National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for imaging magnetic techniques

  1. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Mosher, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  2. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying...

  3. MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY (MR-EIT): A new technique for high resolution conductivity imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyüboðlu, Murat

    MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY (MR-EIT): A new technique for high resolution are measured by using conventional electrical impedance tomography techniques and high resolution magnetic and the point spread function is not space invariant. On the other hand, magnetic field and electrical current

  4. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this technique has been especially popular in imaging such complex structures as aerogels and yeast cells. When applying the CDI technique to a magnetic system, the same...

  5. An iterative technique for refinement of selective excitations for magnetic resonance imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebsack, Eliot Todd

    1999-01-01

    Selective RF pulses are needed or many application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The desired excitation profile is omen used as the spectrum of the applied RF pulse; the modulation waveform of the RF pulse which approximately excites...

  6. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    28 March 2012 00:00 Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying...

  7. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  8. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi-Yung (San Francisco, CA); Petrich, Loren I. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  9. Model-based reconstruction of magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatnuntawech, Itthi

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique that is used to obtain images of soft tissue throughout the body. Since its development in the 1970s, MRI has gained tremendous importance in clinical practice ...

  10. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Ozone-Induced Injury in the Nasal Airways of Monkeys Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Morphometric Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, Stephen A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Trease, Lynn L.; Wagner, James G.; Garcia, Guilherme M.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Kimbell, Julia; Plopper, Charles G.; Corley, Rick A.; Postlewait, Ed; Harkema, Jack R.

    2007-03-01

    ABSTRACT Age-related changes in gross and microscopic structure of the nasal cavity can alter local tissue susceptibility as well as the dose of inhaled toxicant delivered to susceptible sites. This article describes a novel method for the use of magnetic resonance imaging, 3-dimensional airway modeling, and morphometric techniques to characterize the distribution and magnitude of ozone-induced nasal injury in infant monkeys. Using this method, we are able to generate age-specific, 3-dimensional, epithelial maps of the nasal airways of infant Rhesus macaques. The principal nasal lesions observed in this primate model of ozone-induced nasal toxicology were neutrophilic rhinitis, along with necrosis and exfoliation of the epithelium lining the anterior maxilloturbinate. These lesions, induced by acute or cyclic (episodic) exposures, were examined by light microscopy, quantified by morphometric techniques, and mapped on 3-dimensional models of the nasal airways. Here, we describe the histopathologic, imaging, and computational biology methods developed to efficiently characterize, localize, quantify, and map these nasal lesions. By combining these techniques, the location and severity of the nasal epithelial injury were correlated with epithelial type, nasal airway geometry, and local biochemical and molecular changes on an individual animal basis. These correlations are critical for accurate predictive modeling of exposure-dose-response relationships in the nasal airways, and subsequent extrapolation of nasal findings in animals to humans for developing risk assessment.

  11. Methods for chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheidegger, Rachel Nora

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a relatively new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition technique that generates contrast dependent on tissue microenvironment, such as protein concentration and ...

  12. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01

    X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.

  13. Directed evolution of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for noninvasive imaging of dopamine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    The development of molecular probes that allow in vivo imaging of neural signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution remains challenging. Here we applied directed evolution techniques to create magnetic ...

  14. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolstad, J.O.

    1984-06-12

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  15. Electronic imaging system and technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolstad, Jon O. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A method and system for viewing objects obscurred by intense plasmas or flames (such as a welding arc) includes a pulsed light source to illuminate the object, the peak brightness of the light reflected from the object being greater than the brightness of the intense plasma or flame; an electronic image sensor for detecting a pulsed image of the illuminated object, the sensor being operated as a high-speed shutter; and electronic means for synchronizing the shutter operation with the pulsed light source.

  16. Gradient characterization in magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Joseph Yitan

    2007-01-01

    Special magnetic resonance (MR) scans, such as spiral imaging and echo-planar imaging, require speed and gradient accuracy while putting high demands on the MR gradient system that may cause gradient distortion. Additionally, ...

  17. Imaging agents for in vivo magnetic resonance and scintigraphic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engelstad, B.L.; Raymond, K.N.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1991-04-23

    Methods are provided for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and/or scintigraphic imaging of a subject using chelated transition metal and lanthanide metal complexes. Novel ligands for these complexes are provided. No Drawings

  18. Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kraus, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-30

    An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

  19. Abstract--Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided nanorobotic systems that could perform diagnostic, curative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    groups have employed magnetized micro/ nanoparticles and have implemented magnetic propulsion techniquesAbstract-- Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided nanorobotic systems that could perform on the use of a MRI scanner to induce the required external driving forces to guide magnetic nanocapsules

  20. Array combination for parallel imaging in Magnetic Resonance Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Dan Kenrick

    2007-09-17

    In Magnetic Resonance Imaging, the time required to generate an image is proportional to the number of steps used to encode the spatial information. In rapid imaging, an array of coil elements and receivers are used to reduce the number of encoding...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiovascular disease 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Jennifer Margaret Jane

    2013-07-06

    Background Superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (SPIO) are part of a novel and exciting class of ‘smart’ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that are taken up by inflammatory cells. Ultrasmall SPIO ...

  2. Fourier Magnetic Imaging with Nanoscale Resolution and Compressed Sensing Speed-up using Electronic Spins in Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    1 Fourier Magnetic Imaging with Nanoscale Resolution and Compressed Sensing Speed-up using imaging.12 Here we introduce an alternative technique of Fourier magnetic imaging using NV Fourier transform to yield real-space images with nanoscale resolution, wide field-of-view (FOV

  3. Development of integrated imaging techniques for investigating biomarkers in glioblastoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Heisoog

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a diverse disease with many manifestations. Various imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) have been used to study human cancer. In this study, we ...

  4. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidential EnergyOrganizationLecturersLending aImaging

  5. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I C AFAQLensless Imaging of

  6. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I C AFAQLensless Imaging

  7. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I C AFAQLensless ImagingLensless

  8. Abstract-A novel imaging method for electrical impedance tomography is implemented. In this method, the magnetic flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyüboðlu, Murat

    - electrical impedance tomography, magnetic resonance imaging. I. INTRODUCTION Electrical impedance tomography conductivity images [11]. Both of these techniques can be named as magnetic resonance-electrical impedanceAbstract- A novel imaging method for electrical impedance tomography is implemented. In this method

  9. Advanced Millimeter-Wave Security Portal Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-04-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This paper details a number of techniques developed over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, as well as high frequency high bandwidth techniques. Implementation of some of these methods will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems.

  10. Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr. Tom Frank tdfrank@uiuc.edu www.sdal.uiuc.edu 333-7248 321 Davenport Hall #12;Geography 478 Techniques Perspective #12;Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science

  11. Perceptually Based Techniques for Semantic Image Classification and Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, Thrasyvoulos N.

    Perceptually Based Techniques for Semantic Image Classification and Retrieval Dejan Depalov, Schaumburg, IL, 60196 ABSTRACT The accumulation of large collections of digital images has created the need semantically, according to meaningful categories. We present a new approach for semantic classification

  12. Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutron Imaging Explored as Complementary Technique for Improving Cancer Detection August 05, 2013 Researcher Maria Cekanova analyzes the neutron radiographs of a canine breast...

  13. 2007 Nature Publishing Group Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo, Degiorgi

    to sense the magnetic force generated between the tip and spins in a sample. Magnetic resonance is used for the present work is the development of magnetic tips that generate magnetic field gradients as high as 1 of the technique on a patterned CaF2 test object. Unlike the permanent magnet tips previously used for

  14. Selective document image data compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1998-05-19

    A method of storing information from filled-in form-documents comprises extracting the unique user information in the foreground from the document form information in the background. The contrast of the pixels is enhanced by a gamma correction on an image array, and then the color value of each of pixel is enhanced. The color pixels lying on edges of an image are converted to black and an adjacent pixel is converted to white. The distance between black pixels and other pixels in the array is determined, and a filled-edge array of pixels is created. User information is then converted to a two-color format by creating a first two-color image of the scanned image by converting all pixels darker than a threshold color value to black. All the pixels that are lighter than the threshold color value to white. Then a second two-color image of the filled-edge file is generated by converting all pixels darker than a second threshold value to black and all pixels lighter than the second threshold color value to white. The first two-color image and the second two-color image are then combined and filtered to smooth the edges of the image. The image may be compressed with a unique Huffman coding table for that image. The image file is also decimated to create a decimated-image file which can later be interpolated back to produce a reconstructed image file using a bilinear interpolation kernel. 10 figs.

  15. Special Section Guest Editorial Coherent Raman Imaging Techniques and Biomedical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Special Section Guest Editorial Coherent Raman Imaging Techniques and Biomedical Applications. The combination of high resolution and molecular contrast has moved Raman techniques into the biomedical spotlight on biomedical imag- ing. The spontaneous Raman interaction is weak, yielding insufficient photons for fast

  16. Technique for identifying, tracing, or tracking objects in image data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM); Rothganger, Fredrick (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-08-28

    A technique for computer vision uses a polygon contour to trace an object. The technique includes rendering a polygon contour superimposed over a first frame of image data. The polygon contour is iteratively refined to more accurately trace the object within the first frame after each iteration. The refinement includes computing image energies along lengths of contour lines of the polygon contour and adjusting positions of the contour lines based at least in part on the image energies.

  17. Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA); Minard, Kevin R. (Kennewick, WA); Majors, Paul D. (Kennewick, WA)

    2011-11-22

    Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

  18. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Motor Cortex Activation in Schizophrenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Motor Cortex Activation inBrain dysfunction during motor activation and corpus callo-Lee HJ, et al. • FMRI of Motor Cortex Activation in

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of self-assembled biomaterial scaffolds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bull, Steve R; Meade, Thomas J; Stupp, Samuel I

    2014-09-16

    Compositions and/or mixtures comprising peptide amphiphile compounds comprising one or more contrast agents, as can be used in a range of magnetic resonance imaging applications.

  20. Multimodality Image Fusion-Guided Procedures: Technique, Accuracy, and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine, E-mail: naj@mail.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Radiology and Imaging Sciences (United States); Kruecker, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.kruecker@philips.com [Philips Research North America (United States); Kadoury, Samuel, E-mail: samuel.kadoury@polymtl.ca [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Department of Computer and Software Engineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada); Kobeiter, Hicham, E-mail: hicham.kobeiter@gmail.com [CHU Henri Mondor, UPEC, Departments of Radiology and d'imagrie medicale (France); Venkatesan, Aradhana M., E-mail: VenkatesanA@cc.nih.gov; Levy, Elliot, E-mail: levyeb@cc.nih.gov; Wood, Bradford J., E-mail: bwood@cc.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Radiology and Imaging Sciences (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care: Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. Positron-emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image-guided procedures, such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methods of image-fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided.

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging using parallel transmission at 7T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagoski, Borjan Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), also known as phase-encoded (PE) chemical shift imaging (CSI), suffers from both low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the brain metabolites, as well as inflexible ...

  2. Designing and characterizing hyperpolarizable silicon nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anahtar, Melis Nuray

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is one of the most powerful noninvasive tools for diagnosing human disease, but its utility is limited because current contrast agents are ineffective when imaging air-tissue interfaces, ...

  3. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  4. The Future of Real-time Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Address *Electrical Engineering-Systems, 3740 McClintock Avenue, EEB 406, University of Southern. These and other factors require real-time imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful and flexible with excellent image quality. In this article, the term real-time refers to imaging sys- tems that acquire

  5. Magnetic Microscopy and Imaging II John Chapman, Chairman Study of in-plane magnetic domains with magnetic transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayreuther, Günther

    with magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy P. Fischer,a) T. Eimu¨ller, and G. Schu¨tz University of Wu be designed by en- gaging, e.g., the different magnetic couplings between each layers. Due to a balanceMagnetic Microscopy and Imaging II John Chapman, Chairman Study of in-plane magnetic domains

  6. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGE VIEWING ``SCREEN REAL ESTATE'' PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, M. Stella

    MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGE VIEWING AND THE ``SCREEN REAL ESTATE'' PROBLEM By Johanna van der Heyden B Degree: Master of Science Title of thesis: Magnetic Resonance Image Viewing and the ``Screen Real Estate. These ``screen real estate'' issues are extensively explored in the literature but not consistently applied

  7. Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Direct imaging of nanoscale magnetic interactions in minerals Richard J. Harrison*, Rafal E. Dunin. Magnetite is the most strongly magnetic mineral in nature. Small particles of magnetite in single-domain (SD and pseudo-SD particles (1). In most igneous rocks, the grain size of primary magnetic minerals exceeds

  8. Image Processing Techniques for the Quanti cation of Atherosclerotic Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Image Processing Techniques for the Quanti cation of Atherosclerotic Changes K.V. Chandrinos 1 , M processing of fundus images. This method would help in evaluating the e cacy of various treatments changes, focal narrowing and occlusion of retinal vessels. Automatic quanti cation of these changes would

  9. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage density. However, it remains poorly understood, and even the fundamental mechanism of magnetic reversal for exchange-biased systems in changing magnetic fields is...

  10. On the dynamics of magnetic fluids in magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig J

    2008-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of magnetic fluids, often termed ferrofluids, has been an active area of research since the mid 1960s. However, it is only in the past twenty years that these fluids have begun to be used in magnetic ...

  11. Distortion-free magnetic resonance imaging in the zero-field limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelso, Nathan; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Bouchard, Louis-S.; Demas, Vasiliki; Muck, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2009-07-09

    MRI is a powerful technique for clinical diagnosis and materials characterization. Images are acquired in a homogeneous static magnetic field much higher than the fields generated across the field of view by the spatially encoding field gradients. Without such a high field, the concomitant components of the field gradient dictated by Maxwell's equations lead to severe distortions that make imaging impossible with conventional MRI encoding. In this paper, we present a distortion-free image of a phantom acquired with a fundamentally different methodology in which the applied static field approaches zero. Our technique involves encoding with pulses of uniform and gradient field, and acquiring the magnetic field signals with a SQUID. The method can be extended to weak ambient fields, potentially enabling imaging in the Earth's field without cancellation coils or shielding. Other potential applications include quantum information processing and fundamental studies of long-range ferromagnetic interactions.

  12. Solid-Cryogen Cooling Technique for Superconducting Magnets of NMR and MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwasa, Yukikazu

    This paper describes a solid-cryogen cooling technique currently being developed at the M.I.T. Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory for application to superconducting magnets of NMR and MRI. The technique is particularly ...

  13. New techniques and instrumentation for the characterisation of magnetic and electrostatic fields in nanocrystals and working devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    microscope (TEM) [1]. The interpretation of the recorded phase shift can be used to obtain quantitative@fz-juelich.de Keywords: off-axis electron holography, Lorentz imaging, magnetic fields, electric fields, working devices Off-axis electron holography is a powerful technique that be used to record the phase shift of a high

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for chemical sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Vincent Hok

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used for examining the human body. MRI contrast agents currently used in the clinic assist physicians in locating problematic areas, but other tools are needed to interrogate ...

  15. Design algorithms for parallel transmission in magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Setsompop, Kawin

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is on the algorithm design, implementation, and validation of parallel transmission technology in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Novel algorithms are proposed which yield excellent excitation ...

  16. Self-imaging-based laser collimation testing technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudassar, Asloob A.; Butt, Saira

    2010-11-01

    Laser collimation is required in many experiments based on lasers. Some laser experiments demand a high quality of collimation, e.g., the optical coherent processor, image transformer, and Fourier transform generator. A device is required to test the collimation of lasers in such experiments. We have suggested a modification in existing collimation testing techniques by which sensitivity can be improved. Theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate twice the improvement in sensitivity when used with previous techniques.

  17. Achieving molecular selectivity in imaging using multiphoton Raman spectroscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtom, Gary R. ); Thrall, Brian D. ); Chin, Beek Yoke ); Wiley, H Steven ); Colson, Steven D. )

    2000-12-01

    In the case of most imaging methods, contrast is generated either by physical properties of the sample (Differential Image Contrast, Phase Contrast), or by fluorescent labels that are localized to a particular protein or organelle. Standard Raman and infrared methods for obtaining images are based upon the intrinsic vibrational properties of molecules, and thus obviate the need for attached flurophores. Unfortunately, they have significant limitations for live-cell imaging. However, an active Raman method, called Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS), is well suited for microscopy, and provides a new means for imaging specific molecules. Vibrational imaging techniques, such as CARS, avoid problems associated with photobleaching and photo-induced toxicity often associated with the use of fluorescent labels with live cells. Because the laser configuration needed to implement CARS technology is similar to that used in other multiphoton microscopy methods, such as two -photon fluorescence and harmonic generation, it is possible to combine imaging modalities, thus generating simultaneous CARS and fluorescence images. A particularly powerful aspect of CARS microscopy is its ability to selectively image deuterated compounds, thus allowing the visualization of molecules, such as lipids, that are chemically indistinguishable from the native species.

  18. Latest Developments in Image Processing Methods and Technologies for Magnetic Confinement Nuclear Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latest Developments in Image Processing Methods and Technologies for Magnetic Confinement Nuclear Fusion

  19. Surface-Based Analysis of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    Surface-Based Analysis of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Theo G.M. van Erp1, Vikas Y School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA Abstract. Surface-based visualization, atlases the integration of surface-based tech- niques with functional imaging data, combining surface-based nonlinear

  20. Wavelets and functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breakspear, Michael

    Wavelets and functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain Ed Bullmore,a,* Jalal Fadili Breakspeare a Brain Mapping Unit and Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke of Psychiatry (King's College), London, UK e Brain Dynamics Centre (Westmead Hospital) and School of Physics

  1. He Lung Imaging in an Open Access, Very-Low-Field Human Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    3 He Lung Imaging in an Open Access, Very-Low-Field Human Magnetic Resonance Imaging System R. W. Butler,6 F. W. Hersman,4 and R. L. Walsworth1 The human lung and its functions are extremely sensitive lung restrict sub- jects to lying horizontally. Imaging of human lungs using inhaled laser-polarized 3

  2. Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kehayias, J.J.; Joel, D.D.; Adams, W.H.; Stein, H.L.

    1988-05-26

    A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D/sub 2/O in a solution with water.

  3. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging: characterization and comparison 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rane, Swati Dnyandeo

    2005-11-01

    coil configuration, k-space subsampling factor, k-space coverage in the imaging environment, there is a critical need to find the method giving the best results under certain imaging conditions. The tools developed in this research help the selection...

  4. Application of Parallel Imaging to Murine Magnetic Resonance Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chieh-Wei 1980-

    2012-09-21

    . This dissertation describes foundational level work to enable parallel imaging of mice on a 4.7 Tesla/40 cm bore research scanner. Reducing the size of the hardware setup associated with typical parallel imaging was an integral part of achieving the work, as animal...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging 1 A new global optimization algorithm and its application to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    by the uniformity of the magnetic field generated by this magnet, in that, the more uniform is the magnetic field a low field dedicated magnet is that of using permanent magnets surrounded by an iron yoke to amplifyMagnetic Resonance Imaging 1 A new global optimization algorithm and its application to a Magnetic

  6. 3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-11-11

    Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

  7. Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safitri, Anisa

    2012-07-16

    imaging techniques for gas detection and visualization. The infrared camera fundamentals and the camera detectors? algorithm to measure the thermal radiation emitted by a target object is described in Section 2. A semi-quantification approach... for detection is the contrast in transmitted radiation between the target and background, which generates a detector output voltage. The infrared camera can see certain gases, mostly hydrocarbons, because the camera?s detector is equipped with a filter which...

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with hyper-polarized noble gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.; Penttila, S.I.; Caprihan, A.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclei of noble gases can be hyper polarized through a laser-driven spin exchange to a degree many orders of magnitude larger than that attainable by thermal polarization without requiring a strong magnetic field. The increased polarization from the laser pumping enables a good nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal from a gas. The main goal of this project was to demonstrate diffusion-weighted imaging of such hyper-polarized noble gas with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Possible applications include characterizing porosity of materials and dynamically imaging pressure distributions in biological or acoustical systems.

  9. Magnetic pulsing technique for tracking, locating pigs. [Locating pipeline servicing equipment using magnetic pulsing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farque, J.A. (C.D.I., Broken Arrow, OK (United States))

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic transmission systems work well in conjunction with pipe line pigging. They have transmission characteristics that allow an operator to track a pig as it moves through the line with one antenna orientation, and locate a stationary pig and transmitter to within inches with another. Advanced systems offer pig run documentation features by recording the images of transmitter passages and their times and dates. These features will become increasingly important to pipe line owners and operators in the future as the EPA tightens its grip on the pipe line and gas industries. Additionally, pigging personnel with no real experience with the tracking or location of pigs can operate a magnetic system and be immediately productive. This lowers the overall cost to the service company, the pipe line owner, and ultimately the end user of the product.

  10. Instrumentation for parallel magnetic resonance imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, David Gerald

    2007-04-25

    FIGURE 1 An example of a 2D Fourier encoded pulse sequence for MR imaging ..............20 2 Block diagram for an ideal analog mixer with an output bandpass filter ............28 3 Undersampling of a bandpass signal...

  11. Bayesian Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seeger, Matthias

    Imaging 2 Bayesian Experimental Design 3 Scalable Approximate Inference 4 Experiments Seeger (MMCI Healthcare: Growing number of MRI diagnoses Brain research: Ethical human subject studies Seeger (MMCI Extremely versatile Noninvasive, no ionizing radiation Seeger (MMCI) Bayesian MRI Optimization 28 November

  12. Portable low-cost magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: As the premiere modality for brain imaging, MRI could find wider applicability if lightweight, portable systems were available for siting in unconventional locations such as intensive care units (ICUs), physician ...

  13. Single echo acquisition magnetic resonance imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDougall, Mary Preston

    2006-04-12

    limitations are already being approached. Parallel imaging methods (using multiple receiver coils to partially encode k-space) have offered some relief in the efforts and are rapidly becoming the focus of current endeavors to decrease scan time. Ideally...

  14. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob, E-mail: ihahn@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  15. RF Pulse Design for Parallel Excitation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yinan

    2012-07-16

    ? ?= (2.1) where ? is the gyromagnetic ratio. For 1H, ? = 42.58MHz/Tesla. 5 Figure 2.1. Precession of a nuclear spin about an external magnetic field. The imaging of an object relies on the bulk precession of the hydrogen spins in water...

  16. Chromatic Light Adaptation Measured using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wandell, Brian A.

    Chromatic Light Adaptation Measured using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Alex R. Wade- nisms within cone photoreceptor classes. Key words: fMRI; light adaptation; cones; simulation; V1; Naka regulation is part of a process called light adaptation. Light adaptation is an important computational step

  17. Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alenezy, Mohammed D.

    2009-04-17

    A two-parameter computational model is proposed for the study of the regional motion of the left ventricle (LV) wall using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) data. In this model, the LV wall motion is mathematically decomposed into two...

  18. Original Research In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorassini, Monica

    Original Research In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Cervical Spinal Cord at 3 Tesla is feasible at 3 T. Key Words: MRI; 3 Tesla; cervical spinal cord; gradient echo; gray matter; white matter J, and pulsatile flow (9,10). Deficits in motor and sensory function from damage to the spinal cord are mainly due

  19. Two-dimensional Imaging Velocity Interferometry: Technique and Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erskine, D J; Smith, R F; Bolme, C; Celliers, P; Collins, G

    2011-03-23

    We describe the data analysis procedures for an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image at a moment in time, i.e. a snapshot 2d-VISAR. Velocity interferometers (VISAR) measuring target motion to high precision have been an important diagnostic in shockwave physics for many years Until recently, this diagnostic has been limited to measuring motion at points or lines across a target. We introduce an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image, which could be called a snapshot 2d-VISAR. If a sufficiently fast movie camera technology existed, it could be placed behind a traditional VISAR optical system and record a 2d image vs time. But since that technology is not yet available, we use a CCD detector to record a single 2d image, with the pulsed nature of the illumination providing the time resolution. Consequently, since we are using pulsed illumination having a coherence length shorter than the VISAR interferometer delay ({approx}0.1 ns), we must use the white light velocimetry configuration to produce fringes with significant visibility. In this scheme, two interferometers (illuminating, detecting) having nearly identical delays are used in series, with one before the target and one after. This produces fringes with at most 50% visibility, but otherwise has the same fringe shift per target motion of a traditional VISAR. The 2d-VISAR observes a new world of information about shock behavior not readily accessible by traditional point or 1d-VISARS, simultaneously providing both a velocity map and an 'ordinary' snapshot photograph of the target. The 2d-VISAR has been used to observe nonuniformities in NIF related targets (polycrystalline diamond, Be), and in Si and Al.

  20. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirect ImagingDirect

  1. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirect ImagingDirectDirect

  2. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirect Imaging of

  3. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirect Imaging

  4. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileep Singh GroupDiracDirect Imaging

  5. Spectrally Resolved Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the XenonBiosensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilty, Christian; Lowery, Thomas; Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander

    2005-07-15

    Due to its ability to non-invasively record images, as well as elucidate molecular structure, nuclear magnetic resonance is the method of choice for applications as widespread as chemical analysis and medical diagnostics. Its detection threshold is, however, limited by the small polarization of nuclear spins in even the highest available magnetic fields. This limitation can, under certain circumstances, be alleviated by using hyper-polarized substances. Xenon biosensors make use of the sensitivity gain of hyperpolarized xenon to provide magnetic resonance detection capability for a specific low-concentration target. They consist of a cryptophane cage, which binds one xenon atom, and which has been connected via a linker to a targeting moiety such as a ligand or antibody. Recent work has shown the possibility of using the xenon biosensor to detect small amounts of a substance in a heterogeneous environment by NMR. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic resonance (MR) provides the capability to obtain spectrally and spatially resolved images of the distribution of immobilized biosensor, opening the possibility for using the xenon biosensor for targeted imaging.

  6. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laws, David D.

    2010-01-01

    parameters by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance." J.and R. V. Pound. "Nuclear audiofrequency spectroscopy byresonant heating of the nuclear spin system." Phys. Rev. ,

  7. New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superhot, charged plasma gas that fuels fusion reactions in magnetic devices called tokamaks. This gas is subject to instabilities that cause it to leak from the magnetic fields...

  8. A 64-channel personal computer based image reconstruction system and applications in single echo acquisition magnetic resonance elastography and ultra-fast magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yallapragada, Naresh

    2009-05-15

    Emerging technologies in parallel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with massive receiver arrays have paved the way for ultra-fast imaging at increasingly high frame rates. With the increase in the number of receiver channels ...

  9. Cryogenic techniques for large superconducting magnets in space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    A large superconducting magnet is proposed for use in a particle astrophysics experiment, ASTROMAG, which is to be mounted on the United States Space Station. This experiment will have a two-coil superconducting magnet with coils which are 1.3 to 1.7 meters in diameter. The two-coil magnet will have zero net magnetic dipole moment. The field 15 meters from the magnet will approach earth's field in low earth orbit. The issue of high Tc superconductor will be discussed in the paper. The reasons for using conventional niobium-titanium superconductor cooled with superfluid helium will be presented. Since the purpose of the magnet is to do particle astrophysics, the superconducting coils must be located close to the charged particle detectors. The trade off between the particle physics possible and the cryogenic insulation around the coils is discussed. As a result, the ASTROMAG magnet coils will be operated outside of the superfluid helium storage tank. The fountain effect pumping system which will be used to cool the coil is described in the report. Two methods for extending the operating life of the superfluid helium dewar are discussed. These include: operation with a third shield cooled to 90 K with a sterling cycle cryocooler, and a hybrid cryogenic system where there are three hydrogen-cooled shields and cryostat support heat intercept points. Both of these methods will extend the ASTROMAG cryogenic operating life from 2 years to almost 4 years. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of living systems by remote detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wemmer, David; Pines, Alexander; Bouchard, Louis; Xu, Shoujun; Harel, Elad; Budker, Dmitry; Lowery, Thomas; Ledbetter, Micah

    2013-10-29

    A novel approach to magnetic resonance imaging is disclosed. Blood flowing through a living system is prepolarized, and then encoded. The polarization can be achieved using permanent or superconducting magnets. The polarization may be carried out upstream of the region to be encoded or at the place of encoding. In the case of an MRI of a brain, polarization of flowing blood can be effected by placing a magnet over a section of the body such as the heart upstream of the head. Alternatively, polarization and encoding can be effected at the same location. Detection occurs at a remote location, using a separate detection device such as an optical atomic magnetometer, or an inductive Faraday coil. The detector may be placed on the surface of the skin next to a blood vessel such as a jugular vein carrying blood away from the encoded region.

  11. A Fingerprint Classification Technique Using Directional Images Meltem Ballan and F. Ayhan Sakarya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Brian L.

    A Fingerprint Classification Technique Using Directional Images Meltem Ballan and F. Ayhan Sakarya directional histograms. The technique enhances the digitized image using adaptive clipping and image matching classification methods, such as Galton and Henry Classification [2], rely on point patterns in fingerprints which

  12. An Iterative Image Registration Technique with an Application to Stereo Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granada, Universidad de

    121 An Iterative Image Registration Technique with an Application to Stereo Vision Bruce D. Lucas of the image, including rotation. We then describe a stereo vision system that uses this registration technique Abstract Image registration finds a variety of applications in computer vision. Unfortunately, traditional

  13. Implementation of State Transfer Hamiltonians in Spin Chains with Magnetic Resonance Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellaro, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear spin systems and magnetic resonance techniques have provided a fertile platform for experimental investigation of quantum state transfer in spin chains. From the first observation of polarization transfer, predating ...

  14. Fast Algorithms for Image Reconstruction with Application to Partially Parallel MR Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Wotao

    Fast Algorithms for Image Reconstruction with Application to Partially Parallel MR Imaging Yunmei. Key words. Image reconstruction, Variable splitting, TV denoising, Nonlinear optimization 1 from an emerging magnetic resonance (MR) medical imaging technique known as partially parallel imaging

  15. Magnetically-Assisted Statistical Assembly - a new heterogeneous integration technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fonstad, Clifton G. Jr.

