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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Glass and Optical Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NMR Insight into Glass Formers and Modifiers · NMR Studies on Biomaterials and Bioactive Glasses · Non-Linear Optical Properties in Glasses.

2

Lead phosphate glass compositions for optical components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lead phosphate glass to which has been added indium oxide or scandium oe to improve chemical durability and provide a lead phosphate glass with good optical properties.

Sales, Brian C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Split image optical display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by... Professor thermal imaging, chemical delivery and other new horizons. Finally, as part of this lecture, Lewis

5

Multispectral Imaging At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

6

Ferroelectric optical image comparator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Ferroelectric optical image comparator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image.

Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM); Land, Cecil E. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ferroelectric optical image comparator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The property of ferroelectric ceramics such as lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) to store information has been known for many years. This relates to the property of ferroelectric ceramic materials to become permanently polarized when an electric signal is applied to the material. A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 5 figs.

Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

1989-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Glass and Optical Materials - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

10

Optical and structural analysis of lead bismuth silicate glasses  

SciTech Connect

Glasses having compositions 20PbO(79.5-x)Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}xSiO{sub 2} (x = 10,30,50) doped with 0.5 mole% of Nd{sup 3+} ions were prepared by melt quench technique. The spectroscopic properties of the glasses were investigated using optical absorption and fluorescence spectra. The structural investigations of these glasses were carried out by recording the IR spectra. The variation of {Omega}{sub 2} with Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content has been attributed to changes in the asymmetry of the ligand field at the rare earth ion site and to the changes in the rare earth oxygen covalency. Heavy metal oxide glasses have been used as potential candidate in solid state laser, solar concentrators, optical detector, optical fiber and fluorescent display devices.

Bhardwaj, S.; Shukla, R. [Department of physics, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology Murthal, Sonipat, Haryana (India); Sanghi, S.; Agarwal, A.; Pal, I. [Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar, Haryana (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

12

Imaging Beyond Optics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Views" piece in that same issue. "Generations of astronomers have used interferometric tests to achieve the proper shape of their mirrors before using them to image the heavens....

13

Hadamard multimode optical imaging transceiver  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a method and system for simultaneously acquiring and producing results for multiple image modes using a common sensor without optical filtering, scanning, or other moving parts. The system and method utilize the Walsh-Hadamard correlation detection process (e.g., functions/matrix) to provide an all-binary structure that permits seamless bridging between analog and digital domains. An embodiment may capture an incoming optical signal at an optical aperture, convert the optical signal to an electrical signal, pass the electrical signal through a Low-Noise Amplifier (LNA) to create an LNA signal, pass the LNA signal through one or more correlators where each correlator has a corresponding Walsh-Hadamard (WH) binary basis function, calculate a correlation output coefficient for each correlator as a function of the corresponding WH binary basis function in accordance with Walsh-Hadamard mathematical principles, digitize each of the correlation output coefficient by passing each correlation output coefficient through an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC), and performing image mode processing on the digitized correlation output coefficients as desired to produce one or more image modes. Some, but not all, potential image modes include: multi-channel access, temporal, range, three-dimensional, and synthetic aperture.

Cooke, Bradly J; Guenther, David C; Tiee, Joe J; Kellum, Mervyn J; Olivas, Nicholas L; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Judd, Stephen L; Braun, Thomas R

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components.

Sitter, Jr., David N. (Knoxville, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Miniature hybrid optical imaging lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature lens system that corrects for imaging and chromatic aberrations is disclosed, the lens system being fabricated from primarily commercially-available components. A first element at the input to a lens housing is an aperture stop. A second optical element is a refractive element with a diffractive element closely coupled to, or formed a part of, the rear surface of the refractive element. Spaced closely to the diffractive element is a baffle to limit the area of the image, and this is closely followed by a second refractive lens element to provide the final correction. The image, corrected for aberrations exits the last lens element to impinge upon a detector plane were is positioned any desired detector array. The diffractive element is fabricated according to an equation that includes, as variables, the design wavelength, the index of refraction and the radius from an optical axis of the lens system components. 2 figs.

Sitter, D.N. Jr.; Simpson, M.L.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

Chalcogenide Glasses Developed for Optical Micro-sensor Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the sensor field, chalcogenide glasses are well established membranes or thin ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

17

Positron emission tomography and optical tissue imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mobile compact imaging system that combines both PET imaging and optical imaging into a single system which can be located in the operating room (OR) and provides faster feedback to determine if a tumor has been fully resected and if there are adequate surgical margins. While final confirmation is obtained from the pathology lab, such a device can reduce the total time necessary for the procedure and the number of iterations required to achieve satisfactory resection of a tumor with good margins.

Falen, Steven W. (Carmichael, CA); Hoefer, Richard A. (Newport News, VA); Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); McKisson, John (Hampton, VA); Kross, Brian (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA); Stolin, Alexander (Newport News, VA); Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Yorktown, VA)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

18

Optical Spectroscopy of Borate Glasses Doped with Trivalent Rare ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Luminescence properties of rare-earth ions are well-known, but quantum efficiencies ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and ...

19

Chapter 17. Biomedical Optical Imaging Biomedical Optical Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Figure 1.2 shows the schematic diagram of a spectral / Fourier-domain OCT system. A broadband light imaging. The system consists of an interferometer with a spectrometer and line scan camera. Light. The incident light power on the eye is 750 W, the same exposure used in commercial ophthalmic OCT systems

20

Method of producing optical quality glass having a selected refractive index  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical quality glass having a selected refractive index is produced by a two stage drying process. A gel is produced using sol-gel chemistry techniques and first dried by controlled evaporation until the gel volume reaches a pre-selected value. This pre-selected volume determines the density and refractive index of the finally dried gel. The gel is refilled with solvent in a saturated vapor environment, and then dried again by supercritical extraction of the solvent to form a glass. The glass has a refractive index less than the full density of glass, and the range of achievable refractive indices depends on the composition of the glass. Glasses having different refractive indices chosen from an uninterrupted range of values can be produced from a single precursor solution.

Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Minimally invasive diagnostic imaging using high resolution Optical Coherence Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in medical imaging have given researchers unprecedented capabilities to visualize, characterize and understand biological systems. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a high speed, high resolution imaging technique ...

Herz, Paul Richard, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The characterization of particle clouds using optical imaging techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical imaging techniques can be used to provide a better understanding of the physical properties of particle clouds. The purpose of this thesis is to design, perform and evaluate a set of experiments using optical imaging ...

Bruce, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jane), 1972-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Persistent Nanophosphors for In-vivo Optical Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Optical imaging requires more sensitive tools intended for biomedical research and medical applications. Near-infrared persistent luminescence ...

24

Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Glass and Optical Materials: Glass Surfaces and Water in Glasses Program Organizers: Jincheng Du, University of North Texas; John Kieffer, ...

25

Synthesis and optical properties of CsC1-doped gallium-sodium-sulfide glasses  

SciTech Connect

Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}S (GNS) glasses doped with CsCl were synthesized in open crucibles under inert atmosphere. The evaporative loss of CsCl during glass melting was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and corrected for by biasing the CsCl concentration in the mixture of starting materials to obtain glasses with accurately controlled stoichiometry. Glass transition temperatures, refractive index dispersions, and band edge energies were measured for four GNS:CsCl glasses, and the respective values were found to significantly improve over earlier studies that did not mitigate CsCl evaporative losses. The refractive index dispersion measurements indicate that the Cs{sup +} and Cl{sup -} radii are 16% larger in GNS:CsCl glass than in bulk crystalline CsCl. The band edge energy increases from 2.97 eV in GNS glass to 3.32 eV in GNS glass doped with 20 mol% CsCl as a result of introducing Cl{sup -} ions having a large optical electronegativity. The large bandgap of 3.32 eV and the low (450 cm{sup -1}) phonon energy make GNS:20%CsCl an attractive host material for rare-earth ions with radiative transitions in the near ultra-violet, visible, and near-infrared spectral regions.

Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bennett, Bryan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Darrick J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muenchausen, Ross E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Castro, Alonso [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tornga, Stephanie C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Two-color mid-infrared thermometer with a hollow glass optical fiber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a low-temperature optical-fiber-based two-color infrared thermometer. A single 700-{mu}m-bore hollow glass optical fiber collects and transmits radiation that is then modulated and split into two paths by a reflective optical chopper. Two different thermoelectrically cooled mid-infrared HgCdZnTe photoconductors monitor the chopped signals that are recovered with lock-in amplification. With the two previously obtained blackbody calibration equations, a computer algorithm calculates the true temperature and emissivity of a target in real time, taking into account reflection of the ambient radiation field from the target surface. The small numerical aperture of the hollow glass fiber and the fast response of the detectors, together with the two-color principle, permit high spatial and temporal resolution while allowing the user to dynamically alter the fiber-to-target distance. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

Small, W. IV; Celliers, P.M.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-399, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Soltz, B.A. [Conversion Energy Enterprises, 81 Pinebrook Road, Spring Valley, New York 10977 (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Abstract Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360 degree views of the borehole wall from which the character and orientation of lithologic and structural features can be defined for fractured-bedrock aquifer investigations. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing

28

Optical frequency domain imaging of human retina and choroid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a practical noninvasive technology for imaging the microstructure of the human eye in vivo. Using optical interferometry to spatially-resolve backreflections from within ...

Lee, Edward Chin Wang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Automatic registration of LIDAR and optical images of urban scenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion of 3D laser radar (LIDAR) imagery and aerial optical imagery is an efficient method for constructing 3D virtual reality models. One difficult aspect of creating such models is registering the optical image with the ...

Mastin, Dana Andrew

30

Picosecond Optical MCPI-Based Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the desired performance specifications for an advanced optical imager, which borrows practical concepts in high-speed microchannel plate (MCP) intensified x-ray stripline imagers and time-dilation techniques. With a four-fold speed improvement in state-of-the-art high-voltage impulse drivers, and novel atomic-layer deposition MCPs, we tender a design capable of 5 ps optical gating without the use of magnetic field confinement of the photoelectrons. We analyze the electron dispersion effects in the MCP and their implications for gating pulses shorter than the MCP transit time. We present a wideband design printed-circuit version of the Series Transmission Line Transformer (STLT) that makes use of 50-ohm coaxial 1.0 mm (110 GHz) and 1.85 mm (65 GHz) hermetically sealed vacuum feedthroughs and low-dispersion Teflon/Kapton circuit materials without the use of any vias. The STLT matches impedance at all interfaces with a 16:1 impedance (4:1 voltage) reduction, and delivers a dispersion-limited sharp impulse to the MCP strip. A comparison of microstrip design calculations is given, showing variances between method of moments, empirical codes, and finite element methods for broad, low-impedance traces. Prototype performance measurements are forthcoming.

None

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Effect of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} addition on electrical and optical properties of lithium borate glasses  

SciTech Connect

The electrical and optical property of lithium borate glasses was investigated. It is observed that conductivity decreases while density and refractive index increases with the addition of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Radiation length of glasses was determined and it is observed that radiation length decreases with the addition of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

Gedam, R. S.; Ramteke, D. D. [Department of Applied physics, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology, Nagpur-440 010 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

32

High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

Evan A. Salim; Seth C. Caliga; Jonathan B. Pfeiffer; Dana Z. Anderson

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermal lens study of thermo-optical properties and concentration quenching of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate based glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we have used the thermal lens technique combined with conventional spectroscopy to characterize the thermo-optical properties of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate-based glasses. More precisely, we have investigated and quantified experimentally the fluorescence quantum efficiencies of the Er3+ levels, and we describe the role of concentration quenching effects. The fluorescence quantum efficiency of the 4I13/2 level is very high when compared to other phosphate glasses, while that of the green-coupled levels is very small. Other important photonic materials parameters, such as the thermal diffusivity and temperature coefficient of the optical path length change, were obtained and compared with those of other glass systems. The cumulative results obtained here for the Er-doped lead pyrophosphate glass show that this material is a good candidate for photonic applications with a characteristic Er3+ infrared emission around 1550 nm.

Santos, C. C. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Rocha, U. [Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Brazil; Guedes, Ilde [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Vermelho, M. V. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Jacinto, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Optical Synchrotron Radiation Beam Imaging with a Digital Mask  

SciTech Connect

We have applied a new imaging/optical masking technique, which employs a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) and optical synchrotron radiation (OSR), to perform high dynamic range (DR) beam imaging at the JLAB Energy Recovery Linac and the SLAC/SPEAR3 Synchrotron Light Source. The OSR from the beam is first focused onto the DMD to produce a primary image; selected areas of this image are spatially filtered by controlling the state of individual micro-mirrors; and finally, the filtered image is refocused onto a CCD camera. At JLAB this technique has been used successfully to view the beam halo with a DR ~ 105. At SPEAR3 the DMD was used to filter out the bright core of the stored beam to study the turn-by-turn dynamics of the 10-3 weaker injected beam. We describe the optical performance, present limitations and our plans to improve the DR of both experimental systems.

Fiorito, R B; Zhang, H D; Corbett, W J; Fisher, A S; Mok, W Y; Tian, K; Douglas, D; Wilson, F G; Zhang, S

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

April 15, 1993 / Vol. 18, No. 8 / OPTICS LETTERS 565 Confocal microscopy through a fiber-optic imaging bundle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). In the system of Fig. 1, one end of a fiber-optic imaging bundle is placed at the focal plane of lens LiApril 15, 1993 / Vol. 18, No. 8 / OPTICS LETTERS 565 Confocal microscopy through a fiber-optic microscope with a fiber-optic imaging bundle is presented, and experimental results are shown todemonstrate

Gmitro, Arthur F.

37

The MicroChannel Image Intensifier It is a glass wafer, perforated by millions of electron-multiplying  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the intensification of visible images. When it is coupled with suitable electri- cal and optical systems, it can devices that also invert an image. The microchannel plate can replace a complex optical system FLUORESCENT SCREEN MICROCHANNEL PLATE ELECTRON PATH FOCUSING ELECTRODE> FLUORESCENT SCREEN FIBER-OPTIC SCREEN

California at Berkeley, University of

38

Optically Transparent, Mechanically Durable, Nanostructured Superhydrophobic Surfaces Enabled by Spinodally Phase-Separated Glass Thin Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inspired by highly non-wetting natural biological surfaces (e.g., lotus leaves and water strider legs), artificial superhydrophobic surfaces that exhibit water droplet contact angles exceeding 150o have previously been constructed by utilizing various synthesis strategies.[ , , ] Such bio-inspired, water-repellent surfaces offer significant potential for numerous uses ranging from marine applications (e.g., anti-biofouling, anti-corrosion), anti-condensation (e.g., anti-icing, anti-fogging), membranes for selective separation (e.g., oil-water, gas-liquid), microfluidic systems, surfaces requiring reduced maintenance and cleaning, to applications involving glasses and optical materials.[ ] In addition to superhydrophobic attributes, for integration into device systems that have extended operational limits and overall improved performance, surfaces that also possess multifunctional characteristics are desired, where the functionality should match to the application-specific requirements.

Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL; Hillesheim, Daniel A [ORNL; Hunter, Scott Robert [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Lupini, Andrew R [ORNL; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL; Winters, Kyle O. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Haynes, James A [ORNL; Simpson, John T [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Shock-compressed MgSiO3 glass, enstatite, olivine, and quartz: Optical emission, temperatures, and melting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock-compressed MgSiO3 glass, enstatite, olivine, and quartz: Optical emission, temperatures: Shock wave experiments; KEYWORDS: shock temperature, melting, equation of state, pyrometry, silicates starting material shocks to higher temperature states (at a given compressed density) than enstatite

Stewart, Sarah T.

40

High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

Olivier, Scot S. (Livermore, CA); Werner, John S. (Davis, CA); Zawadzki, Robert J. (Sacramento, CA); Laut, Sophie P. (Pasedena, CA); Jones, Steven M. (Livermore, CA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Biological image restoration in optical-sectioning microscopy using prototype image constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deconvolution of images obtained by means of optical-sectioning widefield fluorescence microscopy, is a relevant problem in biological applications. Several methods have been proposed in the last few years, with different degrees of success, to improve ...

M. R. P. Homem; N. D. A. Mascarenhas; L. F. Costa; C. Preza

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Quantum teleportation of optical images with frequency conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a new version of continuous variables quantum holographic teleportation of optical images. Unlike the previously proposed scheme, it is based on the continuous variables quantum entanglement between the light fields of different frequencies and allows for the wavelength conversion between the original and the teleported images. The frequency tunable holographic teleportation protocol can be used as a part of light-matter interface in parallel quantum information processing and parallel quantum memory

Liubov V. Magdenko; Ivan V. Sokolov; Mikhail I. Kolobov

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

43

Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a projection reflection optical system having two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have aspherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 {mu}m, and preferably less than 100 {mu}m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05--0.1 {mu}m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm {times} 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Glass-water Interactions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glass and Optical Materials: Glass-water Interactions ... Corrosion of Photomultiplier Tube Glasses in High Purity Water : Ruhil Dongol1; S. K. Sundaram1; Milind ...

45

Optical image storage in ion implanted PLZT ceramics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optical images can be stored in transparent lead-lanthanum-zirconate-titanate (PLZT) ceramics by exposure to near-uv light with photon energies greater than the band gas energy of approx. 3.35 eV. The image storage process relies on optically induced changes in the switching properties of ferroelectric domains (photoferroelectric effect). Stored images are nonvolatile but can be erased by uniform uv illumination and simultaneous application of an electric field. Although high quality images, with contrast variations of greater than or equal to 100:1 and spatial resolution of approx. 10 ..mu..m, can be stored using the photoferroelectric effect, relatively high exposure energies (approx. 100 mJ/cm/sup 2/) are required to store these images. This large exposure energy severely limits the range of possible applications of nonvolatile image storage in PLZT ceramics. It was found in H, He, and Ar implanted PLZT that the photosensitivity can be significantly increased by ion implantation into the surface to be exposed. The photosensitivity after implantation with 5 x 10/sup 14/ 500 keV Ar/cm/sup 2/ is increased by about three orders of magnitude over that of unimplanted PLZT. The image storage process and the effect of ion implantation is presented along with a phenomenological model which describes the enhancement in photosensitivity obtained by ion implantation. This model takes into account both light- and ion implantation-induced changes in conductivity and gives quantitative agreement with the measured changes in the coercive voltage with light intensity for ion implanted PLZT.

