enable in vivo ultrahigh speed imaging, offering a promising technique for four-dimensional (4-D) imaging of the eye. Using ...

Grulkowski, Ireneusz

457

The Quasi-Distributed Gap Technique for Planar Inductors-Design Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Quasi-Distributed Gap Technique for Planar Inductors-Design Guidelines Jiankun Hu C. R The Quasi-Distributed Gap Technique for Planar Inductors: Design Guidelines Jiankun Hu Charles R. Sullivan of low-permeability magnetic material to form a uniformly distributed gap can facilitate the design

458

Passive magnetic bearing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

Post, Richard F.

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

459

An evaluation of the neutron radiography facility at the Nuclear Science Center for dynamic imaging of two-phase hydrogenous fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Though both film and video radiographic image techniques are available in neutron radiography, radiographic cameras are commonly used to capture the dynamic flow patterns in a rapid sequence of images. These images may be useful to verify two...

Carlisle, Bruce Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

460

Pulse magnetic welder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A welder is described for automated closure of fuel pins by a pulsed magnetic process in which the open end of a length of cladding is positioned within a complementary tube surrounded by a pulsed magnetic welder. Seals are provided at each end of the tube, which can be evacuated or can receive tag gas for direct introduction to the cladding interior. Loading of magnetic rings and end caps is accomplished automatically in conjunction with the welding steps carried out within the tube.

Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "imaging magnetic techniques" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Effect of recording condition on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram with magnetic garnet films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A holographic memory has been attracting attention as recording media with high recording density and high data transfer rate. We have studied the magnetic garnets as a rewritable and long life media for magnetic holography. However, since the signal intensity of reconstructed image was relatively low, the effects of recording conditions on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram were investigated with experiments and the numerical simulation using COMSOL multi-physics. The diffraction efficiency tends to decrease as increasing the spatial frequency, and the use of short pulse laser with the pulse width of 50 ps was found to be effective to achieve high diffraction efficiency. This suggests that the formation of clear magnetic fringe similar to interference pattern can be obtained by the use of short pulse laser since undesirable heat diffusion during radiation does not occur. On the other hand, the diffraction efficiency increased as increasing the film thickness up to 3.1??m but was saturated in the garnet film thicker than 3.1??m in the case of spatial frequency of 1500 line pair/mm. The numerical simulation showed that the effective depth of magnetic fringe was limited about 1.8??m irrespective of the garnet film thickness because the fringes were connected by thermal diffusion near the surface of the film, and the effective depth is limited due to this connection of the magnetic fringe. Avoiding this fringe connection, much higher diffraction efficiency will be achieved.

Nakamura, Yuichi, E-mail: nakamura@ee.tut.ac.jp; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

462

Processing Visual Images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The back of the eye is lined by an extraordinary biological pixel detector, the retina. This neural network is able to extract vital information about the external visual world, and transmit this information in a timely manner to the brain. In this talk, Professor Litke will describe a system that has been implemented to study how the retina processes and encodes dynamic visual images. Based on techniques and expertise acquired in the development of silicon microstrip detectors for high energy physics experiments, this system can simultaneously record the extracellular electrical activity of hundreds of retinal output neurons. After presenting first results obtained with this system, Professor Litke will describe additional applications of this incredible technology.

Litke, Alan (UC Santa Cruz) [UC Santa Cruz

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

463

Magnetic Braids Anthony Yeates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flux function Main result Conclusion 2. Thermonuclear confinement devices. ITER (Internat'l Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). Inside the KSTAR tokamak. Correspond to periodic magnetic braids. 4 / 22

Dundee, University of

464

Magnetic differential torque sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new torque sensor structure is presented. The basic idea is a simple torque sensor with a variable magnetic circuit excited by an axially magnetized permanent magnet ring. The circuit is constituted by iron toothed rings, whose teeth relative position changes whenever an applied torque twists the rotating shaft. A Hall probe measures the induction in an airgap where the induction is uniform. The new structure is an association of two previous ones, thus creating a differential system with the related advantages: diminution of thermal drifts, zero mean value for the signal. The new magnetic circuit is studied by calculating equivalent reluctances through energy calculations and by using electrical analogies.

Lemarquand, V.; Lemarquand, G. [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)] [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known pressure swing adsorption'' technique utilizing the same sorption material. 1 fig.

Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

466

Method and apparatus for separating gases based on electrically and magnetically enhanced monolithic carbon fiber composite sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating gases or other fluids involves placing a magnetic field on a monolithic carbon fiber composite sorption material to more preferentially attract certain gases or other fluids to the sorption material to which a magnetic field is applied. This technique may be combined with the known "pressure swing adsorption" technique utilizing the same sorption material.

Judkins, Roddie R. (9917 Rainbow Dr., Knoxville, TN 37922); Burchell, Timothy D. (109 Greywood Pl., Oak Ridge, TN 37830)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Method and apparatus for measuring nuclear magnetic properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for studying the chemical and structural characteristics of materials is disclosed. The method includes placement of a sample material in a high strength polarizing magnetic field to order the sample nuclei. The condition used to order the sample is then removed abruptly and the ordering of the sample allowed to evolve for a time interval. At the end of the time interval, the ordering of the sample is measured by conventional nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. 5 figs.

Weitekamp, D.P.; Bielecki, A.; Zax, D.B.; Zilm, K.W.; Pines, A.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Correcting Aberrations in Complex Magnet Systems for Muon Cooling Channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Designing and simulating complex magnet systems needed for cooling channels in both neutrino factories and muon colliders requires innovative techniques to correct for both chromatic and spherical aberrations. Optimizing complex systems, such as helical magnets for example, is also difficult but essential. By using COSY INFINITY, a differential algebra based code, the transfer and aberration maps can be examined to discover what critical terms have the greatest influence on these aberrations.

J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

High average power magnetic modulator for metal vapor lasers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A three-stage magnetic modulator utilizing magnetic pulse compression designed to provide a 60 kV pulse to a copper vapor laser at a 4.5 kHz repetition rate is disclosed. This modulator operates at 34 kW input power. The circuit includes a step up auto transformer and utilizes a rod and plate stack construction technique to achieve a high packing factor.

Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Miller, John L. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

E-Print Network 3.0 - ablatherm integrated imaging Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Progressive Encoding System For Transmission of Complex Images Borko Furht1 , Yingli... -based encoding technique, which is suitable for an ... Source: Furht, Borko -...

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced x-ray imaging Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

new... reconstruction technique (SART) algorithm for image reconstruction from projection data generated by an x-ray... discuss relevant issues and conclude the paper. II....

472

MR-Guided Freehand Biopsy of Liver Lesions With Fast Continuous Imaging Using a 1.0-T Open MRI Scanner: Experience in 50 Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess a new open system with a field-strength of 1.0 T for the feasibility of liver biopsy using the freehand technique with fast continuous imaging. Fifty patients with focal liver lesions measuring 5 to 30 mm in diameter were included in the study. Guidance and monitoring was performed using a 1.0-T open magnetic resonance (MR) scanner (Panorama HFO; Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands). With fast continuous imaging using a T1-weighted (T1W) gradient echo (GRE) sequence after administration of gadolinium (Gd)-EOB-DTPA, the needle was placed into the lesion. An interface for interactive dynamic viewing in two perpendicular planes prevented needle deviations T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) fat-suppressed sequence was added to rule out postinterventional hematoma or biloma. All lesions were visible on the interventional images. Biopsy was technically successful, and solid specimens were obtained in all cases. Forty-six patients showed a histopathologic pattern other than native liver tissue, thus confirming correct position of the needle. Time between determination of the lesion and performance of the control scan was on average 18 min. No major complications were recorded. MR guidance with the new 1-T open system must be considered an attractive alternative for liver punction. An interface for dynamic imaging of needle guidance and T1W-GRE imaging with administration of Gd-EOB-DTPA for contrast enhancement allows the pinpoint puncture of liver lesions.