    This paper presents a new technique for the monolithic heterogeneous integration of compound semiconductor devices with silicon integrated circuits, and establishes the theoretical foundation for a key element of the ...

  16. USE OF ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING TECHNIQUES IN THE IMAGING OF...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    data processing methods, which include Optim's proprietary nonlinear velocity optimization technique and pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The nonlinear optimization technique...

  17. Detectors and Data Analysis Techniques for Wide Field Optical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Mike

    and digital image centering and photometry methods. Although the emphasis is geared toward optical imaging classification process, Fisher et al. argued that for any procedural sub­classification scheme based on combining

  18. MRI Magnetic Signature Imaging, Tracking and Navigation for Targeted Micro/Nano-capsule Therapeutics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - back for the microdevice and a propulsion sequence to enable interleaved magnetic propulsionMRI Magnetic Signature Imaging, Tracking and Navigation for Targeted Micro J. Nelson, Antoine Ferreira and Sergej Fatikow Abstract-- The propulsion of nano

  19. Nonlinear Adaptive Parameter Estimation Techniques for Magnetic Transducers Operating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in applications including high speed milling and hybrid motor design have led to the utilization the development of nonlinear adaptive identification techniques for low-order, energy-based hysteresis models as actuators in industrial applications such as high speed milling and highly sensitive sensors

  20. Magneto-optical imaging of thin magnetic films using spins in diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Simpson; Jean-Philippe Tetienne; Julia McCoey; Kumaravelu Ganesan; Liam T. Hall; Steven Petrou; Robert E. Scholten; Lloyd C. L. Hollenberg

    2015-08-10

    Imaging the fields of magnetic materials provides crucial insight into the physical and chemical processes surrounding magnetism, and has been a key ingredient in the spectacular development of magnetic data storage. Existing approaches using the magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE), x-ray and electron microscopy have limitations that constrain further development, and there is increasing demand for imaging and characterisation of magnetic phenomena in real time with high spatial resolution. In this work, we show how the magneto-optical response of an array of negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond can be used to image and map the sub-micron stray magnetic field patterns from thin ferromagnetic films. Using optically detected magnetic resonance, we demonstrate wide-field magnetic imaging over 100x100 {\\mu}m^2 with a diffraction-limited spatial resolution of 440 nm at video frame rates, under ambient conditions. We demonstrate a novel all-optical spin relaxation contrast imaging approach which can image magnetic structures in the absence of an applied microwave field. Straightforward extensions promise imaging with sub-{\\mu}T sensitivity and sub-optical spatial and millisecond temporal resolution. This work establishes practical diamond-based wide-field microscopy for rapid high-sensitivity characterisation and imaging of magnetic samples, with the capability for investigating magnetic phenomena such as domain wall and skyrmion dynamics and the spin Hall effect in metals.

  1. Scanning photo-induced impedance microscopy*/an impedance based imaging technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Werner

    Scanning photo-induced impedance microscopy*/an impedance based imaging technique Steffi Krause a technique, scanning photo-induced impedance micro- scopy (SPIM), suitable for the imaging of the complex Photoelectrochemistry has been used widely to study photo-thermally induced current changes at metal surfaces

  2. Rock Imaging Techniques (C003338) Valid in the academic year 2013-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    techniques" is to provide the students with an overview and insight of a selection of imaging techniques, photocopies of relevant study material will be spread by minerva as well as references to text books and literature. Russ, J.C., 2011. The Image Processing Handbook, Sixth Edition Brandon D., Kaplan, W., 2008

  3. Underwater Metal Detection Using Video Image Processing Techniques to Determine Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Underwater Metal Detection Using Video Image Processing Techniques to Determine Location by Aubrey the undersigned committee hereby approve the attached thesis Underwater Metal Detection Using Video Image Head Marine and Environmental Systems . #12;iii Abstract Underwater Metal Detection Using Video Image

  4. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2004-12-28

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  5. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-12-30

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

  6. THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

  7. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usmani, Nawaid, E-mail: Nawaid.Usmani@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sloboda, Ron [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kamal, Wafa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Monajemi, Tara [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  8. Image-Based Monitoring of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermoablative Therapies for Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempp, Hansjoerg, E-mail: hansjoerg.rempp@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Clasen, Stephan [Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, Philippe L. [SLK-Kliniken, Clinic for Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, and Minimal Invasive Therapies (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Minimally invasive treatment options for liver tumor therapy have been increasingly used during the last decade because their benefit has been proven for primary and inoperable secondary liver tumors. Among these, radiofrequency ablation has gained widespread consideration. Optimal image-guidance offers precise anatomical information, helps to position interventional devices, and allows for differentiation between already-treated and remaining tumor tissue. Patient safety and complete ablation of the entire tumor are the overriding objectives of tumor ablation. These may be achieved most elegantly with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided therapy, where monitoring can be performed based on precise soft-tissue imaging and additional components, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and temperature mapping. New MR scanner types and newly developed sequence techniques have enabled MR-guided intervention to move beyond the experimental phase. This article reviews the current role of MR imaging in guiding radiofrequency ablation. Signal characteristics of primary and secondary liver tumors are identified, and signal alteration during therapy is described. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and temperature mapping as special components of MR therapy monitoring are introduced. Practical information concerning coils, sequence selection, and parameters, as well as sequence gating, is given. In addition, sources of artifacts are identified and techniques to decrease them are introduced, and the characteristic signs of residual tumor in T1-, T2-, and DWI are described. We hope to enable the reader to choose MR sequences that allow optimal therapy monitoring depending on the initial signal characteristics of the tumor as well as its size and location in the liver.

  9. Study of microfluidic measurement techniques using novel optical imaging diagnostics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jaesung

    2007-04-25

    Novel microscale velocity and temperature measurement techniques were studied based on confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and optical serial sectioning microscopy (OSSM). Two microscopic measurement systems were developed, 1) a CLSM micro...

  10. Techniques on Analysis of Photo Phase Shift Imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terry, Robin 1990-

    2012-04-12

    . The shape model has been trained using manual segmentations of AAA. To segment the contour of an AAA gradient information and grey levels near the contour are used. Chen and Amini [19] use a trian- gulated surface model in conjunction with level sets... for vessel segmentation in 3-D MRA images. In addition, Hessian-based vessel enhancement is used as a preprocessing step. Olabarriaga et al. [20] present an approach based on active appearance mod- els for the segmentation of AAA in 3-DCTA images. Grey...

  11. Imaging the mantle beneath Iceland using integrated seismological techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    head, this study presents a tomographic image of the mantle structure beneath Iceland to 400 km depth of the body wave and surface wave information reveals a predominantly horizontal low-velocity anomaly extending from the Moho down to $250 km depth, interpreted as a plume head. Below the plume head a near

  12. ContentBased Image Retrieval Using Metadata and Relaxation Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    .­C. Hsu, I.T. Ieong*, and R.K. Taira** Department of Computer Science University of California, Los Segundo, CA 90245, USA **Department of Radiological Sciences University of California, Los Angeles Los), a Semantic Layer (SL), and a Knowledge Layer (KL). Raw images and segmented objects (represented in contours

  13. Application of L1 Minimization Technique to Image Super-Resolution and Surface Reconstruction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talavatifard, Habiballah

    2013-05-06

    A surface reconstruction and image enhancement non-linear finite element technique based on minimization of L1 norm of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Since minimization in the L1 norm is computationally ...

  14. Digital signal processing techniques for optical coherence tomography : OCT and OCT image enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Desmond Christopher, 1978-

    2004-01-01

    Digital signal processing (DSP) techniques were developed to improve the flexibility, functionality, and image quality of ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. To reduce the dependence of OCT ...

  15. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, A.N.; Anderson, R.E.; Cole, E.I. Jr.

    1995-11-07

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits are disclosed. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits. 17 figs.

  16. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Ann. N. (13170-B Central SE #188, Albuquerque, NM 87123); Anderson, Richard E. (2800 Tennessee NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (2116 White Cloud NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112)

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

  17. Synthetic aperture focusing techniques for ultrasonic imaging of solid objects.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technique (SAFT) has been used in non-destructive testing mainly in its simplest form that mimics acoustic a review of SAFT algorithms applied for post-processing of ultrasonic data acquired in non-destructive obtained from the ultrasonic inspection of test specimens with artificial defects (side drilled holes). 1

  18. REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

  19. Linear beam raster magnet driver based on H-bridge technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinkine, Nikolai I.; Yan, Chen; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Dail, Jeffrey Glenn; Wojcik, Randolph Frank; Gunning, William

    2006-06-06

    An improved raster magnet driver for a linear particle beam is based on an H-bridge technique. Four branches of power HEXFETs form a two-by-two switch. Switching the HEXFETs in a predetermined order and at the right frequency produces a triangular current waveform. An H-bridge controller controls switching sequence and timing. The magnetic field of the coil follows the shape of the waveform and thus steers the beam using a triangular rather than a sinusoidal waveform. The system produces a raster pattern having a highly uniform raster density distribution, eliminates target heating from non-uniform raster density distributions, and produces higher levels of beam current.

  20. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison with experimentally obtained 3D displacement data in homogeneous gelatin phantoms using a 3D MR-ARFI sequence. The agreement of the experimentally measured and simulated results demonstrates the potential to use MR-ARFI displacement data in MRgFUS therapies.

  1. Novel image processing techniques to better understand white matter disruption in multiple sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows a pattern of white rights reserved. Keywords: Multiple Sclerosis; Diffusion Tensor MRI; Atlas; Visualization; Tractography Institutes of Health, USA, RG 3478A2/2 from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, USA, and NSF ITR 0426558

  2. Narrowband and x-Space Magnetic Particle Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwill, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    mT peak-to-peak oscillating magnetic field at 6.23 kHz. ThemT peak-to-peak oscillating magnetic field at 6.23 kHz. Theone or more oscillating magnetic fields to measure the mass

  3. Optimization Digital Image Watermarking Technique for Patent Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elnajjar, Mahmoud; Zaidan, B B; Sharif, Mohamed Elhadi M; Alanazi, Hamdan O

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development of multimedia and internet allows for wide distribution of digital media data. It becomes much easier to edit, modify and duplicate digital information besides that, digital documents are also easy to copy and distribute, therefore it will be faced by many threats. It is a big security and privacy issue. Another problem with digital document and video is that undetectable modifications can be made with very simple and widely available equipment, which put the digital material for evidential purposes under question With the large flood of information and the development of the digital format, it become necessary to find appropriate protection because of the significance, accuracy and sensitivity of the information, therefore multimedia technology and popularity of internet communications they have great interest in using digital watermarks for the purpose of copy protection and content authentication. Digital watermarking is a technique used to embed a known piece of digital data within a...

  4. Z-STEM Imaging of Chemical Ordering in FePt Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Z-STEM Imaging of Chemical Ordering in FePt Magnetic Nanoparticles J.E. Wittig, M.S. Wellons and C.M. Lukehart, Vanderbilt University J. Bentley and L.F. Allard, Oak Ridge National...

  5. Transmit field pattern control for high field magnetic resonance imaging with integrated RF current sources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurpad, Krishna Nagaraj

    2005-11-01

    The primary design criterion for RF transmit coils for MRI is uniform transverse magnetic (B1) field. Currently, most high frequency transmit coils are designed as periodic, symmetric structures that are resonant at the imaging frequency...

  6. Multimodal neuroimaging with simultaneous electroencephalogram and high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdon, Patrick L. (Patrick Lee), 1974-

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) is an important emerging tool in functional neuroimaging with the potential to reveal new mechanisms for brain function ...

  7. Highly Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Fourth Gradient Channel for Compensation of RF Phase Patterns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosshard, John 1983-

    2012-08-20

    A fourth gradient channel was implemented to provide slice dependent RF coil phase compensation for arrays in dual-sided or "sandwich" configurations. The use of highly parallel arrays for single echo acquisition magnetic resonance imaging allows...

  8. Phase-based regional oxygen metabolism in magnetic resonance imaging at high field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Audrey Peiwen

    2010-01-01

    Venous oxygen saturation (Yv) in cerebral veins and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO?) are important indicators for brain function and disease. Phase-susceptibility measurements in magnetic resonance imaging ...

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and analysis for determination of porous media properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uh, Jinsoo

    2007-04-25

    Advanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging methodologies have been developed to determine porous media properties associated with fluid flow processes. This dissertation presents the development of NMR experimental and analysis methodologies...

  10. Detecting tumor responses to treatment using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-09-24

    2008, 453:940-943. doi:10.1038/nrc2289 Cite this article as: Brindle: Detecting tumor responses to treatment using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. BMC Proceedings 2010 4(Suppl 2):O24. Correspondence: kmb1001@cam... Detecting tumor responses to treatment using hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging Kevin M Brindle From 16th International Charles Heidelberger Symposium on Cancer Research Coimbra, Portugal. 26–28 September 2010 Patients with similar...

  11. Detection of Tumors in Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Images using Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detection of Tumors in Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Images using Principal Component Analysis David Alberg Holm (1-2), Thomas Bøvith (2), Cecilia Cappellin (3) (1) Danish Research Centre for Magnetic different tissue classes. For this purpose, two methods were developed and combined. Data Eight mice bearing

  12. A REAL TIME 3D VISUALIZATION PROTOTYPE FOR INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Heidrun

    A REAL TIME 3D VISUALIZATION PROTOTYPE FOR INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING JENS FISCHER­invasive examinations. This prototype allows simultaneous visualization of three different types of data: a 3D­Magnetic@informatik.uni­rostock.de Abstract: This paper describes a prototype of a visualization system which is designed to support

  13. Technique for high axial shielding factor performance of large-scale, thin, open-ended, cylindrical Metglas magnetic shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malkowski, S; Hona, B; Mattie, C; Woods, D; Yan, H; Plaster, B; 10.1063/1.3605665

    2011-01-01

    Metglas 2705M is a low-cost commercially-available, high-permeability Cobalt-based magnetic alloy, provided as a 5.08-cm wide and 20.3-$\\mu$m thick ribbon foil. We present an optimized construction technique for single-shell, large-scale (human-size), thin, open-ended cylindrical Metglas magnetic shields. The measured DC axial and transverse magnetic shielding factors of our 0.61-m diameter and 1.83-m long shields in the Earth's magnetic field were 267 and 1500, for material thicknesses of only 122 $\\mu$m (i.e., 6 foil layers). The axial shielding performance of our single-shell Metglas magnetic shields, obtained without the use of magnetic shaking techniques, is comparable to the performance of significantly thicker, multiple-shell, open-ended Metglas magnetic shields in comparable-magnitude, low-frequency applied external fields reported previously in the literature.

  14. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ?}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ?} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ?}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ?} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and improved signal difference in the lesion.

  15. Near Infrared (NIR) Imaging Techniques Using Lasers and Nonlinear Crystal Optical Parametric Oscillator/Amplifier (OPO/OPA) Imaging and Transferred Electron (TE) Photocathode Image Intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YATES,GEORGE J.; MCDONALD,THOMAS E. JR.; BLISS,DAVID E.; CAMERON,STEWART M.; GREIVES,KENNETH H.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.

    2000-12-20

    Laboratory experiments utilizing different near-infrared (NIR) sensitive imaging techniques for LADAR range gated imaging at eye-safe wavelengths are presented. An OPO/OPA configuration incorporating a nonlinear crystal for wavelength conversion of 1.56 micron probe or broadcast laser light to 807 nm light by utilizing a second pump laser at 532 nm for gating and gain, was evaluated for sensitivity, resolution, and general image quality. These data are presented with similar test results obtained from an image intensifier based upon a transferred electron (TE) photocathode with high quantum efficiency (QE) in the 1-2 micron range, with a P-20 phosphor output screen. Data presented include range-gated imaging performance in a cloud chamber with varying optical attenuation of laser reflectance images.

  16. Wavelets and statistical analysis of functional magnetic resonance images of the human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breakspear, Michael

    Wavelets and statistical analysis of functional magnetic resonance images of the human brain Ed Bullmore Brain Mapping Unit and Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke CNRS UMR 6072, Caen, France, Michael Breakspear Brain Dynamics Centre (Westmead Hospital) and School

  17. Magnetic resonance visualization of conductive structures by sequence-triggered direct currents and spin-echo phase imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eibofner, Frank; Wojtczyk, Hanne; Graf, Hansjörg E-mail: drGraf@t-online.de; Clasen, Stephan

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Instrument visualization in interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly performed via susceptibility artifacts. Unfortunately, this approach suffers from limited conspicuity in inhomogeneous tissue and disturbed spatial encoding. Also, susceptibility artifacts are controllable only by sequence parameters. This work presents the basics of a new visualization method overcoming such problems by applying sequence-triggered direct current (DC) pulses in spin-echo (SE) imaging. SE phase images allow for background free current path localization. Methods: Application of a sequence-triggered DC pulse in SE imaging, e.g., during a time period between radiofrequency excitation and refocusing, results in transient field inhomogeneities. Dependent on the additional z-magnetic field from the DC, a phase offset results despite the refocusing pulse. False spatial encoding is avoided by DC application during periods when read-out or slice-encoding gradients are inactive. A water phantom containing a brass conductor (water equivalent susceptibility) and a titanium needle (serving as susceptibility source) was used to demonstrate the feasibility. Artifact dependence on current strength and orientation was examined. Results: Without DC, the brass conductor was only visible due to its water displacement. The titanium needle showed typical susceptibility artifacts. Applying triggered DC pulses, the phase offset of spins near the conductor appeared. Because SE phase images are homogenous also in regions of persistent field inhomogeneities, the position of the conductor could be determined with high reliability. Artifact characteristic could be easily controlled by amperage leaving sequence parameters unchanged. For an angle of 30° between current and static field visualization was still possible. Conclusions: SE phase images display the position of a conductor carrying pulsed DC free from artifacts caused by persistent field inhomogeneities. Magnitude and phase images are acquired simultaneously under the same conditions without the use of extra measurement time. The presented technique offers many advantages for precise instrument localization in interventional MRI.

  18. Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy-imaging fast spin dynamics in magnetic nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Peter; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Mesler, Brooke L.; Chao, Weilun; Sakdinawat, Anne E.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2007-01-01

    concepts such as spintronics, where in addition to theLogical elements for spintronics, non-volatile magnetic

  19. Reducing Uncertainty in Wind Turbine Blade Health Inspection with Image Processing Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Reducing Uncertainty in Wind Turbine Blade Health Inspection with Image Processing Techniques Huiyi problems Promotion Meet cool peopleBetter jobs Academia Vs Industry #12;Wind Turbine Blade Health damage Source: Sørensen, 2004 BASF coating for wind turbine blades, 2014 Coating layer health

  20. Solar Flare Tracking Using Image Processing Techniques , Frank Y. Shih1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Flare Tracking Using Image Processing Techniques Ming Qu1 , Frank Y. Shih1 , Ju Jing2 grants IIS-0324816, ATM 0233931 and ATM 0313591. Abstract. Automatic property measurement of solar flares through their complete cyclic development is valuable in the studies of solar flares. From the analysis

  1. A study on a lobed jet mixing flow by using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    A study on a lobed jet mixing flow by using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique Hui in the present study to conduct three-dimensional measurements of air jet flows exhausted from a lobed nozzle distributions were used to analyze the characteristics of the mixing process in the lobed jet flow compared

  2. NEAR-IR IMAGING POLARIMETRY TOWARD A BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUD: MAGNETIC FIELD IN SFO 74

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusune, Takayoshi; Sugitani, Koji [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); Miao, Jingqi [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); Tamura, Motohide; Kwon, Jungmi [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sato, Yaeko [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mikata, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Watanabe, Makoto [Department of Cosmosciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 10, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Nishiyama, Shogo [Faculty of Education, Miyagi University of Education, Sendai 980-0845 (Japan); Nagayama, Takahiro [Department of Physics, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Sato, Shuji [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    We have made near-infrared (JHK {sub s}) imaging polarimetry of a bright-rimmed cloud (SFO 74). The polarization vector maps clearly show that the magnetic field in the layer just behind the bright rim is running along the rim, quite different from its ambient magnetic field. The direction of the magnetic field just behind the tip rim is almost perpendicular to that of the incident UV radiation, and the magnetic field configuration appears to be symmetric as a whole with respect to the cloud symmetry axis. We estimated the column and number densities in the two regions (just inside and far inside the tip rim) and then derived the magnetic field strength, applying the Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. The estimated magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim, ?90 ?G, is stronger than that far inside, ?30 ?G. This suggests that the magnetic field strength just inside the tip rim is enhanced by the UV-radiation-induced shock. The shock increases the density within the top layer around the tip and thus increases the strength of the magnetic field. The magnetic pressure seems to be comparable to the turbulent one just inside the tip rim, implying a significant contribution of the magnetic field to the total internal pressure. The mass-to-flux ratio was estimated to be close to the critical value just inside the tip rim. We speculate that the flat-topped bright rim of SFO 74 could be formed by the magnetic field effect.

  3. Registration and Analysis of Myocardial Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - imum upslope, peak and time-to-peak. Qualitative and quantitative validation is carried out of Denmark, DTU #12;2 #12;3 Preface This thesis is based on five months work at the section for Image This thesis presents the registration and analysis of myocardial perfusion mag- netic resonance images

  4. Measurement of nonlinear index by a relay-imaged top-hat Z-scan technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimada, T.; Kurnit, N.A.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    1996-04-01

    Measurements of the nonlinear index of a number of optical materials of interest for the National Ignition Facility have been performed at 1,064 nm and 355 nm by a modified version of the ``top-hat`` technique and the results compared with the more standard gaussian-beam Z-scan technique. The top-hat technique has the advantages of higher sensitivity and smaller uncertainties introduced by beam-quality considerations. The authors have made what they feel to be an additional improvement by placing the defining aperture for the top hat at the front focal plane of the lens that focuses the beam into the sample and then reimaging the input aperture with a second lens onto a ccd camera. Reimaging eliminates diffraction fringes and provides a stationary image even for a wedged sample; recording the entire image permits minimization of spurious effects such as varying interference fringes.

  5. TEST OF THE HEMISPHERIC RULE OF MAGNETIC HELICITY IN THE SUN USING THE HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER (HMI) DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Sun, X.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic twist in solar active regions (ARs) has been found to have a hemispheric preference in sign (hemisphere rule): negative in the northern hemisphere and positive in the southern. The preference reported in previous studies ranges greatly, from ? 58% to 82%. In this study, we examine this hemispheric preference using vector magnetic field data taken by Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and find that 75% ± 7% of 151 ARs studied obey the hemisphere rule, well within the preference range in previous studies. If the sample is divided into two groups—ARs having magnetic twist and writhe of the same sign and having opposite signs—the strength of the hemispheric preference differs substantially: 64% ± 11% for the former group and 87% ± 8% for the latter. This difference becomes even more significant in a sub-sample of 82 ARs having a simple bipole magnetic configuration: 56% ± 16% for the ARs having the same signs of twist and writhe, and 93% with lower and upper confidence bounds of 80% and 98% for the ARs having the opposite signs. The error reported here is a 95% confidence interval. This may suggest that, prior to emergence of magnetic tubes, either the sign of twist does not have a hemispheric preference or the twist is relatively weak.

  6. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-03-01

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  7. Motion of free spins and NMR imaging without a radio-frequency magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kees van Schenk Brill; Jassem Lahfadi; Tarek Khalil; Daniel Grucker

    2015-04-19

    NMR imaging without any radio-frequency magnetic field is explained by a quantum treatment of independent spin~$\\tfrac 12$. The total magnetization is determined by means of their individual wave function. The theoretical treatment, based on fundamental axioms of quantum mechanics and solving explicitly the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with the kinetic energy part which gives the motion of free spins, is recalled. It explains the phase shift of the spin noise spectrum with its amplitude compared to the conventional NMR spectrum. Moreover it explains also the relatively good signal to noise ratio of NMR images obtained without a RF pulse. This derivation should be helpful for new magnetic resonance imaging sequences or for developing quantum computing by NMR.

  8. Simultaneous Electroencephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of General Anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdon, Patrick Lee

    It has been long appreciated that anesthetic drugs induce stereotyped changes in electroencephalogram (EEG), but the relationships between the EEG and underlying brain function remain poorly understood. Functional imaging ...

  9. Uncooled thin film infrared imaging device with aerogel thermal isolation: Deposition and planarization techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruffner, J.A.; Clem, P.G.; Tuttle, B.A.; Brinker, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sriram, C.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Bullington, J.A. [AMMPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The authors have successfully integrated a thermally insulating silica aerogel thin film into a new uncooled monolithic thin film infrared (IR) imaging device. Compared to other technologies (bulk ceramic and microbridge), use of an aerogel layer provides superior thermal isolation of the pyroelectric imaging element from the relatively massive heat sinking integrated circuit. This results in significantly higher thermal and temporal resolutions. They have calculated noise equivalent temperature differences of 0.04--0.10 C from a variety of Pb{sub x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PZT) and Pb{sub x}La{sub 1{minus}x}Zr{sub y}Ti{sub 1{minus}y}O{sub 3} (PLZT) pyroelectric imaging elements in monolithic structures. In addition, use of aerogels results in an easier, less expensive fabrication process and a more robust device. Fabrication of these monolithic devices entails sol-gel deposition of the aerogel, sputter deposition of the electrodes, and solution chemistry deposition of the pyroelectric imaging elements. Uniform pyroelectric response is achieved across the device by use of appropriate planarization techniques. These deposition and planarization techniques are described. Characterization of the individual layers and monolithic structure using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Byer-Roundy techniques also is discussed.

  10. Bioengineering 208: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Laboratory Winter 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    velocity well. b. Acquire a 3D TOF image of the vessel, with the location of the 2D PC image the (volts/amps) scale labeled on the gradient amp test point, and a scaling of 4G/cm at 250A. Turn where all the major vessels going in and out of the head are clear and appear to be flowing straight

  11. Bioengineering 208: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Laboratory Winter 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    velocity well. b. Acquire a 3D TOF image of the vessel, with the location of the 2D PC image the (volts/amps) scale labeled on the gradient amp test point, and a scaling of 4G/cm at 250A. Turn where all the major vessels going in and out of the head are clear and appear to be flowing straight

  12. Bioengineered Probes for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Nervous System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Vivian

    The development of molecular imaging probes has changed the nature of neurobiological research. Some of the most notable successes have involved the use of biological engineering techniques for the creation of fluorescent ...

  13. Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging of Three-dimensional Magnetic Reconnection in a Solar Eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, J Q; Ding, M D; Guo, Y; Priest, E R; Parnell, C E; Edwards, S J; Zhang, J; Chen, P F; Fang, C

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection, a change of magnetic field connectivity, is a fundamental physical process in which magnetic energy is released explosively. It is responsible for various eruptive phenomena in the universe. However, this process is difficult to observe directly. Here, the magnetic topology associated with a solar reconnection event is studied in three dimensions (3D) using the combined perspectives of two spacecraft. The sequence of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images clearly shows that two groups of oppositely directed and non-coplanar magnetic loops gradually approach each other, forming a separator or quasi-separator and then reconnecting. The plasma near the reconnection site is subsequently heated from $\\sim$1 to $\\ge$5 MK. Shortly afterwards, warm flare loops ($\\sim$3 MK) appear underneath the hot plasma. Other observational signatures of reconnection, including plasma inflows and downflows, are unambiguously revealed and quantitatively measured. These observations provide direct evidence of magneti...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Therapy-Induced Necrosis Using Gadolinium-Chelated Polyglutamic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Edward F.; Esparza-Coss, Emilio; Wen Xiaoxia; Ng, Chaan S.; Daniel, Sherita L.; Price, Roger E.; Rivera, Belinda; Charnsangavej, Chusilp; Gelovani, Juri G.; Li Chun . E-mail: cli@di.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Necrosis is the most common morphologic alteration found in tumors and surrounding normal tissues after radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Accurate measurement of necrosis may provide an early indication of treatment efficacy or associated toxicity. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the selective accumulation of polymeric paramagnetic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents-gadolinium p-aminobenzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-poly(glutamic acid) (L-PG-DTPA-Gd and D-PG-DTPA-Gd)-in necrotic tissue. Methods and Materials: Two different solid tumor models, human Colo-205 xenograft and syngeneic murine OCA-1 ovarian tumors, were used in this study. Necrotic response was induced by treatment with poly(L-glutamic acid)-paclitaxel conjugate (PG-TXL). T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo images were obtained immediately and up to 4 days after contrast injection and compared with corresponding histologic specimens. Two low-molecular-weight contrast agents, DTPA-Gd and oligomeric(L-glutamic acid)-DTPA-Gd, were used as nonspecific controls. Results: Initially, there was minimal tumor enhancement after injection of either L-PG-DTPA-Gd or D-PG-DTPA-Gd, but rapid enhancement after injection of low-molecular-weight agents. However, polymeric contrast agents, but not low-molecular-weight contrast agents, caused sustained enhancement in regions of tumor necrosis in both tumors treated with PG-TXL and untreated tumors. These data indicate that high molecular weight, rather than in vivo biodegradation, is necessary for the specific localization of polymeric MR contrast agents to necrotic tissue. Moreover, biotinylated L-PG-DTPA-Gd colocalized with macrophages in the tumor necrotic areas, suggesting that selective accumulation of L- and D-PG-DTPA-Gd in necrotic tissue was mediated through residing macrophages. Conclusions: Our data suggest that MR imaging with PG-DTPA-Gd may be a useful technique for noninvasive characterization of treatment-induced necrosis.