Peercy, P. S.; Land, C. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Applications of Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers for optical coherence tomography imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a micrometer-resolution imaging technique that produces cross-sectional images of sample microstructure by measuring the amplitude and echo time delay of backscattered light. OCT imaging ...

Adler, Desmond Christopher, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Objective assessment of image quality (OAIQ) in fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The statistical evaluation of molecular imaging approaches for detecting, diagnosing, and monitoring molecular response to treatment are required prior to their adoption. The assessment of fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging is particularly challenging since neither instrument nor agent has been established. Small animal imaging does not address the depth of penetration issues adequately and the risk of administering molecular optical imaging agents into patients remains unknown. Herein, we focus upon the development of a framework for OAIQ which includes a lumpy-object model to simulate natural anatomical tissue structure as well as the non-specific distribution of fluorescent contrast agents. This work is required for adoption of fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging in the clinic. Herein, the imaging system is simulated by the diffusion approximation of the time-dependent radiative transfer equation, which describes near infra-red light propagation through clinically relevant volumes. We predict the time-dependent light propagation within a 200 cc breast interrogated with 25 points of excitation illumination and 128 points of fluorescent light collection. We simulate the fluorescence generation from Cardio-Green at tissue target concentrations of 1, 0.5, and 0.25 µM with backgrounds containing 0.01 µM. The fluorescence boundary measurements for 1 cc spherical targets simulated within lumpy backgrounds of (i) endogenous optical properties (absorption and scattering), as well as (ii) exogenous fluorophore crosssection are generated with lump strength varying up to 100% of the average background. The imaging data are then used to validate a PMBF/CONTN tomographic reconstruction algorithm. Our results show that the image recovery is sensitive to the heterogeneous background structures. Further analysis on the imaging data by a Hotelling observer affirms that the detection capability of the imaging system is adversely affected by the presence of heterogeneous background structures. The above issue is also addressed using the human-observer studies wherein multiple cases of randomly located targets superimposed on random heterogeneous backgrounds are used in a “double-blind” situation. The results of this study show consistency with the outcome of above mentioned analyses. Finally, the Hotelling observer’s analysis is used to demonstrate (i) the inverse correlation between detectability and target depth, and (ii) the plateauing of detectability with improved excitation light rejection.

Sahu, Amit K.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Optical study of shear and longitudinal acoustic waves and complex relaxation dynamics of glass forming liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spectroscopic technique Impulsive Stimulated Scattering (ISS) was refined and used to study the complex structural relaxation dynamics of glass forming liquids, allowing both empirical modeling and testing of the ...

Torchinsky, Darius H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

New oxyfluoride glass with high fluorine content and laser patterning of nonlinear optical BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} single crystal line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new oxyfluoride glass of 50BaF{sub 2}-25Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-25B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (mol. %) with a large fraction of fluorine, i.e., F/(F + O) = 0.4, was prepared using a conventional melt-quenching method in order to synthesize new glass-ceramics containing nonlinear optical oxyfluoride crystals. The refractive index at 632.8 nm and ultra-violet cutoff wavelength of the glass were 1.564 and {approx}200 nm, respectively. Eu{sup 3+} ions in the glass showed a high quantum yield of 88% in the photoluminescence spectrum in the visible region. BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} crystals (size: 50-100 nm) showing second harmonic generations were formed through the crystallization of the glass. Lines consisting of BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} crystals were patterned successfully on the glass surface by laser irradiations (Yb:YVO{sub 4} laser with a wavelength of 1080 nm, laser power of 1.1 W, scanning speed of 8 {mu}m/s). High resolution transmission electron microscope observations combined with a focused ion beam technique indicate that BaAlBO{sub 3}F{sub 2} crystals are highly oriented just like a single crystal. The present study proposes that the new oxyfluoride glass and glass-ceramics prepared have a high potential for optical device applications.

Shionozaki, K.; Honma, T.; Komatsu, T. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Statistical methods for 2D-3D registration of optical and LIDAR images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion of 3D laser radar (LIDAR) imagery and aerial optical imagery is an efficient method for constructing 3D virtual reality models. One difficult aspect of creating such models is registering the optical image with the ...

Mastin, Dana Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fiber optic spectroscopic digital imaging sensor and method for flame properties monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for real-time monitoring of flame properties in combustors and gasifiers which includes an imaging fiber optic bundle having a light receiving end and a light output end and a spectroscopic imaging system operably connected with the light output end of the imaging fiber optic bundle. Focusing of the light received by the light receiving end of the imaging fiber optic bundle by a wall disposed between the light receiving end of the fiber optic bundle and a light source, which wall forms a pinhole opening aligned with the light receiving end.

Zelepouga, Serguei A. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Rue, David M. (Chicago, IL); Saveliev, Alexei V. (Chicago, IL)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

High speed optical coherence microscopy with autofocus adjustment and a miniaturized endoscopic imaging probe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a promising technique for high resolution cellular imaging in human tissues. An OCM system for high-speed en face cellular resolution imaging was developed at 1060 nm wavelength at ...

Aguirre, Aaron Dominic

53

Three dimensional imaging detector employing wavelength-shifting optical fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel detector element structure and method for its use is provided. In a preferred embodiment, one or more inorganic scintillating crystals are coupled through wavelength shifting optical fibers (WLSFs) to position sensitive photomultipliers (PS-PMTs). The superior detector configuration in accordance with this invention is designed for an array of applications in high spatial resolution gamma ray sensing with particular application to SPECT, PET and PVI imaging systems. The design provides better position resolution than prior art devices at a lower total cost. By employing wavelength shifting fibers (WLSFs), the sensor configuration of this invention can operate with a significant reduction in the number of photomultipliers and electronics channels, while potentially improving the resolution of the system by allowing three dimensional reconstruction of energy deposition positions.

Worstell, William A. (Framingham, MA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

B-Spline Image Model for Energy Minimization-Based Optical Flow Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust estimation of the optical flow is addressed through a multiresolution energy minimization. It involves repeated evaluation of spatial and temporal gradients of image intensity which rely usually on bilinear interpolation and image filtering. We ... Keywords: Optical flow (OF), robust estimation, splines

G. Le Besnerais; F. Champagnat

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells  

SciTech Connect

Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian cells. New rotational information was obtained: (1) during endocytosis, cargoes lost their rotation freedom at the late stage of internalization; (2) cargoes performed train-like motion when they were transported along the microtubule network by motor proteins inside live cells; (3) During the pause stage of fast axonal transport, cargoes were still bound to the microtubule tracks by motor proteins. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) is another non-invasive and far-field optical imaging technique. Because of its near-field illumination mechanism, TIRFM has better axial resolution than epi-fluorescence microscopy and confocal microscopy. In this work, an auto-calibrated, prism type, angle-scanning TIRFM instrument was built. The incident angle can range from subcritical angles to nearly 90{sup o}, with an angle interval less than 0.2{sup o}. The angle precision of the new instrument was demonstrated through the finding of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angle of metal film coated glass slide. The new instrument improved significantly the precision in determining the axial position. As a result, the best obtained axial resolution was {approx} 8 nm, which is better than current existing instruments similar in function. The instrument was further modified to function as a pseudo TIRF microscope. The illumination depth can be controlled by changing the incident angle of the excitation laser beam or adjusting the horizontal position of the illumination laser spot on the prism top surface. With the new technique, i.e., variable-illumination-depth pseudo TIRF microscopy, the whole cell body from bottom to top was scanned.

Sun, Wei

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Optical switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

Reedy, Robert P. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Optical switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

Reedy, R.P.

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

Near-IR absorption in high-purity photothermorefractive glass and holographic optical elements: measurement and application for high-energy lasers  

SciTech Connect

Volume Bragg gratings (VBGs) in photothermorefractive (PTR) glass are widely used for laser beam control including high-power laser systems. Among them, spectral beam combining based on VBGs is one of the most promising. Achieving 100+ kW of combined laser beams requires the development of PTR glass and VBGs with an extremely low absorption coefficient and therefore methods of its measurement. This paper describes the calorimetric method that was developed for measuring a low absorption coefficient in PTR glass and VBGs. It is based on transmission monitoring of the intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer produced by the plane-parallel surfaces of the measured optical elements when heated by high-power laser radiation. An absorption coefficient at 1085 nm as low as 5x10{sup -5} cm{sup -1} is demonstrated in pristine PTR glass while an absorption coefficient as low as 1x10{sup -4} cm{sup -1} is measured in high-efficiency reflecting Bragg gratings with highest purity. The actual level of absorption in PTR glass allows laser beam control at the 10 kW level, while the 100 kW level would require active cooling and/or decreasing the absorption in PTR Bragg gratings to a value similar to that in virgin PTR glass.

Lumeau, Julien; Glebova, Larissa; Glebov, Leonid B.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

A survey of advanced excimer optical imaging and lithography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first item discussed in this paper is to estimate the future trend regarding minimum geometry and the optical parameters

Koichi Matsumoto; Kyoichi Suwa

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Optical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Optical fiber-based single-shot picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy Andrew R. Cook a͒ and Yuzhen Shen Department of Chemistry, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA ͑Received 27 January 2009; accepted 29 May 2009; published online 17 July 2009͒ A new type of single-shot transient absorption apparatus is described based on a bundle of optical fibers. The bundle contains 100 fibers of different lengths, each successively giving ϳ15 ps longer optical delay. Data are collected by imaging light from the exit of the bundle into a sample where it is overlapped with an electron pulse or laser excitation pulse, followed by imaging onto a charge coupled device ͑CCD͒ detector where the intensity of light from each fiber is measured simultaneously. Application to both ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy and pulse radiolysis is demonstrated. For pulse

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61

Standard test method for measurement of roll wave optical distortion in heat-treated flat glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method is applicable to the determination of the peak-to-valley depth and peak-to-peak distances of the out-of-plane deformation referred to as roll wave which occurs in flat, heat-treated architectural glass substrates processed in a heat processing continuous or oscillating conveyance oven. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This test method does not address other flatness issues like edge kink, ream, pocket distortion, bow, or other distortions outside of roll wave as defined in this test method. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Laboratory Calibration of the Optical Transient Detector and the Lightning Imaging Sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present in detail the laboratory apparatus and techniques that were used to complete a full radiometric calibration of two space-based lightning detectors: the optical transient detector (OTD) and the lightning imaging sensor (LIS) ...

William J. Koshak; Mike F. Stewart; Hugh J. Christian; James W. Bergstrom; John M. Hall; Richard J. Solakiewicz

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Performance Assessment of the Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. Part I: Predicted Diurnal Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory calibration and observed background radiance data are used to determine the effective sensitivities of the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), as functions of local hour and pixel location within the ...

Dennis J. Boccippio; William J. Koshak; Richard J. Blakeslee

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Optical flow image analysis of facial expressions of human emotion: forensic applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to induce emotions in individuals to determine if specific facial movements could be detected and analysed by the optical flow technique. This analysis is in the form of motion vector plots. The procedure ascertains if ... Keywords: emotion, facial expression, forensics, image analysis, optical flow, physiological measurement, surveillance

Carmen J. Duthoit; T. Sztynda; S. K. L. Lal; B. T. Jap; J. I. Agbinya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Mathematical modeling of fluorescence diffuse optical imaging of cell membrane potential changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to provide a mathematical model for spatial distribution of membrane electrical potential changes by fluorescence diffuse optical tomography. We derive the resolving power of the imaging method in the presence of measurement noise. The proposed mathematical model can be used for cell membrane tracking with the resolution of the optical microscope.

Habib Ammari; Josselin Garnier; Laure Giovangigli

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Superhydrophobic Transparent Glass Thin Films  

Glass used in building materials (curtain walls), windshields, goggles, glasses,optical lenses, and similar applications must be durable and transparent. To meetthis challenge, ORNL researchers have invented a method to produce ...

67

Estimation the Performance of Solar Fiber Optic Lighting System after Repairing the Glass Fiber Cables in a South Korean Residential Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar fiber optic lighting system consists of the solar ray concentrating apparatus, the tracking control, lighting transmission and emission parts. This system was installed on a 20-storey apartment building in South Korea. Many residents had concerns about its long-term maintenance. The most common maintenance difficulties are sun tracking problems and damaged glass fiber cables. Sometimes fiber optic lighting systems should not be repaired with splices. Splicing glass fiber cables often results in decreased system efficiency and further cable damage. In this study, the cost of replacing the cables was prohibitive; hence, the drop in efficiency of the damaged cables was answered by repairing through splicing. These damaged cables were repaired by specially process of cutting and polishing. Results showed that the luminous intensity ratio improved by 0.391%, though this was still lower than the recommended guideline of 0.725%. Accordingly, on average 55% of luminous intensity was increased.

Cha, K. S.; Kim, T. K.; Park, M. S.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Micro-fluidics and integrated optics glass sensor for in-line micro-probing of nuclear samples  

SciTech Connect

We study the miniaturisation of Thermal Lens Spectrometry (TLS) towards Lab-on-chip integration in order to reduce the volume of fluid assays in nuclear process control. TLS is of great interest in this context since it combines the advantages of optical detection methods with an inherent suitability for small-scale samples. After validating the experimental principle in a classical thermal lens crossed-beam setup, we show the integration of a Young-interferometer with a microcapillary on a glass substrate, reducing the necessary sample size to 400 nl. The interferometer translates the photo-thermally induced refractive index change in the fluid to a phase shift of the fringe pattern, which can then be detected by a camera. Measurements of Co(II) in ethanol yield a detection limit of c = 5 x 10{sup -4} M for the crossed-beam setup and c = 6x10{sup -3} M for the integrated sensor. At an interaction length of 10 {mu}m, it detects a minimum absorbance of AU = 6 x 10{sup -5} in a probed volume of 10 pl. (authors)

Schimpf, A. [Institut de Microelectronique, Electromagnetisme et Photonique IMEP-LAHC Minatec, Batiment INP Grenoble, 3, parvis Louis Neel, BP 257, 38016 Cedex 1 (France); Canto, F. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique CEA de Marcoule, DEN - DRCP - SEAA - LAMM, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Bucci, D. [Institut de Microelectronique, Electromagnetisme et Photonique IMEP-LAHC Minatec, Batiment INP Grenoble, 3, parvis Louis Neel, BP 257, 38016 Cedex 1 (France); Magnaldo, A.; Couston, L. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique CEA de Marcoule, DEN - DRCP - SEAA - LAMM, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Broquin, J. E. [Institut de Microelectronique, Electromagnetisme et Photonique IMEP-LAHC Minatec, Batiment INP Grenoble, 3, parvis Louis Neel, BP 257, 38016 Cedex 1 (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Imaging carrier and phonon transport in Si using ultrashort optical pulses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments have been conducted that microscopically image thermal diffusion and surface acoustic phonon propagation within a single crystallite of a polycrystalline Si sample. The experimental approach employs ultrashort optical pulses to generate an electron-hole plasma and a second probe pulse is used to image the evolution of the plasma. By decomposing the signal into a component that varies with delay time and a steady state component that varies with pump modulation frequency, the respective influence of carrier recombination and thermal diffusion are identified. Additionally, the coherent surface acoustic phonon component to the signal is imaged using a Sagnac interferometer to monitor optical phase.

David H. Hurley; O. B. Wright; O. Matsuda; B. E. McCandless; S. Shinde

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Measurements of Rainfall Properties Using Long Optical Path Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of long-path optical attenuation of visible light due to rainfall are described, from which rainfall parameters are derived. Novel aspects of the method are the use of a distant uncontrolled and broadband spotlight source, and ...

S. G. Bradley; C. D. Stow; C. A. Lynch-Blosse

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Nanotechnology--Nanomanufacturing; Optical Nano Vision. Description: A new optical imaging technology under ...

72

Magneto-optical imaging of transport current densities in superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Direct imaging of the paths of transport currents in superconductors creates many new possibilities for exploring the basic features of vortex pinning mechanisms and for improving the performance of superconducting materials. A technique for imaging the path and magnitude of the transport current density flowing in superconductors is described. Results are given for a 37-filament BSCCO 2223 powder-in-tube wire, showing a highly inhomogeneous current path within the filaments.

Crabtree, G.W.; Welp, U.; Gunter, D.O.; Zhong, W.; Balachandran, U. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Haldar, P.; Sokolowski, R.S. [Intermagnetics General Corp., Latham, NY (United States); Vlasko-Vlasov, V.K.; Nikitenko, V.I. [Inst. for Solid State Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Glass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Final Report: Imaging of Buried Nanoscale Optically Active Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a final report covering work done at University of Maryland to develop a Ballistic Electron Emission Luminescence (BEEL) microscope. This technique was intended to examine the carrier transport and photon emission in deeply buried optically-active layers and thereby provide a means for materials science to unmask the detailed consequences of experimentally controllable growth parameters, such as quantum dot size, statistics and orientation, and defect density and charge recombination pathways.

Appelbaum, Ian

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

75

Optical imaging through turbid media with a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical imaging through turbid media is demonstrated using a degenerate four-wave mixing correlation time gate. An apparatus and method for detecting ballistic and/or snake light while rejecting unwanted diffusive light for imaging structures within highly scattering media are described. Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) of a doubled YAG laser in rhodamine 590 is used to provide an ultrafast correlation time gate to discriminate against light that has undergone multiple scattering and therefore has lost memory of the structures within the scattering medium. Images have been obtained of a test cross-hair pattern through highly turbid suspensions of whole milk in water that are opaque to the naked eye, which demonstrates the utility of DFWM for imaging through turbid media. Use of DFWM as an ultrafast time gate for the detection of ballistic and/or snake light in optical mammography is discussed.

Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO)

1998-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advancement in infrared imaging technology has allowed the thermal imaging to detect and visualize several gases, mostly hydrocarbon gases. In addition, infrared cameras could potentially be used as a non-contact temperature measurement for gas and vapor. However, current application of infrared imaging techniques for gas measurements are still limited due to several uncertainties in their performance parameters. The aim of this research work was to determine the key factors in the application of infrared imaging technology for gas visualization and a non-contact temperature measurement. Furthermore, the concentration profile and emission rate of the gas are predicted by combining the application of the infrared imaging method with gas dispersion modeling. In this research, infrared cameras have been used to visualize liquefied natural gas (LNG) plumes from LNG spills on water. The analyses of the thermograms showed that the apparent temperatures were different from the thermocouple measurement which occurred due to the assumption of that the object emissivity was always equal to unity. The emissivity for pure methane gas and a mixture of methane and atmospheric gases were then evaluated in order to obtain the actual temperature distribution of the gas cloud. The results showed that by including the emissivity value of the gas, the temperature profile of the dispersed gas obtained from a thermal imaging measurement was in good agreement with the measurement using the thermocouples. Furthermore, the temperature distribution of the gas was compared to the concentration of a dispersed LNG vapor cloud to obtain a correlation between the temperature and the concentration of the cloud. Other application of infrared imaging technique was also conducted for leak detection of natural gas from a pipeline. The capability of an infrared camera to detect a fugitive gas leak was combined with the simulation of vapor discharge and dispersion in order to obtain a correlation between the emission rates and the sizes of the gas plume to the minimum detectable concentration. The relationship of the methane gas cloud size to the gas emission rate was highly dependent to the prevailing atmospheric condition. The results showed that the correlation were best to predict the emission rate less than 0.2 kg/s. At higher emission rate, the increase in gas release rate did not change the size of the cloud significantly.

Safitri, Anisa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Final Report for The University of Texas at Arlington Optical Medical Imaging Section of Advanced Imaging Research Center  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to create state-of-the-art optical medical imaging laboratories for the Biomedical Engineering faculty and student researchers of the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) on the campus of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). This has been successfully achieved. These laboratories provide an unprecedented opportunity for the bioengineers (from UTA) to bring about new breakthroughs in medical imaging using optics. Specifically, three major laboratories have been successfully established and state-of-the-art scientific instruments have been placed in the labs. As a result of this grant, numerous journal and conference publications have been generated, patents for new inventions have been filed and received, and many additional grants for the continuation of the research has been received.

Khosrow Behbehani

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

78

Final Report: Deconvolution of Adaptive Optics Images of Titan, Neptune, and Uranus  

SciTech Connect

This project involved images of Titan, Neptune, and Uranus obtained using the 10-meter W.M. Keck II Telescope and its adaptive optics system. An adaptive optics system corrects for turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere by sampling the wavefront and applying a correction based on the distortion measured for a known source within the same isoplanatic patch as the science target (for example, a point source such as a star). Adaptive optics can achieve a 10-fold increase in resolution over that obtained by images without adaptive optics (for example, Saturn's largest moon Titan is unresolved without adaptive optics but at least 10 resolution elements can be obtained across the disk in Keck adaptive optics images). The adaptive optics correction for atmospheric turbulence is not perfect; a point source is converted to a diffraction-limited core surrounded by a ''halo''. This halo is roughly the size and shape of the uncorrected point spread function one would observe without adaptive optics. In order to enhance the sharpness of the Keck images it is necessary to apply a deconvolution algorithm to the data. Many such deconvolution algorithms exist such as maximum likelihood and maximum entropy. These algorithms suffer to various degrees from noise amplification and creation of artifacts near sharp edges (''ringing''). In order to deconvolve the Keck images I have applied an algorithm specifically developed for observations of planetary bodies, the myopic deconvolution algorithm MISTRAL (''Myopic Iterative STep-preserving Restoration ALgorithm'') (Conan et al. 1998, 2000). MISTRAL was developed by ONERA (Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales) and has been extensively tested on simulated and real AO observations, including observations of Titan (Coustenis et al.2001), Io (Marchis et al.2002, 2001), and asteroids (Hestroffer et al.2001, Rosenberg et al.2001, Makhoul et al.2001). Compared to more classical methods, MISTRAL avoids noise amplification and ringing artifacts, and better restores the initial photometry (Conan et al.1998). MISTRAL uses a stochastic approach to finding the best image reconstruction, using information about the object and the PSF. The general conclusions from this deconvolution effort is that MISTRAL does an excellent job of enhancing the sharpness of the data and preserving the photometry. The continued use of this algorithm for deconvolution of adaptive optics data is strongly suggested.

Gibbard, S; Marchis, F

2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

Infra-red transparent glass as per ancient Indian text ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The test results revealed that new glass could be compared with Calcium Fluoride Glass. ... Optical Response of Laser Materials in High Radiation Environments.

80

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Glass and Optical Materials. Presentation Title, Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optical fiber imaging for high speed plasma motion diagnostics: Applied to low voltage circuit breakers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated portable measurement system is described for the study of high speed and high temperature unsteady plasma flows such as those found in the vicinity of high current switching arcs. An array of optical fibers allows the formation of low spatial resolution images, with a maximum capture rate of 1x10{sup 6} images per second (1 MHz), with 8 bit intensity resolution. Novel software techniques are reported to allow imaging of the arc; and to measure arc trajectories. Results are presented on high current (2 kA) discharge events in a model test fixture and on the application to a commercial low voltage circuit breaker.

McBride, J. W. [School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Balestrero, A.; Tribulato, G. [ABB SACE DIVISION, ABB S.p.A., Via Baioni, Bergamo 35 IT-24123 (Italy); Ghezzi, L. [ABB SACE DIVISION, ABB S.p.A., Viale dell'Industria, Vittuone (MI)18 IT-20010 (Italy); Cross, K. J. [Taicaan Ltd., 2 Venture Road, Southampton Science Park, Southampton, Hampshire SO16 7NP (United Kingdom)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy transfer and non-linear optical properties at near ultraviolet wavelengths: Rare earth 4f yields 5d transitions in crystals and glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following topics were studied: two-photon transitions from 4f ground state to 5d excited states in Ce{sup 3+}:CaF{sub 2}; optical absorption and photoionization measurements from excited state of Ce{sup 3+}:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}; excited state photoionization of Ce{sup 3+} ions in Ce{sub 3+}:CaF{sub 2}; optical gain and loss studies in Ce{sup 3+}:LiYF{sub 4}; Gd {yields}Cr energy transfer in Cr{sup 3+}:GSGG, Cr{sup 3+}:GSAG and Cr{sup 3+}:GGG crystals; nonradiative relaxation in Ce{sup 3+} doped crystals and glasses; and grating formation in impurity doped crystals.

Hamilton, D.S.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Optical Physics of Imaging and Interferometric Phased Arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microwave, submillimetre-wave, and far-infrared phased arrays are of considerable importance for astronomy. We consider the behaviour imaging phased arrays and interferometric phased arrays from a functional perspective. It is shown that the average powers, field correlations, power fluctuations, and correlations between power fluctuations at the output ports of an imaging or interferometric phased array can be found once the synthesised reception patterns are known. The reception patterns do not have to be orthogonal or even linearly independent. It is shown that the operation of phased arrays is intimately related to the mathematical theory of frames, and that the theory of frames can be used to determine the degree to which any class of intensity or field distribution can be reconstructed unambiguously from the complex amplitudes of the travelling waves at the output ports. The theory can be used to set up a likelihood function that can, through Fisher information, be used to determine the degree to which a phased array can be used to recover the parameters of a parameterised source. For example, it would be possible to explore the way in which a system, perhaps interferometric, might observe two widely separated regions of the sky simultaneously.

Stafford Withington; George Saklatvala; Michael P. Hobson

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

84

STAR-GALAXY CLASSIFICATION IN MULTI-BAND OPTICAL IMAGING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground-based optical surveys such as PanSTARRS, DES, and LSST will produce large catalogs to limiting magnitudes of r {approx}> 24. Star-galaxy separation poses a major challenge to such surveys because galaxies-even very compact galaxies-outnumber halo stars at these depths. We investigate photometric classification techniques on stars and galaxies with intrinsic FWHM scenario (SVM{sub best}) where the training data are (unrealistically) a random sampling of the data in both signal-to-noise and demographics and (2) a more realistic scenario where training is done on higher signal-to-noise data (SVM{sub real}) at brighter apparent magnitudes. Testing with COSMOS ugriz data, we find that HB outperforms ML, delivering {approx}80% completeness, with purity of {approx}60%-90% for both stars and galaxies. We find that no algorithm delivers perfect performance and that studies of metal-poor main-sequence turnoff stars may be challenged by poor star-galaxy separation. Using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve, we find a best-to-worst ranking of SVM{sub best}, HB, ML, and SVM{sub real}. We conclude, therefore, that a well-trained SVM will outperform template-fitting methods. However, a normally trained SVM performs worse. Thus, HB template fitting may prove to be the optimal classification method in future surveys.

Fadely, Ross; Willman, Beth [Haverford College, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 370 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, PA 19041 (United States); Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Optical and x-ray imaging of electron beams using synchrotron emission  

SciTech Connect

In the case of very low eniittance electron and positron storage ring beams, it is impossible to make intrusive measurements of beam properties without increasing the emittance and possibly disrupting the beam. In cases where electron or positron beams have high average power densities (such as free electron laser linacs), intrusive probes such as wires and optical transition radiation screens or Cherenkov emitting screens can be easily damaged or destroyed. The optical and x-ray emissions from the bends in the storage rings and often from linac bending magnets can be used to image the beam profile to obtain emittance information about the beam. The techniques, advantages and limitations of using both optical and x-ray synchrotron emission to measure beam properties are discussed and the possibility of single bunch imaging is considered. The properties of suitable imagers and converters such as phosphors are described. Examples of previous, existing and planned applications are given where available, including a pinhole imaging system currently being designed for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

Wilke, M.D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

jPOR: An ImageJ macro to quantify total optical porosity from blue-stained thin sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast and effective method has been developed to measure total optical porosity (TOP) of blue resin-impregnated thin sections. This utilises a macro file (jPOR.txt) for ImageJ, which can be used on digital photomicrographs of thin sections. The method ... Keywords: Image analysis, Image processing, Operator error, Petrology, Point count, Porosity

Clayton Grove; Dougal A. Jerram

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Magneto-Optical Images from the Superconductivity & Magnetism Low-temperature Laboratory  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This is a small, online collection of video supplements to published papers, images, Flash movies, etc. Activities of the Superconductivity and Magnetism Low-Temperature Lab are focused on the experimental studies of superconductivity, magnetism and their coexistence in novel materials at low temperatures. In addition to the magneto-optical gallery, see the video supplements at http://www.cmpgroup.ameslab.gov/supermaglab/video/index.html

Condensed Matter Physics Group (Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory)

88

Improved fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging and tomography by enhanced excitation light rejection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence enhanced optical imaging and tomography studies involve the detection of weak fluorescent signals emanating from nano- to picomolar concentrations of exogenous or endogenously produced fluorophore concurrent with the rejection of an overwhelmingly large component of backscattered excitation light. The elimination of the back-reflected excitation light of the collected signal remains a major and often unrecognized challenge for further reducing the noise floor and increasing sensitivity of small animal fluorescence imaging. In this dissertation, we adapted collimating and gradient index (GRIN) lenses in an existing frequency-domain system to improve excitation light rejection and enhance planar and tomographic imaging. To achieve this goal, we developed planar and tomographic imaging systems based upon ray tracing calculations for improved rejection of excitation light. The “out-of-band (S (?x))” to “in-band (S (?m) - S (?x))” signal ratio assessing excitation leakage was acquired with and without collimating optics. The addition of collimating optics resulted in a 51 to 75% reduction in the transmission ratio of (S (?x))/ (S (?m) - S (?x)) for the phantom studies and an increase of target to background ratio (TBR) from 11% to 31% in animal studies. Additionally, we presented results demonstrating the improvement of model match between experiments and forward simulation models by adaptation of GRIN lens optics to a breast phantom study. In particular, 128 GRIN lenses on the fiber bundle face were employed to align the collected excitation and emission light normal to the filter surface in an existing frequency-domain system. As a result of GRIN lens collimation, we reduced the transmission ratio between 10 and 86 % and improved the model match for tomographic reconstruction of one (1 cm3) and two (0.1 cm3) targets in a 1087 cm3 of breast phantom. Ultimately, this work improves the sensitivity of NIR fluorescence imaging by enhancing the rejection of excitation light and shows that the current sensitivity challenges for translating fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging into the clinic can be overcome.

Hwang, Kil Dong

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Sol-GelGlasses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sol-Gel Glasses Sol-Gel Glasses Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center conducts process development and scale-up of ceramic and glass materials prepared by the sol- gel process. Sol-gel processing uses solutions prepared at low temperature rather than high temperature powder processing to make materi- als with controlled properties. A precursor sol-gel solution (sol) is either poured into a mold and allowed to gel or is diluted and applied to a sub- strate by spinning, dipping, spraying, elec- trophoresis, inkjet printing or roll coating. Controlled drying of the wet gel results in either a ceramic or glass bulk part or a thin film on a glass, plastic, ceramic or metal substrate. Sol-gel derived materials have diverse applications in optics, electronics, energy, space, sensors and

90

Three dimensional optical manipulation and structural imaging of soft materials by use of laser tweezers and multimodal nonlinear microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an integrated system of holographic optical trapping and multimodal nonlinear microscopy and perform simultaneous three-dimensional optical manipulation and non-invasive structural imaging of composite soft-matter systems. We combine different nonlinear microscopy techniques such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, multi-photon excitation fluorescence and multi-harmonic generation, and use them for visualization of long-range molecular order in soft materials by means of their polarized excitation and detection. The combined system enables us to accomplish both, manipulation in composite soft materials such as colloidal inclusions in liquid crystals as well as imaging of each separate constituents of the composite material in different nonlinear optical modalities. We also demonstrate optical generation and control of topological defects and simultaneous reconstruction of their three-dimensional long-range molecular orientational patterns from the nonlinear optical images.

Rahul P. Trivedi; Taewoo Lee; Kris A. Bertness; Ivan I. Smalyukh

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

91

Heart wall velocimetry and exogenous contrast-based cardiac flow imaging in Drosophila melanogaster using Doppler optical coherence tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is a central organism in biology and is becoming increasingly important in the cardiovascular sciences. Prior work in optical imaging of the D. melanogaster heart has focused on static ...

Choma, Michael A.

92

Optics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optics A computer program to calculate the optical properties of glazing systems and laminates. The program can be used to construct new laminates from existing components and...

93

Fluorescence enhanced optical tomography on breast phantoms with measurements using a gain modulated intensified CCD imaging system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging using near-infrared (NIR) light developed for in-vivo molecular targeting and reporting of cancer provides promising opportunities for diagnostic imaging. However, prior to the administration of unproven contrast agents, the benefits of fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging must be assessed in feasibility phantom studies. A novel intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) imaging system has been developed to perform 3-D fluorescence tomographic imaging in the frequency-domain using near-infrared contrast agents. This study is unique since it (i) employs a large tissue-mimicking phantom (~1087 cc), which is shaped and sized to resemble a female breast and part of the extended chest wall region, and (ii) enables rapid data acquisition in the frequency-domain by using a gain-modulated ICCD camera. Diagnostic 3-D fluorescence-enhanced optical tomography is demonstrated using 0.5-1 cc single and multiple targets contrasted from their surrounding by ??M concentrations of Indocyanine green (ICG) in the breast-shaped phantom (10 cm diameter), under varying conditions of target-to-background absorption contrast ratios (1:0 and 100:1) and target depths (up to 3 cm deep). Boundary surface fluorescence measurements of referenced amplitude and phase shift were used along with the coupled diffusion equation of light propagation in order to perform 3-D image reconstructions using the approximate extended Kalman filter (AEKF) algorithm, and hence differentiate the target from the background based on fluorescent optical contrast. Detection of single and multiple targets is demonstrated under various conditions of target depths (up to 2 cm deep), absorption optical contrast ratio (1:0 and 100:1), target volumes (0.5-1 cc), and multiple targets (up to three 0.5 cc targets). The feasibility of 3-D image reconstructions from simultaneous multiple point excitation sources are presented. Preliminary lifetime imaging studies with 1:2 and 2:1 optical contrast in fluorescence lifetime of the contrast agents is also demonstrated. The specificity of the optical imager is further assessed from homogeneous phantom studies containing no fluorescently contrasted targets. While nuclear imaging currently provides clinical diagnostic opportunities using radioactive tracers, molecular targeting of tumors using non-ionizing NIR contrast agents tomographically imaged using the frequency-domain ICCD imaging system could possibly become a new method of diagnostic imaging.

Godavarty, Anuradha

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

First results from the MIT optical rapid imaging system (MORIS) on the IRTF: A stellar occultation by Pluto and a transit by exoplanet XO-2b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a high-speed, visible-wavelength imaging instrument: MORIS (the MIT Optical Rapid Imaging System). MORIS is mounted on the 3 m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its primary component is ...

Gulbis, Amanda A. S.

95

Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emission of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 m. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

Malone, Robert; Celeste, John; Celliers, Peter; Frogget, Brent; Robert Guyton,,; Kaufman, Morris; Lee, Tony; MacGowan, Brian; Ng, Edmend; Reinbachs, Imants; Robinson, Ronald; Tunnell, Thomas; Watts, Phillip

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Optical Alignment Techniques for Line-Imaging Velocity Interferometry and Line-Imaging Self-Emission of Targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 meters. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

Malone, R M; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Frogget, B .; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M I; Lee, T L; MacGowan, B J; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Traditional Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Glass product types and applications...plates, cups, bowls, serving dishes Fiberglass Wool: insulation, filters Textile: plastic or rubber tire reinforcements, fabrics,

98

Glass Fibers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14   Compositional ranges for insulation-type glasses...from materials melted in a cupola with coke as fuel, all iron oxide

99

Refractive index of glass and its dipersion for visible light.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classification of optical glass and empirical relations between the refractive index and its dispersion are discussed in terms of moments of the glass's IR and UV absorption spectra. The observed linear dependence of index on dispersion within glass families is shown to arise primarily from the approximately linear superposition of the electronic absorptions of glass former and glass modifiers. The binary classification into crown and flint glasses is also based primarily on electronic spectra: Crown glasses are 'wide-gap' materials with excitation energies greater than {approx}12.4 eV, while flint glasses are their 'narrow-gap' counterpart.