Fischbach, Frank, E-mail: frank.fischbach@med.ovgu.de [Otto von Guericke University, Department of Radiology, Medical School (Germany); Bunke, Juergen [Philips Healthcare (Germany); Thormann, Markus; Gaffke, Gunnar; Jungnickel, Kerstin [Otto von Guericke University, Department of Radiology, Medical School (Germany); Smink, Jouke [Philips Healthcare (Germany); Ricke, Jens [Otto von Guericke University, Department of Radiology, Medical School (Germany)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Associated particle imaging (API)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Associated Particle Imaging (API) is an active neutron probe technique that provides a 3-D image with elemental composition of the material under interrogation, and so occupies a unique niche in the interrogation of unknown objects. The highly penetrating nature of neutrons enables API to provide detailed information about targets of interest that are hidden from view. Due to the isotropic nature of the induced reactions, radiation detectors can be set on the same side of the object as the neutron source, so that the object can be interrogated from a single side. At the heat of the system is a small generator that produces a continuous, monoenergetic flux of neutrons. By measuring the trajectory of coincident alpha particles that are produced as part of the process, the trajectory of the neutron can be inferred. Interactions between a neutron and the material in its path often produce a gamma ray whose energy is characteristic of that material. When the gamma ray is detected, its energy is measured and combined with the trajectory information to produce a 3-D image of the composition of the object being interrogated. During the course of API development, a number of improvements have been made. A new, more rugged sealed Tube Neutron Generator (STNG) has been designed and fabricated that is less susceptible to radiation damage and better able to withstand the rigors of fielding than earlier designs. A specialized high-voltage power supply for the STNG has also been designed and built. A complete package of software has been written for the tasks of system calibration, diagnostics and data acquisition and analysis. A portable system has been built and field tested, proving that API can be taken out of the lab and into real-world situations, and that its performance in the field is equal to that in the lab.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Magnetization dynamics of cobalt grown on graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spin pumping is a rapidly growing field which has demonstrated promising results in a variety of material systems. This technique utilizes the resonant precession of magnetization in a ferromagnet to inject spin into an adjacent non-magnetic material. Spin pumping into graphene is attractive on account of its exceptional spin transport properties. This article reports on FMR characterization of cobalt grown on chemical vapor deposition graphene and examines the validity of linewidth broadening as an indicator of spin pumping. In comparison to cobalt samples without graphene, direct contact cobalt-on-graphene exhibits increased FMR linewidthan often used signature of spin pumping. Similar results are obtained in Co/MgO/graphene structures, where a 1?nm MgO layer acts as a tunnel barrier. However, magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and Kerr microscopy measurements demonstrate increased magnetic disorder in cobalt grown on graphene, perhaps due to changes in the growth process and an increase in defects. This magnetic disorder may account for the observed linewidth enhancement due to effects such as two-magnon scattering or mosaicity. As such, it is not possible to conclude successful spin injection into graphene from FMR linewidth measurements alone.

Berger, A. J.; White, S. P.; Adur, R.; Pu, Y.; Hammel, P. C., E-mail: hammel@physics.osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Amamou, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Kawakami, R. K. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

475

Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency. 15 figures.

Prueitt, M.L.; Mueller, F.M.; Smith, J.L.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

476

Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Calculations on permanent-magnet quadrupoles with nonrectangular cross section  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current trend toward higher frequencies to power drift-tube linacs (DTLs) and coupled-cavity linacs (CCLs) reduces the space available for quadrupole focusing magnets. Similarly, the space available for matching sections between linac sections is limited, and often the matching section bunchers are designed in odd shapes to make them fit. This shaping further restricts focusing magnet space. One approach to attaining sufficient quadrupole strength is such situations is to use rare-earth permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) with cross sections tailored to fill as much of the available space as possible. In this paper, we describe some techniques we have developed to calculate the properties of such magnets both singly and when other magnets are nearby. 3 refs., 4 figs.

Boicourt, G.P.; Merson, J.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Method for large and rapid terahertz imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of large-scale active THz imaging using a combination of a compact high power THz source (>1 watt), an optional optical system, and a camera for the detection of reflected or transmitted THz radiation, without the need for the burdensome power source or detector cooling systems required by similar prior art such devices. With such a system, one is able to image, for example, a whole person in seconds or less, whereas at present, using low power sources and scanning techniques, it takes several minutes or even hours to image even a 1 cm.times.1 cm area of skin.

Williams, Gwyn P.; Neil, George R.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

479

Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

Miyadera, Haruo; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Greene, Steve J.; Milner, Edward C.; Morris, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Masuda, Koji [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Perry, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

480

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 252 (2002) 159161 Magnetically induced alignment of FNS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 252 (2002) 159­161 Magnetically induced alignment the observation of magnetically controlled anchoring of ferro-nematic suspensions. We found that application of a weak magnetic field to a cell with the ferro-suspension induces an easy orientation axis with weak

Reznikov, Yuri