  15. Bayesian Experimental Design of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seeger, Matthias

    Nickisch, Rolf Pohmann and Bernhard Sch¨olkopf Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics research of the brain. Without applying any harmful ioniz- ing radiation, this technique stands out by its

  16. A Method for Extracting Light Echo Fluxes Using the NN2 Difference Imaging Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew B. Newman; Armin Rest

    2006-10-19

    Light echoes are interesting because of the wealth of information they offer about their progenitors and the reflecting dust. Due to their faint surface brightnesses, difference imaging is necessary to separate most light echoes from the sky background. However, difference images reveal only the relative fluxes between two epochs. Obtaining absolute fluxes for individual epochs has traditionally relied on a single template image that is free of light echoes. Since such an observation is normally unavailable, a light echo-free template must be constructed by a complicated and usually subjective process. Here we present an application of the NN2 method of Barris et al. to extract the relative fluxes of light echoes across a range of epochs directly from a series of difference images. This method requires no privileged image and makes maximal use of the observational data. Statistical methods to estimate the zero-flux level and thus the absolute flux are also presented. The efficacy of the technique is demonstrated by an application to the light echoes around SN 1987A. The resulting images reveal new detail and faint light echo structures. This method can be adapted and applied to other extended variable light sources, such as stellar outflows and supernova remnants.

  17. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

  18. Characterization of beam dynamics in the APS injector rings using time-resolved imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, B.X.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Borland, M.

    1997-06-01

    Images taken with streak cameras and gated intensified cameras with both time (longitudinal) and spatial (transverse) resolution reveal a wealth of information about circular accelerators. The authors illustrate a novel technique by a sequence of dual-sweep streak camera images taken at a high dispersion location in the booster synchrotron, where the horizontal coordinate is strongly correlated with the particle energy and the {open_quotes}top-view{close_quotes} of the beam gives a good approximation to the particle density distribution in the longitudinal phase space. A sequence of top-view images taken fight after injection clearly shows the beam dynamics in the phase space. We report another example from the positron accumulator ring for the characterization of its beam compression bunching with the 12th harmonic rf.

  19. Bistable illusory rebound motion: Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of perceptual states and switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    Bistable illusory rebound motion: Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging of perceptual of a recently discovered visual illusion that we call Fillusory rebound motion_ (IRM) are described. This illusion is remarkable because motion is perceived in the absence of any net motion energy in the stimulus

  20. Application of a single step temporal imaging of magnetic induction tomography for metal flow visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    and sensing coils. MIT has potential in visualization of metal flow for continuous casting mainly because of spatio-temporal resolution using the real metal flow in continuous casting. Results are comparedApplication of a single step temporal imaging of magnetic induction tomography for metal flow

  1. Event-related single-shot volumetric functional magnetic resonance inverse imaging of visual processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Event-related single-shot volumetric functional magnetic resonance inverse imaging of visual head coil array data and then apply inverse reconstruction methods to obtain volumetric fMRI estimates-related brain activity. We demonstrate the sensitivity and inter-subject reliability of volumetric InI using

  2. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsky, Yarom; Bingham, Philip R; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Carmichael, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  3. GPU-accelerated denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howison, Mark; Wes Bethel, E.

    2014-05-29

    The raw computational power of GPU accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. In practice, applying these filtering operations requires setting multiple parameters. This study was designed to provide better guidance to practitioners for choosing the most appropriate parameters by answering two questions: what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? And what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? To answer the first question, we use two different metrics, mean squared error (MSE) and mean structural similarity (MSSIM), to compare denoising quality against a reference image. Surprisingly, the best improvement in structural similarity with the bilateral filter is achieved with a small stencil size that lies within the range of real-time execution on an NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU. Moreover, inappropriate choices for parameters, especially scaling parameters, can yield very poor denoising performance. To answer the second question, we perform an autotuning study to empirically determine optimal memory tiling on the GPU. The variation in these results suggests that such tuning is an essential step in achieving real-time performance. These results have important implications for the real-time application of denoising to MR images in clinical settings that require fast turn-around times.

  4. Method and apparatus for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy using microstrip transmission line coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2006-04-04

    Apparatus and method for MRI imaging using a coil constructed of microstrip transmission line (MTL coil) are disclosed. In one method, a target is positioned to be imaged within the field of a main magnetic field of a magnet resonance imaging (MRI) system, a MTL coil is positioned proximate the target, and a MRI image is obtained using the main magnet and the MTL coil. In another embodiment, the MRI coil is used for spectroscopy. MRI imaging and spectroscopy coils are formed using microstrip transmission line. These MTL coils have the advantageous property of good performance while occupying a relatively small space, thus allowing MTL coils to be used inside restricted areas more easily than some other prior art coils. In addition, the MTL coils are relatively simple to construct of inexpensive components and thus relatively inexpensive compared to other designs. Further, the MTL coils of the present invention can be readily formed in a wide variety of coil configurations, and used in a wide variety of ways. Further, while the MTL coils of the present invention work well at high field strengths and frequencies, they also work at low frequencies and in low field strengths as well.

  5. Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

    2014-01-21

    A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

  6. Imaging exotic properties of nanoscale magnetic lattices | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHusseinSOLICWfATION/MODIFICATlONImagingLaboratory Imaging

  7. Stellar magnetic field measurements Zeeman-Doppler imaging and magnetic-flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cool stars and solar-like stars Instrumentation The most successful spectrographs field measurements of the Herbig Ae stars HD 101412 (left panel) and HD 150193 (right panel) (FORS 2). Left panel: Phase diagram and residuals for the longitudinal magnetic field measurements of the Cephei

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Paul H. (Los Alamos, NM); Brainard, James R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Ryan, Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC.sub.16 H.sub.14 N.sub.6. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques.

  10. Statistical techniques for detecting the intergalactic magnetic field from large samples of extragalactic Faraday rotation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akahori, Takuya; Gaensler, B. M.; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: bryan.gaensler@sydney.edu.au

    2014-08-01

    Rotation measure (RM) grids of extragalactic radio sources have been widely used for studying cosmic magnetism. However, their potential for exploring the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies is unclear, since other Faraday-rotation media such as the radio source itself, intervening galaxies, and the interstellar medium of our Galaxy are all significant contributors. We study statistical techniques for discriminating the Faraday rotation of filaments from other sources of Faraday rotation in future large-scale surveys of radio polarization. We consider a 30° × 30° field of view toward the south Galactic pole, while varying the number of sources detected in both present and future observations. We select sources located at high redshifts and toward which depolarization and optical absorption systems are not observed so as to reduce the RM contributions from the sources and intervening galaxies. It is found that a high-pass filter can satisfactorily reduce the RM contribution from the Galaxy since the angular scale of this component toward high Galactic latitudes would be much larger than that expected for the IGMF. Present observations do not yet provide a sufficient source density to be able to estimate the RM of filaments. However, from the proposed approach with forthcoming surveys, we predict significant residuals of RM that should be ascribable to filaments. The predicted structure of the IGMF down to scales of 0.°1 should be observable with data from the Square Kilometre Array, if we achieve selections of sources toward which sightlines do not contain intervening galaxies and RM errors are less than a few rad m{sup –2}.

  11. Accessing interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments via exterior measurements, I. Boundary-value techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Plaster

    2013-09-22

    We propose a new concept for determining the interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments. If a closed three-dimensional boundary surface surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined such that its interior encloses no currents or sources of magnetization, each of the interior vector field components and the magnetic scalar potential will satisfy a Laplace equation. Therefore, if either the vector field components or the normal derivative of the scalar potential can be measured on the surface of this boundary, thus defining a Dirichlet or Neumann boundary-value problem, respectively, the interior vector field components or the scalar potential (and, thus, the field components via the gradient of the potential) can be uniquely determined via solution of the Laplace equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the interior magnetic field components during the operating phase of neutron electric dipole moment experiments when it is not, in general, feasible to perform direct in situ measurements of the interior field components. We also study the specifications that a vector field probe must satisfy in order to determine the interior vector field components to a certain precision. The technique we propose here may also be applicable to experiments requiring monitoring of the vector magnetic field components within some closed boundary surface, such as searches for neutron-antineutron oscillations along a flight path or measurements in storage rings of the muon anomalous magnetic moment $g-2$ and the proton electric dipole moment.

  12. Ultra-fast Imaging of Two-Phase Flow in Structured Monolith Reactors; Techniques and Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heras, Jonathan Jaime

    2.1.9 NMR SPECTROMETER (HARDWARE) 2.2. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING 2.2.1 MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENTS 2.2.2 SLICE SELECTION 2.2.3 K-SPACE VECTOR FORMALISM... , kB is the Boltzmann constant, T is the absolute temperature, ? is the Planck constant divided by 2pi, and ? is the gyromagnetic ratio. The gyromagnetic ratio is nucleus specific, and has a value of 42.58 MHz/Tesla for 1H. The spin...

  13. Assessment of liver steatosis and fibrosis in rats using integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton imaging technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jian

    We report the implementation of a unique integrated coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy imaging technique developed for ...

  14. DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE USING THE MAGNETIC FLUX LEAKAGE TECHNIQUE L. Clapham, V. Babbar, and James Byrne.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clapham, Lynann

    DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE USING THE MAGNETIC FLUX LEAKAGE TECHNIQUE L. Clapham, V. Babbar mechanical damage in pipelines. However, MFL application to mechanical damage detection faces hurdles which effects, 2) the stress distribution around a mechanically damaged region is very complex, consisting

  15. Noise temperature improvement for magnetic fusion plasma millimeter wave imaging systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, J.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.

    2014-03-15

    Significant progress has been made in the imaging and visualization of magnetohydrodynamic and microturbulence phenomena in magnetic fusion plasmas [B. Tobias et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 6, 2106042 (2011)]. Of particular importance have been microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging and microwave imaging reflectometry systems for imaging T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations. These instruments have employed heterodyne receiver arrays with Schottky diode mixer elements directly connected to individual antennas. Consequently, the noise temperature has been strongly determined by the conversion loss with typical noise temperatures of ?60?000 K. However, this can be significantly improved by making use of recent advances in Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit chip low noise amplifiers to insert a pre-amplifier in front of the Schottky diode mixer element. In a proof-of-principle design at V-Band (50–75 GHz), significant improvement of noise temperature from the current 60?000 K to measured 4000 K has been obtained.

  16. Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair Surgeries -An

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, James

    Image-Guided Techniques Improve the Short-term Outcome of Autologous Osteochondral Cartilage Repair and deliver osteochondral grafts remains problematic. We investigated whether image-guided methods (optically-guided and template-guided) can improve the outcome of mo- saic arthroplasty procedures. Methods: Fifteen sheep were

  17. Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

  18. Minute Effects of Sex on the Aging Brain: A Multisample Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fjell, Anders M.

    Age is associated with substantial macrostructural brain changes. While some recent magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported larger age effects in men than women, others find no sex differences. As brain morphometry ...

  19. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of the porcine temporomandibular joint disc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benavides, E.; Bilgen, M.; Al-Hafez, B.; Alrefae, T.; Wang, Y; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-28

    scanned on a 9.4?Tesla horizontal bore MRI scanner using an inductively coupled surface coil. High-resolution gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted spin-echo based images were obtained. The mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy (FA) were computed...

  20. Magnetic imaging of ion-irradiation patterned CoPt multilayers using complementary electron and photon probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    Magnetic imaging of ion-irradiation patterned CoÕPt multilayers using complementary electron with perpendicular anisotropy were patterned by ion irradiation through a stencil mask to produce in-plane magnetization in the irradiated regions. The boundaries of the patterns, defined by the transition from out

  1. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Wei

    2010-12-15

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian cells. New rotational information was obtained: (1) during endocytosis, cargoes lost their rotation freedom at the late stage of internalization; (2) cargoes performed train-like motion when they were transported along the microtubule network by motor proteins inside live cells; (3) During the pause stage of fast axonal transport, cargoes were still bound to the microtubule tracks by motor proteins. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is another non-invasive and far-field optical imaging technique. Because of its near-field illumination mechanism, TIRFM has better axial resolution than epi-fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy. In this work, an auto-calibrated, prism type, angle-scanning TIRFM instrument was built. The incident angle can range from subcritical angles to nearly 90{sup o}, with an angle interval less than 0.2{sup o}. The angle precision of the new instrument was demonstrated through the finding of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angle of metal film coated glass slide. The new instrument improved significantly the precision in determining the axial position. As a result, the best obtained axial resolution was {approx} 8 nm, which is better than current existing instruments similar in function. The instrument was further modified to function as a pseudo TIRF microscope. The illumination depth can be controlled by changing the incident angle of the excitation laser beam or adjusting the horizontal position of the illumination laser spot on the prism top surface. With the new technique, i.e., variable-illumination-depth pseudo TIRF microscopy, the whole cell body from bottom to top was scanned.

  2. Calculation of nuclear matter in the presence of strong magnetic field using LOCV technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordbar, G H

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we are interested in the properties of nuclear matter at zero temperature in the presence of strong magnetic fields using the lowest order constraint variational (LOCV) method employing $AV_{18}$ nuclear potential. Our results indicate that in the absence of a magnetic field, the energy per particle is a symmetric function of the spin polarization parameter. This shows that for the nuclear matter, the spontaneous phase transition to a ferromagnetic state does not occur. However, we have found that for the magnetic fields $ B\\gtrsim 10 ^ {18}\\ G$, the symmetry of energy is broken and the energy has a minimum at a positive value of the spin polarization parameter. We have also found that the effect of magnetic field on the value of energy is more significant at the low densities. Our calculations show that at lower densities, the spin polarization parameter is more sensitive to the magnetic field.

  3. K-space reconstruction of magnetic resonance inverse imaging (K-InI) of human visuomotor systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MRI InI Visual MRI Neuroimaging K-InI Inverse solution MEG EEG Electroencephalography channels of a radio-frequency coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) can achieve ultra. Mathematically, the InI reconstruction is a generalization of parallel MRI (pMRI), which includes image space

  4. VFISV: Very Fast Inversion of the Stokes Vector for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrero, J M; Kubo, M; Socas-Navarro, H; Schou, J; Couvidat, S; Bogart, R

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe in detail the implementation and main properties of a new inversion code for the polarized radiative transfer equation (VFISV: Very Fast inversion of the Stokes vector). VFISV will routinely analyze pipeline data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on-board of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). It will provide full-disk maps (4096$\\times$4096 pixels) of the magnetic field vector on the Solar Photosphere every 10 minutes. For this reason VFISV is optimized to achieve an inversion speed that will allow it to invert 16 million pixels every 10 minutes with a modest number (approx. 50) of CPUs. Here we focus on describing a number of important details, simplifications and tweaks that have allowed us to significantly speed up the inversion process. We also give details on tests performed with data from the spectropolarimeter on-board of the Hinode spacecraft.

  5. Noise-Produced Patterns in Images Constructed from Magnetic Flux Leakage Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Levesley, Jeremy; Elkington, Peter; Bacciarelli, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic flux leakage measurements help identify the position, size and shape of corrosion-related defects in steel casings used to protect boreholes drilled into oil and gas reservoirs. Images constructed from magnetic flux leakage data contain patterns related to noise inherent in the method. We investigate the patterns and their scaling properties for the case of delta-correlated input noise, and consider the implications for the method's ability to resolve defects. The analytical evaluation of the noise-produced patterns is made possible by model reduction facilitated by large-scale approximation. With appropriate modification, the approach can be employed to analyze noise-produced patterns in other situations where the data of interest are not measured directly, but are related to the measured data by a complex linear transform involving integrations with respect to spatial coordinates.

  6. Simultaneous PET/fMRI for imaging neuroreceptor dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Christin Y. (Christin Yen-Ming)

    2014-01-01

    Whole-brain neuroimaging is a key technique for studying brain function and connectivity. Recent advances in combining two imaging modalities - magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) - into ...

  7. Calculation methods and detection techniques for electric and magnetic fields from power lines with measurement verification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander V

    1994-01-01

    An accurate determination and characterization of electric and magnetic fields produced by power lines is a complex task. Different models must be used for far fields and for near fields. This study is centered on computation and measurement aspects...

  8. Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2003-11-25

    A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the biological object in a main magnetic field and in a radio frequency field, the main magnetic field having a static field direction; rotating the biological object at a rotational frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. According to another embodiment, the radio frequency is pulsed to provide a sequence capable of producing a spectrum that is substantially free of spinning sideband peaks.

  9. Vector Magnetic Fields and Electric Currents from the Imaging Vector Magnetograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing Li; A. A. van Ballegooijen; Don Mickey

    2008-11-01

    First, we describe a general procedure to produce high quality vector magnetograms using the Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) at Mees Solar Observatory. At the spatial resolution 2"x2", the Stokes Q,U,V uncertainty reaches 0.001-0.0005 in time-averaged data over 1-hour in the quiet Sun. When vector magnetic fields are inferred from the time-averaged Stokes spectral images of FeI 6302.5A, the resulting uncertainties are on the order of 10 G for the longitudinal fields, 40 G for the transverse field strength and 9 degree for the magnetic azimuth. The magnetic field inversion used in this work is the "Triplet" code, which was developed and implemented in the IVM software package by the late Barry J. LaBonte. The inversion code is described in detail in the Appendix. Second, we solve for the absolute value of the vertical electric current density, |Jz|, accounting for the above IVM problems, for two different active regions. One is a single sunspot region (NOAA 10001 observed on 20 June 2002) while the other is a more complex, quadrupolar region (NOAA10030 observed on 15 July 2002). We use a calculation that does not require disambiguation of 180 degree in the transverse field directions. The |Jz| uncertainty is on the order of 7.0 mA m^-2. The vertical current density increases with increasing vertical magnetic field. The rate of increase is about 1 -2 times as large in the quadrupolar NOAA 10030 region as in the simple NOAA 10001, and it is more spatially variable over NOAA 10030 than over NOAA 10001.

  10. Advanced Penning-type ion source development and passive beam focusing techniques for an associated particle imaging neutron generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sy, Amy

    2013-01-01

    cusp magnetic field to the plasma confinement and resultantaxial magnetic field and the resultant magnetic confinementaxial magnetic field imposes a type of magnetic confinement

  11. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P. Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.

    2015-03-30

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in surface roughness.

  12. Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

    1994-04-01

    The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

  13. Phase-locking of magnetic islands diagnosed by ECE-imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tobias, B.; Grierson, B. A.; Muscatello, C. M.; Ren, X.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Zemedkun, S. E.; Munsat, T. L.; Classen, I. G. J.

    2014-08-13

    Millimeter-wave imaging diagnostics identify phase-locking and the satisfaction of 3-wave coupling selection criteria amongst multiple magnetic island chains by providing a localized, internal measurement of the 2D power spectral density, S(?, kpol). In high-confinement tokamak discharges, these interactions impact both plasma rotation and tearing stability. Nonlinear coupling amongst neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) of different n-number, with islands not satisfying the poloidal mode number selection criterion {m, m ', m - m ' }, contributes to a reduction in core rotation and flow shear in the vicinity of the modes.

  14. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to fluids in porous media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandava, Shanthi Sree

    1991-01-01

    and resolution of those saturations were developed with regards to the imaging method employed. The estimates so developed show that MRI can effectively monitor dynamic displacements for quantitative property estimation. An NMR spin-echo technique... in porous media was conducted with NMR Spectroscopy. A study of the effect of surrounding physical barriers on the diffusion of fluids in porous media was attempted. A Pulsed Gradient Spin-Echo sequence was developed to determine apparent self...

  15. Fielding the magnetically applied pressure-shear technique on the Z accelerator (completion report for MRT 4519).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, C. Scott; Haill, Thomas A.; Dalton, Devon Gardner; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Lamppa, Derek C.

    2013-09-01

    The recently developed Magnetically Applied Pressure-Shear (MAPS) experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms was fielded on August 16, 2013 on shot Z2544 utilizing hardware set A0283A. Several technical and engineering challenges were overcome in the process leading to the attempt to measure the dynamic strength of NNSA Ta at 50 GPa. The MAPS technique relies on the ability to apply an external magnetic field properly aligned and time correlated with the MHD pulse. The load design had to be modified to accommodate the external field coils and additional support was required to manage stresses from the pulsed magnets. Further, this represents the first time transverse velocity interferometry has been applied to diagnose a shot at Z. All subsystems performed well with only minor issues related to the new feed design which can be easily addressed by modifying the current pulse shape. Despite the success of each new component, the experiment failed to measure strength in the samples due to spallation failure, most likely in the diamond anvils. To address this issue, hydrocode simulations are being used to evaluate a modified design using LiF windows to minimize tension in the diamond and prevent spall. Another option to eliminate the diamond material from the experiment is also being investigated.

  16. Applications of Magnetic Resonance to Current Detection and Microscale Flow Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern-Manners, Nicholas Wm

    2011-01-01

    field and an oscillating magnetic field in the sample and,static and oscillating magnetic fields when consideringthe sample produce oscillating magnetic fields that can be

  17. Zero source insertion technique to account for undersampling in GPR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-02-25

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  18. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  19. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  20. Near to the Brain: Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Lightweight Brain Imaging Technique for Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Near to the Brain: Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy as a Lightweight Brain Imaging Technique conditions. The brain activity plot is the mean change in deoxygenated hemoglobin over 130 trials of each and position judgment tasks in pie charts and bar graphs. The brain activity plot is the mean chance

  1. A new technique for imaging Mineralized Fibrils on Bovine Trabecular Bone Fracture Surfaces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansma, Paul

    A new technique for imaging Mineralized Fibrils on Bovine Trabecular Bone Fracture Surfaces coated with extrafibrillar mineral particles. The mineral particles are distinctly different in different collagen fibrils. If the observed particles can be verified to be native extrafibrillar mineral, this could

  2. Novel Precipitated Zirconia-Based DGT Technique for High-Resolution Imaging of Oxyanions in Waters and Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Novel Precipitated Zirconia-Based DGT Technique for High- Resolution Imaging of Oxyanions in Waters binding layer was synthesized to meet these requirements by in situ precipitation of zirconia into a precast hydrogel. The particle diameter 0.2 m of zirconia in this precipitated gel was uniform

  3. Simulation of High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Images on the IBM Blue Gene/L Supercomputer Using SIMRI

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baum, K. G.; Menezes, G.; Helguera, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging system simulators are tools that provide a means to evaluate system architecture and create artificial image sets that are appropriate for specific applications. We have modified SIMRI, a Bloch equation-based magnetic resonance image simulator, in order to successfully generate high-resolution 3D MR images of the Montreal brain phantom using Blue Gene/L systems. Results show that redistribution of the workload allows an anatomically accurate 256 3 voxel spin-echo simulation in less than 5 hours when executed on an 8192-node partition of a Blue Gene/L system.

  4. A Comparison of Image Quality Evaluation Techniques for Transmission X-Ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolgert, Peter J; /Marquette U. /SLAC

    2012-08-31

    Beamline 6-2c at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is capable of Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) at 30 nm resolution. Raw images from the microscope must undergo extensive image processing before publication. Since typical data sets normally contain thousands of images, it is necessary to automate the image processing workflow as much as possible, particularly for the aligning and averaging of similar images. Currently we align images using the 'phase correlation' algorithm, which calculates the relative offset of two images by multiplying them in the frequency domain. For images containing high frequency noise, this algorithm will align noise with noise, resulting in a blurry average. To remedy this we multiply the images by a Gaussian function in the frequency domain, so that the algorithm ignores the high frequency noise while properly aligning the features of interest (FOI). The shape of the Gaussian is manually tuned by the user until the resulting average image is sharpest. To automatically optimize this process, it is necessary for the computer to evaluate the quality of the average image by quantifying its sharpness. In our research we explored two image sharpness metrics, the variance method and the frequency threshold method. The variance method uses the variance of the image as an indicator of sharpness while the frequency threshold method sums up the power in a specific frequency band. These metrics were tested on a variety of test images, containing both real and artificial noise. To apply these sharpness metrics, we designed and built a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) called 'Blur Master.' We found that it is possible for blurry images to have a large variance if they contain high amounts of noise. On the other hand, we found the frequency method to be quite reliable, although it is necessary to manually choose suitable limits for the frequency band. Further research must be performed to design an algorithm which automatically selects these parameters.

  5. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT.

  6. Evaluation of the Prostate Bed for Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy Using Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Pitroda, Sean P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Eggener, Scott E. [Department of Urology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Urology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Stadler, Walter M. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Pelizzari, Charles A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Vannier, Michael W.; Oto, Aytek [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of a 4-year period in which endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was considered for all men referred for salvage radiation therapy (RT) at a single academic center; to describe the incidence and location of locally recurrent disease in a contemporary cohort of men with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP), and to identify prognostic variables associated with MRI findings in order to define which patients may have the highest yield of the study. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 88 men without clinically palpable disease underwent eMRI for detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after RP. The median interval between RP and eMRI was 32 months (interquartile range, 14-57 months), and the median PSA level was 0.30 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.19-0.72 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging scans consisting of T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging were evaluated for features consistent with local recurrence. The prostate bed was scored from 0-4, whereby 0 was definitely normal, 1 probably normal, 2 indeterminate, 3 probably abnormal, and 4 definitely abnormal. Local recurrence was defined as having a score of 3-4. Results: Local recurrence was identified in 21 men (24%). Abnormalities were best appreciated on T2-weighted axial images (90%) as focal hypointense lesions. Recurrence locations were perianastomotic (67%) or retrovesical (33%). The only risk factor associated with local recurrence was PSA; recurrence was seen in 37% of men with PSA >0.3 ng/mL vs 13% if PSA {<=}0.3 ng/mL (P<.01). The median volume of recurrence was 0.26 cm{sup 3} and was directly associated with PSA (r=0.5, P=.02). The correlation between MRI-based tumor volume and PSA was even stronger in men with positive margins (r=0.8, P<.01). Conclusions: Endorectal MRI can define areas of local recurrence after RP in a minority of men without clinical evidence of disease, with yield related to PSA. Further study is necessary to determine whether eMRI can improve patient selection and success of salvage RT.

  7. Feasibility of VHE gamma ray detection by an array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes using the fluorescence technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contreras, J L; Arqueros, F; López, M; Barrio, J A; Nievas, M

    2015-01-01

    The last 20 years have seen the development of new techniques in Astroparticle Physics providing access to the highest end of the electromagnetic spectrum. It has been shown that some sources emit photons up to energies close to 100 TeV. Yet the fluxes of these photons are incredibly low and new detection techniques are needed to go higher in energy. A new technique that would use the new generation of Cherenkov Telescopes, i.e., the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), is proposed to push further the energy frontier. It is based on the detection of the fluorescence radiation emitted in extensive air showers, a successful method used in ultra-high-energy cosmic ray experiments, like the Pierre Auger Observatory. It would complement the standard imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique with only minor modifications of the hardware currently being developed for the CTA and would not imply significant extra costs during its planned operation.

  8. Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis using a slot scanning technique: Fixed-focus reconstruction and the resulting image quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibata, Koichi, E-mail: shibatak@suzuka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science 1001-1, Kishioka-cho, Suzuka 510-0293 (Japan); Notohara, Daisuke; Sakai, Takihito [R and D Department, Medical Systems Division, Shimadzu Corporation 1, Nishinokyo-Kuwabara-cho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis (PS-TS) is a novel technique that fuses the slot scanning technique and the conventional tomosynthesis (TS) technique. This approach allows one to obtain long-view tomosynthesis images in addition to normally sized tomosynthesis images, even when using a system that has no linear tomographic scanning function. The reconstruction technique and an evaluation of the resulting image quality for PS-TS are described in this paper. Methods: The PS-TS image-reconstruction technique consists of several steps (1) the projection images are divided into strips, (2) the strips are stitched together to construct images corresponding to the reconstruction plane, (3) the stitched images are filtered, and (4) the filtered stitched images are back-projected. In the case of PS-TS using the fixed-focus reconstruction method (PS-TS-F), one set of stitched images is used for the reconstruction planes at all heights, thus avoiding the necessity of repeating steps (1)–(3). A physical evaluation of the image quality of PS-TS-F compared with that of the conventional linear TS was performed using a R/F table (Sonialvision safire, Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto, Japan). The tomographic plane with the best theoretical spatial resolution (the in-focus plane, IFP) was set at a height of 100 mm from the table top by adjusting the reconstruction program. First, the spatial frequency response was evaluated at heights of ?100, ?50, 0, 50, 100, and 150 mm from the IFP using the edge of a 0.3-mm-thick copper plate. Second, the spatial resolution at each height was visually evaluated using an x-ray test pattern (Model No. 38, PTW Freiburg, Germany). Third, the slice sensitivity at each height was evaluated via the wire method using a 0.1-mm-diameter tungsten wire. Phantom studies using a knee phantom and a whole-body phantom were also performed. Results: The spatial frequency response of PS-TS-F yielded the best results at the IFP and degraded slightly as the distance from the IFP increased. A visual evaluation of the spatial resolution using the x-ray test pattern indicated that the resolution was 1.8 lp/mm at the IFP and 1.2 lp/mm at heights of ?100 and 100 mm from the IFP. The authors demonstrated that a spatial resolution of 1.2–1.8 lp/mm could be obtained within heights of 200 mm of the IFP. The slice sensitivity varied between 11.1 and 13.8 mm for heights between ?50 and 100 mm, and there was no critical change in the slice sensitivity within a height range of 150 mm around the IFP. The phantom results demonstrated that tomosynthesis and long-view images could be reconstructed. Conclusions: PS-TS-F provides tomosynthesis images while using low-cost systems that have no tomographic scanning function, such as tableside-controlled universal R/F systems or universal radiographic systems.