Smith, D. Y.; Karstens, W. (Physics); (Univ. of Vermont); (Saint Michael's Coll.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Optical systems for synchrotron radiation: lecture 4. Soft x-ray imaging systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The history and present techniques of soft x-ray imaging are reviewed briefly. The physics of x-ray imaging is described, including the temporal and spatial coherence of x-ray sources. Particular technologies described are: contact x-ray microscopy, zone plate imaging, scanned image zone plate microscopy, scanned image reflection microscopy, and soft x-ray holography and diffraction. (LEW)

Howells, M.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Optical Nanomaterials for Photonics/Biophotonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of optical nanoparticles in telecommunications, photodetectors, LED , etc. - Fluorescent Imaging using optical nanolabels (including multiphoton ...

102

Edge-Strength of Thin Chemically Strengthened Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structure and Transport Properties of Nanoconfined Water in Porous Silica and Water-Glass ... on the Mechanical and Optical Properties of Multiphase Ceramics.

103

Energy transfer and non-linear optical properties at near ultraviolet wavelengths: Rare earth 4f {yields} 5d transitions in crystals and glasses. Final report, June 1, 1984--May 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following topics were studied: two-photon transitions from 4f ground state to 5d excited states in Ce{sup 3+}:CaF{sub 2}; optical absorption and photoionization measurements from excited state of Ce{sup 3+}:Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}; excited state photoionization of Ce{sup 3+} ions in Ce{sub 3+}:CaF{sub 2}; optical gain and loss studies in Ce{sup 3+}:LiYF{sub 4}; Gd {yields}Cr energy transfer in Cr{sup 3+}:GSGG, Cr{sup 3+}:GSAG and Cr{sup 3+}:GGG crystals; nonradiative relaxation in Ce{sup 3+} doped crystals and glasses; and grating formation in impurity doped crystals.

Hamilton, D.S.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Characterizing LED with Time-Resolved Photo-Luminescence and Optical Beam Induced Current Imaging.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With rapid development of light emitting device, the detection techniques of semiconductor are more and more important, which include time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) and optical beam… (more)

Wu, Shang-jie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Optical keyboard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY); Feichtner, John D. (Fiddletown, CA); Phillips, Thomas E. (San Diego, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.  

SciTech Connect

At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Tellier, L. L. (Larry L.); Ho, Cheng,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hydroxyls and Glass Surface Reactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass · Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

108

Pulmonary toxicity and kinetic study of Cy5.5-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by optical imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in the development of nanotechnology and devices now make it possible to accurately deliver drugs or genes to the lung. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used as contrast agents, thermal therapy for cancer, and be made to concentrate to target sites through an external magnetic field. However, these advantages may also become problematic when taking into account safety and toxicological factors. This study demonstrated the pulmonary toxicity and kinetic profile of anti-biofouling polymer coated, Cy5.5-conjugated thermally cross-linked superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TCL-SPION) by optical imaging. Negatively charged, 36 nm-sized, Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was prepared for optical imaging probe. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION was intratracheally instilled into the lung by a non-surgical method. Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION slightly induced pulmonary inflammation. The instilled nanoparticles were distributed mainly in the lung and excreted in the urine via glomerular filtration. Urinary excretion was peaked at 3 h after instillation. No toxicity was found under the concentration of 1.8 mg/kg and the half-lives of nanoparticles in the lung and urine were estimated to be about 14.4 {+-} 0.54 h and 24.7 {+-} 1.02 h, respectively. Although further studies are required, our results showed that Cy5.5-conjugated TCL-SPION can be a good candidate for use in pulmonary delivery vehicles and diagnostic probes.

Cho, Wan-Seob [Division of Toxicologic Pathology, Department of Toxicological Research, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 231 Jinhoungno Eunpyung-ku, Seoul 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Respiratory Medicine Unit, ELEGI/Colt Laboratory, Centre for Inflammation Research, The Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh, EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: wcho@staffmail.ed.ac.uk; Cho, Minjung; Kim, Seoung Ryul; Choi, Mina; Lee, Jeong Yeon; Han, Beom Seok [Division of Toxicologic Pathology, Department of Toxicological Research, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 231 Jinhoungno Eunpyung-ku, Seoul 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sue Nie [Division of Genetic Toxicology, Department of Toxicological Research, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 231 Jinhoungno Eunpyung-ku, Seoul 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mi Kyung; Jon, Sangyong [Research Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnology, Department of Life Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jayoung [Division of Toxicologic Pathology, Department of Toxicological Research, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 231 Jinhoungno Eunpyung-ku, Seoul 122-704 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

A low-power, high-sensitivity micromachined optical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the optical fiber interconnects, reflections from glass surfaces, and ... International Frequency Control Symposium (IEEE, Newport Beach, CA, 2010 ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Direct observation of the current distribution in thin superconducting strips using magneto-optic imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of the flux and current distribution of a long thin strip of YBa2Cu3O7 placed in a perpendicular to the magneto-optically found field map we find on a model-independent basis the current distribution across critical field is negli- gible, they obtained explicit expressions for the field and current distributions

Johansen, Tom Henning

111

Metallic Glass II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: ... of the metallic glasses during heating is dependent on the thermal stability of ...

112

DOE Glass Publications Portal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

coated glass products. The Glass IOF is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) which...

113

Bulk Metallic Glasses IX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of elements to form metallic-glass alloys] have resulted in the required cooling rate ... Bauschinger Effect in Metallic Glass Nanowires under Cyclic Loading.

114

Bulk Metallic Glasses XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... A Bulk Metallic Glass with Record-breaking Damage Tolerance ... Oxidation on the Surface Characteristics of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses.

115

OPTICAL DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF THE ODIN UV/VISIBLE SPECTROGRAPH AND INFRARED IMAGER INSTRUMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by mercury and sodium street lights. Radiometric calibration is not provided internally. V. Details of IR excellent spectral imaging performance and stray-light rejection. This paper first briefly describes will provide important contributions to stratospheric ozone research. The scientific analysis

Saskatchewan, University of

116

Pulse-dilation enhanced gated optical imager with 5 ps resolution (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 5 ps gated framing camera was demonstrated using the pulse-dilation of a drifting electron signal. The pulse-dilation is achieved by accelerating a photoelectron derived information pulse with a time varying potential [R. D. Prosser, J. Phys. E 9, 57 (1976)]. The temporal dependence of the accelerating potential causes a birth time dependent axial velocity dispersion that spreads the pulse as it transits a drift region. The expanded pulse is then imaged with a conventional gated microchannel plate based framing camera and the effective gating time of the combined instrument is reduced over that of the framing camera alone. In the drift region, electron image defocusing in the transverse or image plane is prevented with a large axial magnetic field. Details of the unique issues associated with rf excited photocathodes were investigated numerically and a prototype instrument based on this principle was recently constructed. Temporal resolution of the instrument was measured with a frequency tripled femtosecond laser operating at 266 nm. The system demonstrated 20x temporal magnification and the results are presented here. X-ray image formation strategies and photometric calculations for inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments are also examined.

Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom); Bell, P. M.; Koch, J. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; McCarville, T.; Pivovaroff, M.; Soufli, R.; Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: Qle@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Imaging the internal structure of the rat cochlea using optical coherence tomography at 0.827 m and 1.3 m  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This study used 2 OCT systems with different light sources: 1) a semiconductor optical amplifier operating in integration of the backscattered light signal over long time intervals. In contrast, the present system used of using fast fiberoptic-based OCT imaging systems for determining cochlea microanatomy with resolu- tion

Chen, Zhongping

119

Glass Cookware Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Cookware Safety Glass Cookware Safety Under the wrong conditions, glass cookware can crack, break or shatter. Glass cookware is tempered (heat resistant). However, there are many steps to follow to ensure safe use of glass cookware. Glass Cookware Steps: If the steps are not followed, glass cookware can shatter unexpectedly. shatters, (it looks as if it has exploded) If glass bakeware is chipped, cracked, or scratched, it's time for it to be retired from service. It is more likely to shatter! Don't take glass bakeware directly from the freezer to the oven, or vice versa. Allow the oven to fully preheat before putting glassware inside. Don't add liquid to glassware that is already hot. Cover the bottom of glass bakeware with liquid before cooking meat or vegetables.

120

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Magneto-optical image of magnetic fields within a YBCO superconductor showing electrically ... PHY, High-Temp Superconductors See also http ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Optical Images of an Exosolar Planet 25 Light Years from Earth  

SciTech Connect

Fomalhaut is a bright star 7.7 parsec (25 light years) from Earth that harbors a belt of cold dust with a structure consistent with gravitational sculpting by an orbiting planet. Here, we present optical observations of an exoplanet candidate, Fomalhaut b. In the plane of the belt, Fomalhaut b lies approximately 119 astronomical units (AU) from the star, and within 18 AU of the dust belt. We detect counterclockwise orbital motion using Hubble Space Telescope observations separated by 1.73 years. Dynamical models of the interaction between the planet and the belt indicate that the planet's mass is at most three times that of Jupiter for the belt to avoid gravitational disruption. The flux detected at 0.8 {micro}m is also consistent with that of a planet with mass no greater than a few times that of Jupiter. The brightness at 0.6 {micro}m and the lack of detection at longer wavelengths suggest that the detected flux may include starlight reflected off a circumplanetary disk, with dimension comparable to the orbits of the Galilean satellites. We also observed variability of unknown origin at 0.6 {micro}m.

Kalas, P; Graham, J R; Chiang, E; Fitzgerald, M P; Clampin, M; Kite, E S; Stapelfeldt, K; Krist, J

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

Monolithically integrated solid state laser and waveguide using spin-on glass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithically integrated photonic circuit combining a semiconductor source of excitation light with an optically active waveguide formed on the substrate. The optically active waveguide is preferably formed of a spin-on glass to which are added optically active materials which can enable lasing action, optical amplification, optical loss, or frequency conversion in the waveguide, depending upon the added material.

Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Hohimer, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); Neal, Daniel R. (Tijeras, NM); Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Glass Working, Use and Discard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the glass object, be it glass block or glass vessel. Thisglass would have been reheated and cast, probably into blocks

Nicholson, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Optical scanning apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical scanner employed in a radioactive environment for reading indicia imprinted about a cylindrical surface of an article by means of an optical system including metallic reflective and mirror surfaces resistant to degradation and discoloration otherwise imparted to glass surfaces exposed to radiation is described.

Villarreal, R.A.

1985-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electro-optic transient imaging instrumentation development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Implications for SSC instrumentation development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last decade, the underground weapons physics laboratories fielded by LLNL's Nuclear Test and Experimental Sciences (NTES) program have experienced marked change. This change is characterized by a phenomenal growth in the amount of data returned per event. These techniques have been developed as a result of the severe demands placed upon transient instrumentation by the physics requirements of our underground nuclear laboratories. The detector front-ends must quickly detect, process and transmit a large volume of data to recording stations located approximately 1 km from the event. In a recent event, the detector front-ends successfully handled data at a prompt rate of approximately 13 Terabits/sec. Largely, this advance can be attributed directly to the increased use of electro-optic techniques. These highly-parallel high-bandwidth imaging instrumentation systems developed for the test program may have a lot to offer the high-energy physics community tackling the challenge of the unprecedented luminosity and fidelity demands at the SSC. In what follows, we discuss details of a few of our prompt instrumentation techniques and compare these capabilities to the detector requirements for the challenging physics at the SSC. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Lowry, M.; Jacoby, B.; Schulte, H.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential Tiny Glass Bubbles With Big Potential August 19, 2011 - 12:32pm Addthis SRNL's Porous Walled Hollow Glass Microspheres (which are about half the width of a human hair in diameter) have a network of interconnected pores that enable them to be filled with, hold and release gases and other materials. | Image courtesy of SRNL SRNL's Porous Walled Hollow Glass Microspheres (which are about half the width of a human hair in diameter) have a network of interconnected pores that enable them to be filled with, hold and release gases and other materials. | Image courtesy of SRNL Liisa O'Neill Liisa O'Neill Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? SRNL's porous walled glass microspheres allow the potential for

127

DRAFT Glass.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FAST FACTS FAST FACTS Glass technology provides a versatile method for safely managing a variety of wastes SRNL has studied the behavior in glass of nearly every element in the Periodic Table Overview Converting waste materials into a stable glass form is a highly effective way of treating and disposing of many types of waste, including some hazardous and radioactive wastes. Vitrifi cation - the immobilization of a material in glass - is

128

Analysis of Glass Breakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of a Bucketwheel Stacker Reclaimer Structural Failure · Analysis of Glass Breakage · Analysis of Sealed, Integrated, Automotive Wheel Bearings.

129

Glass Stronger than Steel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Stronger than Steel Glass Stronger than Steel Stories of Discovery & Innovation Glass Stronger than Steel Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of R. Ritchie and M. Demetriou Highly magnified image shows a sharp crack introduced into palladium-based metallic glass and the extensive plastic shielding, marked by the white shear lines extending out from the crack, prevent the crack from opening the glass any further. Inset is a magnified view of the shear lines (arrow) developed during plastic sliding. 03.28.11 Glass Stronger than Steel A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech. Drop a glass and it breaks, right? But there's a kind of glass that while

130

Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging Print Imaging Print The wavelengths of soft x-ray photons (1-15 nm) are very well matched to the creation of "nanoscopes" capable of probing the interior structure of biological cells and inorganic mesoscopic systems.Topics addressed by soft x-ray imaging techniques include cell biology, nanomagnetism, environmental science, and polymers. The tunability of synchrotron radiation is absolutely essential for the creation of contrast mechanisms. Cell biology CAT scans are performed in the "water window" (300-500 eV). Nanomagnetism studies require the energy range characteristic of iron, cobalt, and nickel (600-900 eV). Mid- and far-infrared (energies below 1 eV) microprobes using synchrotron radiation are being used to address problems such as chemistry in biological tissues, chemical identification and molecular conformation, environmental biodegradation, mineral phases in geological and astronomical specimens, and electronic properties of novel materials. Infrared synchrotron radiation is focused through, or reflected from, a small spot on the specimen and then analyzed using a spectrometer. Tuning to characteristic vibrational frequencies serves as a sensitive fingerprint for molecular species. Images of the various species are built up by raster scanning the specimen through the small illuminated spot.

131

DTIRC based optical collimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-imaging optical concentrators have been used in the past to increase the power density of incoming radiation in applications such as photovoltaic (PV) solar and optical wireless communications. This paper explores the use of Dielectric Totally Internally ... Keywords: DTIRC, collimator, concentrator, non-imaging, optical

Roberto Ramirez-Iniguez; Ali Ahmadinia; Hernando Fernandez-Canque

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Deformation and Void Structure in Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass · Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

134

Method for making glass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is discussed for making better quality molten borosilicate glass in a glass melter, the glass having the desired viscosity and, preferably, also the desired resistivity so that the glass melt can be established effectively and the product of the glass melter will have the desired level of quality. The method includes the adjustment of the composition of the glass constituents that are fed into the melter in accordance with certain correlations that reliably predict the viscosity and resistivity from the melter temperature and the melt composition, then heating the ingredients to the melter's operating temperature until they melt and homogenize. The equations include the calculation of a non-bridging oxygen'' term from the numbers of moles of the various ingredients, and then the determination of the viscosity and resistivity from the operating temperature of the melter and the non-bridging oxygen term.

Jantzen, C.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

GlassMelt&Sealing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glass Melting and Sealing Glass Melting and Sealing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center performs process development of glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals. Small batches of specialty glass can be melted from reagent grade oxide powders. Glass and glass-ceramic-to-metal seals are made in microprocessor controlled inert atmospheres and are checked for her- meticity after sealing. Sandia's extensive properties database of low melting solder glasses is used to aid in material and processing decisions when making glass-to-glass, ceramic-to-ceramic, and glass-to-ceramic seals. These seals are typically done in air at much lower tem- peratures than glass and glass-to-ceramic seals. Capabilities * Interface with designers and vendors to assure that the most appropriate materi-

136

Mechanical Properties of Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... moduli and Vicker's hardness, as well as high transparency in the UV/visible region, ... Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and  ...

137

About - Glass Publications Portal  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

from the repository at OSTI. The Glass Publications Portal is sponsored by the DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Industrial Technologies Program. In...

138

Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients  

SciTech Connect

An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Diels, Jean-Claude M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

139

Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for ...  

For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; Available Technologies. ... Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Metal Bone ...

140

Depth profiling the optical absorption and thermal reflection coefficient via an analysis based on the method of images (abstract)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of depth profiling optical absorption in a thermally depth variable solid is a problem of direct interest for the analysis of complex structured materials. In this work

J. F. Power

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Importance of glass and brass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of scientific instruments in the scientific revolution, especially brass and glass. Precise lenses and lens grinding, glass vessels for chemical experiments, the advances in astronomy, microscopy and many other areas due to glass...

Dugan, David

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

142

MST: Organizations: Ceramic and Glass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

formation and machining, to complete component fabrication and testing. Our Mission Our ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic products meet customer needs in defense, energy,...

143

Graded index antireflective coatings for glass. Second annual report  

SciTech Connect

M.I.T. is conducting research which will lead to a process for forming broad band antireflective (AR) coatings on glass. Use of these coatings increases the extractable heat from flat-plate solar collectors by 30 to 50% compared with their performance under equivalent solar flux, surface temperature and ambient conditions without broad band AR coatings. Graded index surface films can virtually eliminate reflection losses if controlled properly. Graded index films on a borosilicate glass (Corning Glass Works No. 7740, Pyrex) has been demonstrated. While glass treated this way exhibited adequate optical properties, the glass itself, cannot be fabricated by the float glass process because of excessive working temperatures, and consequently is too expensive for solar applications. The objective of this work is to define glass compositions and processing steps which will result in graded index surface films (which exhibit broad band AR characteristics) on glasses which can be fabricated by the float glass process. The mechanism by which these graded index surface films are produced on glass surfaces consists of preferentially etching one phase from a phase separated glass. The film which remains consists of a porous structure in which the fraction of solid phase increases continuously from the free surface toward the bulk glass. Scattering effects are eliminated by limiting the size of the pore structure to dimensions which are substantially less than the wavelength of light. With this structure, the local index of refraction is proportional to the fraction of solid phase which is present. Characterizations are intended to define the microstructural and chemical nature of the surface film throughout its thickness. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Haggerty, J.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to fill a need in the glass industry for a non-contact temperature sensor for glass melts. At present, the glass forming industry (e.g., bottle manufacture) consumes significant amounts of energy. Careful control of temperature at the point the bottle is molded is necessary to prevent the bottle from being rejected as out-of-specification. In general, the entire glass melting and conditioning process is designed to minimize this rejection rate, maximize throughput and thus control energy and production costs. This program focuses on the design, development and testing of an advanced optically based pyrometer for glass melts. The pyrometer operates simultaneously at four wavelengths; through analytical treatment of the signals, internal temperature profiles within the glass melt can be resolved. A novel multiplexer alloys optical signals from a large number of fiber-optic sensors to be collected and resolved by a single detector at a location remote from the process. This results in a significant cost savings on a per measurement point basis. The development program is divided into two phases. Phase 1 involves the construction of a breadboard version on the instrument and its testing on a pilot-scale furnace. In Phase 2, a prototype analyzer will be constructed and tested on a commercial forehearth. This report covers the Phase 1 activities.

Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Kramlich, J.; Koppang, R.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

GRADIENT INDEX SPHERES BY THE SEQUENTIAL ACCRETION OF GLASS POWDERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is seeking a method for fabricating mm-scale spheres having a refractive index that varies smoothly and continuously from the center to its surface [1]. The fabrication procedure must allow the creation of a range of index profiles. The spheres are to be optically transparent and have a refractive index differential greater than 0.2. The sphere materials can be either organic or inorganic and the fabrication technique must be capable of scaling to low cost production. Mo-Sci Corporation proposed to develop optical quality gradient refractive index (GRIN) glass spheres of millimeter scale (1 to 2 mm diameter) by the sequential accretion and consolidation of glass powders. Other techniques were also tested to make GRIN spheres as the powder-accretion method produced non-concentric layers and poor optical quality glass spheres. Potential ways to make the GRIN spheres were (1) by "coating" glass spheres (1 to 2 mm diameter) with molten glass in a two step process; and (2) by coating glass spheres with polymer layers.

MARIANO VELEZ

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Glass electrolyte composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.

Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

147

Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Waste glass weathering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weathering of glass is reviewed by examining processes that affect the reaction of commercial, historical, natural, and nuclear waste glass under conditions of contact with humid air and slowly dripping water, which may lead to immersion in nearly static solution. Radionuclide release data from weathered glass under conditions that may exist in an unsaturated environment are presented and compared to release under standard leaching conditions. While the comparison between the release under weathering and leaching conditions is not exact, due to variability of reaction in humid air, evidence is presented of radionuclide release under a variety of conditions. These results suggest that both the amount and form of radionuclide release can be affected by the weathering of glass.

Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Bulk Metallic Glasses X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites · Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic ...

150

Bulk Metallic Glasses VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society ... Air-Oxidation of a ( Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc · Anelastic ...

151

Terahertz Properties of Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of advances in THz-TDS spectroscopy of selected glass families ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate ... Molecular Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in ...

152

Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

153

DWPF GLASS BEADS AND GLASS FRIT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect

DWPF is considering replacing irregularly shaped glass frit with spherical glass beads in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process to decrease the yield stress of the melter feed (a non-Newtonian Bingham Plastic). Pilot-scale testing was conducted on spherical glass beads and glass frit to determine how well the glass beads would transfer when compared to the glass frit. Process Engineering Development designed and constructed the test apparatus to aid in the understanding and impacts that spherical glass beads may have on the existing DWPF Frit Transfer System. Testing was conducted to determine if the lines would plug with the glass beads and the glass frit slurry and what is required to unplug the lines. The flow loop consisted of vertical and horizontal runs of clear PVC piping, similar in geometry to the existing system. Two different batches of glass slurry were tested: a batch of 50 wt% spherical glass beads and a batch of 50 wt% glass frit in process water. No chemicals such as formic acid was used in slurry, only water and glass formers. The glass beads used for this testing were commercially available borosilicate glass of mesh size -100+200. The glass frit was Frit 418 obtained from DWPF and is nominally -45+200 mesh. The spherical glass beads did not have a negative impact on the frit transfer system. The transferring of the spherical glass beads was much easier than the glass frit. It was difficult to create a plug with glass bead slurry in the pilot transfer system. When a small plug occurred from setting overnight with the spherical glass beads, the plug was easy to displace using only the pump. In the case of creating a man made plug in a vertical line, by filling the line with spherical glass beads and allowing the slurry to settle for days, the plug was easy to remove by using flush water. The glass frit proved to be much more difficult to transfer when compared to the spherical glass beads. The glass frit impacted the transfer system to the point that the test apparatus had to be disassembled to dislodge the plugs created in the system.

Adamson, D; Bradley Pickenheim, B

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

Characterization of crushed glass as a transpired air heating solar collector material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of crushed glass matrices as the heat-absorbing media in air heating solar collectors is investigated. An experimantal program was undertaken to characterize the most likely candidate glass types and sizes by measuring pressure drops, optical extinction coefficients, and volumetric heat transfer coefficients. Bed efficiencies were also measured and found to be similar to those expected for screen matrices unless critical amounts of clear glass were used as a top layer, which results in lower efficiency.

Collier, R.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Through the looking glass: you can play against your own reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interactive artwork overturns the commonsense assumption that a looking glass reflects the world in front of it. The worlds outside and inside the looking glass are not symmetric in our optical system. This feature allows you to play an air-hockey ...

Yasuaki Kakehi; Takeshi Naemura

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Argonne Software Licensing: Glass Furnace Model (GFM)  

The Glass Furnace Model (GFM) The Glass Furnace Model (GFM) Version 4.0, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) glass furnace simulation code was developed at Argonne ...

157

Demonstration of high-Q mid-infrared chalcogenide glass-on-silicon resonators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrated high-index-contrast, waveguide-coupled As[subscript 2]Se[subscript 3] chalcogenide glass resonators monolithically integrated on silicon fabricated using optical lithography and a lift-off process. The ...

Lin, Hongtao

158

Gadolinium Borosilicate Glass-Bonded Gd-Silicate Apatite: A Glass-Ceramic Nuclear Waste Form for Actinides  

SciTech Connect

A Gd-rich crystalline phase precipitated in a sodium gadolinium alumino-borosilicate glass during synthesis. The glass has a chemical composition of 45.39-31.13 wt% Gd2O3, 28.80-34.04 wt% SiO2, 10.75-14.02 wt% Na2O, 4.30-5.89 wt% Al2O3, and 10.75-14.91 wt% B2O3. Backscattered electron images revealed that the crystals are hexagonal, elongated, acicular, prismatic, skeletal or dendritic, tens of mm in size, some reaching 200 mm in length. Electron microprobe analysis confirmed that the crystals are chemically homogeneous and have a formula of NaGd9(SiO4)6O2 with minor B substitution for Si. The X-ray diffraction pattern of this phase is similar to that of lithium gadolinium silicate apatite. Thus, this hexagonal phase is a rare earth silicate with the apatite structure. We suggest that this Gd-silicate apatite in a Gd-borosilicate glass is a potential glass-ceramic nuclear waste form for actinide disposition. Am, Cm and other actinides can easily occupy the Gd-sites. The potential advantages of this glass-ceramic waste form include: (1) both the glass and apatite can be used to immobilize actinides, (2) silicate apatite is thermodynamically more stable than the glass, (3) borosilicate glass-bonded Gd-silicate apatite is easily fabricated, and (4) the Gd is an effective neutron absorber.

Zhao, Donggao (Michigan, Univ Of - Ann Arbor); Li, Liyu (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Davis, Linda L. (ASSOC WESTERN UNIVERSITY); Weber, William J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Ewing, Rodney C. (Michigan, Univ Of - Ann Arbor); KP Hart and GR Lumpkin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

160

Composite polymer: Glass edge cladding for laser disks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Large neodymium glass laser disks for disk amplifiers such as those used in the Nova laser require an edge cladding which absorbs at 1 micrometer. This cladding prevents edge reflections from causing parasitic oscillations which would otherwise deplete the gain. Nova now utilizes volume-absorbing monolithic-glass claddings which are fused at high temperature to the disks. These perform quite well but are expensive to produce. Absorbing glass strips are adhesively bonded to the edges of polygonal disks using a bonding agent whose index of refraction matches that of both the laser and absorbing glass. Optical finishing occurs after the strips are attached. Laser disks constructed with such claddings have shown identical gain performance to the previous Nova disks and have been tested for hundreds of shots without significant degradation. 18 figs.

Powell, H.T.; Wolfe, C.A.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.E.; Riley, M.O.; Lyon, R.E.; Jessop, E.S.

1987-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Mechanical and Acoustic Studies of Deep Ocean Glass Sphere Implosions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanical and Acoustic Studies of Deep Ocean Glass Sphere Implosions P. W. Gorham, M. Rosen, J. W of the instrument package and therefore no knowledge of the cause of the loss. Because the failure rate mooring and the electro-optical power and teleme- try riser cables for survival in the event of implosion

Learned, John

162

Versa Glass | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 43220 Product Versa is manufacturing a new technology privacy glass in Ohio that is LEED and has cleantech properties References Versa Glass1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

163

Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass.

164

Lumino: tangible blocks for tabletop computers based on glass fiber bundles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tabletop computers based on diffuse illumination can track fiducial markers placed on the table’s surface. In this paper, we demonstrate how to do the same with objects arranged in a three-dimensional structure without modifying the table. We present lumino, a system of building blocks. In addition to a marker, each block contains a glass fiber bundle. The bundle optically guides the light reflected off markers in the higher levels down to the table surface, where the table’s built-in camera reads it. While guiding marker images down, the bundle optically scales and rearranges them. It thereby fits the images of an entire vertical arrangement of markers into the horizontal space usually occupied by a single 2D marker. We present six classes of blocks and matching marker designs, each of which is optimized for different requirements. We show three demo applications. One of them is a construction kit that logs and critiques constructions. The presented blocks are unpowered and maintenance-free, keeping larger numbers of blocks manageable. ACM Classification: H5.2 [Information interfaces and

Patrick Baudisch; Torsten Becker; Frederik Rudeck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development of a process control sensor for the glass industry. Phase 2: Prototype design, development and demonstration  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an advanced multichannel, on-line optical system for the non-contact measurement of forehearth glass melt temperatures at depth. The analyzer employs multiple narrow infrared (IR) band measurements of glass radiation to reconstruct the glass temperature profiles at depth. The TAS replaces expensive Tri-plex thermocouples, which frequently have service lives as short as 6 months to 1 years. By using passive non-contact sensor heads and fiber optic cables, temperature sensitive electronic components can be located at a safe distance from the hostile process environment. This provides significantly better reliability of the vulnerable electro-optic components and ready access for maintenance.

Gardner, M.; Candee, A.; Koppang, R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Advanced Optics | Center for Functional Nanomaterials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy optics The Advanced Optical Spectroscopy & Microscopy Facility combines a broad range of optical instruments suitable for studies of optical properties of hard, soft or biological materials using ultrafast and nonlinear spectroscopy, and single-molecule optical and confocal methods. Capabilities Fluorescence imaging (up to five channels simultaneously), two-color fluorescence lifetime imaging, spectral imaging, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy Fluorescence lifetime measurements, including time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved fluorescence spectra, using single-photon counting and fluorescence upconversion methods Single-molecule spectroscopy: fluorescence intensity, lifetimes, anisotropy and fluorescence spectra

167

Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Optical fuel pin scanner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane at a cylindrical outside surface by use of an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image of an encircled cylindrical surface area to a stationary photodiode array.

Kirchner, Tommy L. (Richland, WA); Powers, Hurshal G. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Cavity-enhanced absorption for optical refrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 20-fold increase over the single path optical absorption is demonstrated with a low loss medium placed in a resonant cavity. This has been applied to laser cooling of Yb:ZBLAN glass resulting in 90% absorption of the incident pump light. A coupled-cavity scheme to achieve active optical impedance matching is analyzed.

Seletskiy, Denis V; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

Sontakke, Atul D.; Annapurna, K. [Glass Science and Technology Section, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata - 700 032 (India)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Glass Plates under Micro-indentation” Incorporation in Glass Ionomer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of nanocrystalline calcium de?cient hydroxyapatite gnCDHAl incorporation in glass ..... K., Nishino, M., 2003. Toughness, bonding and ?uoride release.

172

WINDOW 5 Glass Library Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update WINDOW 6 or 7 Glass Library Update Last update:12/09/13 07:26 PM Automatic IGDB Update Feature in WINDOW 6 and 7 The latest versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 have an automatic IGDB database update function in the Glass Library. When you first open the program, it checks to see if there is an IGDB version later than what you already have installed, and will notify you if there is an update. Then you can download and install the IGDB database, and click on the Update IGDB button in the Glass Library in order to start the automatic update. For older versions of WINDOW 6 and 7 without the automatic IGDB update function bullet How to Check the Current WINDOW5 IGDB Version bullet Updating the Glass Library bullet Problem Updating the Glass Library bullet Discontinued Records or Reused NFRC IDs

173

Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

Kruger, Albert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Farooqi, Rahmatullah [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States), Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, (Korea, Republic of)

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

Boaz, P.T.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Method for heating a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Glass rupture disk  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

Glass, S. Jill (Albuquerque, NM); Nicolaysen, Scott D. (Albuquerque, NM); Beauchamp, Edwin K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Interstitial BiO molecule as a center of broadband IR luminescence in bismuth-doped silica glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IR luminescence and absorption in bismuth-doped silica glass-core fibers observed recently (see [arXiv:1106.2969v1 [physics.optics]) are argued to be caused by transitions in interstitial BiO molecules

Sokolov, V O; Dianov, E M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to 'normal glasses of a 1 to 2 order of magnitude, which can result in unique properties in areas such as hydrogen storage, gas transport, gas separations and purifications, sensors, global warming applications, new drug delivery systems and so on. One of the most interesting porous glass products that SRNL has developed and patented is Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs) that are being studied for many different applications. The European Patent Office (EPO) just recently notified SRS that the continuation-in-part patent application for the PW-HGMs has been accepted. The original patent, which was granted by the EPO on June 2, 2010, was validated in France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The microspheres produced are generally in the range of 2 to 100 microns, with a 1 to 2 micron wall. What makes the SRNL microspheres unique from all others is that the team in Figure 1 has found a way to induce and control porosity through the thin walls on a scale of 100 to 3000 {angstrom}. This is what makes the SRNL HW-HGMs one-of-a-kind, and is responsible for many of their unique properties and potential for various applications, including those in tritium storage, gas separations, H-storage for vehicles, and even a variety of new medical applications in the areas of drug delivery and MRI contrast agents. SRNL Hollow Glass Microspheres, and subsequent, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres are fabricated using a flame former apparatus. Figure 2 is a schematic of the apparatus.

Sexton, W.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

The University of Hawaii Wide Field Imager (UHWFI)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Hawaii Wide-Field Imager (UHWFI) is a focal compressor system designed to project the full half-degree field of the UH 2.2 m telescope onto the refurbished UH 8Kx8K CCD camera. The optics use Ohara glasses and are mounted in an oil-filled cell to minimize light losses and ghost images from the large number of internal lens surfaces. The UHWFI is equipped with a six-position filter wheel and a rotating sector blade shutter,both driven by stepper motors. The instrument saw first light in 2004 in an engineering mode. After filling the lens cell with index matching oil, integration of all software components into the user interface, tuning of the CCD performance, and the purchase of the final filter set, UHWFI is now fully commissioned at the UH 2.2 m telescope.

Klaus W. Hodapp; Andreas Seifahrt; Gerard A. Luppino; Richard Wainscoat; Ed Sousa; Hubert Yamada; Alan Ryan; Richard Shelton; Mel Inouye; Andrew J. Pickles; Yanko K. Ivanov

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Quinary metallic glass alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Holder for rotating glass body  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

Kolleck, Floyd W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

183

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Method of determining glass durability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

Jantzen, Carol Maryanne (Aiken, SC); Pickett, John Butler (Aiken, SC); Brown, Kevin George (Augusta, GA); Edwards, Thomas Barry (Aiken, SC)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagant strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Baylor, Lewis C. (North Augusta, SC); Whitaker, Michael J. (North Augusta, SC); O' Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications is described. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagent strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping. 12 figs.

Wicks, G.G.; Livingston, R.R.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.; O`Rourke, P.E.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

Unusually Stable Glasses May Benefit Drugs, Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... glass is more apt to convert to a low-energy crystalline order ... to study how molecules diffuse during subsequent annealing of the two types of glass ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Compositional Study of Neutron Detecting Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current study involves the production and characterization of glass with high concentrations of Gd2O3 in various oxide glass formers, and containing one of ...

190

Laboratory Equipment - Ace Glass UV Photochemistry Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Specifications / Capabilities: UV Photchemistry Safety Cabinet Ace Glass Cat. Number 7836-20. ... Power Supply Ace Glass Cat. Number 7830-60. ...

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Chemical Strengthening of Soda Lime Silicate Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

192

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Database and Interim Glass Property Models for Hanford HLW Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a methodology for an increase in the efficiency and a decrease in the cost of vitrifying high-level waste (HLW) by optimizing HLW glass formulation. This methodology consists in collecting and generating a database of glass properties that determine HLW glass processability and acceptability and relating these properties to glass composition. The report explains how the property-composition models are developed, fitted to data, used for glass formulation optimization, and continuously updated in response to changes in HLW composition estimates and changes in glass processing technology. Further, the report reviews the glass property-composition literature data and presents their preliminary critical evaluation and screening. Finally the report provides interim property-composition models for melt viscosity, for liquidus temperature (with spinel and zircon primary crystalline phases), and for the product consistency test normalized releases of B, Na, and Li. Models were fitted to a subset of the screened database deemed most relevant for the current HLW composition region.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Vienna, John D.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Russell, Renee L.