  9. WE-G-17A-08: Electron Gun Operation for in Line MRI-Linac Configurations: An Assessment of Beam Fidelity and Recovery Techniques for Different SIDs and Magnetic Field Strengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, B; Keall, P; Constantin, D; Holloway, L; Kolling, S; Oborn, B; Fahrig, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To test the functionality of medical electron guns within the fringe field of a purpose built superconducting MRI magnet, and to test different recovery techniques for a variety of imaging field strengths and SIDs. Methods: Three different electron guns were simulated using Finite Element Modelling; a standard diode gun, a standard triode gun, and a novel diode gun designed to operate within parallel magnetic fields. The approximate working regime of each gun was established by assessing exit current in constant magnetic fields of varying strength and defining ‘working’ as less than 10% change in injection current. Next, the 1.0T MRI magnet was simulated within Comsol Multiphysics. The coil currents in this model were also scaled to produce field strengths of .5, 1, 1.5 and 3T. Various magnetic shield configurations were simulated, varying the SID from 800 to 1300mm. The average magnetic field within the gun region was assessed together with the distortion in the imaging volume - greater than 150uT distortion was considered unacceptable. Results: The conventional guns functioned in fields of less than 7.5mT. Conversely, the redesigned diode required fields greater than .1T to function correctly. Magnetic shielding was feasible for SIDS of greater than 1000mm for field strengths of .5T and 1T, and 1100mm for 1.5 and 3.0T. Beyond these limits shielding resulted in unacceptable MRI distortion. In contrast, the redesigned diode could perform acceptably for SIDs of less than 812, 896, 931, and 974mm for imaging strengths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 3.0T. Conclusions: For in-line MRIlinac configurations where the electron gun is operating in low field regions, shielding is a straight forward option. However, as magnetic field strength increases and the SID is reduced, shielding results in too great a distortion in the MRI and redesigning the electron optics is the preferable solution. The authors would like to acknowledge funding from the National Health and Research Council (AUS), National Institute of Health (NIH), and Cancer Institute NSW.

  10. Spectroscopic ion beam imaging for investigations into magnetic field mapping of a plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the inference of the magnetic field (Bp and Bt) of a magnetically confined plasma from the curvature of a singly changes in magnetic field with time in almost any magnetic confinement device. II. PRINCIPLE OF LOCAL,3 As an HIBP's charged probing ions travel through a plasma, they are deflected by the confining magnetic field

  11. In vivo chlorine-35, sodium-23 and proton magnetic resonance imaging of the rat brain , M. Augath2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In vivo chlorine-35, sodium-23 and proton magnetic resonance imaging of the rat brain S. Kirsch1 of the cytoplasm and the volume of cells [1]. In order to investigate the feasibility of combined in vivo 35 Cl, 23 Na and 1 H MRI we developed a rf coil setup to measure 35 Cl, 23 Na and 1 H signals in one scanning

  12. Weighted simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levakhina, Y. M.; Mueller, J.; Buzug, T. M.; Duschka, R. L.; Vogt, F.; Barkhausen, J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a nonlinear weighting scheme into the backprojection operation within the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). It is designed for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features in order to reduce limited angle artifacts. Methods: The algorithm estimates which projections potentially produce artifacts in a voxel. The contribution of those projections into the updating term is reduced. In order to identify those projections automatically, a four-dimensional backprojected space representation is used. Weighting coefficients are calculated based on a dissimilarity measure, evaluated in this space. For each combination of an angular view direction and a voxel position an individual weighting coefficient for the updating term is calculated. Results: The feasibility of the proposed approach is shown based on reconstructions of the following real three-dimensional tomosynthesis datasets: a mammography quality phantom, an apple with metal needles, a dried finger bone in water, and a human hand. Datasets have been acquired with a Siemens Mammomat Inspiration tomosynthesis device and reconstructed using SART with and without suggested weighting. Out-of-focus artifacts are described using line profiles and measured using standard deviation (STD) in the plane and below the plane which contains artifact-causing features. Artifacts distribution in axial direction is measured using an artifact spread function (ASF). The volumes reconstructed with the weighting scheme demonstrate the reduction of out-of-focus artifacts, lower STD (meaning reduction of artifacts), and narrower ASF compared to nonweighted SART reconstruction. It is achieved successfully for different kinds of structures: point-like structures such as phantom features, long structures such as metal needles, and fine structures such as trabecular bone structures. Conclusions: Results indicate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm to reduce typical tomosynthesis artifacts produced by high-attenuation features. The proposed algorithm assigns weighting coefficients automatically and no segmentation or tissue-classification steps are required. The algorithm can be included into various iterative reconstruction algorithms with an additive updating strategy. It can also be extended to computed tomography case with the complete set of angular data.

  13. Identification of breast contour for nipple segmentation in breast magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwo, Chih-Ying [Department of Information Management, Chien Hsin University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Information Management, Chien Hsin University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Gwo, Allen [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Wei, Chia-Hung, E-mail: rogerwei@uch.edu.tw [Department of Information Management, Chien Hsin University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan and Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Information Management, Chien Hsin University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan and Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Huang, Pai Jung [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan and Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Informatics, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan and Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a method to simulate the breast contour and segment the nipple in breast magnetic resonance images. Methods: This study first identifies the chest wall and removes the chest part from the breast MR images. Subsequently, the cleavage and its motion artifacts are removed, distinguishing the separate breasts, where the edge points are sampled for curve fitting. Next, a region growing method is applied to find the potential nipple region. Finally, the potential nipple region above the simulated curve can be removed in order to retain the original smooth contour. Results: The simulation methods can achieve the least root mean square error (RMSE) for certain cases. The proposed YBnd and (Dmin+Dmax)/2 methods are significant due toP = 0.000. The breast contour curve detected by the two proposed methods is closer than that determined by the edge detection method. The (Dmin+Dmax)/2 method can achieve the lowest RMSE of 1.1029 on average, while the edge detection method results in the highest RMSE of 6.5655. This is only slighter better than the comparison methods, which implies that the performance of these methods depends upon the conditions of the cases themselves. Under this method, the maximal Dice coefficient is 0.881, and the centroid difference is 0.36 pixels. Conclusions: The contributions of this study are twofold. First, a method was proposed to identify and segment the nipple in breast MR images. Second, a curve-fitting method was used to simulate the breast contour, allowing the breast to retain its original smooth shape.

  14. How to Find More Supernovae with Less Work: Object Classification Techniques for Difference Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Stephen; Aragon, Cecilia; Romano, Raquel; Thomas, Rollin C.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Wong, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    How to Find More Supernovae with Less Work: Object Classi?methods: statistical — supernovae: general — techniques:for objects such as supernovae, active galactic nuclei,

  15. Capabilities and limitations of Phase Contrast Imaging techniques with X-rays and neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damato, Antonio Leonardo

    2009-01-01

    Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) was studied with the goal of understanding its relevance and its requirements. Current literature does not provide insight on the effect of a relaxation in coherence requirements on the PCI ...

  16. Magnetic States in Fe Nanoparticles Imaged by Off-axis Electron Holography Luise Theil Kuhn1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    a procedure that is described elsewhere [1]. In FIG. 1 (d), a magnetic vortex surrounds a flux tube that runs.e. their magnetic configurations may be vortex-like. The critical size for this transition from single domain to vortex behaviour is crucial for determining the net magnetic moments carried by magnetic nanoparticles, i

  17. The feasibility of Quadrupole Dip Imaging with PMRI: focus on multiple sclerosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeter, Edward Hilton

    2013-02-22

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) techniques provide valuable information for the diagnosis, monitoring, treatment, and study of many diseases. However, limitations on the sensitivity and specificity warrant the development of new imaging techniques...

  18. Electrical, optical and magnetic investigations on LiNiPO{sub 4} based olivines synthesized by solution combustion technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayan, Lakshmi [St. Aloysius College, Edathua, Alappuzha (District), Kerala 689573 (India); Cheruku, Rajesh [Department of Physics, School of Physical, Chemical and Applied Sciences, Pondicherry University, R.V. Nagar, Kalapet, Pondicherry 605 014 (India); Govindaraj, G., E-mail: ggraj_7@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, School of Physical, Chemical and Applied Sciences, Pondicherry University, R.V. Nagar, Kalapet, Pondicherry 605 014 (India)

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Solution combustion technique and preparation of nanocrystalline olivine materials. • Olivine type LiNiPO{sub 4} based nanocrystalline materials and characterization. • AC electrical studies on olivine type LiNi{sub 1?x}M{sub x}PO{sub 4}(M = Cu{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+})based materials. • Enhancement of ionic conductivity in the nanocrystalline phase of LiNiPO{sub 4} material. - Abstract: Citric acid assisted solution combustion technique is explored for synthesis of supervalent Cu{sup 2+}/Mg{sup 2+} ion doped LiNiPO{sub 4} system. XRD, FT-IR and microscopy studies confirmed the formation of a well crystallized material at low concentration of dopants. Ionic conductivity increases for lower concentrations of dopants due to the increased channel size for Li{sup +} diffusion. Owing to inherent anti-site defects, ionic conductivity decreases with increase of dopant concentration. Magnetic studies are explored for confirmation of antiferromagnetic nature of ions. Wagner polarization method is used to elucidate the negligible contribution of electrons to total conductivity.

  19. A novel technique for injecting and extracting beams in a circular hadron accelerator without using septum magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)395725

    2015-01-01

    With a few exceptions, all on-axis injection and extraction schemes implemented in circular particle accelerators, synchrotrons, and storage rings, make use of magnetic and electrostatic septa with systems of slow-pulsing dipoles acting on tens of thousands of turns and fast-pulsing dipoles on just a few. The dipoles create a closed orbit deformation around the septa, usually referred to as an orbit bump. A new approach is presented which obviates the need for the septum deflectors. Fastpulsing elements are still required, but their strength can be minimized by choosing appropriate local accelerator optics. This technique should increase the beam clearance and reduce the usually high radiation levels found around the septa and also reduce the machine impedance introduced by the fast-pulsing dipoles. The basis of the technique is the creation of stable islands around stable fixed points in horizontal phase space. The trajectories of these islands may then be adjusted to match the position and angle of the inco...

  20. Resolving the Impact of Biological Processes on Water Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media Through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Micro-Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, Joseph D.

    2005-06-01

    The magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) work at Montana State University has extended the imaging of a single biofilm in a 1 mm capillary reactor to correlate T2 magnetic relaxation maps displaying biofilm structure with the corresponding velocity patterns in three dimensions in a Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm fouled square capillary. A square duct geometry is chosen to provide correlation with existing experiments and simulations, as research bioreactors tend to be of square or rectangular cross section for optical or microelectrode access. The spatially resolved velocity data provide details on the impact of biofilm induced advection on mass transport from the bulk fluid to the biofilm and through the capillary bioreactor.

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation of Pore-Scale Flow in a Bead Pack: Comparison with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Vogt, Sarah J.; Codd, Sarah L.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Mckinley, Matthew I.

    2013-04-01

    A significant body of current research is aimed at developing methods for numerical simulation of flow and transport in porous media that explicitly resolve complex pore and solid geometries, and at utilizing such models to study the relationships between fundamental pore-scale processes and macroscopic manifestations at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. A number of different numerical methods for pore-scale simulation have been developed, and have been extensively tested and validated for simplified geometries. However, validation of pore-scale simulations of fluid velocity for complex, three-dimensional (3D) pore geometries that are representative of natural porous media is challenging due to our limited ability to measure pore-scale velocity in such systems. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offer the opportunity to measure not only the pore geometry, but also local fluid velocities under steady-state flow conditions in 3D and with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we present a 3D velocity field measured at sub-pore resolution (tens of micrometers) over a centimeter-scale 3D domain using MRI methods. We have utilized the measured pore geometry to perform 3D simulations of Navier-Stokes flow over the same domain using direct numerical simulation techniques. We present a comparison of the numerical simulation results with the measured velocity field. It is shown that the numerical results match the observed velocity patterns well overall except for a variance and small systematic scaling which can be attributed to the known experimental error in the MRI measurements. The comparisons presented here provide strong validation of the pore-scale simulation methods and new insights for interpretation of uncertainty in MRI measurements of pore-scale velocity. This study also provides a potential benchmark for future comparison of other pore-scale simulation methods.

  2. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Yue; Wang Hesheng; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pan, Charlie; Hussain, Hero; Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which could aid in individualizing therapy, particularly for patients at risk for liver injury after RT.

  3. Evaluation of Angiographic and Technical Aspects of Carotid Stenting with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasel, Stella, E-mail: Stella.Blasel@kgu.de; Hattingen, Elke; Berkefeld, Joachim; Kurre, Wiebke [University of Frankfurt, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Morawe, Gerald [University of Frankfurt, Department of Biomathematics (Germany); Zanella, Friedhelm; Rochemont, Richard Du Mesnil de [University of Frankfurt, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    The detection of clinically silent ischemic lesions on postprocedural diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images has become a preferred method for the description of embolic risks. The purpose of this single-center study was to evaluate whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) could determine material related or technical risk factors of filter-protected carotid stenting. Eighty-four patients with symptomatic severe ({>=}60%) carotid artery stenoses received filter-protected carotid stenting. Standard DWI (b = 1000) was performed within 48 h before and after carotid stenting. The occurrence and load of new postinterventional DWI lesions were assessed. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors associated with DWI lesions, with emphasis on technical factors such as use of different access devices (guiding catheter method vs. long carotid sheath method), type of stent (open-cell nitinol stent vs. closed-cell Wallstent), and protective device (filters with 80-{mu}m vs. 110-120-{mu}m pore size). Markers for generalized atherosclerosis and for degree and site of stenosis were assessed to allow comparison of adequate risk profiles. Access, protective device, and stent type were not significantly associated with new embolic DWI lesions when we compared patients with equivalent risk profiles (long carotid sheath method 48% [11 of 23] vs. guiding catheter method 44% [27 of 61], Wallstent 47% [15 of 32] vs. nitinol stent 44% [23 of 52], and small pore size filter 61% [11 of 18] vs. large pore size filter 41% [27 of 66]). Single-center DWI studies with a moderate number of cases are inadequate for proper assessment of the embolic risk of technical- or material-related risk factors in carotid stenting. Larger multicenter studies with more cases are needed.

  4. SOLAR ACTIVITY DETECTION AND PREDICTION USING IMAGE PROCESSING AND MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT SOLAR ACTIVITY DETECTION AND PREDICTION USING IMAGE PROCESSING AND MACHINE LEARNING for automatic detection and prediction of solar activities, including prominence eruptions, emerging flux. These methods can be used for automatic observation of solar activities and prediction of space weather that may

  5. Development of Automatic Techniques for Segmentation of Brain Tissues fromMultispectral MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by radiofrequency inhomogeneity acrossfield-of-view; (2) strip- ping away image pixels which represent skull. 0-7803-2544-3195 $4.00 0 1995 IEEE 1453 matters, in addition to low radiation and multispectral is extended to investigate the automation of (a) correc- tion for radiofrequency (RF)inhomogeneity across

  6. Image-guided surgical techniques for cartilage repair an animal trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, James

    guided method Template guided method and the Conventional method #12;Computer planning for CAMA 1. Scan-guided CAMA Separate templates are used for harvesting, drilling, and delivery. #12;Animal Study 15 sheep randomized into three groups: conventional, image-guided, and template-guided At 0 months: Take a CT

  7. 3D MULTIPLE CRACK SYSTEM: EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS USING MOTION-BASED IMAGE PROCESSING TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, George

    , including the number of cracks, surface area, volume, tortuosity, and permeability. Keywords: X-ray microtomography, image processing, concrete fracture. INTRODUCTION We examine the crack surfaces of concrete the fracture behavior of concrete, they have been ignored because "understanding of this problem

  8. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Sears, Jr., Jesse A. (Kennewick, WA); Hoyt, David W. (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA)

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  9. Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-01-24

    The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

  10. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Wong, C. Shun; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Princeton, UofV, and UNH | U.S...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    supported by: NIH, NASA Impactbenefit to spin-off field: Static & dynamic imaging of lungs, heart, and possibly the brain, possible imaging of astronauts 'Hyperpolarized gas...

  12. Rf coil design for multi-frequency magnetic resonance imaging & spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabirzadeh, Arash

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is known as a valuable diagnostic tool for physicians as well as a research tool for biochemists. In addition to hydrogen (which is the most abundant atom with nuclear magnetic resonance capability), other species...

  13. Images of gravitational and magnetic phenomena derived from two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography of interacting binary stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Cocking, Alexander S.; Fisher, John G.; Conover, Marshall J., E-mail: mrichards@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: asc5097@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-11-10

    We have used two-dimensional back-projection Doppler tomography as a tool to examine the influence of gravitational and magnetic phenomena in interacting binaries that undergo mass transfer from a magnetically active star onto a non-magnetic main-sequence star. This multitiered study of over 1300 time-resolved spectra of 13 Algol binaries involved calculations of the predicted dynamical behavior of the gravitational flow and the dynamics at the impact site, analysis of the velocity images constructed from tomography, and the influence on the tomograms of orbital inclination, systemic velocity, orbital coverage, and shadowing. The H? tomograms revealed eight sources: chromospheric emission, a gas stream along the gravitational trajectory, a star-stream impact region, a bulge of absorption or emission around the mass-gaining star, a Keplerian accretion disk, an absorption zone associated with hotter gas, a disk-stream impact region, and a hot spot where the stream strikes the edge of a disk. We described several methods used to extract the physical properties of the emission sources directly from the velocity images, including S-wave analysis, the creation of simulated velocity tomograms from hydrodynamic simulations, and the use of synthetic spectra with tomography to sequentially extract the separate sources of emission from the velocity image. In summary, the tomography images have revealed results that cannot be explained solely by gravitational effects: chromospheric emission moving with the mass-losing star, a gas stream deflected from the gravitational trajectory, and alternating behavior between stream state and disk state. Our results demonstrate that magnetic effects cannot be ignored in these interacting binaries.

  14. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, L. Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2014-11-15

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (?1 ?s) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ?0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  15. Effect of Boundary Conditions on Performance of Poroelastographic Imaging Techniques in Non Homogenous Poroelastic Media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Anuj

    2012-02-14

    NOMENCLATURE SR Stress Relaxation AS Axial Strain PR Poisson?s Ratio TC Time Constant EPR Effective Poisson?s Ratio CNRe Axial Strain Elastogram Contrast to Noise Ratio PCNRe Effective Poisson?s Ratio Elastogram Contrast to Noise Ratio CTE Contrast... Page 15 Time-sequenced EPR images for +40db permeability contrast between inclusion and background ............................................................ 3 6 16 PCNRe plot for SR (red) and creep (blue...

  16. Evaluating imaging biomarkers for neurodegeneration in pre-symptomatic Huntington's disease using machine learning techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aron, Adam

    data, we applied multivariate pattern analysis techniques to several derived voxel-based and segmented e, a Department of Neuroscience, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA b of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA d Department of Psychology, University

  17. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael (Brooktondale, NY) [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  18. Differences in span task performance recorded in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) simulator compared to a standard laboratory condition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harcourt-Brown, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Forty-eight participants completed a working memory span task in a functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) simulator and laboratory. Differences in performance between the two conditions were investigated. The trends in the ...

  19. High-resolution imaging of hypervelocity metal jets using advanced high-speed photographic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, L.L.; Muelder, S.A.

    1995-08-29

    It is now possible to obtain high resolution sequential photographs of the initial formation and evolution of hypervelocity metal jets formed by shaped charge devices fired in air. Researchers have been frustrated by the high velocity of the jet material and the luminous sheath of hot gases cloaking the jet that made detailed observation of the jet body extremely difficult. The camera system that provides the photographs is a large format multi-frame electro-optic camera, referred to as an IC camera (IC stands for image converter), that utilizes electro-optic shuttering, monochromatic pulsed laser illumination and bandpass filtering to provide sequential pictures (in 3D if desired) with minimal degradation due to luminous air shocks or motion blur. The large format (75mm image plane), short exposure (15 ns minimum), ruby laser illumination and bandpass filtering (monochromatic illumination while excluding extraneous light) produces clear, sharp, images of the detailed surface structure of a metal shaped charge jet during early jet formation, elongation of the jet body, jet tip evolution and subsequent particulation (breakup) of the jet body. By utilizing the new camera system in conjunction with the more traditional rotating mirror high speed cameras, pulsed radiography, and electrical sensors, a maximum amount of, often unique, data can be extracted from a single experiment. This paper was intended primarily as an oral presentation. For purposes of continuity and simplicity in these proceedings, the authors have chosen to concentrate on the development of the IC camera system and its impact on the photography of high speed shaped chargejets.

  20. Multiparticle imaging technique for two-phase fluid flows using pulsed laser speckle velocimetry. Final report, September 1988--November 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The practical use of Pulsed Laser Velocimetry (PLV) requires the use of fast, reliable computer-based methods for tracking numerous particles suspended in a fluid flow. Two methods for performing tracking are presented. One method tracks a particle through multiple sequential images (minimum of four required) by prediction and verification of particle displacement and direction. The other method, requiring only two sequential images uses a dynamic, binary, spatial, cross-correlation technique. The algorithms are tested on computer-generated synthetic data and experimental data which was obtained with traditional PLV methods. This allowed error analysis and testing of the algorithms on real engineering flows. A novel method is proposed which eliminates tedious, undersirable, manual, operator assistance in removing erroneous vectors. This method uses an iterative process involving an interpolated field produced from the most reliable vectors. Methods are developed to allow fast analysis and presentation of sets of PLV image data. Experimental investigation of a two-phase, horizontal, stratified, flow regime was performed to determine the interface drag force, and correspondingly, the drag coefficient. A horizontal, stratified flow test facility using water and air was constructed to allow interface shear measurements with PLV techniques. The experimentally obtained local drag measurements were compared with theoretical results given by conventional interfacial drag theory. Close agreement was shown when local conditions near the interface were similar to space-averaged conditions. However, theory based on macroscopic, space-averaged flow behavior was shown to give incorrect results if the local gas velocity near the interface as unstable, transient, and dissimilar from the average gas velocity through the test facility.

  1. Final Report on Development of Optimized Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Formation Techniques for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Alan

    2013-11-01

    The University of New Mexico (UNM) proposed a collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop and test methods for improved formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas relevant to magnetized target fusion (MTF) energy research. MTF is an innovative approach for a relatively fast and cheap path to the production of fusion energy that utilizes magnetic confinement to assist in the compression of a hot plasma to thermonuclear conditions by an external driver. LANL is currently pursing demonstration of the MTF concept via compression of an FRC plasma by a metal liner z-pinch in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM. A key physics issue for the FRC's ultimate success as an MTF target lies in the initial pre-ionization (PI) stage. The PI plasma sets the initial conditions from which the FRC is created. In particular, the PI formation process determines the amount of magnetic flux that can be trapped to form the FRC. A ringing theta pinch ionization (RTPI) technique, such as currently used by the FRX-L device at LANL, has the advantages of high ionization fraction, simplicity (since no additional coils are required), and does not require internal electrodes which can introduce impurities into the plasma. However RTPI has been shown to only trap #24;50% of the initial bias flux at best and imposes additional engineering constraints on the capacitor banks. The amount of trapped flux plays an important role in the FRC's final equilibrium, transport, and stability properties, and provides increased ohmic heating of the FRC through induced currents as the magnetic field decays. Increasing the trapped flux also provides the route to greatest potential gains in FRC lifetime, which is essential to provide enough time to translate and compress the FRC effectively. In conjunction with LANL we initially planned to develop and test a microwave break- down system to improve the initial PI plasma formation. The UNM team would design the microwave optics and oversee the fabrication and assembly of all components and assist with integration into the FRX-L machine control system. LANL would provide a preexisting 65 kW X-band microwave source and some associated waveguide hardware. Once constructed and installed, UNM would take the lead in operating the microwave breakdown system and conducting studies to optimize its use in FRC PI formation in close cooperation with the needs of the LANL MTF team. In conjunction with our LANL collaborators, we decided after starting the project to switch from a microwave plasma breakdown approach to a plasma gun technology to use for enhanced plasma formation in the FRX-L field-reversed configuration experiment at LANL. Plasma guns would be able to provide significantly higher density plasma with greater control over its distribution in time and space within the experiment. This would allow greater control and #12;ne-tuning of the PI plasma formed in the experiment. Multiple plasma guns would be employed to fill a Pyrex glass test chamber (built at UNM) with plasma which would then be characterized and optimized for the MTF effort.

  2. Advanced Penning-type ion source development and passive beam focusing techniques for an associated particle imaging neutron generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sy, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Compact Permanent Magnet Microwave-Driven Neutron Generator.generator. The planned replacement of this electromagnet with a permanent-magnet

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fukushima, Eiichi (Los Alamos, NM); Roeder, Stephen B. W. (La Mesa, CA); Assink, Roger A. (Albuquerque, NM); Gibson, Atholl A. V. (Bryan, TX)

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  4. HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollub, Randy L.

    Provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. Provides in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for ...

  5. Manipulation of the magnetic state of a small ferromagnetic particle by means of nonlocal spin-injection techniques ,,invited...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otani, Yoshichika

    at the cross so that, un- like the direct spin-injection device Fig.1 b , only the spin current can reachManipulation of the magnetic state of a small ferromagnetic particle by means of nonlocal spin-injection is used for spin current injection into a nanoscale ferromagnetic particle to reverse its magnetization

  6. Design and Simulation of Coils for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rispoli, Joseph V

    2015-06-05

    The growing availability of high-field magnetic resonance (MR) scanners has reignited interest in the in vivo investigation of metabolics in the body. In particular, multinuclear MR spectroscopy (MRS) data reveal physiological details inaccessible...

  7. Design and Simulation of Coils for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rispoli, Joseph V

    2015-06-05

    radiative losses and becomes increasingly compelling at higher fields (38). Adriany et al. characterized the performance of a variety of 7T surface coils with conventional shielding, reporting appreciable benefits over unshielded versions... Alternating current ACR American College of Radiology AP Anterior–posterior AWG American wire gauge B0 Static magnetic flux density B1 RF magnetic flux density B1 - Circularly-polarized receive B1 B1 + Circularly-polarized transmit B1 B2 Proton...

  8. Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging using deuterum as a contrast agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kehayias, Joseph J. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Joel, Darrel D. (Setauket, NY); Adams, William H. (Eastport, NY); Stein, Harry L. (Glen Head, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D.sub.2 O in a solution with water.

  9. Nanoscale magnetic field mapping with a single spin scanning probe magnetometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondin, L.; Tetienne, J.-P.; Spinicelli, P.; Roch, J.-F.; Jacques, V.; Dal Savio, C.; Karrai, K.; Dantelle, G.; Thiaville, A.; Rohart, S.

    2012-04-09

    We demonstrate quantitative magnetic field mapping with nanoscale resolution, by applying a lock-in technique on the electron spin resonance frequency of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect placed at the apex of an atomic force microscope tip. In addition, we report an all-optical magnetic imaging technique which is sensitive to large off-axis magnetic fields, thus extending the operation range of diamond-based magnetometry. Both techniques are illustrated by using a magnetic hard disk as a test sample. Owing to the non-perturbing and quantitative nature of the magnetic probe, this work should open up numerous perspectives in nanomagnetism and spintronics.

  10. Real time image integrator for magnetic surface mapping experiments in TJ-I U torsatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin, J.; Carballo, I.; Olmos, P.; Ascasibar, E.; Pastor, I.; Qin, J.; Herranz, J.; Fraguas, A.L. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)] [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-02-01

    The authors describe in this paper a video integrator system developed for mapping the magnetic surfaces inside the TJ-I U torsatron built at CIEMAT and devoted to fusion plasma studies. A description of the video integrator hardware as well as some of the results carried out with the system are also presented and discussed.

  11. Pulsed Gradient Spin Echo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Diffusion in Granular Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, Joseph D.; Caprihan, Arvind; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Fukushima, Eiichi

    2000-01-10

    We derive the formalism to obtain spatial distributions of collisional correlation times for macroscopic particles undergoing granular flow from pulsed gradient spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion data. This is demonstrated with an example of axial motion in the shear flow regime of a 3D granular flow in a horizontal rotating cylinder at one rotation rate. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  12. Hybrid tomography for conductivity imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Widlak; O. Scherzer

    2012-03-20

    Hybrid imaging techniques utilize couplings of physical modalities -- they are called hybrid, because, typically, the excitation and measurement quantities belong to different modalities. Recently there has been an enormous research interest in this area because these methods promise very high resolution. In this paper we give a review on hybrid tomography methods for \\emph{electrical conductivity} imaging. The reviewed imaging methods utilize couplings between electric, magnetic and ultrasound modalities. By this it is possible to perform high-resolution electrical impedance imaging and to overcome the low-resolution problem of electric impedance tomography.

  13. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largestX-Ray ImagingImaging

  14. Film vs. magnetic tape recording for IRLS AN/AAD-5 for open skies imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, V.; Saatzer, P.; Goede, W.

    1996-11-01

    The United States Government (USG) Full Operational Capability (FOC) Open Skies aircraft (OC-135) will be equipped with an Infrared Line Scanner AN/AAD-5, fully compliant with the treaty requirements. An extensive trade study is conducted to explore the possibility of switching from film recording to either analog or digital magnetic tape recording when the AAD-5 IRLS is flown in the Open Skies Aircraft. This paper presents preliminary trade study results and the overall conclusions and recommendations based on the analysis. A flight measurement program is now being carried out under the Follow On Sensor Evaluation Program (FOSEP) to evaluate the digital magnetic recording as compared to the film recording and the results of these fight measurement will be presented at a later date. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  16. A 16-Channel Receive Array Insert for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast at 7T 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    By, Samantha

    2014-04-01

    , this will enable the ability to acquire images with higher resolution than could be achieved at 3T or 1.5T in clinically standard scan times. This has the potential to improve the morphological characterization of tumors and their involvement in the surrounding...

  17. Development of a 0.014-inch Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guidewire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalar, Ergin

    . The conductors were made of superelastic, nonmagnetic, biocompatible mate- rials, Nitinol or MP35N. Then, such as balloon angioplasty and stent placement (4). Currently, the MR imaging-guidewire is made of Nitinol, 0 can construct a 0.014-inch MRIG with superelastic materials, such as Nitinol and MP35N, similar

  18. Classification System for Identifying Women at Risk for Altered Partial Breast Irradiation Recommendations After Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalchik, Kristin V.; Vallow, Laura A.; McDonough, Michelle; Thomas, Colleen S.; Heckman, Michael G.; Peterson, Jennifer L.; Adkisson, Cameron D.; Serago, Christopher; McLaughlin, Sarah A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To study the utility of preoperative breast MRI for partial breast irradiation (PBI) patient selection, using multivariable analysis of significant risk factors to create a classification rule. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2009, 712 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent preoperative bilateral breast MRI at Mayo Clinic Florida. Of this cohort, 566 were retrospectively deemed eligible for PBI according to the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39 inclusion criteria using physical examination, mammogram, and/or ultrasound. Magnetic resonance images were then reviewed to determine their impact on patient eligibility. The patient and tumor characteristics were evaluated to determine risk factors for altered PBI eligibility after MRI and to create a classification rule. Results: Of the 566 patients initially eligible for PBI, 141 (25%) were found ineligible because of pathologically proven MRI findings. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional ipsilateral breast cancer in 118 (21%). Of these, 62 (11%) had more extensive disease than originally noted before MRI, and 64 (11%) had multicentric disease. Contralateral breast cancer was detected in 28 (5%). Four characteristics were found to be significantly associated with PBI ineligibility after MRI on multivariable analysis: premenopausal status (P=.021), detection by palpation (P<.001), first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer (P=.033), and lobular histology (P=.002). Risk factors were assigned a score of 0-2. The risk of altered PBI eligibility from MRI based on number of risk factors was 0:18%; 1:22%; 2:42%; 3:65%. Conclusions: Preoperative bilateral breast MRI altered the PBI recommendations for 25% of women. Women who may undergo PBI should be considered for breast MRI, especially those with lobular histology or with 2 or more of the following risk factors: premenopausal, detection by palpation, and first-degree relative with a history of breast cancer.

  19. Breast density quantification using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with bias field correction: A postmortem study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Huanjun; Johnson, Travis; Lin, Muqing; Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Su, Min-Ying; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Quantification of breast density based on three-dimensional breast MRI may provide useful information for the early detection of breast cancer. However, the field inhomogeneity can severely challenge the computerized image segmentation process. In this work, the effect of the bias field in breast density quantification has been investigated with a postmortem study. Methods: T1-weighted images of 20 pairs of postmortem breasts were acquired on a 1.5 T breast MRI scanner. Two computer-assisted algorithms were used to quantify the volumetric breast density. First, standard fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering was used on raw images with the bias field present. Then, the coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) method estimated and corrected the bias field during the iterative tissue segmentation process. Finally, FCM clustering was performed on the bias-field-corrected images produced by CLIC method. The left–right correlation for breasts in the same pair was studied for both segmentation algorithms to evaluate the precision of the tissue classification. Finally, the breast densities measured with the three methods were compared to the gold standard tissue compositions obtained from chemical analysis. The linear correlation coefficient, Pearson'sr, was used to evaluate the two image segmentation algorithms and the effect of bias field. Results: The CLIC method successfully corrected the intensity inhomogeneity induced by the bias field. In left–right comparisons, the CLIC method significantly improved the slope and the correlation coefficient of the linear fitting for the glandular volume estimation. The left–right breast density correlation was also increased from 0.93 to 0.98. When compared with the percent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis, results after bias field correction from both the CLIC the FCM algorithms showed improved linear correlation. As a result, the Pearson'sr increased from 0.86 to 0.92 with the bias field correction. Conclusions: The investigated CLIC method significantly increased the precision and accuracy of breast density quantification using breast MRI images by effectively correcting the bias field. It is expected that a fully automated computerized algorithm for breast density quantification may have great potential in clinical MRI applications.

  20. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 131 (2012) Printed 27 June 2012 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) Stokes IQUV Magnetic Doppler Imaging of Ap stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    IQUV Magnetic Doppler Imaging of Ap stars I. ESPaDOnS and NARVAL Observations J. Silvester1,2 , G, corresponding to 297 individual polarised spectra, have been obtained for 7 bright Ap stars using the ESPa generation of surface maps of Ap stars, this study estab- lishes the performance and stability of the ESPa

  1. An analysis of the PERL Magnetic Resonance Imaging theory and implementation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kremkus, Mark Christian

    2013-02-22

    . . Expenmentation. 27 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION . 29 CONCLUSIONS . REFERENCES. APPENDIX A ? FUNDAMENTALS OF MRI . . 32 33 Resolut&on and F&eld of Viev . Contrast Rad&t&-frequencf Coils. Cirad&ent Coils . . 41 . . 42 . . . 44 . . 43 APPENDIX B - BURST... Coil Lavout 14 F&sure 3 2 Field along x &n lmag&ng Re ion for N 15 F&gure 3. 3 F&eld ulon . r in Imagmg Reg&on fi&r &V=6 . . Figure 3 4 I icld along i. &n Imaging Reg&on for N= J(&0 Figure 3 5 I'ield Strength vs. L Figure 3 6 Fiekl Pattern Along x...

  2. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largestX-Ray Imaging

  3. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largestX-RayX-Ray Imaging of

  4. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-Ray Imaging

  5. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-Ray ImagingX-Ray

  6. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-RayX-Ray Imaging

  7. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic

  8. Lensless x-ray imaging in reflection geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, S.; Parks, D.H.; Seu, K.A.; Turner, J.J.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.H.; Cabrini, S.; Kevan, S.D.; Su, R.

    2011-02-03

    Lensless X-ray imaging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography, and Fourier transform holography can provide time-resolved, diffraction-limited images. Nearly all examples of these techniques have focused on transmission geometry, restricting the samples and reciprocal spaces that can be investigated. We report a lensless X-ray technique developed for imaging in Bragg and small-angle scattering geometries, which may also find application in transmission geometries. We demonstrate this by imaging a nanofabricated pseudorandom binary structure in small-angle reflection geometry. The technique can be used with extended objects, places no restriction on sample size, and requires no additional sample masking. The realization of X-ray lensless imaging in reflection geometry opens up the possibility of single-shot imaging of surfaces in thin films, buried interfaces in magnetic multilayers, organic photovoltaic and field-effect transistor devices, or Bragg planes in a single crystal.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF PIV TECHNIQUE UNDER MAGNETIC FIELDS AND MEASUREMENT OF TURBULENT PIPE FLOW OF FLIBE SIMULANT FLUID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    reports a development of unique experimental techniques using aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide commercial nuclear fusion reactor.1 The main functions of the blankets for D-T fusion reactors are to breed shielding. An essential idea of a liquid breeder concept is that if a liquid containing lithium can

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. XX, NO. X, MONTH 2009 1 Machine Learning Techniques for the Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, James P.

    ) technique is commonly used for non-destructive testing of oil and gas pipelines. This testing involves- tion, non-destructive testing, regression, support vector machines, partial least squares, kernelization. I. INTRODUCTION THIS paper addresses the problem of automated non-destructive testing

  11. Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

  12. A Prospective Study of the Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Determining Candidacy for Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorn, Paige L.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Haq, Farah; Goldberg, Mira; Abe, Hiroyuki; Hasan, Yasmin; Chmura, Steven J.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Retrospective data have demonstrated that breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may change a patient's eligibility for partial breast irradiation (PBI) by identifying multicentric, multifocal, or contralateral disease. The objective of the current study was to prospectively determine the frequency with which MRI identifies occult disease and to establish clinical factors associated with a higher likelihood of MRI prompting changes in PBI eligibility. Methods and Materials: At The University of Chicago, women with breast cancer uniformly undergo MRI in addition to mammography and ultrasonography. From June 2009 through May 2011, all patients were screened prospectively in a multidisciplinary conference for PBI eligibility based on standard imaging, and the impact of MRI on PBI eligibility according to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0413 entry criteria was recorded. Univariable analysis was performed using clinical characteristics in both the prospective cohort and in a separate cohort of retrospectively identified patients. Pooled analysis was used to derive a scoring index predictive of the risk that MRI would identify additional disease. Results: A total of 521 patients were screened for PBI eligibility, and 124 (23.8%) patients were deemed eligible for PBI based on standard imaging. MRI findings changed PBI eligibility in 12.9% of patients. In the pooled univariable analysis, tumor size ?2 cm on mammography or ultrasonography (P=.02), age <50 years (P=.01), invasive lobular histology (P=.01), and HER-2/neu amplification (P=.01) were associated with a higher likelihood of MRI changing PBI eligibility. A predictive score was generated by summing the number of significant risk factors. Patients with a score of 0, 1, 2, and 3 had changes to eligibility based on MRI findings in 2.8%, 13.2%, 38.1%, and 100%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: MRI identified additional disease in a significant number of patients eligible for PBI, based on standard imaging. Clinical characteristics may be useful in directing implementation of MRI in the staging of PBI candidates.

  13. Difference between healthy children and ADHD based on wavelet spectral analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    González Gómez Dulce, I. E-mail: emoreno@fcfm.buap.mx E-mail: joserm84@gmail.com; Moreno Barbosa, E. E-mail: emoreno@fcfm.buap.mx E-mail: joserm84@gmail.com; Hernández, Mario Iván Martínez E-mail: emoreno@fcfm.buap.mx E-mail: joserm84@gmail.com; Méndez, José Ramos E-mail: emoreno@fcfm.buap.mx E-mail: joserm84@gmail.com; Silvia, Hidalgo Tobón; Pilar, Dies Suarez E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx; Eduardo, Barragán Pérez E-mail: neurodoc@prodigy.net.mx; Benito, De Celis Alonso

    2014-11-07

    The main goal of this project was to create a computer algorithm based on wavelet analysis of region of homogeneity images obtained during resting state studies. Ideally it would automatically diagnose ADHD. Because the cerebellum is an area known to be affected by ADHD, this study specifically analysed this region. Male right handed volunteers (infants with ages between 7 and 11 years old) were studied and compared with age matched controls. Statistical differences between the values of the absolute integrated wavelet spectrum were found and showed significant differences (p<0.0015) between groups. This difference might help in the future to distinguish healthy from ADHD patients and therefore diagnose ADHD. Even if results were statistically significant, the small size of the sample limits the applicability of this methods as it is presented here, and further work with larger samples and using freely available datasets must be done.

  14. Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucourt, Maximilian de, E-mail: mdb@charite.de; Streitparth, Florian, E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Collettini, Federico [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Guettler, Felix [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Teichgraeber, U. K. [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

  15. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Changlian [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden) [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Jianfeng [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden) [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Department of Physiology, Henan Traditional Medical University (China); Li, Qian; Huang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Hongfu [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden) [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Kuhn, Hans-Georg [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Blomgren, Klas, E-mail: klas.blomgren@neuro.gu.se [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden) [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. {yields} Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. {yields} Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. {yields} Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. {yields} Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 {sup o}C. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  16. Comparison of edge turbulence velocity analysis techniques using Gas Puff Imaging data on Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierchio, Jennifer Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past, two methods for analyzing data from the Gas Puff Imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod have been used. One uses temporal and spatial Fourier analysis to obtain wavenumber-frequency spectra, from which a phase ...

  17. A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wichlas, Florian, E-mail: florian.wichlas@charite.de; Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Rump, Jens [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Chopra, Sascha S. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M. [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bail, Hermann J. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

  18. MRI Magnet Design: Search Space Analysis, EDAs and a Real-World Problem with Significant Dependencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Marcus

    of superconductive magnet configurations in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems as a challenging real

  19. Kinetic effects on double hysteresis in spin crossover molecular magnets analyzed with first order reversal curve diagram technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stan, Raluca-Maria; Gaina, Roxana; Enachescu, Cristian E-mail: radu.tanasa@uaic.ro; Stancu, Alexandru; Tanasa, Radu E-mail: radu.tanasa@uaic.ro; Bronisz, Robert

    2015-05-07

    In this paper, we analyze two types of hysteresis in spin crossover molecular magnets compounds in the framework of the First Order Reversal Curve (FORC) method. The switching between the two stable states in these compounds is accompanied by hysteresis phenomena if the intermolecular interactions are higher than a threshold. We have measured the static thermal hysteresis (TH) and the kinetic light induced thermal hysteresis (LITH) major loops and FORCs for the polycrystalline Fe(II) spin crossover compound [Fe{sub 1?x}Zn{sub x}(bbtr){sub 3}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} (bbtr?=?1,4-di(1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)butane), either in a pure state (x?=?0) or doped with Zn ions (x?=?0.33) considering different sweeping rates. Here, we use this method not only to infer the domains distribution but also to disentangle between kinetic and static components of the LITH and to estimate the changes in the intermolecular interactions introduced by dopants. We also determined the qualitative relationship between FORC distributions measured for TH and LITH.

  20. 1,2-Hydroxypyridonates as Contrast Agents for Magnetic ResonanceImaging: TREN-1,2-HOPO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jocher, Christoph J.; Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Avedano, Stefano; Botta, Mauro; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-05-08

    1,2-Hydroxypyridinones (1,2-HOPO) form very stable lanthanide complexes that may be useful as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). X-ray diffraction of single crystals established that the solid state structures of the Eu(III) and the previously reported [Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 5452] Gd(III) complex are identical. The recently discovered sensitizing properties of 1,2-HOPO chelates for Eu(III) luminescence allow direct measurement of the number if water molecules in the metal complex. Fluorescence measurements of the Eu(III) complex corroborate that in solution two water molecules coordinate the lanthanide (q = 2) as proposed from the analysis of NMRD profiles. In addition, fluorescence measurements have verified the anion binding interactions of lanthanide TREN-1,2-HOPO complexes in solution, studied by relaxivity, revealing only very weak oxalate binding (K{sub A} = 82.7 {+-} 6.5 M{sup -1}). Solution thermodynamic studies of the metal complex and free ligand have been carried out using potentiometry, spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The metal ion selectivity of TREN-1,2-HOPO supports the feasibility of using 1,2-HOPO ligands for selective lanthanide binding [pGd = 19.3 (2); pZn = 15.2 (2), pCa = 8.8 (3)].

  1. 232 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 29, No. 3 / February 1, 2004 Off-resonant defocus-contrast imaging of cold atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scholten, Robert

    of column-density images of cold atoms, using a noninterferometric phase- recovery technique based prospects for simple, nondestructive imaging of atoms in magnetic and optical traps and condensates. © 2004 is predominant, despite its limited dynamic range and recoil heating. Off-resonant phase-imaging tech- niques

  2. Bacterial protein complexes studied by single-molecule imaging and single-cell micromanipulation techniques in microfluidic devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Marcel

    2010-06-28

    Biological systems of bacteria were investigated at the single-cell and single-molecule level. Additionally, aspects of the techniques employed were studied. A unifying theme in each project is the reliance on optical ...

  3. Technique and application of a non-invasive three dimensional image matching method for the study of total shoulder arthroplasty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimini, Daniel Frank

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of in-vivo glenohumeral joint biomechanics after total shoulder arthroplasty are important for the improvement of patient function, implant longevity and surgical technique. No data has been published on the ...

  4. Laser Transmission Studies with Magnetic Nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chintamani Pai; H. Muthurajan; Nooris Momin; Radha Srinivasan; R. Nagarajan

    2015-09-14

    Transmission of He-Ne (632 nm, 10 mW) Gaussian laser beam through Hexane and Water based magnetic nanofluids containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles show strong non-linear and magneto-optical effects. Application of external magnetic field (up to 1.7 Wb/m2) perpendicular to the incident laser beam produces a change in forward scattered pattern of the incident laser beam. Dependence of forward scattered patterns in presence of external magnetic field has been studied. Image processing has been carried out to understand spatial distribution of the forward scattered patterns and temporal evolution of patterns involving particle image velocimetry technique. Change in non-linear refractive index is estimated for samples showing self-diffraction arising from higher order non-linear optical effect. Observed effects are useful for understanding light scattering from magnetic nanofluids and developing optofluidic devices and sensors.

  5. Laser Transmission Studies with Magnetic Nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pai, Chintamani; Momin, Nooris; Srinivasan, Radha; Nagarajan, R

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of He-Ne (632 nm, 10 mW) Gaussian laser beam through Hexane and Water based magnetic nanofluids containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles show strong non-linear and magneto-optical effects. Application of external magnetic field (up to 1.7 Wb/m2) perpendicular to the incident laser beam produces a change in forward scattered pattern of the incident laser beam. Dependence of forward scattered patterns in presence of external magnetic field has been studied. Image processing has been carried out to understand spatial distribution of the forward scattered patterns and temporal evolution of patterns involving particle image velocimetry technique. Change in non-linear refractive index is estimated for samples showing self-diffraction arising from higher order non-linear optical effect. Observed effects are useful for understanding light scattering from magnetic nanofluids and developing optofluidic devices and sensors.

  6. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 10, NO. 1, JANUARY 2001 95 Hybrid LMS-MMSE Inverse Halftoning Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Pao-Chi

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 10, NO. 1, JANUARY 2001 95 Hybrid LMS-MMSE Inverse, clustered-dot ordered dither, and error diffusion. At first, the least-mean-square (LMS) adaptive filtering. The optimal masks obtained from the LMS method are used as the default filter masks. Finally, we propose

  7. Rigid overlay of volume sonography and MR image data of the female pelvic floor using a fiducial based alignment--feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the authors [1], advances in 3D sonographical imaging as well as in data acquisition techniques allowRigid overlay of volume sonography and MR image data of the female pelvic floor using a fiducial with enhanced informative content. In this paper, we present an overlay technique of magnetic resonance (MR

  8. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeat Pumps Heat Pumpsfacility doe logo CH2M-WG logoImaging

  9. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdahoImaging Print The

  10. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdahoImaging Print

  11. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  12. A New Approach to Lung Image Segmentation using Fuzzy Possibilistic C-Means Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomathi, M

    2010-01-01

    Image segmentation is a vital part of image processing. Segmentation has its application widespread in the field of medical images in order to diagnose curious diseases. The same medical images can be segmented manually. But the accuracy of image segmentation using the segmentation algorithms is more when compared with the manual segmentation. In the field of medical diagnosis an extensive diversity of imaging techniques is presently available, such as radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Medical image segmentation is an essential step for most consequent image analysis tasks. Although the original FCM algorithm yields good results for segmenting noise free images, it fails to segment images corrupted by noise, outliers and other imaging artifact. This paper presents an image segmentation approach using Modified Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) algorithm and Fuzzy Possibilistic c-means algorithm (FPCM). This approach is a generalized version of standard Fuzzy CMeans Clustering (FCM) ...

  13. Development and application of a high speed digital data acquisition technique to study steam bubble collapse using particle image velocimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidl, William Daniel

    1992-01-01

    John Poston ( Head of Department ) ABSTRACT Development anil Appl&cat&on of a. H&vh Speed D&g&tal Data A?qu&s&t&on Techn&que to Study Steam Bubble & 'ollapse us&ng Part&cle Image L'elo imetry I August 1090) K&)liam Dan&el Schr&n Jl. B S . 1&nited... '2 Description of the i'omponents IV THE EXPERIiXIE'XTAL PRO('EDI RE 4i IV 1 Introduction IV 3 Seed Selection IV 3 Expentnental Apparatus IV. 4 Experimental Setup IV 6 Taking data . IV 6 Fhpping, Looking, and Appraising the Data IV 7 Enhancing...

  14. Molecular imaging by optically-detected electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancies in nanodiamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hegyi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demo...

  15. Imaging dirac-mass disorder from magnetic dopant-atoms in the ferromagnetic topological insulator Crx(Bi?.?Sb?.?)??xTe?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Inhee; Kim, Chung Koo; Lee, Jinho; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Zhong, Ruidan D.; Schneeloch, John A.; Liu, Tiansheng S.; Valla, Tonica; Tranquada, John M.; Gu, Genda; et al

    2015-01-20

    To achieve and use the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TIs), it is necessary to open a “Dirac-mass gap” in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely applied approach. However, it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in themore »ferromagnetic TI Cr?.??(Bi?.?Sb?.?)?.??Te?. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap ?(r) reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate is directly related to fluctuations in n(r), the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of ?(r) not inconsistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship ?(r)?n(r) is confirmed throughout and exhibits an electron–dopant interaction energy J* = 145 meV·nm². These observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential.« less

  16. Imaging dirac-mass disorder from magnetic dopant-atoms in the ferromagnetic topological insulator Crx(Bi?.?Sb?.?)??xTe?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Inhee [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kim, Chung Koo [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lee, Jinho [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea); Billinge, Simon J. L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Zhong, Ruidan D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Schneeloch, John A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Liu, Tiansheng S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); North Univ. of China, Shanxi (China); Valla, Tonica [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gu, Genda [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Davis, J. C. Seamus [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Univ. of St. Andrews, Fife (Scotland)

    2015-02-03

    To achieve and use the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TIs), it is necessary to open a “Dirac-mass gap” in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely applied approach. However, it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in the ferromagnetic TI Cr?.??(Bi?.?Sb?.?)?.??Te?. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap ?(r) reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate is directly related to fluctuations in n(r), the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of ?(r) not inconsistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship ?(r)?n(r) is confirmed throughout and exhibits an electron–dopant interaction energy J* = 145 meV·nm². These observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential.

  17. Technical Note Intracoronary MR Imaging Using a 0.014-Inch MR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalar, Ergin

    and Methods: A custom gold/sliver/Nitinol/ MP35N-based, 0.014-inch MRIG was manufactured. To test its with this technique is that the x-ray contrast agent can outline only the vessel lumen. Magnetic res- onance imaging (MRI), which provides not only anatom- ical images of the heart but also functional as well

  18. Magnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name:Power Electronics Group Jump to:

  19. Instruments High-resolution imaging of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boppart, Stephen

    Instruments & Methods High-resolution imaging of gynecologic neoplasms using optical coherence and Gynecologists.) Diagnostic imaging methods available to gynecologists include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

  20. Development of radiohalogenated muscarinic ligands for the in vivo imaging of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1994-06-01

    Alterations in the density of acetylcholinergic muscarinic receptors (m-AChR) have been observed in various dementias. This has spurred interest in the development of radiohalogenated ligands which can be used for the non-invasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by nuclear medicine techniques. We have developed a new ligand 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl ({alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl)-{alpha}-phenylacetate (IQNP,12) which demonstrates high affinity for the muscarinic receptor. When labeled with radioiodine it has been shown to be selective and specific for m-ACHR. Initial studies on the separation and in vivo evaluation of the various isomers of IQNP have shown that the stereochemistry of the chiral centers and the configuration around the double bond play an important role in m-AChR subtype specificity. In vivo evaluation of these stereoisomers demonstrate that E-(R,R)-IQNP has a high affinity for the M{sub 1} muscarinic subtype while Z-(R,R)-IQNP demonstrate a high affinity for M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} receptor subtypes. These data demonstrate IQNP (12) has potential for use in the non-evasive in vivo detection of m-AChR by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A brominated analogue, ``BrQNP,`` in which the iodine has been replaced by a bromine atom, has also been prepared and was shown to block the in vivo uptake of IQNP in the brain and heart and therefore has potential for positron emission tomographic (PET) studies of m-AChR.

  1. Magnetic fields, spots and weather in chemically peculiar stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Kochukhov

    2007-11-30

    New observational techniques and sophisticated modelling methods has led to dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of the interplay between the surface magnetism, atomic diffusion and atmospheric dynamics in chemically peculiar stars. Magnetic Doppler images, constructed using spectropolarimetric observations of Ap stars in all four Stokes parameters, reveal the presence of small-scale field topologies. Abundance Doppler mapping has been perfected to the level where distributions of many different chemical elements can be deduced self-consistently for one star. The inferred chemical spot structures are diverse and do not always trace underlying magnetic field geometry. Moreover, horizontal chemical inhomogeneities are discovered in non-magnetic CP stars and evolving chemical spots are observed for the first time in the bright mercury-manganese star alpha And. These results show that in addition to magnetic fields, another important non-magnetic structure formation mechanism acts in CP stars.

  2. Magnetic Stereoscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Wiegelmann; Bernd Inhester

    2006-12-21

    The space mission STEREO will provide images from two viewpoints. An important aim of the STEREO mission is to get a 3D view of the solar corona. We develop a program for the stereoscopic reconstruction of 3D coronal loops from images taken with the two STEREO spacecraft. A pure geometric triangulation of coronal features leads to ambiguities because the dilute plasma emissions complicates the association of features in image 1 with features in image 2. As a consequence of these problems the stereoscopic reconstruction is not unique and multiple solutions occur. We demonstrate how these ambiguities can be resolved with the help of different coronal magnetic field models (potential, linear and non-linear force-free fields). The idea is that, due to the high conductivity in the coronal plasma, the emitting plasma outlines the magnetic field lines. Consequently the 3D coronal magnetic field provides a proxy for the stereoscopy which allows to eliminate inconsistent configurations. The combination of stereoscopy and magnetic modelling is more powerful than one of these tools alone. We test our method with the help of a model active region and plan to apply it to the solar case as soon as STEREO data become available.

  3. Near-electrode imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

  4. Magnetic Damping For Maglev

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.; Chen, S.S.

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic damping is one of the important parameters that control the response and stability of maglev systems. An experimental study to measure magnetic damping directly is presented. A plate attached to a permanent magnet levitated on a rotating drum was tested to investigate the effect of various parameters, such as conductivity, gap, excitation frequency, and oscillation amplitude, on magnetic damping. The experimental technique is capable of measuring all of the magnetic damping coefficients, some of which cannot be measured indirectly.

  5. A 200-MHz fully-differential CMOS front-end with an on-chip inductor for magnetic resonance imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala, Julio Enqrique, II

    2007-04-25

    with an observed liquid sample. In [5], an implantable solenoidal microcoil is designed to be 5 used in NMR microspectroscopy experiments in a 2-Tesla magnet (85.13-MHz). The outer diameter of the coil was approximately 200 µm and the length was 580 µm. The coil... microspec- troscopy. Liquid samples were loaded into a fused silica capillary positioned 50 µm above a 3.5-turn microcoil so that approximately 1 nL of the sample was present above the sensitive region of the microcoil. At 5.9-Tesla magnet (250-MHz), NMR...

  6. Design of multi-channel radio-frequency front-end for 200mhz parallel magnetic resonance imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaoqun

    2009-05-15

    ) which also acts as a variable gain amplifier (VGA). The quadrature image rejection downconverter consists of a quadrature generator, a passive mixer with a transimpedance amplifier which converts the output current signal of the passive mixer...

  7. Neuroimaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T: Comparison of Oxygenation-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Gary H.

    and becomes a larger fraction of the total noise at 3.0 T. Activation of the primary motor and visual cortex a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla (T) seems to represent a good compromise. Functional MRI (f

  8. Measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, W.L.

    1980-10-01

    The discussion will be restricted to measurements of voltage and current. Also, although the measurements themselves should be as quantitative as possible, the discussion is rather nonquantitative. Emphasis is on types of instruments, how they may be used, and the inherent advantages and limitations of a given technique. A great deal of information can be obtained from good, clean voltage and current data. Power and impedance are obviously inherent if the proper time relationships are preserved. Often an associated, difficult-to-determine, physical event can be evaluated from the V-I data, such as a time-varying load characteristic, or the time of light emission, etc. The lack of active high voltage devices, such as 50-kV operational amplifiers, restricts measurement devices to passive elements, primarily R and C. There are a few more exotic techniques that are still passive in nature. There are several well-developed techniques for voltage measurements. These include: spark gaps; electrostatic meters; capacitive dividers; mixed RC dividers; and the electro-optic effect. Current is measured by either direct measurement of charge flow or by measuring the resulting magnetic field.

  9. Development of accelerator based spatially resolved ion beam analysis techniques for the study of plasma materials interactions in magnetic fusion devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnard, Harold Salvadore

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-material interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices pose significant scientific and engineering challenges for the development of steady-state fusion power reactors. Understanding PMI is crucial for the develpment ...

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications: Progress and challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doaga, A.; Cojocariu, A. M.; Constantin, C. P.; Caltun, O. F. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol I. Nr. 11, Iasi, 700506 (Romania); Hempelmann, R. [Physical Chemistry Department, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2013-11-13

    Magnetic nanoparticles present unique properties that make them suitable for applications in biomedical field such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia and drug delivery systems. Magnetic hyperthermia involves heating the cancer cells by using magnetic particles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The cell temperature increases due to the thermal propagation of the heat induced by the nanoparticles into the affected region. In order to increase the effectiveness of the treatment hyperthermia can be combined with drug delivery techniques. As a spectroscopic technique MRI is used in medicine for the imaging of tissues especially the soft ones and diagnosing malignant or benign tumors. For this purpose Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1?x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles with x between 0 and 1 have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The cristallite size was determined by X-ray diffraction, while the transmission electron microscopy illustrates the spherical shape of the nanoparticles. Magnetic characterizations of the nanoparticles were carried out at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured by calorimetric method at different frequencies and it has been observed that this value depends on the chemical formula, the applied magnetic fields and the frequency. The study consists of evaluating the images, obtained from an MRI facility, when the nanoparticles are dispersed in agar phantoms compared with the enhanced ones when Omniscan was used as contrast agent. Layer-by-layer technique was used to achieve the necessary requirement of biocompatibility. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was modified by coating it with oppositely charged polyelectrolites, making it possible for the binding of a specific drug.

  11. Grants (Dr. Anke Henning) Main Applicant; project grant; Imaging synaptic plasticity by ultra-high field magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grants (Dr. Anke Henning) Submitted · Main Applicant; project grant; Imaging synaptic plasticity for our project part; Zentrum für integrative Humanphysiologie (ZIHP); November 2007 ­ December 2009 1999 of living and tuition fee; Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD); August 1999 ­ May 2000 #12;

  12. Velocity and concentration studies of flowing suspensions by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Technical progress report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Our search for a suitable combination of imageable particles in a carrier liquid which will not dissolve the particles has led us to try pharmaceutical particles in silicon oil. This combination doses not seem to last long enough for adequate NMR measurements. Results are discussed.

  13. Analyzing and improving image quality in reflective ghost imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Nicholas D. (Nicholas David)

    2011-01-01

    Ghost imaging is a transverse imaging technique that relies on the correlation between a pair of light fields, one that has interacted with the object to be imaged and one that has not. Most ghost imaging experiments have ...