2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

194

Comparison of Unmonochromatized Synchrotron Radiation and Conventional X-rays in the Imaging of Mammographic Phantom and Human Breast Specimens: A Preliminary Result  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple imaging setup based on the principle of coherence-based contrast X-ray imaging with unmonochromatized synchrotron radiation was used for studying mammographic phantom and human breast specimens. The use of unmonochromatized synchrotron radiation simplifies the instrumentation, decreases the cost and makes the procedure simpler and potentially more suitable for clinical applications. The imaging systems consisted of changeable silicon wafer attenuators, a tungsten slit system, a CdWO4 scintillator screen, a CCD (Charge Coupled Device) camera coupled to optical magnification lenses, and a personal computer. In preliminary studies, a spatial resolution test pattern and glass capillary filled with air bubbles were imaged to evaluate the resOolution characteristics and coherence-based contrast enhancement. Both the spatial resolution and image quality of the proposed system

Haijo Jung; Hee-joung Kim; Eun-kyung Kim; Jin-o Hong; Jung Ho Je; Yeukuang Hwu; Wen-li Tsai; Giorgio Magaritondo; Hyung-sik Yoo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers 7.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers Geek-Up[6.17.2011]: Metallic Glass and 3D Plasmon Rulers June 17, 2011 - 5:41pm Addthis Check out a short animation of a 3D plasmon ruler as it delivers optical information about the structural dynamics of an attached protein and read more below. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? The discovery of a new property of glass offers new insight into the atomic structure and behavior of metallic glasses, which are in products such as anti-theft tags and power transformers. A new ruler could help provide scientists with unprecedented details into a variety of biological events, including the interaction between DNA and enzymes, protein folding and cell membrane vibrations.

196

Characterizing the radiation response of Cherenkov glass detectors with isotopic sources  

SciTech Connect

Abstract Cherenkov detectors are widely used for particle identification and threshold detectors in high-energy physics. Glass Cherenkov detectors that are sensitive to beta emissions originating from neutron activation have been demonstrated recently as a potential replacement for activation foils. In this work, we set the groundwork to evaluate large Cherenkov glass detectors for sensitivity to MeV photons through first understanding the measured response of small Cherenkov glass detectors to isotopic gamma-ray sources. Counting and pulse height measurements are acquired with reflected glass Cherenkov detectors read out with a photomultiplier tube. Simulation was used to inform our understanding of the measured results. This simulation included radioactive source decay, radiation interaction, Cherenkov light generation, optical ray tracing, and photoelectron production. Implications for the use of Cherenkov glass detectors to measure low energy gammaray response are discussed.

Hayward, J P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hobbs, C. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Bell, Zane W [ORNL; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Johnson, Rose E [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Lillard, Cole R [ORNL; Ramey, Lucas A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Black optic display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical display includes a plurality of stacked optical waveguides having first and second opposite ends collectively defining an image input face and an image screen, respectively, with the screen being oblique to the input face. Each of the waveguides includes a transparent core bound by a cladding layer having a lower index of refraction for effecting internal reflection of image light transmitted into the input face to project an image on the screen, with each of the cladding layers including a cladding cap integrally joined thereto at the waveguide second ends. Each of the cores is beveled at the waveguide second end so that the cladding cap is viewable through the transparent core. Each of the cladding caps is black for absorbing external ambient light incident upon the screen for improving contrast of the image projected internally on the screen.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Preform For Producing An Optical Fiber And Method Therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a simple method for fabricating fiber-optic glass preforms having complex refractive index configurations and/or dopant distributions in a radial direction with a high degree of accuracy and precision. The method teaches bundling together a plurality of glass rods of specific physical, chemical, or optical properties and wherein the rod bundle is fused in a manner that maintains the cross-sectional composition and refractive-index profiles established by the position of the rods.

Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); Koplow, Jeffery P. (Washington, DC)

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

Preform For Producing An Optical Fiber And Method Therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a simple method for fabricating fiber-optic glass preforms having complex refractive index configurations and/or dopant distributions in a radial direction with a high degree of accuracy and precision. The method teaches bundling together a plurality of glass rods of specific physical, chemical, or optical properties and wherein the rod bundle is fused in a manner that maintains the cross-sectional composition and refractive-index profiles established by the position of the rods.

Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); Koplow, Jeffery P. (Washington, DC)

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

200

Optical flow using phase information for deblurring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a method for reconstructing motion-degraded images by using velocity information generated with a phase-based optical flow calculation. The optical flow method applies a set of frequency-tuned Gabor ...

Texin, Cheryl (Cheryl A.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hand-held optical fuel pin scanner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane perpendicular to an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image to a stationary photodiode array.

Kirchner, Tommy L. (Richland, WA); Powers, Hurshal G. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hand-held optical fuel pin scanner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical scanner for indicia arranged in a focal plane perpendicular to an optical system including a rotatable dove prism. The dove prism transmits a rotating image to a stationary photodiode array.

Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

1980-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

GLASS COMPOSITION-TCLP RESPONSE MODEL FOR WASTE GLASSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This paper describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Method for manufacturing glass frit  

SciTech Connect

A method of manufacturing a glass frit for use in the manufacture of uniform glass microspheres to serve as containers for laser fusion fuel to be exposed to laser energy which includes the formation of a glass gel which is then dried, pulverized, and very accurately sized to particles in a range of, for example, 125 to 149 micrometers. The particles contain an occluded material such as urea which expands when heated. The sized particles are washed, dried, and subjected to heat to control the moisture content prior to being introduced into a system to form microspheres.

Budrick, Ronald G. (Ann Arbor, MI); King, Frank T. (Hillsboro, OR); Nolen, Jr., Robert L. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Real-time Molecular Study of Bystander Effects of Low dose Low LET radiation Using Living Cell Imaging and Nanoparticale Optics  

SciTech Connect

In this study two novel approaches are proposed to investigate precisely the low dose low LET radiation damage and its effect on bystander cells in real time. First, a flow shear model system, which would provide us a near in vivo situation where endothelial cells in the presence of extra cellular matrix experiencing continuous flow shear stress, will be used. Endothelial cells on matri-gel (simulated extra cellular matrix) will be subjected to physiological flow shear (that occurs in normal blood vessels). Second, a unique tool (Single nano particle/single live cell/single molecule microscopy and spectroscopy; Figure A) will be used to track the molecular trafficking by single live cell imaging. Single molecule chemical microscopy allows one to single out and study rare events that otherwise might be lost in assembled average measurement, and monitor many target single molecules simultaneously in real-time. Multi color single novel metal nanoparticle probes allow one to prepare multicolor probes (Figure B) to monitor many single components (events) simultaneously and perform multi-complex analysis in real-time. These nano-particles resist to photo bleaching and hence serve as probes for unlimited timeframe of analysis. Single live cell microscopy allows one to image many single cells simultaneously in real-time. With the combination of these unique tools, we will be able to study under near-physiological conditions the cellular and sub-cellular responses (even subtle changes at one molecule level) to low and very low doses of low LET radiation in real time (milli-second or nano-second) at sub-10 nanometer spatial resolution. This would allow us to precisely identify, at least in part, the molecular mediators that are responsible of radiation damage in the irradiated cells and the mediators that are responsible for initiating the signaling in the neighboring cells. Endothelial cells subjected to flow shear (2 dynes/cm2 or 16 dynes/cm2) and exposed to 0.1, 1 and 10 cGy on coverslips will be examined for (a) low LET radiation-induced alterations of cellular function and its physiological relevance in real time; and (b) radiation damage triggered bystander effect on the neighboring unirradiated cells. First, to determine the low LET radiation induced alteration of cellular function we will examine: (i) the real time transformation of single membrane transporters in single living cells; (ii) the pump efficiency of membrane efflux pump of live cells in real time at the molecular level; (iii) the kinetics of single-ligand receptor interaction on single live cell surface (Figure C); and (iv) alteration in chromosome replication in living cell. Second, to study the radiation triggered bystander responses, we will examine one of the key signaling pathway i.e. TNF- alpha/NF-kappa B mediated signaling. TNF-alpha specific nano particle sensors (green) will be developed to detect the releasing dynamics, transport mechanisms and ligand-receptor binding on live cell surface in real time. A second sensor (blue) will be developed to simultaneously monitor the track of NF-kB inside the cell. The proposed nano-particle optics approach would complement our DOE funded study on biochemical mechanisms of TNF-alpha- NF-kappa B-mediated bystander effect.

Natarajan, Mohan [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio; Xu, Nancy R [Old Dominion University; Mohan, Sumathy [UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

Chalcogenide glass nanostructures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chalcogenide nanowires and other micro-and nano scale structures are grown on a preselected portion of on a substrate. They are amorphous and of uniform composition and can be grown by a sublimation-condensation process onto the surface of an amorphous substrate. Among other uses, these structures can be used as coatings on optical fibers, as coatings on implants, as wispering galleries, in electrochemical devices, and in nanolasers.

Johnson, Bradley R. (Richland, WA); Schweiger, Michael J. (Richland, WA); MacIsaac, Brett D. (Kennewick, WA); Sundaram, S. Kamakshi (Richland, WA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Video image position determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

Christensen, Wynn (Los Alamos, NM); Anderson, Forrest L. (Bernalillo, NM); Kortegaard, Birchard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Parallel Algorithms for Image Processing on OMC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author studies a class of VLSI organizations with optical interconnects for fast solutions to several image processing tasks. The organization and operation of these architectures are based on a generic model called OMC, which is used to understand ... Keywords: OMC, computational complexity, computational limits, computerised picture processing, constant time algorithms, fine grain image computing, free space optics, generic model, image processing, optical information processing, optical interconnects, parallel algorithms, parallel algorithms.

Mary Mehrnoosh Eshaghian

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Glass in 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... This presentation is an overview of the findings from the June 21-22, 2010 American Ceramic Society Leadership Summit ... Borosilicate Glasses: Steve W. Martin1; Randi Christensen1; Garrett Olson1; 1Iowa State University

210

Thermal insulation of window glass  

SciTech Connect

The thermal insulation of window glass can be increased by a factor of two using spray-on semiconductive SnO/sub 2/: Sb or IN/sub 2/O/sub 3/: Sn coatings. (auth)

Sievers, A.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fast Crystals and Strong Glasses  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes new results on model colloid systems that provide insight into the behavior of fundamental problems in colloid physics, and more generally, for other materials as well. By visualizing the nucleation and growth of colloid crystals, we find that the incipient crystallites are much more disordered than expected, leading to a larger diversity of crystal morphologies. When the entropic contribution of these diverse morphologies is included in the free energy, we are able to describe the behavior very well, and can predict the nucleation rate surprisingly accurately. The talk also describes the glass transition in deformable colloidal particles, and will show that when the internal elasticity of the particles is included, the colloidal glass transition mimics that of molecular glass formers much more completely. These results also suggest that the elasticity at the scale of the fundamental unit, either colloid particle or molecule, determines the nature of the glass transition, as described by the "fragility."

Weitz, David [Harvard

2009-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

212

Sulfate Fining Chemistry in Oxidized and Reduced Soda-Lime-Silica Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Various reducing agents were used and their additions were varied to (1) increase glass quality through eliminating defects from silica scum, (2) decrease SOx emissions through changing the kind and quantity of reducing agents, and (3) improve production efficiency through increased flexibility of glass redox control during continuous processing. The work included measuring silica sand dissolution and sulfate decomposition in melts from glass batches. Glass batches were heated at a temperature-increase rate deemed similar to that experienced in the melting furnace. The sulfate decomposition kinetics was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis-differential thermal analysis and evolved gas analysis. Sulfur concentrations in glasses quenched at different temperatures were determined using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The distribution of residual sand (that which was not dissolved during the initial batch reactions) in the glass was obtained as a function of temperature with optical microscopy in thin-sections of melts. The fraction of undissolved sand was measured with X-ray diffraction. The results of the present study helped Visteon Inc. reduce the energy consumption and establish the batch containing 0.118 mass% of graphite as the best candidate for Visteon glass production. The improved glass batch has a lower potential for silica scum formation and for brown fault occurrence in the final glass product. It was established that bubbles trapped in the melt even at 1450 C have a high probability to be refined when reaching the hot zone in the glass furnace. Furthermore, silica sand does not accumulate at the glass surface and dissolves faster in the batch with graphite than in the batch with carbocite.

Matyas, Josef; Hrma, Pavel R.

2005-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling. A number of engineering considerations and recommendations were prepared based on the experimental findings, experience, and other process considerations. Recommendations for future testing are included. In conjunction with future work, it is recommended that a professional consultant be engaged to guide and assist with testing and design input.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

214

BNFL Report Glass Formers Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to obtain powder property data on candidate glass former materials, sufficient to guide conceptual design and estimate the cost of glass former handling facilities as requested under Part B1 of BNFL Technical and Development Support. Twenty-nine glass forming materials were selected and obtained from vendors for the characterization of their physical properties, durability in caustic solution, and powder flow characteristics. A glass former was selected based on the characterization for each of the ten oxide classes required for Envelope A, B, and C mixtures. Three blends (A, B, and C) were prepared based on formulations provided by Vitreous State Laboratory and evaluated with the same methods employed for the glass formers. The properties obtained are presented in a series of attached Tables. It was determined that five of the ten glass formers, (kyanite, iron oxide, titania, zircon, and zinc oxide) have the potential to cause some level of solids f low problems. The problems might include arching or ratholing in the silo/hopper. In addition, all of the blends may require consideration for their handling.

Schumacher, R.F.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

215

Reconstruction dynamics of recorded holograms in photochromic glass  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the dynamics of the record-erase process of holograms in photochromic glass using continuum Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser radiation ({lambda}=532 nm). A bidimensional microgrid pattern was formed and visualized in photochromic glass, and its diffraction efficiency decay versus time (during reconstruction step) gave us information (D, {Delta}n) about the diffusion process inside the material. The recording and reconstruction processes were carried out in an off-axis setup, and the images of the reconstructed object were recorded by a CCD camera. Measurements realized on reconstructed object images using holograms recorded at a different incident power laser have shown a two-stage process involved in silver atom kinetics.

Mihailescu, Mona; Pavel, Eugen; Nicolae, Vasile B.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

Video Toroid Cavity Imager  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Thin display optical projector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical system (20) projects light into a planar optical display (10). The display includes laminated optical waveguides (12) defining an inlet face (14) at one end and an outlet screen (16) at an opposite end. A first mirror (26) collimates light from a light source (18) along a first axis, and distributes the light along a second axis. A second mirror (28) collimates the light from the first mirror along the second axis to illuminate the inlet face and produce an image on the screen.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

High-power regenerative Nd-phosphate glass amplifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact high-power regenerative Nd-phosphate glass amplifier is described which incorporates spatial filtering and full image relay techniques. Output energies up to 1.2 J at a pulse duration of 140 +- 10 psec (FWHM) and 3 J at 900 +- 70 psec (FWHM) are achieved in a smooth nearly flattop beam intensity profile. Even with present-day technology, this system could be scaled into a terawatt regime.

Roschger, E.W.; Balmer, J.E.

1985-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Stokes imaging of AM Her systems using 3D inhomogeneous models-II. Modelling X-ray and optical data of CP Tucanae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The viewing geometry of the polar CP Tuc that better explains its optical and X-ray light curves is controversial. Previous modelling of white-light polarimetric data considered the partial self-eclipse of an extended inhomogeneous emitting region. Alternatively, phase-dependent absorption has been used to reproduce the X-ray data. This paper presents new optical polarimetric data of CP Tuc and a model that consistently explains its optical and X-ray data. The model was based on an extension of the CYCLOPS code that added X-ray bremsstrahlung emission and pre-shock region absorption to the original version, which only accounted for cyclotron emission. The new code creates the possibility of simultaneous optical and X-ray fitting. We show that self-eclipse and absorption data have distinct signatures on the X-ray spectra. Although we were able to reasonably fit the CP Tuc optical data to cases of absorption and self-eclipse, we were only able to reproduce the X-ray orbital modulation after considering the abso...

Silva, K M G; Costa, J E R; de Souza, C A; Cieslinski, D; Hickel, G R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

1993 CAT workshop on beamline optical designs  

SciTech Connect

An Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) Workshop on Beamline Optical Designs was held at Argonne National Laboratory on July 26--27, 1993. The goal of this workshop was to bring together experts from various synchrotron sources to provide status reports on crystal, reflecting, and polarizing optics as a baseline for discussions of issues facing optical designers for CAT beamlines at the APS. Speakers from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the University of Chicago, the National Synchrotron Light Source, and the University of Manchester (England) described single- and double-crystal monochromators, mirrors, glass capillaries, and polarizing optics. Following these presentations, the 90 participants divided into three working groups: Crystal Optics Design, Reflecting Optics, and Optics for Polarization Studies. This volume contains copies of the presentation materials from all speakers, summaries of the three working groups, and a ``catalog`` of various monochromator designs.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

HLW Glass Studies: Development of Crystal-Tolerant HLW Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In our study, a series of lab-scale crucible tests were performed on designed glasses of different compositions to further investigate and simulate the effect of Cr, Ni, Fe, Al, Li, and RuO2 on the accumulation rate of spinel crystals in the glass discharge riser of the HLW melter. The experimental data were used to expand the compositional region covered by an empirical model developed previously (Matyᚠet al. 2010b), improving its predictive performance. We also investigated the mechanism for agglomeration of particles and impact of agglomerates on accumulation rate. In addition, the TL was measured as a function of temperature and composition.

Matyas, Josef; Huckleberry, Adam R.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lang, Jesse B.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

223

Optical scanning apparatus for indicia imprinted about a cylindrical axis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical scanner employed in a radioactive environment for reading indicia imprinted about a cylindrical surface of an article by means of an optical system including metallic reflective and mirror surfaces resistant to degradation and discoloration otherwise imparted to glass surfaces exposed to radiation.

Villarreal, Richard A. (Kennewick, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Integral window hermetic fiber optic components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam.

Dalton, R.D.; Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.; Waker, D.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Video image position determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to the control of video and optical information and, more specifically, to control systems utilizing video images to provide control. Accurate control of video images and laser beams is becoming increasingly important as the use of lasers for machine, medical and experimental processes escalates. In, AURORA, an installation at Los Alamos National Laboratory dedicated to laser fusion research, it is necessary to precisely control the path and angle of up to 96 lasers beams. This invention is comprised of an optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

Christensen, W.; Anderson, F.L.; Kortegaard, B.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Video image position determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to the control of video and optical information and, more specifically, to control systems utilizing video images to provide control. Accurate control of video images and laser beams is becoming increasingly important as the use of lasers for machine, medical and experimental processes escalates. In, AURORA, an installation at Los Alamos National Laboratory dedicated to laser fusion research, it is necessary to precisely control the path and angle of up to 96 lasers beams. This invention is comprised of an optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

Christensen, W.; Anderson, F.L.; Kortegaard, B.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

An Overview of the Structure-Property Relationships in Silicon-Based Oxynitride Glasses  

SciTech Connect

The silicon oxynitride glasses take advantage of nitrogen-bonding to attain high elastic modulus, increased softening temperatures and viscosities, greater slow crack growth resistance and modest gains in fracture resistance. Of the oxynitride glasses, the Si-Y-Al based oxynitride glasses have been most extensively studied and a degree of success has been achieved in understanding how changes in glass composition affect structural parameters and their relationship to properties. More recent studies have focused on the Si-RE-Me oxynitride glasses where Me is primarily Al or Mg and RE includes most of the lanthanide series elements. These glasses possess a range of elastic, thermal, mechanical and optical properties, which can be correlated with the strength of the RE bond in terms of the cationic field strength. However, such correlation require knowledge of not only the RE valence state but also its coordination with the anions. Herein, the current state of the art understanding of the properties and structural parameters of oxynitride glasses and their interrelationships are reviewed.