  14. A finite elements method to solve the Bloch–Torrey equation applied to diffusion magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Dang Van; Li, Jing-Rebecca; Grebenkov, Denis; Le Bihan, Denis

    2014-04-15

    The complex transverse water proton magnetization subject to diffusion-encoding magnetic field gradient pulses in a heterogeneous medium can be modeled by the multiple compartment Bloch–Torrey partial differential equation (PDE). In addition, steady-state Laplace PDEs can be formulated to produce the homogenized diffusion tensor that describes the diffusion characteristics of the medium in the long time limit. In spatial domains that model biological tissues at the cellular level, these two types of PDEs have to be completed with permeability conditions on the cellular interfaces. To solve these PDEs, we implemented a finite elements method that allows jumps in the solution at the cell interfaces by using double nodes. Using a transformation of the Bloch–Torrey PDE we reduced oscillations in the searched-for solution and simplified the implementation of the boundary conditions. The spatial discretization was then coupled to the adaptive explicit Runge–Kutta–Chebyshev time-stepping method. Our proposed method is second order accurate in space and second order accurate in time. We implemented this method on the FEniCS C++ platform and show time and spatial convergence results. Finally, this method is applied to study some relevant questions in diffusion MRI.

  15. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R.; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J.; Singh, M.

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  16. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Pelc, Norbert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Shin Mihye [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bennett, N. Robert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Qualcomm MEMS Technologies, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also evaluated to determine its stability during acceleration, and a pulse width modulation algorithm was implemented to control the rotation speed of the motor. Results: At a magnetic flux density of 41 mT orthogonal to the axis of rotation (on the lower end of the expected flux density in the MR suite) the maximum speed of the motor was found to be 5150 revolutions per minute (rpm). The acceleration time necessary to reach 3000 rpm was found to be approximately 10 s at 59 mT. The resonance frequency of the assembly with the anode attached was 1310 rpm (21.8 Hz) which is far below the desired operating speeds. Pulse width modulation provides an effective method to control the speed of the motor with a resolution of 100 rpm. Conclusions: The proposed design can serve as a direct replacement to the conventional induction motor used in rotating anode x-ray tubes. It does not suffer from a reduced rotation speed when operating in a MR environment. The presence of chromic steel bearings in the prototype prevented testing at the higher field strengths, and future iterations of the design could eliminate this shortcoming. The prototype assembly demonstrates proof of concept of the authors' design and overcomes one of the major obstacles for a MR compatible rotating anode x-ray tube.

  17. Copyright by SIAM. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited. SIAM J. IMAGING SCIENCES c 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    forces we use total variation­based inverse scale-space techniques on the input data. Furthermore, we use process is the external data, which can be images of any kind, such as photographs or magnetic resonance of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095. Current address: Mental Images, Fasanenstr. 81, 10623 Berlin

  18. Relation between photospheric flow fields and the magnetic field distribution on the solar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, G.W.; Title, A.M.; Topka, K.P.; Tarbell, T.D.; Shine, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Using the technique of local correlation tracking on a 28 minute time sequence of white-light images of solar granulation, the horizontal flow field on the solar surface is measured. The time series was obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 (Space Shuttle flight 51-F) and is free from atmospheric blurring and distortion. The SOUP flow fields have been compared with carefully aligned magnetograms taken over a nine hour period at the Big Bear Solar Observatory before, during, and after the SOUP images. The flow field and the magnetic field agree in considerable detail: vectors which define the flow of the white-light intensity pattern (granulation) point toward magnetic field regions, magnetic fields surround flow cells, and magnetic features move along the flow arrows. The projected locations of free particles (corks) in the measured flow field congregate at the same locations where the magnetic field is observed. 31 references.

  19. Nondestructive NMR technique for moisture determination in radioactive materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aumeier, S.; Gerald, R.E. II; Growney, E.; Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.

    1998-12-04

    This progress report focuses on experimental and computational studies used to evaluate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting, quantifying, and monitoring hydrogen and other magnetically active nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu) in Spent nuclear fuels and packaging materials. The detection of moisture by using a toroid cavity NMR imager has been demonstrated in SiO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} systems. The total moisture was quantified by means of {sup 1}H NMR detection of H{sub 2}O with a sensitivity of 100 ppm. In addition, an MRI technique that was used to determine the moisture distribution also enabled investigators to discriminate between bulk and stationary water sorbed on the particles. This imaging feature is unavailable in any other nondestructive assay (NDA) technique. Following the initial success of this program, the NMR detector volume was scaled up from the original design by a factor of 2000. The capacity of this detector exceeds the size specified by DOE-STD-3013-96.

  20. The AGN origin of cluster magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Hao

    2009-01-01

    Images of gas density and strength of the Biermann Battery3.6 are the images of gas density and battery source term ofImages of gas density, temperature, magnetic energy density and strength of the Biermann Battery

  1. Noninvasive Monitoring of Microvascular Changes With Partial Irradiation Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yu-Chun [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jiun-Jie [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ji-Hong [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yi-Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Wai, Yau-Yau; Ng, Shu-Hang; Wu, Yi-Ming [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chun-Chieh, E-mail: jjwang@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China) [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taiwan (China)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: The microvasculature of a tumor plays an important role in its response to radiation therapy. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI are both sensitive to vascular characteristics. The present study proposed a partial irradiation approach to a xenograft tumor to investigate the intratumoral response to radiation therapy using DCE and BOLD MRI. Methods and Materials: TRAMP-C1 tumors were grown in C57BL/6J mice. Partial irradiation was performed on the distal half of the tumor with a single dose of 15 Gy. DCE MRI was performed to derive the endothelium transfer constant, K{sup trans}, using pharmacokinetic analysis. BOLD MRI was performed using quantitative R2* measurements with carbogen breathing. The histology of the tumor was analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin staining and CD31 staining to detect endothelial cells. The differences between the irradiated and nonirradiated regions of the tumor were assessed using K{sup trans} values, ?R2* values in response to carbogen and microvascular density (MVD) measurements. Results: A significantly increased K{sup trans} and reduced BOLD response to carbogen were found in the irradiated region of the tumor compared with the nonirradiated region (P<.05). Histologic analysis showed a significant aggregation of giant cells and a reduced MVD in the irradiated region of the tumor. The radiation-induced difference in the BOLD response was associated with differences in MVD and K{sup trans}. Conclusions: We demonstrated that DCE MRI and carbogen-challenge BOLD MRI can detect differential responses within a tumor that may potentially serve as noninvasive imaging biomarkers to detect microvascular changes in response to radiation therapy.

  2. Evaluation of electric and magnetic fields distribution and SAR induced in 3D models of water containers by radiofrequency radiation using FDTD and FEM simulation techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelsamie, Maher A A; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Hashim, Dzulkifly

    2014-01-01

    In this study, two software packages using different numerical techniques FEKO 6.3 with Finite-Element Method (FEM) and XFDTD 7 with Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) were used to assess exposure of 3D models of square, rectangular, and pyramidal shaped water containers to electromagnetic waves at 300, 900, and 2400 MHz frequencies. Using the FEM simulation technique, the peak electric field of 25, 4.5, and 2 V/m at 300 MHz and 15.75, 1.5, and 1.75 V/m at 900 MHz were observed in pyramidal, rectangular, and square shaped 3D container models, respectively. The FDTD simulation method confirmed a peak electric field of 12.782, 10.907, and 10.625 V/m at 2400 MHz in the pyramidal, square, and rectangular shaped 3D models, respectively. The study demonstrated an exceptionally high level of electric field in the water in the two identical pyramid shaped 3D models analyzed using the two different simulation techniques. Both FEM and FDTD simulation techniques indicated variations in the distribution of elect...

  3. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  4. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-04-24

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  5. Molecular imaging by optically-detected electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancies in nanodiamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Hegyi; Eli Yablonovitch

    2012-12-11

    Molecular imaging refers to a class of noninvasive biomedical imaging techniques with the sensitivity and specificity to image biochemical variations in-vivo. An ideal molecular imaging technique visualizes a biochemical target according to a range of criteria, including high spatial and temporal resolution, high contrast relative to non-targeted tissues, depth-independent penetration into tissue, lack of harm to the organism under study, and low cost. Because no existing molecular imaging modality is ideal for all purposes, new imaging approaches are needed. Here we demonstrate a novel molecular imaging approach, called nanodiamond imaging, that uses nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers as an imaging agent, and image nanodiamond targets in pieces of chicken breast. Nanodiamonds can be tagged with biologically active molecules so they bind to specific receptors; their distribution can then be quantified in-vivo via optically-detected magnetic resonance of the NVs. In effect, we are demonstrating Optically-Detected Functional-Electron-Spin-Resonance-Imaging, OD-f-ESRI. By combining optical detection with magnetic resonance, nanodiamond imaging achieves high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. It is absent of the complications of ionizing radiation, and the cost should be similar to all-optical imaging. Because nanodiamond imaging is limited by the depth of optical penetration into tissue to depths of a few cm, nanodiamond imaging should open up new avenues of investigation for applications where high depth penetration is not required, such as in small-animal imaging, tumor margin imaging, sentinel lymph node mapping, and perhaps mammography.

  6. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, C.A.

    2011-01-28

    Heusler intermetallics Mn{sub 2}Y Ga and X{sub 2}MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X{sub 2}MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn{sub 2}Y Ga to the logical Mn{sub 3}Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co{sub 2}FeSi (Appendix B).

  7. Innovative biomagnetic imaging sensors for breast cancer: A model-based study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Y.; Golkowski, M.

    2012-04-01

    Breast cancer is a serious potential health problem for all women and is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. The current screening procedures and imaging techniques, including x-ray mammography, clinical biopsy, ultrasound imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging, provide only 73% accuracy in detecting breast cancer. This gives the impetus to explore alternate techniques for imaging the breast and detecting early stage tumors. Among the complementary methods, the noninvasive biomagnetic breast imaging is attractive and promising, because both ionizing radiation and breast compressions that the prevalent x-ray mammography suffers from are avoided. It furthermore offers very high contrast because of the significant electromagnetic properties' differences between the cancerous, benign, and normal breast tissues. In this paper, a hybrid and accurate modeling tool for biomagnetic breast imaging is developed, which couples the electromagnetic and ultrasonic energies, and initial validations between the model predication and experimental findings are conducted.

  8. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Lambert, Jonathan [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Parker, Joel [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B. [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum. Conclusions: The electron-density atlas method provides the ability to automatically define organs and map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for radiotherapy dose planning and DRR generation. This method provides the necessary tools for MRI-alone treatment planning and adaptive MRI-based prostate radiation therapy.

  9. Modifications in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters After ?-Particle-Emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab Therapy of HER2-Expressing Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heyerdahl, Helen; Røe, Kathrine; Brevik, Ellen Mengshoel; Dahle, Jostein

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ?-particle-emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab radioimmunotherapy on tumor vasculature to increase the knowledge about the mechanisms of action of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: Human HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenografts were grown bilaterally in athymic nude mice. Mice with tumor volumes 253 ± 36 mm{sup 3} (mean ± SEM) were treated with a single injection of either {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab at a dose of 1000 kBq/kg body weight (treated group, n=14 tumors) or 0.9% NaCl (control group, n=10 tumors). Dynamic T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) was used to study the effect of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab on tumor vasculature. DCEMRI was performed before treatment and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after therapy. Tumor contrast-enhancement curves were extracted voxel by voxel and fitted to the Brix pharmacokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the tumors that underwent radioimmunotherapy were compared with the corresponding parameters of control tumors. Results: Significant increases of k{sub ep}, the rate constant of diffusion from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma (P<.05), and k{sub el,} the rate of clearance of contrast agent from the plasma (P<.01), were seen in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection, compared with the control group. The product of k{sub ep} and the amplitude parameter A, associated with increased vessel permeability and perfusion, was also significantly increased in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection (P<.01). Conclusions: Pharmacokinetic modeling of MRI contrast-enhancement curves evidenced significant alterations in parameters associated with increased tumor vessel permeability and tumor perfusion after {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab treatment of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Richard A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; harkema, J. R.; Kimbell, Julia; Gargas, M. L.; Kinzell, John H.

    2009-06-01

    The percentages of total air?ows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were cal-culated from computational ?uid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These air?ow calcula-tions, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, mon-keys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the ?ne structures of the nasal turbinates and air?ows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired air?ows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (~50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (air?ows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These di?erences in regional air?ows can have signi?cant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  11. Tunable exchange bias-like effect in patterned hard-soft two-dimensional lateral composites with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hierro-Rodriguez, A., E-mail: ahierro@fc.up.pt; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Martín, J. I.; Alameda, J. M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Centro de Investigación en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnología—CINN (CSIC—Universidad de Oviedo—Principado de Asturias), Parque Tecnológico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera (Spain); Teixeira, J. M. [IN-IFIMUP, Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Vélez, M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2014-09-08

    Patterned hard-soft 2D magnetic lateral composites have been fabricated by e-beam lithography plus dry etching techniques on sputter-deposited NdCo{sub 5} thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Their magnetic behavior is strongly thickness dependent due to the interplay between out-of-plane anisotropy and magnetostatic energy. Thus, the spatial modulation of thicknesses leads to an exchange coupled system with hard/soft magnetic regions in which rotatable anisotropy of the thicker elements provides an extra tool to design the global magnetic behavior of the patterned lateral composite. Kerr microscopy studies (domain imaging and magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry) reveal that the resulting hysteresis loops exhibit a tunable exchange bias-like shift that can be switched on/off by the applied magnetic field.

  12. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, Anand

    2009-05-26

    The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite particles. The overall goal of this project is to understand the mechanism of magnetite particle synthesis in the presence of the biomineralization proteins, mms6 and C25. Previous work has hypothesized that the mms6 protein helps to template magnetite and cobalt ferrite particle synthesis and that the C25 protein templates cobalt ferrite formation. However, the effect of parameters such as the protein concentration on the particle formation is still unknown. It is expected that the protein concentration significantly affects the nucleation and growth of magnetite. Since the protein provides iron-binding sites, it is expected that magnetite crystals would nucleate at those sites. In addition, in the previous work, the reaction medium after completion of the reaction was in the solution phase, and magnetic particles had a tendency to fall to the bottom of the medium and aggregate. The research presented in this thesis involves solid Pluronic gel phase reactions, which can be studied readily using small-angle x-ray scattering, which is not possible for the solution phase experiments. In addition, the concentration effect of both of the proteins on magnetite crystal formation was studied.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    it for babies, why not for concrete? #12;2 Non-destructive-testing Methods for Concrete Structures. Irie et al structure · In both cases procedure is destructive Systems to monitor concrete modulus · Ultra-sonic pulse and examined under microscope Limited number of sections can be obtained and only after unloading Destructive

  14. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metals cobalt and terbium. These are systems in which the interaction of the localized rare-earth electrons in terbium and the itinerant transition-metal electrons in cobalt are...

  15. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidential EnergyOrganizationLecturersLending

  16. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidential EnergyOrganizationLecturersLendingLensless

  17. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidential

  18. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I C AFAQ »LeeStrategicCenter

  19. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I C AFAQ

  20. Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I C AFAQLensless

  1. Direct torsional actuation of microcantilevers using magnetic excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Nalam, Prathima C.; Tam, Qizhan; Carpick, Robert W.; Exarhos, Annemarie L.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2014-09-01

    Torsional mode dynamic force microscopy can be used for a wide range of studies including mapping lateral contact stiffness, torsional frequency or amplitude modulation imaging, and dynamic friction measurements of various materials. Piezo-actuation of the cantilever is commonly used, but it introduces spurious resonances, limiting the frequency range that can be sampled, and rendering the technique particularly difficult to apply in liquid medium where the cantilever oscillations are significantly damped. Here, we demonstrate a method that enables direct torsional actuation of cantilevers with high uniformity over wide frequency ranges by attaching a micrometer-scale magnetic bead on the back side of the cantilever. We show that when beads are magnetized along the width of the cantilever, efficient torsional actuation of the cantilevers can be achieved using a magnetic field produced from a solenoid placed underneath the sample. We demonstrate the capability of this technique by imaging atomic steps on graphite surfaces in tapping mode near the first torsional resonance of the cantilever in dodecane. The technique is also applied to map the variations in the lateral contact stiffness on the surface of graphite and polydiacetylene monolayers.

  2. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D X-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Labate; P. Koester; T. Levato; L. A. Gizzi

    2012-11-02

    A novel X-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any X-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named Energy-encoded Pinhole Camera - EPiC) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available X-ray spectral domain is only limited by the Quantum Efficiency of scientific-grade X-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any X-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent ICF related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  3. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D X-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labate, L; Levato, T; Gizzi, L A

    2012-01-01

    A novel X-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any X-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named Energy-encoded Pinhole Camera - EPiC) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available X-ray spectral domain is only limited by the Quantum Efficiency of scientific-grade X-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any X-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent ICF related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  4. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D x-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labate, L.; Koester, P.; Levato, T.; Gizzi, L. A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    A novel x-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any x-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named energy-encoded pinhole camera) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available x-ray spectral domain is only limited by the quantum efficiency of scientific-grade x-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any x-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent inertial confinement fusion related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  5. Promising technique improves hydrogen production of affordable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Materialscientist, Wikipedia) (click image to enlarge) Promising technique improves hydrogen production of affordable alternative to platinum By Angela Hardin * October 26, 2015...

  6. History of Solar Magnetic Fields since George Ellery Hale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stenflo, Jan

    2015-01-01

    As my own work on the Sun's magnetic field started exactly 50 years ago at Crimea in the USSR, I have been a participant in the field during nearly half the time span since Hale's discovery in 1908 of magnetic fields in sunspots. The present historical account is accompanied by photos from my personal slide collection, which show a number of the leading personalities who advanced the field in different areas: measurement techniques, from photographic to photoelectric and imaging methods in spectro-polarimetry; theoretical foundations of MHD and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields (birth of dynamo theory); the quest for increased angular resolution from national projects to international consortia (for instruments both on ground and in space); introduction of the Hanle effect in astrophysics and the Second Solar Spectrum as its playground; small-scale nature of the field, the fundamental resolution limit, and transcending it by resolution-independent diagnostics.

  7. Discovery of a new class of coronal structures in white light eclipse images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druckmüller, Miloslav; Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw

    2014-04-10

    White light images of the solar corona, taken during total solar eclipses, capture the complex dynamic relationship between the coronal plasma and the magnetic field. This relationship can be recorded on timescales of seconds to minutes, within a few solar radii above the solar surface. Rays, large-scale loops, and streamers, which are the brightest structures in these images, have shaped current models of the coronal magnetic field and solar wind flow. We show in this work how the application of novel image processing techniques to unique high-resolution white light eclipse images reveals the presence of a new class of structures, reminiscent of smoke rings, faint nested expanding loops, expanding bubbles, and twisted helical structures. These features are interpreted as snapshots of the dynamical evolution of instabilities developing at prominence-corona interfaces and propagating outward with the solar wind.

  8. Cosmic magnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with the cosmic magnetism in a non-mathematical way. It uses Faraday's very powerful and highly pictorial concept of lines of magnetic force and their associated physical properties to explain the structure and behavior of magnetic fields in extraterrestrial objects. Contents include: forces of nature; magnetic field of earth; solar and interplanetary magnetic fields; magnetic fields in the solar system; stars and pulsars; and magnetic fields of the milky way and other galaxies.

  9. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  10. McCausland Center For Brain Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    .mricro.com). he Siemens 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imag- ing system at the McCausland Center for Brain Imaging the Palmetto Richland Memorial Hospi- tal. The Siemens 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imag- ing system is fitted brain remains one of the great scientific challenges of our generation. With approximately 100 billion

  11. Category:Magnetic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia:Geothermal Regulatory RoadmapISGANLEDS ExampleAR

  12. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H; Wouters, B; Jaffray, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 4×4 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  13. Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Junzhou

    demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for com- pressed MR image reconstruction. 1 [1][2] show that it is possi- ble to accurately reconstruct the Magnetic Resonance (MR) images from for real MR images. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used

  14. Plated lamination structures for integrated magnetic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Bucknell C.

    2014-06-17

    Semiconductor integrated magnetic devices such as inductors, transformers, etc., having laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are provided, wherein the laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are formed using electroplating techniques. For example, an integrated laminated magnetic device includes a multilayer stack structure having alternating magnetic and insulating layers formed on a substrate, wherein each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by an insulating layer, and a local shorting structure to electrically connect each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to an underlying magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to facilitate electroplating of the magnetic layers using an underlying conductive layer (magnetic or seed layer) in the stack as an electrical cathode/anode for each electroplated magnetic layer in the stack structure.

  15. Three-dimensional medical image analysis using local dynamic algorithm selection on a multiple-instruction, multiple-data architecture. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stytz, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The dissertation outlines development of a medical imaging machine which renders 3D images from voxel data within a MIMD multiprocessor architecture at interactive rates. Interactive performance is achieved using local dynamic selection of the optimum adaptive recursive hidden-surface removal algorithm. A survey of the medical imaging, graphics, and medical imaging modality literature is provided. A description of Computerized Technology, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography, and Ultrasound imaging modalities is presented Previous work in 3D volume rendering graphics techniques and data models is introduced. Eleven medical imaging machines are examined with emphasis on characterization of the major innovation(s) and performance of each machine. A five stage image processing pipeline is described.

  16. Imaging using transport models for wave-wave correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    exploration in geophysics [16] and non-destructive testing of materials [26]. One standard imaging technique

  17. Interpretation of electron holographic phase images and defocused bright-field images of nanocarbon field emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    a corresponding out-of-focus image recorded from a similar wire [2]. These images cannot be interpreted usingInterpretation of electron holographic phase images and defocused bright-field images of nanocarbon field, image simulation Electron holography is well suited to the investigation of electric and magnetic

  18. Image texture analysis of elastograms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Fasahat

    1999-01-01

    and developed to make it a commercial product. 'This research applies image texture analysis to computer generated elastograms to obtain effective texture features. Four image analysis techniques, no-occurrence statistics, wavelet decomposition, frontal analysis...

  19. Topics in genomic image processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jianping

    2006-04-12

    The image processing methodologies that have been actively studied and developed now play a very significant role in the flourishing biotechnology research. This work studies, develops and implements several image processing techniques for M...

  20. Teaching Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    with others such as a small group discussion or the question-answer technique to al- low the 4-H?ers to express their opinion. 2. Illustrated talk This method is an offshoot of the lecture technique, in which the teacher supports the talk with such things... as drawings, posters, copies of articles and other materials. The drawings or posters need not be professional art pieces, they need only be interesting and clear. For ex- ample, in entomology, rather than just talking about the various shapes...

  1. A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, J.O.

    2001-01-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in two hydrocarbon reservoirs. This was accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using MR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurements were compared with petrographic analysis results to determine the relative roles of petrographic elements such as porosity type, mineralogy, texture, and distribution of clay and cement in creating permeability heterogeneity.

  2. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schoeder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  3. Flows and Non-thermal Velocities in Solar Active Regions Observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode: A Tracer of Active Region Sources of Heliospheric Magnetic Fields?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Doschek; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; K. Muglach; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara; T Watanabe

    2008-07-17

    From Doppler velocity maps of active regions constructed from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft we observe large areas of outflow (20-50 km/s) that can persist for at least a day. These outflows occur in areas of active regions that are faint in coronal spectral lines formed at typical quiet Sun and active region temperatures. The outflows are positively correlated with non-thermal velocities in coronal plasmas. The bulk mass motions and non-thermal velocities are derived from spectral line centroids and line widths, mostly from a strong line of Fe XII at 195.12 Angstroms. The electron temperature of the outflow regions estimated from an Fe XIII to Fe XII line intensity ratio is about 1.2-1.4 MK. The electron density of the outflow regions derived from a density sensitive intensity ratio of Fe XII lines is rather low for an active region. Most regions average around 7E10+8 cm(-3), but there are variations on pixel spatial scales of about a factor of 4. We discuss results in detail for two active regions observed by EIS. Images of active regions in line intensity, line width, and line centroid are obtained by rastering the regions. We also discuss data from the active regions obtained from other orbiting spacecraft that support the conclusions obtained from analysis of the EIS spectra. The locations of the flows in the active regions with respect to the longitudinal photospheric magnetic fields suggest that these regions might be tracers of long loops and/or open magnetic fields that extend into the heliosphere, and thus the flows could possibly contribute significantly to the solar wind.

  4. Magnets & Magnet Condensed Matter Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Sights from around the Magnet Lab in 2010. On the cover MAGNETS & MAGNET MATERIALS Engineering materials in Mesoporous Silica SBA-15 31 YBCO Pancake Wound Test Coil for 32-T Magnet Development 32 Strong Vortex Pinning from Marine Cyanobacteria 37 Heavy Petroleum Composition 2. Progression of the Boduszynski Model

  5. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  6. First MR images obtained during megavoltage photon irradiation from a prototype integrated linac-MR system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fallone, B. G.; Murray, B.; Rathee, S.; Stanescu, T.; Steciw, S.; Vidakovic, S.; Blosser, E.; Tymofichuk, D. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2009-06-15

    The authors report the first magnetic resonance (MR) images produced by their prototype MR system integrated with a radiation therapy source. The prototype consists of a 6 MV linac mounted onto the open end of a biplanar 0.2 T permanent MR system which has 27.9 cm pole-to-pole opening with flat gradients (40 mT/m) running under a TMX NRC console. The distance from the magnet isocenter to the linac target is 80 cm. The authors' design has resolved the mutual interferences between the two devices such that the MR magnetic field does not interfere with the trajectory of the electron in the linac waveguide, and the radiofrequency (RF) signals from each system do not interfere with the operation of the other system. Magnetic and RF shielding calculations were performed and confirmed with appropriate measurements. The prototype is currently on a fixed gantry; however, in the very near future, the linac and MR magnet will rotate in unison such that the linac is always aimed through the opening in the biplanar magnet. MR imaging was found to be fully operational during linac irradiation and proven by imaging a phantom with conventional gradient echo sequences. Except for small changes in SNR, MR images produced during irradiation were visually and quantitatively very similar to those taken with the linac turned off. This prototype system provides proof of concept that the design has decreased the mutual interferences sufficiently to allow the development of real-time MR-guided radiotherapy. Low field-strength systems (0.2-0.5 T) have been used clinically as diagnostic tools. The task of the linac-MR system is, however, to provide MR guidance to the radiotherapy beam. Therefore, the 0.2 T field strength would provide adequate image quality for this purpose and, with the addition of fast imaging techniques, has the potential to provide 4D soft-tissue visualization not presently available in image-guided radiotherapy systems. The authors' initial design incorporates a permanent magnet; however, other types of magnets and field strengths could also be incorporated. Usable MR images were obtained during linac irradiation from the linac-MR prototype. The authors' prototype design can be used as the functional starting point in developing real-time MR guidance offering soft-tissue contrast that can be coupled with tumor tracking for real-time adaptive radiotherapy.

  7. Image credit: Dreamstime Technology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through development of superconducting magnet technology. Without that research today's high- resolutionImage credit: Dreamstime Technology for research saves lives Technology developed to advance STFC in particle physics technology not only supported important experiments at CERN but pioneered early

  8. Methods for functional brain imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witzel, Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the potential for non-invasive mapping of structure and function (fMRI) in the human brain. In this thesis, we propose a series of methodological developments towards ...

  9. ECE 390 Electric & Magnetic Fields Catalog Description: Static and quasi-static electric and magnetic fields.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECE 390 ­ Electric & Magnetic Fields Catalog Description: Static and quasi-static electric's and Laplace's equations. Boundary value problems, method of images · Steady electric currents, static magnetic, students will be able to... 1. Identify the characteristics of static electric and magnetic fields in free

  10. Exoplanet Detection Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Debra A; Laughlin, Greg P; Macintosh, Bruce; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Sahlmann, Johannes; Yee, Jennifer C

    2015-01-01

    We are still in the early days of exoplanet discovery. Astronomers are beginning to model the atmospheres and interiors of exoplanets and have developed a deeper understanding of processes of planet formation and evolution. However, we have yet to map out the full complexity of multi-planet architectures or to detect Earth analogues around nearby stars. Reaching these ambitious goals will require further improvements in instrumentation and new analysis tools. In this chapter, we provide an overview of five observational techniques that are currently employed in the detection of exoplanets: optical and IR Doppler measurements, transit photometry, direct imaging, microlensing, and astrometry. We provide a basic description of how each of these techniques works and discuss forefront developments that will result in new discoveries. We also highlight the observational limitations and synergies of each method and their connections to future space missions.

  11. Threshold Doses for Focal Liver Reaction After Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma Depend on Liver Function: Evaluation on Magnetic Resonance Imaging With Gd-EOB-DTPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanuki, Naoko; Takeda, Atsuya; Oku, Yohei; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Nishimura, Shuichi; Aoki, Yosuke; Mizuno, Tomikazu; Iwabuchi, Shogo; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Focal liver reaction (FLR) appears on radiographic images after stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease. We investigated the threshold dose (TD) of FLR and possible factors affecting the TD on gadoxetate acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: In 50 patients who were treated with SABR for small HCC and followed up by MRI for >6 months, FLR, seen as a hypointense area, was evaluated on the hepatobiliary phase of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI. The follow-up MRI with the largest extent of FLR was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) image, and patients with good image fusion concordance were eligible. After delineating the border of the FLR manually, a dose–volume histogram was used to identify the TD for the FLR. Clinical and volumetric factors were analyzed for correlation with the TD. Results: A total of 45 patients were eligible for analysis with a median image fusion concordance of 84.9% (range, 71.6-95.4%). The median duration between SABR and subsequent hepatobiliary phase MRI with the largest extent of FLR was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). The median TD for FLR was 28.0 Gy (range, 22.3-36.4 Gy). On univariate analysis, pre-treatment Child-Pugh (CP) score and platelet count were significantly correlated with the TD. On multiple linear regression analysis, CP score was the only parameter that predicted TD. Median TDs were 30.5 Gy (range, 26.2.3-36.4 Gy) and 25.2 Gy (range, 22.3-27.5 Gy) for patients with CP-A and CP-B disease, respectively. Conclusion: The TD was significantly correlated with baseline liver function. We propose 30 Gy for CP-A disease and 25 Gy for CP-B disease in 5 fractions as TDs for FLR after SABR for patients with HCC and chronic liver disease. Use of these TDs will help to predict potential loss of liver tissue after SABR.

  12. Summary report for nanoscale magnetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J.G.; Waddill, G.D.; Jankowski, A.F.; Tamura, E.; Sterne, P.A.; Pappas, D.P.; Tong, S.Y.

    1993-09-23

    We have probed the electronic, geometric, and magnetic nanoscale structure of ultrathin magnetic films, both monolayers and multilayers (Fe/Cu(001), FePt, FeCoPt, UFe{sub 2}, U-S). Techniques used included the MCD (magnetic circular dichroism)-variants of of x-ray absorption, core-level photoemission, and photoelectron diffraction. Progress has been made on nanoscale structure-property relations, in part of coupling of world-class experimentation and theoretical modeling. Feasibility of investigations of 5f magnetism using bulk uranium samples also has been demonstrated.

  13. Magnetic hydrogel with high coercivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sözeri, H.; Alvero?lu, E.; Kurtan, U.; ?enel, M.; Baykal, A.

    2013-08-01

    Highlights: • Polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels containing magnetic BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles have been prepared. • Magnetization measurements reveal that hydrogels have hard magnetic properties with high coercivity. • Magnetic nanoparticles makes the gel more homogeneous and do not diffuse out of the gel during water intake. • These gels are useful in applications as wastewater treatment once gels are magnetized before its usage. - Abstract: This study investigates the synthesis and characterization of polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels containing magnetic BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles. Structural, electrical, and magnetic characterization of the gels have been performed with X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, DC conductivity, magnetization and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The preparation and characterization of polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels that contain 5 and 10 mg BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (16 and 21 nm diameter) nanoparticles are described herein. It is seen from the fluorescence spectra that, nanoparticles surrounded to pyranine molecules so that some of pyranine molecules could not bound to the polymer strands. Electrical measurements show that presence of nanoparticles make the gel more homogeneous. Magnetization measurements reveal that hydrogels have hard magnetic properties with quite high coercivity of 4.2 kOe, which does not change with swelling. This feature makes these gels useful in applications as wastewater treatment if they are magnetized before use.

  14. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  15. Discovery of magnetic fields in three He variable Bp stars with He and Si spots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Briquet; S. Hubrig; M. Schoeller; P. De Cat

    2006-10-18

    It is essential for the understanding of stellar structure models of high mass stars to explain why constant stars, non-pulsating chemically peculiar hot Bp stars and pulsating stars co-exist in the slowly pulsating B stars and beta Cephei instability strips. We have conducted a search for magnetic fields in the four Bp stars HD55522, HD105382, HD131120, and HD138769 which previously have been wrongly identified as slowly pulsating B stars. A recent study of these stars using the Doppler Imaging technique revealed that the elements He and Si are inhomogeneously distributed on the stellar surface, causing the periodic variability. Using FORS1 in spectropolarimetric mode at the VLT, we have acquired circular polarisation spectra to test the presence of a magnetic field in these stars. A variable magnetic field is clearly detected in HD55522 and HD105382, but no evidence for the existence of a magnetic field was found in HD131120. The presence of a magnetic field in HD138769 is suggested by one measurement at 3 sigma level. We discuss the occurence of magnetic B stars among the confirmed pulsating B stars and find strong magnetic fields of order kG and oscillations to be mutually exclusive.

  16. From solar to stellar corona: the role of wind, rotation and magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Réville, Victor; Strugarek, Antoine; Matt, Sean P; Bouvier, Jérôme; Folsom, Colin P; Petit, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Observations of surface magnetic fields are now within reach for many stellar types thanks to the development of Zeeman-Doppler Imaging. These observations are extremely useful for constraining rotational evolution models of stars, as well as for characterizing the generation of magnetic field. We recently demonstrated that the impact of coronal magnetic field topology on the rotational braking of a star can be parametrized with a scalar parameter: the open magnetic flux. However, without running costly numerical simulations of the stellar wind, reconstructing the coronal structure of the large scale magnetic field is not trivial. An alternative -broadly used in solar physics- is to extrapolate the surface magnetic field assuming a potential field in the corona, to describe the opening of the field lines by the magnetized wind. This technique relies on the definition of a so-called source surface radius, which is often fixed to the canonical value of 2.5Rsun. However this value likely varies from star to star...

  17. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-{Tc} superconductor at low temperature.

  18. A Feature-Based, Robust, Hierarchical Algorithm for Registering Pairs of Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radke, Rich

    overlaps compare favorably with retinal image registration techniques published in the literature. Index TermsÐRobust estimation, registration, transformation estimation, image mosaic, retinal imaging, feature extraction, feature refinement, multiscale methods, ophthalmic image processing, biomedical image processing

  19. Comparison of receiver function deconvolution techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesce, Kathryn A

    2010-01-01

    Receiver function (RF) techniques are commonly used by geophysicists to image discontinuities and estimate layer thicknesses within the crust and upper mantle. A receiver function is a time-series record of the P-to-S (Ps) ...

  20. Minimally invasive diagnostic imaging using high resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herz, Paul Richard, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    Advances in medical imaging have given researchers unprecedented capabilities to visualize, characterize and understand biological systems. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a high speed, high resolution imaging technique ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslian, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Babapour Mofrad, Farshid; Astarakee, Mahdi; Khaledi, Navid; Fadavi, Pedram

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  2. CHANDRA AND HST IMAGING OF THE QUASARS PKS B0106+013 AND 3C 345: INVERSE COMPTON X-RAYS AND MAGNETIZED JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Hogan, B. S.; Marshall, H. L.

    2012-04-01

    We present results from deep ({approx}70 ks) Chandra/ACIS observations and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys F475W observations of two highly optically polarized quasars belonging to the MOJAVE blazar sample, viz., PKS B0106+013 and 1641+399 (3C 345). These observations reveal X-ray and optical emissions from the jets in both sources. X-ray emission is detected from the entire length of the 0106+013 radio jet, which shows clear bends or wiggles-the X-ray emission is brightest at the first prominent kiloparsec jet bend. A picture of a helical kiloparsec jet with the first kiloparsec-scale bend representing a jet segment moving close(r) to our line of sight, and getting Doppler boosted at both radio and X-ray frequencies, is consistent with these observations. The X-ray emission from the jet end, however, peaks at about 0.''4 ({approx}3.4 kpc) upstream of the radio hot spot. Optical emission is detected both at the X-ray jet termination peak and at the radio hot spot. The X-ray jet termination peak is found upstream of the radio hot spot by around 0.''2 ({approx}1.3 kpc) in the short projected jet of 3C 345. HST optical emission is seen in an arc-like structure coincident with the bright radio hot spot, which we propose is a sharp (apparent) jet bend instead of a terminal point, that crosses our line of sight and consequently has a higher Doppler beaming factor. A weak radio hot spot is indeed observed less than 1'' downstream of the bright radio hot spot, but has no optical or X-ray counterpart. By making use of the parsec-scale radio and the kiloparsec-scale radio/X-ray data, we derive constraints on the jet Lorentz factors ({Gamma}{sub jet}) and inclination angles ({theta}): for a constant jet speed from parsec to kiloparsec scales, we obtain a {Gamma}{sub jet} of {approx}70 for 0106+013 and {approx}40 for 3C 345. On relaxing this assumption, we derive a {Gamma}{sub jet} of {approx}2.5 for both the sources. Upper limits on {theta} of {approx}13 Degree-Sign are obtained for the two quasars. Broadband (radio-optical-X-ray) spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling of individual jet components in both quasars suggests that the optical emission is from the synchrotron mechanism, while the X-rays are produced via the inverse Compton mechanism from relativistically boosted cosmic microwave background seed photons. The locations of the upstream X-ray termination peaks strongly suggest that the sites of bulk jet deceleration lie upstream (by a few kiloparsecs) of the radio hot spots in these quasars. These regions are also the sites of shocks or magnetic field dissipation, which reaccelerate charged particles and produce high-energy optical and X-ray photons. This is consistent with the best-fit SED modeling parameters of magnetic field strength and electron power-law indices being higher in the jet termination regions compared to the cores. The shocked jet regions upstream of the radio hot spots, the kiloparsec-scale jet wiggles and a 'nose cone'-like jet structure in 0106+013, and the V-shaped radio structure in 3C 345, are all broadly consistent with instabilities associated with Poynting-flux-dominated jets. A greater theoretical understanding and more sensitive numerical simulations of jets spanning parsec to kiloparsec scales are needed, however, to make direct quantitative comparisons.

  3. ADAPTIVE AND ROBUST TECHNIQUES (ART) FOR THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yao

    ADAPTIVE AND ROBUST TECHNIQUES (ART) FOR THERMOACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY By YAO XIE A DISSERTATION.1 Thermoacoustic Tomography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Image Reconstruction Algorithms for TAT

  4. Planar visualization of phase objects using a focusing schlieren technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dong-Ho

    1998-01-01

    A focusing schlieren technique has been designed and phics. constructed to examine planar images of optically thin phase objects including high-speed gas jets and flames. The conventional schlieren technique is a highly useful visualization method...

  5. Reciprocity and gyrotropism in magnetic resonance transduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tropp, James

    2006-12-15

    We give formulas for transduction in magnetic resonance - i.e., the appearance of an emf due to Larmor precession of spins - based upon the modified Lorentz reciprocity principle for gyrotropic (also called 'nonreciprocal') media, i.e., in which a susceptibility tensor is carried to its transpose by reversal of an external static field [cf., R. F. Harrington and A. T. Villeneuve IRE Trans. Microwave Theory and Technique MTT6, 308 (1958)]. Prior applications of reciprocity to magnetic resonance, despite much success, have ignored the gyrotropism which necessarily arises due to nuclear and/or unpaired electronic spins. For detection with linearly polarized fields, oscillating at the Larmor frequency, the emf is written in terms of a volume integral containing a product of two factors which we define as the antenna patterns, i.e. (H{sub 1x}{+-}iH{sub 1y}), where, e.g., for a single transceive antenna, the H's are just the spatially dependent oscillatory magnetic field strengths, per the application of some reference current at the antenna terminals, with the negative sign obtaining for transmission, and the positive for reception. Similar expressions hold for separate transmit and receive antennas; expressions are also given for circular polarization of the fields. We then exhibit a receive-only array antenna of two elements for magnetic resonance imaging of protons, which, due an intensity artifact arising from stray reactive coupling of the elements, produces, despite its own bilateral symmetry, asymmetric proton NMR images of a symmetric cylindrical phantom containing aqueous saline solution [J. Tropp and T. Schirmer, J. Magn. Reson. 151, 146 (2001)]. Modification of this two-port antenna, to function in transmit-receive mode, allows us to demonstrate highly nonreciprocal behavior: that is, to record images (of cylindrical test phantoms containing aqueous saline solution) whose appearance dramatically changes, when the roles of transmission and reception are swapped between the two antenna ports--giving in one instance a signal intensity pattern whose form resembles an umbrella (i.e., with a central column of moderate intensity surmounted by a bright canopy), and in the other, a distorted oval with slight concavities at its horizontal extremes, whose outline suggests that of a cat's eye. The relation between image patterns and drive scheme can be shown to reverse if the static polarizing field is reversed. Electromagnetic and circuit calculations, together with the modified reciprocity principle, allow us to reproduce these pattern changes in numerical simulations, closely and convincingly. Although the imaging experiments are performed at a static field of 3.0 T, and consequently a Larmor frequency of 128 MHz, the nonreciprocal effects are not related to the shortness of the wavelength in aqueous medium, but appear equally in simulations based in either the quasistatic or full electromagnetic regimes. Finally, we show that although antenna patterns for transmission and reception are swapped with reversal of the polarizing field, meaning that the receive pattern equals the transmit pattern with the field reversed, this in no way invalidates the familiar rotating wave model of spin dynamics in magnetic resonance.

  6. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  7. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Roger R. (Walnut Creek, CA); Fabyan, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  8. Noise Reduction in CMOS Image Sensors for High Quality Imaging: The Autocorrelation Function Filter on Burst Image Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Frank

    Noise Reduction in CMOS Image Sensors for High Quality Imaging: The Autocorrelation Function Filter-hiro@waseda.jp Abstract We propose a new method for image noise detection and reduction in complementary metal oxide semi- conductor (CMOS) image sensors inspired from audio noise cancelling techniques. Our algorithm is based

  9. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  10. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matsui, Hiroshi (Glen Rock, NJ); Matsunaga, Tadashi (Tokyo, JP)

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  11. Ground Magnetics At Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Colwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Colwell, Et Al., 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date 2011 - 2011...

  12. Master Thesis Proposal Eddy Current Imaging of Electrically Conducting Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Master Thesis Proposal Eddy Current Imaging of Electrically Conducting Media Domenico Lahaye and optimization techniques en- abling the eddy current imaging of electrically conducting media. Examples: · perform a literature study into topics such as eddy current imaging, inverse problems including

  13. Advancements in branched bottlebrush polymers for responsive, targeted imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sowers, Molly A. (Molly Ann)

    2015-01-01

    Multi-modality and stimuli responsive nanoparticles are promising platform materials for medical imaging and diagnostics. Specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nearinfrared (NIR) fluorescent probes can be used ...

  14. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM); Flynn, Edward R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  15. Magnetic Visions: Mapping Cosmic Magnetism with LOFAR and SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Beck

    2008-04-29

    The origin of magnetic fields in the Universe is an open problem in astrophysics and fundamental physics. "Cosmic Magnetism" has been accepted as Key Science Project both for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR, under construction) and the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA). At low frequencies LOFAR and SKA will allow to map the structure of weak magnetic fields in the outer regions and halos of galaxies, in galaxy clusters and in the Milky Way. High-resolution polarization observations at high frequencies with the SKA will trace magnetic fields in the disks and central regions of galaxies in unprecedented detail. All-sky surveys of Faraday rotation measures (RM) towards polarized background sources will be used to model the structure and strength of the magnetic fields in the Milky Way, the interstellar medium of galaxies and the intergalactic medium. The new method of "RM Synthesis", applied to spectro-polarimetric data cubes, will separate RM components from different distances and allow 3-D "Faraday tomography". Magnetic fields in distant galaxies and clusters and in intergalactic filaments will be searched for by deep imaging of weak synchrotron emission and of RM towards background sources. This will open a new era in the observation of cosmic magnetic fields.

  16. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references.

  17. Image compression/decompression based on mathematical transform, reduction/expansion, and image sharpening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-12-30

    An image represented in a first image array of pixels is first decimated in two dimensions before being compressed by a predefined compression algorithm such as JPEG. Another possible predefined compression algorithm can involve a wavelet technique. The compressed, reduced image is then transmitted over the limited bandwidth transmission medium, and the transmitted image is decompressed using an algorithm which is an inverse of the predefined compression algorithm (such as reverse JPEG). The decompressed, reduced image is then interpolated back to its original array size. Edges (contours) in the image are then sharpened to enhance the perceptual quality of the reconstructed image. Specific sharpening techniques are described. 22 figs.

  18. Control of magnetization-reversal processes via uniaxial anisotropy strength in La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 electrodes for spintronic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, L. C.; Yan, W.; Moya, X.; Ghidini, M.; Maccherozzi, F.; Dhesi, S. S.; Mathur, N. D.

    2015-12-14

    Spintronic device performance depends critically on magnetization-reversal processes, but these are rarely imaged in order to verify correct operation. Here we use magnetometry and magnetic imaging to study thin films and patterned elements...

  19. Imaging vector fields using Line Integral Convolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, B.; Leedom, L.C.

    1993-03-01

    Imaging vector fields has applications in science, art, image processing and special effects. An effective new approach is to use linear and curvilinear filtering techniques to locally blur textures along a vector field. This approach builds on several previous texture generation and filtering techniques. It is, however, unique because it is local, one-dimensional and independent of any predefined geometry or texture. The technique is general and capable of imaging arbitrary two- and three-dimensional vector fields. The local one-dimensional nature of the algorithm lends itself to highly parallel and efficient implementations. Furthermore, the curvilinear filter is capable of rendering detail on very intricate vector fields. Combining this technique with other rendering and image processing techniques -- like periodic motion filtering -- results in richly informative and striking images. The technique can also produce novel special effects.

  20. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  1. Discovery of magnetic fields in three He variable Bp stars with He and Si spots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briquet, M; Schöller, M; De Cat, P

    2006-01-01

    It is essential for the understanding of stellar structure models of high mass stars to explain why constant stars, non-pulsating chemically peculiar hot Bp stars and pulsating stars co-exist in the slowly pulsating B stars and beta Cephei instability strips. We have conducted a search for magnetic fields in the four Bp stars HD55522, HD105382, HD131120, and HD138769 which previously have been wrongly identified as slowly pulsating B stars. A recent study of these stars using the Doppler Imaging technique revealed that the elements He and Si are inhomogeneously distributed on the stellar surface, causing the periodic variability. Using FORS1 in spectropolarimetric mode at the VLT, we have acquired circular polarisation spectra to test the presence of a magnetic field in these stars. A variable magnetic field is clearly detected in HD55522 and HD105382, but no evidence for the existence of a magnetic field was found in HD131120. The presence of a magnetic field in HD138769 is suggested by one measurement at 3 ...

  2. Iterative electromagnetic Born inversion applied to earth conductivity imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alumbaugh, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    This thesis investigates the use of a fast imaging technique to deduce the spatial conductivity distribution in the earth from low frequency (< 1 MHz), cross well electromagnetic (EM) measurements. The theory embodied in this work is the extension of previous strategies and is based on the Born series approximation to solve both the forward and inverse problem. Nonlinear integral equations are employed to derive the series expansion which accounts for the scattered magnetic fields that are generated by inhomogeneities embedded in either a homogenous or a layered earth. A sinusoidally oscillating, vertically oriented magnetic dipole is employed as a source, and it is assumed that the scattering bodies are azimuthally symmetric about the source dipole axis. The use of this model geometry reduces the 3-D vector problem to a more manageable 2-D scalar form. The validity of the cross well EM method is tested by applying the imaging scheme to two sets of field data. Images of the data collected at the Devine, Texas test site show excellent correlation with the well logs. Unfortunately there is a drift error present in the data that limits the accuracy of the results. A more complete set of data collected at the Richmond field station in Richmond, California demonstrates that cross well EM can be successfully employed to monitor the position of an injected mass of salt water. Both the data and the resulting images clearly indicate the plume migrates toward the north-northwest. The plausibility of these conclusions is verified by applying the imaging code to synthetic data generated by a 3-D sheet model.

  3. MANSFIELD ET AL.: TRANSFORMING IMAGE COMPLETION 1 Transforming Image Completion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohli, Pushmeet

    .K. Abstract Image completion is an important photo-editing task which involves synthetically filling a hole-of-the-art techniques. 1 Introduction Image completion is an important photo-editing task which involves synthetically the pixel traversal order critical. A number of user-driven [12] and intelligent [3] heuristics have been

  4. Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirect

  5. Next Generation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemm, Piper Julia

    2012-01-01

    Meade, T. J. Gd(III)-Nanodiamond conjugates for MRI contrastMeade, T. J. Gd(III)-Nanodiamond conjugates for MRI contrastMeade, T. J. Gd(III)-Nanodiamond conjugates for MRI contrast

  6. Next Generation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemm, Piper Julia

    2012-01-01

    and environmental impact of Fe make it a promising candidate for more sustainable contrast agent development.

  7. Next Generation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemm, Piper Julia

    2012-01-01

    were filtered over 0.45 ! m PTFE filters to remove dust andsolids through a 0.45 ! m PTFE filter the red solution wasand filtered over a 0.45 ! m PTFE filter. After evaporation

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of plantar plate rupture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, L; Cracchiolo, A; Farahani, K; Seeger, LL

    1996-01-01

    had an ipsilateral hallux valgus, and five had a hammertoe8), and an ipsilateral hallux valgus (6 of 8). Patients with

  9. Nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging C. L. Degena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo, Degiorgi

    tobacco mosaic virus particles sitting on a nanometer-thick layer of ad- sorbed hydrocarbons. This result, which represents a 100 million- fold improvement in volume resolution over conventional MRI considerable effort, attempts to push the spatial resolution of conventional MRI into the realm of high

  10. Image Charge Differential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Image Charge Differential Amplifier FT 0 Crude Oil Time (s) 543210 Frequency (kHz) m/z m q B f organic molecules such as heavy crude oils. Heavy crudes are some of the most complex organic mixtures found in nature. As the crude oil industry grows in size and demand for crude oil increases, techniques

  11. Magnet Cable Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royet, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    J. Royet, "Magnet Cable Manufacturing", oral presentation atDivision Magnet Cable Manufacturing J. Royet October 1990J I Magnet Cable Manufacturing* John Royet Accelerator &

  12. Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by Kannan M. Krishnan, Ph.D. Departments of Materials Science and Physics University of Washington Abstract There has been a renaissance in magnetism. Central to this work are innovations in chemical synthesis of nanoparticles, their size-dependent magnetic

  13. Stargate: Energy Management Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijay Raghunathan; Mani Srivastava; Trevor Pering; Roy Want

    2004-01-01

    Stargate: Energy Management Techniques Vijay Raghunathan,Platform specific energy management is crucial for longSolution: System level energy management techniques and

  14. Turbulence in the Solar Atmosphere: Manifestations and Diagnostics via Solar Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manolis K. Georgoulis

    2005-11-15

    Intermittent magnetohydrodynamical turbulence is most likely at work in the magnetized solar atmosphere. As a result, an array of scaling and multi-scaling image-processing techniques can be used to measure the expected self-organization of solar magnetic fields. While these techniques advance our understanding of the physical system at work, it is unclear whether they can be used to predict solar eruptions, thus obtaining a practical significance for space weather. We address part of this problem by focusing on solar active regions and by investigating the usefulness of scaling and multi-scaling image-processing techniques in solar flare prediction. Since solar flares exhibit spatial and temporal intermittency, we suggest that they are the products of instabilities subject to a critical threshold in a turbulent magnetic configuration. The identification of this threshold in scaling and multi-scaling spectra would then contribute meaningfully to the prediction of solar flares. We find that the fractal dimension of solar magnetic fields and their multi-fractal spectrum of generalized correlation dimensions do not have significant predictive ability. The respective multi-fractal structure functions and their inertial-range scaling exponents, however, probably provide some statistical distinguishing features between flaring and non-flaring active regions. More importantly, the temporal evolution of the above scaling exponents in flaring active regions probably shows a distinct behavior starting a few hours prior to a flare and therefore this temporal behavior may be practically useful in flare prediction. The results of this study need to be validated by more comprehensive works over a large number of solar active regions.

  15. Image Compression by Back Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    CHAPTER 9 Image Compression by Back Propagation: An Example of Extensional Programming* GARRISON W the case with the computatiolls associated with basic cognitive pro- cesses such as vision and audition techniques. The technique we employ is known as back propagation. developed by l1umelhart, Hinton

  16. Magnetization process of a single magnetic ring detected by nonlocal spin valve measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otani, Yoshichika

    Magnetization process of a single magnetic ring detected by nonlocal spin valve measurement T of a 200-nm-wide Permalloy ring using a nonlocal spin-valve measurement technique in a lateral geometry state using lateral spin-valve geometry.13­15 The chirality is found to be easily determined from

  17. Technique for ship/wake detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-05-01

    An automated ship detection technique includes accessing data associated with an image of a portion of Earth. The data includes reflectance values. A first portion of pixels within the image are masked with a cloud and land mask based on spectral flatness of the reflectance values associated with the pixels. A given pixel selected from the first portion of pixels is unmasked when a threshold number of localized pixels surrounding the given pixel are not masked by the cloud and land mask. A spatial variability image is generated based on spatial derivatives of the reflectance values of the pixels which remain unmasked by the cloud and land mask. The spatial variability image is thresholded to identify one or more regions within the image as possible ship detection regions.

  18. AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    serious study of research problems in infiltration. THEORYInfiltration Measurement Techniques REFERENCES J .B. Dick, "Experimental Studies

  19. Imaging Liquids Using Microfluidic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Bingwen; Yang, Li

    2013-05-10

    Chemistry occurring in the liquid and liquid surface is important in many applications. Chemical imaging of liquids using vacuum based analytical techniques is challenging due to the difficulty in working with liquids with high volatility. Recent development in microfluidics enabled and increased our capabilities to study liquid in situ using surface sensitive techniques such as electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Due to its small size, low cost, and flexibility in design, liquid cells based on microfluidics have been increasingly used in studying and imaging complex phenomena involving liquids. This paper presents a review of microfluidic cells that were developed to adapt to electron microscopes and various spectrometers for in situ chemical analysis and imaging of liquids. The following topics will be covered including cell designs, fabrication techniques, unique technical features for vacuum compatible cells, and imaging with electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Challenges are summarized and recommendations for future development priority are proposed.

  20. Picosecond Optical MCPI-Based Imagers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-10-01

    We present the desired performance specifications for an advanced optical imager, which borrows practical concepts in high-speed microchannel plate (MCP) intensified x-ray stripline imagers and time-dilation techniques. With a four-fold speed improvement in state-of-the-art high-voltage impulse drivers, and novel atomic-layer deposition MCPs, we tender a design capable of 5 ps optical gating without the use of magnetic field confinement of the photoelectrons. We analyze the electron dispersion effects in the MCP and their implications for gating pulses shorter than the MCP transit time. We present a wideband design printed-circuit version of the Series Transmission Line Transformer (STLT) that makes use of 50-ohm coaxial 1.0 mm (110 GHz) and 1.85 mm (65 GHz) hermetically sealed vacuum feedthroughs and low-dispersion Teflon/Kapton circuit materials without the use of any vias. The STLT matches impedance at all interfaces with a 16:1 impedance (4:1 voltage) reduction, and delivers a dispersion-limited sharp impulse to the MCP strip. A comparison of microstrip design calculations is given, showing variances between method of moments, empirical codes, and finite element methods for broad, low-impedance traces. Prototype performance measurements are forthcoming.

  1. Correlation lifetimes of quiet and magnetic granulation from the SOUP (Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter) instrument on Spacelab 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Title, A.; Tarbell, T.; Topka, K.; Acton, L.; Duncan, D.

    1988-10-01

    The flight of the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 allowed the collection of time sequences of diffraction-limited (0.5 arc second) granulation images with excellent pointing (0.003 arc second jitter RMS) and freedom from the distortion that plagues ground-based images. The solar 5 minute oscillations are clearly seen in the data. Using Fourier transforms in the temporal and spatial domain, the authors show that these dominate the autocorrelation lifetime in magnetic regions. When the oscillations are removed the autocorrelation lifetime is found to be 410 and 890 seconds, respectively, in quiet and magnetic regions. In quiet areas exploding granules are common. It is hard to find that neither explodes nor is unaffected by a nearby explosion. A significant fraction of granule lifetimes are terminated by nearby explosions. Local correlation-tracking techniques are used to measure horizontal displacements, and thus transverse velocities, in the intensity field. In the quiet sun it is possible to detect both super- and mesogranulation. Horizontal velocities are as great as 1000 m/s quiet sun, and the average velocity is 400 m/s. In magnetic regions, horizontal velocities are much less, about 200 m/s. These flows effect the measured lifetime. A lower limit to the lifetime in quiet and magnetic sun is estimated to be 440 and 950 seconds respectively.

  2. Medical Image Segmentation Xiaolei Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xiaolei

    . The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) holds the copyright to the DICOM standard. Medical (CAT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Ultrasound, and X-Ray, in standard DICOM formats are often and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard is created as a cooperative international standard for communication

  3. A Small Scale Magnetic Particle Relaxometer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Ghamrawy, Ahmed

    2013-12-09

    scanner development, superparamagnetic materials development, and image reconstruction techniques. In this project a small scale LabView-based system will be developed for use on small lab created phantoms, using 25 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO...

  4. Advanced Millimeter-Wave Imaging Enhances Security Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-01-12

    Millimeter-wave imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This paper details a number of techniques developed over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, as well as high frequency high bandwidth techniques. Implementation of some of these methods will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems.

  5. Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  6. Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitton, Mary C.

    Medial Techniques for Automating Finite Element Analysis by Jessica Renee Crawford Crouch Analysis. (Under the direction of Stephen M. Pizer.) Finite element analysis provides a principled method the simulation of tissue deformation. The drawback to using finite element analysis for imaging problems

  7. Genetic Painting: A Salience Adaptive Relaxation Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collomosse, John

    Chapter 4 Genetic Painting: A Salience Adaptive Relaxation Technique for Painterly Rendering paintings1. We draw upon our previous ob- servations of artistic practice to define the degree of optimality for a painting to be measured by the correlation between the salience map of the original image and the level

  8. Measuring the strong electrostatic and magnetic fields with proton radiography for ultra-high intensity laser channeling on fast ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uematsu, Y.; Iwawaki, T.; Habara, H., E-mail: habara@eei.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, K. A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ivancic, S.; Theobald, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Lei, A. L. [Shanghai Institute of Laser Plasma, 201800 Shanghai (China)

    2014-11-15

    In order to investigate the intense laser propagation and channel formation in dense plasma, we conducted an experiment with proton deflectometry on the OMEGA EP Laser facility. The proton image was analyzed by tracing the trajectory of mono-energetic protons, which provides understanding the electric and magnetic fields that were generated around the channel. The estimated field strengths (E ? 10{sup 11} V/m and B ? 10{sup 8} G) agree with the predictions from 2D-Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, indicating the feasibility of the proton deflectometry technique for over-critical density plasma.

  9. Patterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -increasing demands in data storage and to new applications of magnetic devices in the field of sensors. NewPatterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks STEPHEN Y. CHOU Invited Paper, opens up new opportunities for engineering innovative magnetic materials and devices, developing ultra

  10. Impact of seismic resolution on geostatistical techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukerji, T.; Rio, P.; Mavko, G.M.

    1995-12-31

    Seismic measurements are often incorporated in geostatistical techniques for estimation and simulation of petrophysical properties such as porosity. The good correlation between seismic and rock properties provides a basis for these techniques. Seismic data have a wide spatial coverage not available in log or core data. However, each seismic measurement has a characteristic response function determined by the source-receiver geometry and signal bandwidth. The image response of the seismic measurement gives a filtered version of the true velocity image. Therefore the seismic image we obtain cannot reflect exactly the true seismic velocity at all scales of spatial heterogeneities present in the earth. The seismic response function can be conveniently approximated in the spatial spectral domain using a Born approximation. Our goal is to study how the seismic image response affects the estimation of variograms and spatial scales, and its impact on geostatistical results. Limitations of view angles and signal bandwidth not only smoothes the seismic image, increasing the variogram range, but can also introduce anisotropic spatial structures in the image. We can add value to the seismic data by better characterizing an quantifying these attributes. As an exercise we present example of seismically assisted cosimulation of porosity between wells.

  11. Prospects for x-ray polarimetry measurements of magnetic fields in magnetized liner inertial fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Alan G. Gilmore, Mark

    2014-11-15

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments, where a metal liner is imploded to compress a magnetized seed plasma may generate peak magnetic fields ?10{sup 4} T (100 Megagauss) over small volumes (?10{sup ?10}m{sup 3}) at high plasma densities (?10{sup 28}m{sup ?3}) on 100 ns time scales. Such conditions are extremely challenging to diagnose. We discuss the possibility of, and issues involved in, using polarimetry techniques at x-ray wavelengths to measure magnetic fields under these extreme conditions.

  12. Image alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  13. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  14. Medical Imaging: ECE-4BF3 Winter 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    and formation; post-processing for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy; comparisons to other medical with medical imaging technologies- both from a physics and engineering perspective through to a practical.). However, comparative applications with other imaging modalities (e.g. PET, SPECT, ultrasound, mammography

  15. Medical Imaging: Elec Eng -4BF3 Winter 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    image acquisition and formation; post-processing for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy is designed to allow students to become familiar with medical imaging technologies- both from a physics modalities (e.g. PET, SPECT, ultrasound, mammography, CT, EEG, MEG) will be made where appropriate. Practical

  16. Real-time imaging of density ducts between the plasmasphere and ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loi, Shyeh Tjing; Cairns, Iver H; Menk, Frederick W; Waters, Colin L; Erickson, Philip J; Trott, Cathryn M; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Morgan, John; Lenc, Emil; Offringa, Andre R; Bell, Martin E; Ekers, Ronald D; Gaensler, B M; Lonsdale, Colin J; Feng, Lu; Hancock, Paul J; Kaplan, David L; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Deshpande, A A; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2015-01-01

    Ionization of the Earth's atmosphere by sunlight forms a complex, multi-layered plasma environment within the Earth's magnetosphere, the innermost layers being the ionosphere and plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is believed to be embedded with cylindrical density structures (ducts) aligned along the Earth's magnetic field, but direct evidence for these remains scarce. Here we report the first direct wide-angle observation of an extensive array of field-aligned ducts bridging the upper ionosphere and inner plasmasphere, using a novel ground-based imaging technique. We establish their heights and motions by feature-tracking and parallax analysis. The structures are strikingly organized, appearing as regularly-spaced, alternating tubes of overdensities and underdensities strongly aligned with the Earth's magnetic field. These findings represent the first direct visual evidence for the existence of such structures.

  17. High throughput 3D optical microscopy : from image cytometry to endomicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Heejin

    2014-01-01

    Optical microscopy is an imaging technique that allows morphological mapping of intracellular structures with submicron resolution. More importantly, optical microscopy is a technique that can readily provide images with ...

  18. Three-dimensional magnetic spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering and neutron depolarization: A comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rekveldt, M. Theo; Dijk, Niels H. van; Grigoriev, Serguei V.; Kraan, Wicher H.; Bouwman, Wim G. [Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina, St-Petersburg District (Russian Federation); Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2006-07-15

    The recently developed magnetic spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique provides unique information about the distance correlation of the local vector magnetization as a function of the spin-echo length within a magnetic material. The technique probes the magnetic correlations on a length scale from 10 nm up to 10 {mu}m within the bulk of a magnetic material by evaluating the Larmor precession of a polarized neutron beam in a spin-echo setup. The characteristics of the spin-echo SANS technique are discussed and compared to those of the more conventional neutron depolarization technique. Both of these techniques probe the average size of the magnetic inhomogeneities and the local magnetic texture. The magnetic spin-echo SANS technique gives information on the size distribution of these magnetic inhomogeneities perpendicular to the beam and, in principle, independent on the local magnetic induction. This information is not accessible by the neutron depolarization technique that gives the average size parallel to the beam multiplied with the square of the local magnetic induction. The basic possibilities of the magnetic spin-echo SANS technique are demonstrated by experiments on samples with a strong magnetic texture.

  19. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the alpha-particle spectrometer concept, and outlines challenges involved in the magnetic field design. Tagged photon interrogation: • We investigated a method for discriminating fissile from benign cargo-material response to an energy-tagged photon beam. The method relies upon coincident detection of the tagged photon and a photoneutron or photofission neutron produced in the target material. The method exploits differences in the shape of the neutron production cross section as a function of incident photon energy in order to discriminate photofission yield from photoneutrons emitted by non-fissile materials. Computational tests of the interrogation method as applied to material composition assay of a simple, multi-layer target suggest that the tagged-photon information facilitates precise (order 1% thickness uncertainty) reconstruction of the constituent thicknesses of fissile (uranium) and high-Z (Pb) constituents of the test targets in a few minutes of photon-beam exposure. We assumed an 18-MeV endpoint tagged photon beam for these simulations. • The report addresses several candidate design and data analysis issues for beamline infrastructure required to produce a tagged photon beam in a notional AI-dedicated facility, including the accelerator and tagging spectrometer.

  20. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    Superconducting Magnet Division Permanent Magnet Designs with Large Variations in Field Strength the residual field of the magnetized bricks by concentrating flux lines at the iron pole. Low Field Design Medium Field Design Superconducting Magnet Division Dipole and Quadrupole Magnets for RHIC e

  1. Superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  2. The HERMES dual-radiator ring imaging Cerenkov detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akopov, N Z; Bailey, K; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Capitani, G P; Carter, P; Cisbani, E; De Leo, R; De Sanctis, E; De Schepper, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Filippone, B W; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Hansen, J O; Hommez, B; Iodice, M; Jackson, H E; Jung, P; Kaiser, R; Kanesaka, J; Kowalczyk, R; Lagamba, L; Maas, A; Muccifora, V; Nappi, E; Negodaeva, K; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; O'Connor, T; O'Neill, T G; Potterveld, D H; Ryckbosch, D; Sakemi, Y; Sato, F; Schwind, A; Shibata, T A; Suetsugu, K; Thomas, E; Tytgat, M; Urciuoli, G M; Van de Kerckhove, K; Van de Vyver, R; Yoneyama, S; Zohrabyan, H G; Zhang, L F

    2002-01-01

    The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging Cerenkov(RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasizes measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C4F10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet.

  3. In vivo imaging with a cell-permeable porphyrin-based MRI contrast agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Taekwan

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

  4. In Vivo Imaging with a Cell-Permeable Porphyrin-Based MRI Contrast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Taekwan

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

  5. Microbial Cell Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is finding increasing application in a variety of fields including microbiology. Until the emergence of AFM, techniques for ivnestigating processes in single microbes were limited. From a biologist's perspective, the fact that AFM can be used to generate high-resolution images in buffers or media is its most appealing feature as live-cell imaging can be pursued. Imaging living cells by AFM allows dynamic biological events to be studied, at the nanoscale, in real time. Few areas of biological research have as much to gain as microbiology from the application of AFM. Whereas the scale of microbes places them near the limit of resolution for light microscopy. AFM is well suited for the study of structures on the order of a micron or less. Although electron microscopy techniques have been the standard for high-resolution imaging of microbes, AFM is quickly gaining favor for several reasons. First, fixatives that impair biological activity are not required. Second, AFM is capable of detecting forces in the pN range, and precise control of the force applied to the cantilever can be maintained. This combination facilitates the evaluation of physical characteristics of microbes. Third, rather than yielding the composite, statistical average of cell populations, as is the case with many biochemical assays, the behavior of single cells can be monitored. Despite the potential of AFM in microbiology, there are several limitations that must be considered. For example, the time required to record an image allows for the study of gross events such as cell division or membrane degradation from an antibiotic but precludes the evaluation of biological reactions and events that happen in just fractions of a second. Additionally, the AFM is a topographical tool and is restricted to imaging surfaces. Therefore, it cannot be used to look inside cells as with opticla and transmission electron microscopes. other practical considerations are the limitation on the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  6. DARTPIV : Dynamic Adaptive Real-Time Particle Image Velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Samvaran

    2013-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a technique that allows for the detailed visualization of fluid flow. By performing computational analysis on images taken by a high-sensitivity camera that monitors the movement of ...

  7. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zhang, Song

    2012-08-29

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  8. Guest Editorial Sparse Approximations in Signal and Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Guest Editorial Sparse Approximations in Signal and Image Processing Sparse approximation to solve many other signal processing problems, including blind source separation, feature extraction techniques to images as well as audio and biomedical signals, new efficient im- plementations of greedy

  9. X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials June 22, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Imaging and data analysis techniques offer new approach to probing material properties In a new...

  10. Retrieving Imaged Documents in Digital Libraries Based on Word Image Coding Yue Lu, Li Zhang, Chew Lim Tan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chew Lim

    Retrieving Imaged Documents in Digital Libraries Based on Word Image Coding Yue Lu, Li Zhang, Chew are scanned and archived in the form of digital images in digital libraries, to make them available and challenging problem. For this purpose, a word image coding technique is proposed in this paper, and a web

  11. Magnetic manipulation with several mobile coils towards gastrointestinal capsular endoscopy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . These techniques, based on flexible endoscopes, are fairly reliable and provide high resolution images that enable gastrointestinal diagnosis techniques, Given Imaging developed, in 2000, the M2A (mouth to anus) capsule endoscopy capsule embedding a battery, a CCD camera, LEDs and a RF transmitter. Patients swallow the capsule which

  12. Miniature, high-speed imaging transform spectrometers and advanced sampling algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of miniature imaging Fourier transform spectrometers and irregular sampling techniques. An imaging spectrometer is a device that takes a series of images that include information from ...

  13. Nanostructured magnetic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

  14. CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS THROUGH GYRORESONANCE EMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    . The spiralling motion of electrons in the 200­ 2000 G fields in the solar corona produces sufficient opacity to render the corona optically thick, making it easy to recognize such sources in microwave images from. Keywords: Sun, solar corona, solar magnetic fields, solar radio emission Introduction Since the realization

  15. Novel mathematical modeling approaches to assess ischemic stroke lesion evolution on medical imaging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rekik, Islem

    2014-11-28

    Stroke is a major cause of disability and death worldwide. Although different clinical studies and trials used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to examine patterns of change in different imaging modalities (eg: perfusion ...

  16. Direct visualization of the perforant pathway in the human brain with ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustinack, Jean

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging yields high resolution images that reveal detailed cerebral anatomy and explicit cytoarchitecture in the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and white matter in the human brain. Our ...

  17. The development of magnetic tunnel junction fabrication techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elwell, Clifford Alastair

    , Dept. Materials Science, University of Cambridge July, 2002. Acknowledgements This work would not have been possible without the support of a number of people. I would firstly like to thank my supervisor, Dr Mark Blamire for all his... . All my proof readers have been great: Frances Gibson, Karen Yates, Mike Gibson, Angus Bryant, Angela MacKay, Gemma France, Mike Elwell and John Durrell. In the words of Socrates: “The unexamined life is not worth living.” I’d like to thank everyone...

  18. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROIMAGING OF CHILDREN USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stromswold, Karin

    year in the United States. As many as 52% of these children will require some form of special needs to the comparatively low rate of death among children who manifest idiopathic developmental delay. It is not surprising

  19. Sandia Energy - Sandia Magnetized Fusion Technique Produces Significant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput AnalysisSinkhole Officials Turn

  20. Magnets and Power Supplies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Longitudinal bunch profile and Magnets and Power Supplies Dipole Magnets and Power Supplies Value Dipole Number 80+1 No. of power...

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01

    Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

  2. 'Data Deluge' Pushes Mass Spec Imaging to New Heights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is to zero in on the most important location and the most important ion in an image." Enter randomized linear algebra (RLA), a mathematical technique commonly used in...

  3. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  4. Application of a nudging technique to thermoacoustic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Application of a nudging technique to thermoacoustic tomography Xavier Bonnefond and Sébastien Marinesque December 3, 2011 Abstract ThermoAcoustic Tomography (TAT) is a promising, non invasive, medical inversion method. 1 Introduction ThermoAcoustic Tomography (TAT) is a hybrid imaging technique that uses

  5. Multiphase imaging of gas flow in a nanoporous material usingremote detection NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harel, Elad; Granwehr, Josef; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pines, Alex

    2005-10-03

    Pore structure and connectivity determine how microstructured materials perform in applications such as catalysis, fluid storage and transport, filtering, or as reactors. We report a model study on silica aerogel using a recently introduced time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance imaging technique to characterize the flow field and elucidate the effects of heterogeneities in the pore structure on gas flow and dispersion with Xe-129 as the gas-phase sensor. The observed chemical shift allows the separate visualization of unrestricted xenon and xenon confined in the pores of the aerogel. The asymmetrical nature of the dispersion pattern alludes to the existence of a stationary and a flow regime in the aerogel. An exchange time constant is determined to characterize the gas transfer between them. As a general methodology, this technique provides new insights into the dynamics of flow in porous media where multiple phases or chemical species may be present.

  6. 3-dimensional surface imaging using Active Wavefront Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frigerio, Federico, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    A novel 3D surface imaging technique using Active Wavefront Sampling (AWS) is presented. In this technique, the optical wavefront traversing a lens is sampled at two or more off-axis locations and the resulting motion of ...

  7. Noise in the processing and application of magnetic gradients Leon Foks, Kristofer Davis, and Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetics, Colorado School of Mines,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noise in the processing and application of magnetic gradients Leon Foks, Kristofer Davis SUMMARY The increased use of magnetic gradients brings about the need for reliable noise characterization to characterize noise in magnetic gradient data. We use an equivalent source technique and finite differ- ence

  8. Atomic magnetic gradiometer for room temperature high sensitivity magnetic field detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu,Shoujun (Berkeley, CA); Lowery, Thomas L. (Belmont, MA); Budker, Dmitry (El Cerrito, CA); Yashchuk, Valeriy V. (Richmond, CA); Wemmer, David E. (Berkeley, CA); Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA)

    2009-08-11

    A laser-based atomic magnetometer (LBAM) apparatus measures magnetic fields, comprising: a plurality of polarization detector cells to detect magnetic fields; a laser source optically coupled to the polarization detector cells; and a signal detector that measures the laser source after being coupled to the polarization detector cells, which may be alkali cells. A single polarization cell may be used for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by prepolarizing the nuclear spins of an analyte, encoding spectroscopic and/or spatial information, and detecting NMR signals from the analyte with a laser-based atomic magnetometer to form NMR spectra and/or magnetic resonance images (MRI). There is no need of a magnetic field or cryogenics in the detection step, as it is detected through the LBAM.

  9. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing...

  10. Investigation of Peptide Folding by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, SoYoun

    2012-07-16

    . Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful technique to investigate protein structure, dynamics, and folding mechanisms, since it provides residue-specific information. One of the major contributions that govern protein structure appears...

  11. Medical Imaging: ECE-4BF3 Michael D. Noseworthy, Ph.D., P.Eng.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    ; post-processing for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy; comparisons to other medical imaging This course is designed to allow students to become familiar with medical imaging technologies- both from imaging modalities (e.g. PET, SPECT, ultrasound, mammography, CT, EEG, MEG) will be made where appropriate

  12. Towards Systematic Exploration of Tradeoffs for Medical Image Registration on Heterogeneous Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Shuvra S.

    . INTRODUCTION Advances in medical imaging technologies have enabled medical diagnoses and procedures simply of imaging modalities (e.g. computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance into one integrated view through a procedure called image registration. Image registration is the process

  13. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  14. INVESTIGATION OF THERAPY IMPROVEMENT USING REAL-TIME PHOTOACOUSTIC IMAGING GUIDED HIGH INTENSITY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Huizhong

    2013-05-31

    . Although several groups showed that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),[32, 91, 92] thermoacoustic tomography (TAT),[93] ultrasound imaging[25, 94] have the capabilities of monitoring the thermal lesion generated by HIFU in the targeted region, PAI has... modes (such as head and neck imaging), special RF coils are used to fit closely to the patient’s anatomy, and these coils will interfere with HIFU transducer placement. Photoacoustic imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging or thermoacoustic imaging...

  15. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  16. New techniques for the scientific visualization of three-dimensional multi-variate and vector fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    Volume rendering allows us to represent a density cloud with ideal properties (single scattering, no self-shadowing, etc.). Scientific visualization utilizes this technique by mapping an abstract variable or property in a computer simulation to a synthetic density cloud. This thesis extends volume rendering from its limitation of isotropic density clouds to anisotropic and/or noisy density clouds. Design aspects of these techniques are discussed that aid in the comprehension of scientific information. Anisotropic volume rendering is used to represent vector based quantities in scientific visualization. Velocity and vorticity in a fluid flow, electric and magnetic waves in an electromagnetic simulation, and blood flow within the body are examples of vector based information within a computer simulation or gathered from instrumentation. Understand these fields can be crucial to understanding the overall physics or physiology. Three techniques for representing three-dimensional vector fields are presented: Line Bundles, Textured Splats and Hair Splats. These techniques are aimed at providing a high-level (qualitative) overview of the flows, offering the user a substantial amount of information with a single image or animation. Non-homogenous volume rendering is used to represent multiple variables. Computer simulations can typically have over thirty variables, which describe properties whose understanding are useful to the scientist. Trying to understand each of these separately can be time consuming. Trying to understand any cause and effect relationships between different variables can be impossible. NoiseSplats is introduced to represent two or more properties in a single volume rendering of the data. This technique is also aimed at providing a qualitative overview of the flows.

  17. Efficient implementation schemes for image enhancement filters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Khadem Mahmud

    1994-01-01

    Generalized median filtering techniques that have appeared in previous literature suffer from some severe disadvantages. They are not only hardware intensive and time consuming but also tend to smear image edges. These shortcomings can be overcome...

  18. Magnetic tests for magnetosome chains in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Benjamin P.

    Magnetic tests for magnetosome chains in Martian meteorite ALH84001 Benjamin P. Weiss* , Soon Sam* Divisions of *Geological and Planetary Sciences and ¶Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and §Jet Propulsion to magnetofossils. Here we use three rock magnetic techniques, low-temperature cycling, the Moskowitz test

  19. A Radiographic Technique With Heavy Ion Microbeams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muscio, J.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Debray, M. E.; Valda, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Kesque, J. M.; Minsky, D. M.

    2007-02-12

    In this work, we introduce a new technique to perform densitometric and multielemental analysis of samples at the same time using a simple detector with heavy ion micro-beams. It consists in the simultaneous analysis of X-rays induced in the sample and in a secondary target arranged behind the specimen. The X-rays originated in the secondary target are attenuated when crossing the specimen producing a radiographic image with a monochromatic source.

  20. New characterization techniques for LSST sensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nomerotski, A.

    2015-06-18

    Fully depleted, thick CCDs with extended infra-red response have become the sensor of choice for modern sky surveys. The charge transport effects in the silicon and associated astrometric distortions could make mapping between the sky coordinates and sensor coordinates non-trivial, and limit the ultimate precision achievable with these sensors. Two new characterization techniques for the CCDs, which both could probe these issues, are discussed: x-ray flat fielding and imaging of pinhole arrays.

  1. Beryllium liner implosion experiments on the Z accelerator in preparation for magnetized liner inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, R. D.; Martin, M. R.; Lemke, R. W.; Jennings, C. A.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Slutz, S. A.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Davis, J.-P.; Flicker, D. G.; Rogers, T. J.; Robertson, G. K.; Kamm, R. J.; Smith, I. C.; Savage, M.; Stygar, W. A.; Rochau, G. A.; Jones, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2013-05-15

    Multiple experimental campaigns have been executed to study the implosions of initially solid beryllium (Be) liners (tubes) on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The implosions were driven by current pulses that rose from 0 to 20 MA in either 100 or 200 ns (200 ns for pulse shaping experiments). These studies were conducted in support of the recently proposed Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)], as well as for exploring novel equation-of-state measurement techniques. The experiments used thick-walled liners that had an aspect ratio (initial outer radius divided by initial wall thickness) of either 3.2, 4, or 6. From these studies, we present three new primary results. First, we present radiographic images of imploding Be liners, where each liner contained a thin aluminum sleeve for enhancing the contrast and visibility of the liner's inner surface in the images. These images allow us to assess the stability of the liner's inner surface more accurately and more directly than was previously possible. Second, we present radiographic images taken early in the implosion (prior to any motion of the liner's inner surface) of a shockwave propagating radially inward through the liner wall. Radial mass density profiles from these shock compression experiments are contrasted with profiles from experiments where the Z accelerator's pulse shaping capabilities were used to achieve shockless (“quasi-isentropic”) liner compression. Third, we present “micro-B-dot ” measurements of azimuthal magnetic field penetration into the initially vacuum-filled interior of a shocked liner. Our measurements and simulations reveal that the penetration commences shortly after the shockwave breaks out from the liner's inner surface. The field then accelerates this low-density “precursor” plasma to the axis of symmetry.

  2. Simultaneous multislice spiral and EPI chemical shift imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abuhashem, Obaidah Anees

    2013-01-01

    The current prominent excitation methods of 3D slabs used for MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) include long dead times in each TR. This dead time is necessary for magnetization moments' longitudinal relaxation, and so a good ...

  3. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  4. Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalvati, Farzad Tizhoosh, Hamid R.; Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar; Rodrigues, George

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

  5. Method for the detection of a magnetic field utilizing a magnetic vortex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novosad, Valentyn (Chicago, IL); Buchanan, Kristen (Batavia, IL)

    2010-04-13

    The determination of the strength of an in-plane magnetic field utilizing one or more magnetically-soft, ferromagnetic member, having a shape, size and material whereas a single magnetic vortex is formed at remanence in each ferromagnetic member. The preferred shape is a thin circle, or dot. Multiple ferromagnetic members can also be stacked on-top of each other and separated by a non-magnetic spacer. The resulting sensor is hysteresis free. The sensor's sensitivity, and magnetic saturation characteristics may be easily tuned by simply altering the material, size, shape, or a combination thereof to match the desired sensitivity and saturation characteristics. The sensor is self-resetting at remanence and therefore does not require any pinning techniques.

  6. Radio Tomographic Imaging for Ambient Assisted Living

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patwari, Neal

    radio device. We describe a technique named radio tomographic imaging (RTI), which produces real of people. People's locations are inferred from the estimated RTI images. We show results from a long of the domestic environment, we introduce methods to make the RTI system self-calibrating. Experimental results

  7. Image Mining in IRIS: Integrated Retinal Information System Wynne Hsu, Mong Li Lee, Kheng Guan Goh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Mong Li "Janice"

    , applies state-of- the-art data mining and image processing techniques on the retinal images to aid in the screening process. 2. Image Classification An abnormal retinal image has one or more of the following signs1 Image Mining in IRIS: Integrated Retinal Information System Wynne Hsu, Mong Li Lee, Kheng Guan

  8. Image 2006 DESY A Beamline Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollin, George

    a MATLAB© simulation of the beam line so that the run data can be analyzed and the next tests can be more angle of entry) - Initial entry position #12;Image © 2006 DESY Summary My project was to design a MATLAB of the Magnetic Field p r = qBr r v dt = 2 r #12;Image © 2006 DESY What is MATLAB? MATLAB® is a high

  9. Nanocomposite Magnets: Transformational Nanostructured Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: GE is using nanomaterials technology to develop advanced magnets that contain fewer rare earth materials than their predecessors. Nanomaterials technology involves manipulating matter at the atomic or molecular scale, which can represent a stumbling block for magnets because it is difficult to create a finely grained magnet at that scale. GE is developing bulk magnets with finely tuned structures using iron-based mixtures that contain 80% less rare earth materials than traditional magnets, which will reduce their overall cost. These magnets will enable further commercialization of HEVs, EVs, and wind turbine generators while enhancing U.S. competitiveness in industries that heavily utilize these alternatives to rare earth minerals.

  10. Magnetic Activity in Stars, Discs and Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald Lynden-Bell

    2000-07-14

    Although magnetic fields in interstellar matter were postulated almost fifty years ago, magnetohydrodynamic theory was then much hampered by our inability to see what the magnetic field configurations were like and, after a decade of innovative development, cynics, not without some justification, began to claim that anything can happen when magnetism and an imaginative theorist get together. Thus cosmic lightning in particular received a bad press. More recently great advances in observational techniques that we shall hear of from Title, Beck, Moran and Mirabel have enabled us to see not only the sun's magnetic field with unprecedented clarity but the fields in galaxies, quasars and microquasars are now measured and not merely figments of fertile imaginations.

  11. Image Fusion for MR Bias Stochastic Systems Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    We can target T1 and T2 through appropriate selection of TE and TR. #12;Image Reconstruction The MRImage Fusion for MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group Joint work with W. Wells, J. Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, A. Willsky, B. Mulkern #12;Magnetic Resonance The magnetic resonance (MR

  12. On the computation of the eigenproblems of hydrogen and helium in strong magnetic and electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the computation of the eigenproblems of hydrogen and helium in strong magnetic and electric) and helium (two electron problem) in strong magnetic and electric fields. Key Words: Schr¨odinger equation these techniques can not longer be applied in cases where both, a magnetic and an electric field are present

  13. On the computation of the eigenproblems of hydrogen and helium in strong magnetic and electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the computation of the eigenproblems of hydrogen and helium in strong magnetic and electric-dimensional Schr¨o- dinger equation for helium (two electron problem) in strong magnetic and electric fields. Key these techniques can no longer be applied in cases where both a magnetic and an electric field are present

  14. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-11-14

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Magnetic switch coupling to synchronize magnetic modulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Kim W. (Albuquerque, NM); Kiekel, Paul (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus for synchronizing the output pulses from a pair of magnetic switches. An electrically conductive loop is provided between the pair of switches with the loop having windlings about the core of each of the magnetic switches. The magnetic coupling created by the loop removes voltage and timing variations between the outputs of the two magnetic switches caused by any of a variety of factors. The only remaining variation is a very small fixed timing offset caused by the geometry and length of the loop itself.

  16. Magnetic switch coupling to synchronize magnetic modulators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, K.W.; Kiekel, P.

    1999-04-27

    Apparatus for synchronizing the output pulses from a pair of magnetic switches is disclosed. An electrically conductive loop is provided between the pair of switches with the loop having windings about the core of each of the magnetic switches. The magnetic coupling created by the loop removes voltage and timing variations between the outputs of the two magnetic switches caused by any of a variety of factors. The only remaining variation is a very small fixed timing offset caused by the geometry and length of the loop itself. 13 figs.

  17. WE-G-17A-09: Novel Magnetic Shielding Design for Inline and Perpendicular Integrated 6 MV Linac and 1.0 T MRI Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, X; Ma, B; Kuang, Y; Diao, X

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The influence of fringe magnetic fields delivered by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on the beam generation and transportation in Linac is still a major challenge for the integration of linear accelerator and MRI (Linac-MRI). In this study, we investigated an optimal magnetic shielding design for Linac-MRI and further characterized the beam trajectory in electron gun. Methods: Both inline and perpendicular configurations were analyzed in this study. The configurations, comprising a Linac-MRI with a 100cm SAD and an open 1.0 T superconductive magnet, were simulated by the 3D finite element method (FEM). The steel shielding around the Linac was included in the 3D model, the thickness of which was varied from 1mm to 20mm, and magnetic field maps were acquired with and without additional shielding. The treatment beam trajectory in electron gun was evaluated using OPERA 3d SCALA with and without shielding cases. Results: When Linac was not shielded, the uniformity of diameter sphere volume (DSV) (30cm) was about 5 parts per million (ppm) and the fringe magnetic fields in electron gun were more than 0.3 T. With shielding, the magnetic fields in electron gun were reduced to less than 0.01 T. For the inline configuration, the radial magnetic fields in the Linac were about 0.02T. A cylinder steel shield used (5mm thick) altered the uniformity of DSV to 1000 ppm. For the perpendicular configuration, the Linac transverse magnetic fields were more than 0.3T, which altered the beam trajectory significantly. A 8mm-thick cylinder steel shield surrounding the Linac was used to compensate the output losses of Linac, which shifted the magnetic fields' uniformity of DSV to 400 ppm. Conclusion: For both configurations, the Linac shielding was used to ensure normal operation of the Linac. The effect of magnetic fields on the uniformity of DSV could be modulated by the shimming technique of the MRI magnet. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  18. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland; Flanagan, Gene

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  19. Magnetic monopoles: a status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Trower, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    A solitary, uncorroborated Stanford candidate event is the only evidence that magnetic monpoles derives from Dirac's assertion that monopoles could explain charge quantization and the 't Hooft-Polyakov demonstration that monopoles are an inevitable consequence of many gauge theories currently being used to unify the electroweak (photon-lepton) and nuclear (quark) interactions. The monopole abundance implied by the Stanford event is in clear contradiction to bounds on their number from astronomical data. Fortunately, the already considerable and expanding arsenal of detection techniques are being fashioned to experimentally test the many open questions surrounding monopoles.

  20. Controlling Magnetism at the Nanoscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jared

    2012-01-01

    157 A.2 Magnetism Unit Conversion148 A.1 Magnetism Unit ConversionA·m) Table A.1: Magnetism Unit Conversion Table Quantity A.1