Becher, Paul F [ORNL; Hampshire, Stuart [University of Limerick; Pomeroy, Michael [University of Limerick; Hoffmann, M. J. [Universituet Karlsruhe, Germany; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Satet, Raphaella L. [Universituet Karlsruhe, Germany

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Exploration of Ion-Exchanged Glass for Seals Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the nuclear industry grows around the globe, it brings with it a need for more safeguards and proliferation resistant technologies. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) depends on effective containment and surveillance (C/S) technologies and methods for maintaining continuity of knowledge over nuclear assets. Tags and seals, a subset of C/S technologies, are an area where innovation has been relatively stagnant for the past fifteen years. It is necessary to investigate technologies not previously used in this field in order to defend against emerging threats and methods of defeat. Based on a gap analysis of tags and seals currently being used by the IAEA, completed with the input of several subject matter experts, the technology selected for investigation was ion-exchanged glass. Ion-exchanged glass is relatively inexpensive, has high strength, and can be used in a variety of applications. If identical pieces of glass are exchanged under the same conditions and subjected to the same point load, the fracture patterns produced can be compared and used as a verification measure. This technology has the potential to be used in passive seal applications. Each image was categorized depending on its fracture as a "3 leaf" or "4 leaf" pattern. These two populations were separately analyzed and evaluated. Several methods used to analyze the fracture patterns involve the use of image analysis software such as ImageJ and the MATLAB Control Point Selection Tool. The statistical analysis software Minitab was used to validate the use of facture pattern analysis as verification tool. The analysis yielded a 60% verified comparison for samples demonstrating a "3 leaf" fracture pattern and a 78% verified comparison for samples with a "4 leaf" fracture pattern. This preliminary analysis provides a strong indication of the plausibility for the use of ion-exchanged glass as a verification measure for C/S measures and specifically tags and seals.

Ghanbari, Roushan

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Interactive optical panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

230

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Optical materials, Part 1 - Nonlinear optical properties/radiation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book examines the nonlinear optical properties of laser materials. The physical radiation effects on laser materials are also considered. Topics considered include: nonlinear optical properties; nonlinear and harmonic generation materials; two-photon absorption; nonlinear refractive index; stimulated Raman scattering; radiation damage; crystals; and glasses.

Weber, M.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Tellurite glass as a waste form for a simulated mixed chloride waste stream: Candidate materials selection and initial testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tellurite glasses have been researched widely for the last 60 years since they were first introduced by Stanworth. These glasses have been primarily used in research applications as glass host materials for lasers and as non-linear optical materials, though many other uses exist in the literature. Tellurite glasses have long since been used as hosts for various, and even sometimes mixed, halogens (i.e., multiple chlorides or even chlorides and iodides). Thus, it was reasonable to expect that these types of glasses could be used as a waste form to immobilize a combination of mixed chlorides present in the electrochemical separations process involved with fuel separations and processing from nuclear reactors. Many of the properties related to waste forms (e.g., chemical durability, maximum chloride loading) for these materials are unknown and thus, in this study, several different types of tellurite glasses were made and their properties studied to determine if such a candidate waste form could be fabricated with these glasses. One of the formulations studied was a lead tellurite glass, which had a low sodium release and is on-par with high-level waste silicate glass waste forms.

Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Vienna, John D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ALUMINUM IMPACTS ON CRYSTALLIZATION IN U.S. HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this task was to develop glass formulations for (Department of Energy) DOE waste streams with high aluminum concentrations to avoid nepheline formation while maintaining or meeting waste loading and/or waste throughput expectations as well as satisfying critical process and product performance related constraints. Liquidus temperatures and crystallization behavior were carefully characterized to support model development for higher waste loading glasses. The experimental work, characterization, and data interpretation necessary to meet these objectives were performed among three partnering laboratories: the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Projected glass compositional regions that bound anticipated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Hanford high level waste (HLW) glass regions of interest were developed and used to generate glass compositions of interest for meeting the objectives of this study. A thorough statistical analysis was employed to allow for a wide range of waste glass compositions to be examined while minimizing the number of glasses that had to be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. The glass compositions were divided into two sets, with 45 in the test matrix investigated by the U.S. laboratories and 30 in the test matrix investigated by KRI. Fabrication and characterization of the US and KRI-series glasses were generally handled separately. This report focuses mainly on the US-series glasses. Glasses were fabricated and characterized by SRNL and PNNL. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the quenched and canister centerline cooled (CCC) glasses and were generally iron oxides and spinels, which are not expected to impact durability of the glass. Nepheline was detected in five of the glasses after the CCC heat treatment. Chemical composition measurements for each of the glasses were conducted following an analytical plan. A review of the individual oxides for each glass revealed that there were no errors in batching significant enough to impact the outcome of the study. A comparison of the measured compositions of the replicates indicated an acceptable degree of repeatability as the percent differences for most of the oxides were less than 5% and percent differences for all of the oxides were less than 10 wt%. Chemical durability was measured using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). All but two of the study glasses had normalized leachate for boron (NL [B]) values that were well below that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass. The two highest NL [B] values were for the CCC versions of glasses US-18 and US-27 (10.498 g/L and 15.962 g/L, respectively). Nepheline crystallization was identified by qualitative XRD in five of the US-series glasses. Each of these five glasses (US-18, US-26, US-27, US-37 and US-43) showed a significant increase in NL [B] values after the CCC heat treatment. This reduction in durability can be attributed to the formation of nepheline during the slow cooling cycle and the removal of glass formers from the residual glass network. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of each glass in the study was determined by both optical microscopy and XRD methods. The correlation coefficient of the measured XRD TL data versus the measured optical TL data was very good (R{sup 2} = 0.9469). Aside from a few outliers, the two datasets aligned very well across the entire temperature range (829 C to 1312 C for optical data and 813 C to 1310 C for XRD crystal fraction data). The data also correlated well with the predictions of a PNNL T{sub L} model. The correlation between the measured and calculated data had a higher degree of merit for the XRD crystal fraction data than for the optical data (higher R{sup 2} value of 0.9089 versus 0.8970 for the optical data). The SEM-EDS analysis of select samples revealed the presence of undissolved RuO{sub 2} in all glasses due to the low solubility of RuO{sub 2} in borosilicate glass. These

Fox, K; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P; James Marra, J

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Structure glass technology : systems and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glass cannot compete with steel in terms of strength or durability, but it is the only structural material that offers the highly sought after qualities of translucency and transparency. The use of glass has evolved from ...

Leitch, Katherine K. (Katherine Kristen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

235

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Frequency Comb, Ultrafast Laser. ...

236

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Iron-Based Superconductors. Description ...

237

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Space Weather Forecasts. Description ...

238

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Organic Solar Power. Description ...

239

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PHYSICAL AGING OF PLASTICIZED POLYMER GLASS. WH Han and GB McKenna, Polymers Division, Building 224, Room ...

240

Graphene Reinforced Glass and Ceramic Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, Graphene Reinforced Glass ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

OPTICS5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optics5 (5.1.02) Knowledge Base Optics5 (5.1.02) Knowledge Base Last Updated: 09/11/13 Table of Contents INSTALLATION EXECUTION bullet ** Operating Systems -- Microsoft Windows 7 and Vista ** bullet ** Running Optics5 with Microsoft Windows 7 and Vista ** bullet ** Running Optics5 with Microsoft Windows 7 and Vista 64 bit ** Optics5 may not work correctly with regional/locale settings using "," as a decimal separator. bullet Which Windows operating systems can be used to run Optics? "Class Does Not Support Automation or Expected Interface" error message bullet How much hard disk space should be available to install Optics? Optics user manual bullet I receive a virus warning (nimda-virus) when installing Optics. What should I do? NFRC Procedure for Applied Films bullet I have installed Optics but I can't find the program or the icon.

242

Challenge: mobile optical networks through visual MIMO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile optical communications has so far largely been limited to short ranges of about ten meters, since the highly directional nature of optical transmissions would require costly mechanical steering mechanisms. Advances in CCD and CMOS imaging technology ... Keywords: computer vision, line of sight(los), optical communication, rf communication, visual mimo

Ashwin Ashok; Marco Gruteser; Narayan Mandayam; Jayant Silva; Michael Varga; Kristin Dana

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Nanotechnology; Biotechnology/Health; Nanocrystals; Hwang. ...

244

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can liners. This waste stream must be boxed to protect custodial staff. It goes directly to the landfill lined cardboard box. Tape seams with heavy duty tape to contain waste. Limit weight to 20 lbs. Or

Sheridan, Jennifer

245

Stereoscopic optical viewing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved optical system which provides the operator with a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

Tallman, C.S.

1986-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

246

Phosphate Glass Fiber Reactivity and Optical Response in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructural Characteristics of Nano Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride and Titanium Ions · Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Nano Hydroxyapatite ...

247

High-Temperature Viscosity of Commercial Glasses  

SciTech Connect

Arrhenius models were developed for glass viscosity within the processing temperature of six types of commercial glasses: low-expansion-borosilicate glasses, E glasses, fiberglass wool glasses, TV panel glasses, container glasses, and float glasses. Both local models (for each of the six glass types) and a global model (for the composition region of commercial glasses, i.e., the six glass types taken together) are presented. The models are based on viscosity data previously obtained with rotating spindle viscometers within the temperature range between 900 C and 1550 C; the viscosity varied from 1 Pa?s to 750 Pa?s. First-order models were applied to relate Arrhenius coefficients to the mass fractions of 15 components: SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, MgO, CaO, SrO, BaO, PbO, ZnO, Li2O, Na2O, K2O. The R2 is 0.98 for the global model and ranges from .097 to 0.99 for the six local models. The models are recommended for glasses containing 42 to 84 mass% SiO2 to estimate viscosities or temperatures at a constant viscosity for melts within both the temperature range from 1100 C to 1550 C and viscosity range from 5 to 400 Pa?s.

Hrma, Pavel R.

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS  

SciTech Connect

The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

Jantzen, C.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hollow Core Fiber Optics for Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hollow Core Fiber Optics for Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy Jason M. Kriesel and testing of hollow core glass waveguides (i.e., fiber optics) for use in Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR) and Long related applications, and fiber optics are a key enabling technology needed to improve the utility

250

Standard Guide for Dry Lead Glass and Oil-Filled Lead Glass Radiation Shielding Window Components for Remotely Operated Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standard Guide for Dry Lead Glass and Oil-Filled Lead Glass Radiation Shielding Window Components for Remotely Operated Facilities

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Recirculation bubbler for glass melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas bubbler device provides enhanced recirculation of molten glass within a glass melter apparatus. The bubbler device includes a tube member disposed within a pool of molten glass contained in the melter. The tube member includes a lower opening through which the molten glass enters and upper slots disposed close to (above or below) the upper surface of the pool of molten glass and from which the glass exits. A gas (air) line is disposed within the tube member and extends longitudinally thereof. A gas bubble distribution device, which is located adjacent to the lower end of the tube member and is connected to the lower end of the gas line, releases gas through openings therein so as to produce gas bubbles of a desired size in the molten glass and in a distributed pattern across the tube member.

Guerrero, Hector (Evans, GA); Bickford, Dennis (Folly Beach, SC)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

Slit-scanning confocal microendoscope for high-resolution in vivo imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and construction of a novel imaging system in which a fiber-optic imaging bundle and miniature optical face of the fiber-optic imaging bundle. In this system an argon- ion laser operating at 488 nm is used bundle is the object for this optical system. The light coming from the bun- dle is collimated

Gmitro, Arthur F.

253

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes.

Phillips, T.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

"S" Glass Manufacturing Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect

A glass-ceramic-to metal sealing technology patented by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA) was developed by MRC-Mound for use in the manufacture of weapon components. Successful implementation attracted increasingly widespread weapon use of this technology. "S-glass" manufacturing technology was transferred to commercial vendors to ensure that weapons production schedules would be met in the coming years. Such transfer also provided sources of this fledgling technology for the Department of Defense (DOD), aerospace and other commercial uses. The steps involved in the technology transfer are described, from the initial cooperative development work of Sandia and Mound scientists and technologists to the final phase of qualifying commercial vendors for component manufacture.

Buckner, Dean, A.; McCollister, Howard, L.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Lid heater for glass melter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass melter having a lid electrode for heating the glass melt radiantly. The electrode comprises a series of INCONEL 690 tubes running above the melt across the melter interior and through the melter walls and having nickel cores inside the tubes beginning where the tubes leave the melter interior and nickel connectors to connect the tubes electrically in series. An applied voltage causes the tubes to generate heat of electrical resistance for melting frit injected onto the melt. The cores limit heat generated as the current passes through the walls of the melter. Nickel bus connection to the electrical power supply minimizes heat transfer away from the melter that would occur if standard copper or water-cooled copper connections were used between the supply and the INCONEL 690 heating tubes. 3 figures.

Phillips, T.D.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Full spectrum optical safeguard  

SciTech Connect

An optical safeguard device with two linear variable Fabry-Perot filters aligned relative to a light source with at least one of the filters having a nonlinear dielectric constant material such that, when a light source produces a sufficiently high intensity light, the light alters the characteristics of the nonlinear dielectric constant material to reduce the intensity of light impacting a connected optical sensor. The device can be incorporated into an imaging system on a moving platform, such as an aircraft or satellite.

Ackerman, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

257

Solid state optical microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

Young, I.T.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

258

Solid state optical microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

Young, Ian T. (Pleasanton, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

Richardson, BS

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Thin optic surface analysis for high resolution X-ray telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The art of glass developed throughout the years has covered artifacts ranging from crude ornaments to high precision optics used in flat panel displays, hard disk drives, and x-ray telescopes. Methods for manufacturing ...

Akilian, Mireille

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SNAP Image Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Images Images Cutaway image of SNAP A cutaway illustration of SNAP showing some of the interior optics. Cutaway image of SNAP A computer generated cutaway illustration of SNAP Cutaway image of SNAP's primary mirror A computer generated cutaway illustration of SNAP's primary mirror image of SNAP spacecraft A computer generated illustration of the SNAP spacecraft computer generated image of SNAP A computer generated illustration of SNAP Before-and-after pictures (and Hubble Space Telescope picture) of a high-redshift supernovae discovered by the Supernova Cosmology Project in March, 1998. Before-and-after pictures (and Hubble Space Telescope picture) of a high-redshift supernovae discovered in March, 1998. This observaton showed that the expansion of the universe was accelerarting. Credit: High Redshift Supernova Search Supernova Cosmology Project

262

Development and fabrication of advanced cover glass for a GaAs solar cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work on improving solar cell conversion efficiencies by modifying the cell cover glass. Two approaches were investigated during the course of this work: grooved cover glasses to reduce the effect of top contact obscuration and secondary concentrators to improve concentrator solar cell performances in tracking modules. The grooved cover glass work used an array of metallized V shaped grooves in a thin cover glass (plastic) window to deflect incident light rays away from solar cell front surface regions covered by the solar cell electrical contact metallization onto unobstructed, optically active regions of the solar cell. Secondary concentrators are being considered for use on concentrator solar cells to improve overall system conversion efficiency and reduce receiver module cost. Secondary concentrators designed and fabricated during this project consist of small glass cones to attach directly to the top of the receiver solar cell. When appropriately designed, these secondary concentrator glass cones increase sunlight concentration on the solar cell, improve solar flux uniformity on the cell, improve system tolerance to tracking error, and allow for concentration ratios greater than can be ordinarily achieved with acrylic Fresnel lenses.

Borden, P.G.; Kaminar, N.R.; Grounner, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sensitive interferometric video thermal wave imager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of parallel thermal wave imaging is demonstrated in which the thermal wave image of a heated sample is converted into an optical phase image which is sensitively probed by a Twyman–Green interferometer. The sample is mounted onto an assembly of optical layers which acts as a temperature sensitive mirror.Heat conduction from the sample to this mirror results in a two?dimensional distribution of optical phase which is probed broadfield by the interferometer. The resulting transmission thermal wave image has characteristics analogous to those of photopyroelectric images. The interferogram produced in the interferometer may be recorded by videography

J. F. Power

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Glass-wool study of laser-induced spin currents en route to hyperpolarized Cs salt  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear spin polarization of optically pumped Cs atoms flows to the surface of Cs hydride in a vapor cell. A fine glass wool lightly coated with the salt helps greatly increase the surface area in contact with the pumped atoms and enhance the spin polarization of the salt nuclei. Even though the glass wool randomly scatters the pump light, the atomic vapor can be polarized with unpolarized light in a magnetic field. The measured enhancement in the salt enables study of the polarizations of light and atomic nuclei very near the salt surface.

Ishikawa, Kiyoshi [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating, forming and tempering a glass sheet is disclosed including the steps of heating at least one glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, forming the glass sheet to a predetermined configuration, and cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature to temper the glass sheet. 2 figs.

Boaz, P.T.; Sitzman, G.W.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Optical antenna design for indoor optical wireless communication systems: Research Articles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper, the design of the non-imaging totally internally reflecting concentrator family denominated optical antennas (OAs) is discussed, and its use for indoor optical wireless communication systems is explained. The lenses presented here ... Keywords: antenna, communications, indoor, infrared, optical, wireless

R. Ramirez-Iniguez; R. J. Green

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method of bundling rods so as to form an optical fiber preform  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a simple method for fabricating fiber-optic glass preforms having complex refractive index configurations and/or dopant distributions in a radial direction with a high degree of accuracy and precision. The method teaches bundling together a plurality of glass rods of specific physical, chemical, or optical properties and wherein the rod bundle is fused in a manner that maintains the cross-sectional composition and refractive-index profiles established by the position of the rods.

Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); Koplow, Jeffery P. (Washington, DC)

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Low-temperature hermetic sealing of optical fiber components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for manufacturing low-temperature hermetically sealed optical fiber components is provided. The method comprises the steps of: inserting an optical fiber into a housing, the optical fiber having a glass core, a glass cladding and a protective buffer layer disposed around the core and cladding; heating the housing to a predetermined temperature, the predetermined temperature being below a melting point for the protective buffer layer and above a melting point of a solder; placing the solder in communication with the heated housing to allow the solder to form an eutectic and thereby fill a gap between the interior of the housing and the optical fiber; and cooling the housing to allow the solder to form a hermetic compression seal between the housing and the optical fiber.

Kramer, D.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Large area 3-D reconstructions from underwater optical surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotic underwater vehicles are regularly performing vast optical surveys of the ocean floor. Scientists value these surveys since optical images offer high levels of detail and are easily interpreted by humans. Unfortunately, ...

Singh, Hanumant

270

Quantitative luminescence imaging system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

271

Quantitative luminescence imaging system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

Erwin, David N. (San Antonio, TX); Kiel, Johnathan L. (San Antonio, TX); Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Stahl, Kurt A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A History of the Theories of Glass Structure: Can We Really Believe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass · Glass Ceramics ... Terahertz Properties of Lithium Iron Phosphate Glasses.

273

Optical Learning Chip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel type of an optical neurochip with learning capability and memory function is reported. The neurochip is a three dimensional optoelectronic integrated circuit consisting of a light emitting diode array and a variable sensitivity photodetector (VSPD) array. The principle of operation and the fundamental characteristics are described. By using the fabricated optical neurochip with 32 neurons and 32\\Theta32 synapses, experiments of on-chip learning based on the backpropagation and Boltzmann machine learning algorithms have successfully been demonstrated. INTRODUCTION Optoelectronics is expected to play an important role in hardware implementation of neural networks because of its innate parallelism, high-density interconnection, and direct image processing abilities [1]. This summary describes an optical learning chip with variable synaptic interconnections developed in our laboratory. This chip enables to perform on-chip learning by using an internal analog memory function. Firs...

Jun Ohta Yoshikazu; Jun Ohta; Yoshikazu Nitta; Kazuo Kyuma

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Quantum Physics; Quantum Communications; Ultrafast Photon Detector; Nam. ...

275

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Energy; Fossil Fuels;Distillation Curves for Complex Fuel Mixtures. ...

276

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Scanning Electron Microscope with Spin Polarization Analysis. ...

277

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Metrology, Basic Units; Mass; Electronic Kilogram. Description ...

278

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nist.gov. 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Public safety & Smart Grid. Description: Electrical engineer ...

279

Process for preparing improved silvered glass mirrors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass mirrors having improved weathering properties are prepared by an improvement in the process for making the mirrors. The glass surface after it has been cleaned but before it is silvered, is contacted with a solution of lanthanide rare earths in addition to a sensitization solution of tin or palladium. The addition of the rare earths produces a mirror which has increased resistance to delamination of the silver from the glass surface in the presence of water.

Buckwalter, C.Q. Jr.

1980-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image No 150 DPI Version 300 DPI Image. Title: Ultrafast Laser Speeds Up Quest for Atomic Control. ...

282

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: House; Trees. Description: *BFRL. Subjects (names): ...

283

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: New Imaging Tool is Boon to Fuel Cell Research. Description: NIST ...

284

Prestressed glass, aezoelectric electrical power source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical power source which comprises a body of prestressed glass having a piezoelectric transducer supported on the body in direct mechanical coupling therewith.

Newson, Melvin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Stone, Clay, and Glass Industries, 1994. The cement and lime manufacturing industries emit almost half of ...

286

Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with a ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material. 6 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electrochemical cell with high conductivity glass electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A secondary electrochemical cell with sodium-sulfur or other molten reactants is provided with an ionically conductive glass electrolyte. The cell is contained within an electrically conductive housing with a first portion at negative potential and a second portion insulated therefrom at positive electrode potential. The glass electrolyte is formed into a plurality of elongated tubes and placed lengthwise within the housing. The positive electrode material, for instance sulfur, is sealed into the glass electrolyte tubes and is provided with an elongated axial current collector. The glass electrolyte tubes are protected by shield tubes or sheets that also define narrow annuli for wicking of the molten negative electrode material.

Nelson, P.A.; Bloom, I.D.; Roche, M.F.

1986-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

Bulk Metallic Glasses VIII - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society .... The Oxidation Behavior of an FeCo-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at 600 - 700C.

289

Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses ... copper have been treated in hydrogen atmospheres to form nanocrystals imbedded in a glassy matrix.

290

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stone et al. Industries Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry by Source, 1994. Three sources, coal, natural gas, and electricity, account for...

291

Mechanical Properties of Thin Film Metallic Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of these and other properties, thin film metallic-glasses (TFMGs) are a promising structural material for fabricating the next generation of micro- and ...

292

Nepheline Crystallization in Nuclear Waste Glasses: Progress ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, One significant limitation to waste loading in glass for Hanford defense wastes is the commonly high Al concentrations. The primary concern is ...

293

Lithiated Glass Scintillating-Particle Neutron Detector  

developed from glass that has been loaded with a high concentration of lithium-6, a neutron-absorbing material. A scintillating material in the form ...

294

Lithiated Glass Scintillating-Particle Neutron Detector ...  

... ORNL invention uses a matrix material developed from glass that has been loaded with a high concentration of lithium-6, a neutron-absorbing ...

295

Advanced Characterization Techniques of Glasses - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Many researchers rely on NMR of glass-forming cations to understand network structure, often in combination with other experimental and ...

296

Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The electrical resistivity of oxide melts is important for the design and operation of electric furnaces. The electrical properties of glass and slag ...

297

Fractography of Thermally Shocked Glass Cookware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractography of fractured glass cookware can be a time consuming process of putting ... to Conduct Thermal Shock Test on Refractories Using Steel Blocks.

298

Optical fiber inspection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

Moore, F.W.

1985-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

299

Optical fiber inspection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected.

Moore, Francis W. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Solar Glass Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Glass Fact Sheet Harvard Green Campus Initiative What is Solar Glass? Solar glass is a type electricity and the rest to let in light. Solar glass is not fully transparent, so it should not be used or patterned to minimize heat gain and control glare are ideal candidates. Solar glass can be made in different

Paulsson, Johan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Storage and disposal of radioactive waste as glass in canisters  

SciTech Connect

A review of the use of waste glass for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste glass is presented. Typical properties of the canisters used to contain the glass, and the waste glass, are described. Those properties are used to project the stability of canisterized waste glass through interim storage, transportation, and geologic disposal.

Mendel, J.E.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Properties of Glass-Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 21   Maximum use temperatures of selected glass-ceramics...9608 Corning 1000 1830 â?¦ LAS I â?¦ 1000 1830 46% SiC fiber-reinforced composite LAS II (Nb) â?¦ 1100 2010 46% SiC fiber-reinforced composite LAS III (Nb,Zr) â?¦ 1200 2190 46% SiC fiber-reinforced composite LAS-type â?¦ 1200â??1300 2190â??2370 â?¦ Cordierite 9606 Corning 1100 2010 Creep over 900 °C (1650 °F)...

303

6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects in modern optics. Topics: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming ...

Warde, Cardinal

304

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 5. Optical materials. Part 3. Applications, coatings, and fabrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book describes the uses, coatings, and fabrication of laser materials. Topics considered include: optical waveguide materials; optical storage materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; laser crystals; laser glasses; quantum counter materials; thin films and coatings; multilayer dielectric coatings; graded-index surfaces and films; optical materials fabrication; fabrication techniques; fabrication procedures for specific materials.

Weber, M.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

OPTICS 5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OPTICS (Version 5.1.02) OPTICS (Version 5.1.02) Release notes NOTE: See the Optics Knowledge Base for how to run this version of Optics on the Microsoft Vista and Microsoft Windows 7 operating systems March 5, 2003: Release Maintenance Pack 2 New ! January 7, 2003: Release Maintenance Pack 1 October 23, 2002: Release Optics 5.1.01 September 27, 2002: Release Optics 5.1.00 (only released on CDs at NFRC Annual Fall Meeting) Release notes Maintenance Pack 2 Bug fixes: New features: bullet Applied films that were created could not be saved or exported. This has been fixed. bullet Exporting glazing systems generated a message that the operation failed because the glazing system type is unknown. Glazing systems can now be exported to file (e.g. to view the spectral data), but the structure information will be lost.

306

SRNL POROUS WALL GLASS MICROSPHERES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a new medium for storage of hydrogen and other gases. This involves fabrication of thin, Porous Walled, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), with diameters generally in the range of 1 to several hundred microns. What is unique about the glass microballons is that porosity has been induced and controlled within the thin, one micron thick walls, on the scale of 10 to several thousand Angstroms. This porosity results in interesting properties including the ability to use these channels to fill the microballons with special absorbents and other materials, thus providing a contained environment even for reactive species. Gases can now enter the microspheres and be retained on the absorbents, resulting in solid-state and contained storage of even reactive species. Also, the porosity can be altered and controlled in various ways, and even used to filter mixed gas streams within a system. SRNL is involved in about a half dozen different programs involving these PW-HGMs and an overview of some of these activities and results emerging are presented.

Wicks, G; Leung Heung, L; Ray Schumacher, R

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Optical Design of Beam Shaping Optics for Camera Probe and LED Light Illumination Used for Minimally Invasive Abdominal Surgery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The optical design of a LED illuminator and camera imaging system were studied for potential use in a small medical "robotic type" probe to be… (more)

He, Weiyi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Optical Design of Beam Shaping Optics for Camera Probe and LED Light Illumination Used for Minimally Invasive Abdominal Surgery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The optical design of a LED illuminator and camera imaging system were studied for potential use in a small medical "robotic type" probe to… (more)

He, Weiyi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Optical engineering  

SciTech Connect

The Optical Engineering thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in the summer of 1996 with the following main objectives: (1) to foster and stimulate leading edge optical engineering research and efforts key to carrying out LLNL's mission and enabling major new programs; (2) to bring together LLNL's broad spectrum of high level optical engineering expertise to support its programs. Optical engineering has become a pervasive and key discipline, with applications across an extremely wide range of technologies, spanning the initial conception through the engineering refinements to enhance revolutionary application. It overlaps other technologies and LLNL engineering thrust areas.

Saito, T T

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Development of Bulk Metallic Glasses with High Plasticity Using the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-Oxidation of a (Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc · Anelastic Deformation of a Metallic Glass · Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses.

311

Optical state-of-charge monitor for batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining the instantaneous state-of-charge of a battery in which change in composition with discharge manifests itself as a change in optical absorption. In a lead-acid battery, the sensor comprises a fiber optic system with an absorption cell or, alternatively, an optical fiber woven into an absorbed-glass-mat battery. In a lithium-ion battery, the sensor comprises fiber optics for introducing light into the anode to monitor absorption when lithium ions are introduced.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Load relaxation studies of a metallic glass  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results of load relaxation studies of a commercial metallic glass as a function of temperature are reported. The data suggest that metallic glasses exhibit deformation behavior with flow laws similar to those governing plastic deformation in crystalline solids. The lack of appreciable work hardening in annealed material and the identification of an anelastic component are also indicated by the experimental observations. (GHT)

Hadnagy, T.D.; Krenisky, D.J.; Ast, D.G.; Li, C.Y.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Viscous Glass Sealants for SOFC Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two series of silicate glasses that contain gallium as the primary critical component have been identified and optimized for viscous sealing of solid oxide fuel cells operating from 650 to 850°C. Both series of glass sealants crystallize partially upon heat treatment and yield multiphase microstructures that allow viscous flow at temperatures as low as 650°C. A fully amorphous sealant was also developed by isolating, synthesizing and testing a silicate glass of the same composition as the remnant glassy phase in one of the two glass series. Of ~40 glasses tested for longer than 500 hours, a set of 5 glasses has been further tested for up to 1000h in air, wet hydrogen, and against both yttria-stabilized zirconia and aluminized stainless steel. In some cases the testing times reached 2000h. The reactivity testing has provided new insight into the effects of Y, Zr, and Al on bulk and surface crystallization in boro-gallio-silicate glasses, and demonstrated that at least 5 of the newly-developed glasses are viable viscous sealants.

Scott Misture

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

Schumacher, R.F.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Direct conversion of halogen-containing wastes to borosilicate glass  

SciTech Connect

Glass has become a preferred waste form worldwide for radioactive wastes: however, there are limitations. Halogen-containing wastes can not be converted to glass because halogens form poor-quality waste glasses. Furthermore, halides in glass melters often form second phases that create operating problems. A new waste vitrification process, the Glass Material Oxidation and dissolution System (GMODS), removes these limitations by converting halogen-containing wastes into borosilicate glass and a secondary, clean, sodium-halide stream.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Rudolph, J.C.

1996-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

317

Method for heating and forming a glass sheet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for heating and forming a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to at least a first predetermined temperature, applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature, cooling an outer surface of the glass sheet to at least a third predetermined temperature and forming the glass sheet using forming rollers to a predetermined configuration.

Boaz, Premakaran Tucker (Livonia, MI)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Tapered capillary optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

Hirsch, Gregory (365 Talbot Ave., Pacifica, CA 94044)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters  

SciTech Connect

The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO/sub 3/-HF and H/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/ to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated.

Rankin, W.N.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Wednesday, 28 September 2011 00:00 Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Titanium sealing glasses and seals formed therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alkaline-earth lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions containing CaO, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, TiO.sub.2 and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in various combinations of mole-% are provided. These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys that have a high aqueous durability for component or device applications requiring exposure to moisture, water or body fluids. Particular applications of the titanium sealing-glass compositions include forming glass-to-metal seals for lithium batteries and implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, Robert D. (Lakewood, CO); Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Gaseous Sulfate Solubility in Glass: Experimental Method  

SciTech Connect

Sulfate solubility in glass is a key parameter in many commercial glasses and nuclear waste glasses. This report summarizes key publications specific to sulfate solubility experimental methods and the underlying physical chemistry calculations. The published methods and experimental data are used to verify the calculations in this report and are expanded to a range of current technical interest. The calculations and experimental methods described in this report will guide several experiments on sulfate solubility and saturation for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Enhanced Waste Glass Models effort. There are several tables of sulfate gas equilibrium values at high temperature to guide experimental gas mixing and to achieve desired SO3 levels. This report also describes the necessary equipment and best practices to perform sulfate saturation experiments for molten glasses. Results and findings will be published when experimental work is finished and this report is validated from the data obtained.

Bliss, Mary

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Heat capacity at the glass transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fundamental problem of glass transition is to explain the jump of heat capacity at the glass transition temperature $T_g$ without asserting the existence of a distinct solid glass phase. This problem is also common to other disordered systems, including spin glasses. We propose that if $T_g$ is defined as the temperature at which the liquid stops relaxing at the experimental time scale, the jump of heat capacity at $T_g$ follows as a necessary consequence due to the change of system's elastic, vibrational and thermal properties. In this picture, we discuss time-dependent effects of glass transition, and identify three distinct regimes of relaxation. Our approach explains widely observed logarithmic increase of $T_g$ with the quench rate and the correlation of heat capacity jump with liquid fragility.

Kostya Trachenko; Vadim Brazhkin

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Scanning computed confocal imager  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a confocal imager comprising a light source emitting a light, with a light modulator in optical communication with the light source for varying the spatial and temporal pattern of the light. A beam splitter receives the scanned light and direct the scanned light onto a target and pass light reflected from the target to a video capturing device for receiving the reflected light and transferring a digital image of the reflected light to a computer for creating a virtual aperture and outputting the digital image. In a transmissive mode of operation the invention omits the beam splitter means and captures light passed through the target.

George, John S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Correcting for optical aberrations using multilayer displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical aberrations of the human eye are currently corrected using eyeglasses, contact lenses, or surgery. We describe a fourth option: modifying the composition of displayed content such that the perceived image appears ...

Huang, Fu-Chung

327

Dynamic Radiographic Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiographic system recently developed by American and Russian collaborators is designed to capture multiple images of a dynamic event lasting less than 10 microseconds. Various optical and electro-optical components were considered and their performance compared. The final system employed a solid crystal of lutetium oxyorthosilicate doped with cerium (LSO:Ce or LSO) for X-ray-to-light conversion with a coherent fiber optic bundle to relay the scintillator image to a streak camera with charge coupled device (CCD) readout. Resolution and sensitivity studies were carried out for this system on two different sources of X-rays: a 20 MeV microtron and a 70 MeV betatron.

Volkov, A.; Turley, D.; Veeser, L.; Lukyanov, N.; Yegorov, N.; Baker, S.A.; Mirenko, V.; Lewis, W.; Kuropatkin, Y.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Rhenium Solubility in Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glass: Implications for the Processing and Immobilization of Technetium-99  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved to be an arduous task for the researchers in nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State, the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is ~1300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility/retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of the similarity between their ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing Re (0 – 10,000 ppm by mass) were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules in order to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 °C. The rhenium was found to predominantly exist as Re (VII) in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ~3000 ppm (by mass) with inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of crystalline inclusions that were detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The implications of these results on the immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes in borosilicate glasses have been discussed.

McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.; Goel, Ashutosh; Liezers, Martin; Schweiger, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W.; Kruger, Albert A.

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

Anomalous Adsorption of Ultrafast Laser Irradiation in Glass ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Anomalous Adsorption of Ultrafast Laser Irradiation in Glass ... and is driven by the stress induced by absorption of ultrafast light in glass.

330

Cost model for a small glass manufacturing enterprise.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The cost model developed is for small, glass-manufacturing enterprises to help themdetermine their product costs. It estimates the direct cost in glass manufacturing such as… (more)

Gopisetti, Swetha.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ion-Exchanged Glass with High Damage Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

332

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Title Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5022E Year...

333

Thermal Performance Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in Installed Insulating Glazing Units Title Thermal Performance Impacts of Center-of-Glass Deflections in Installed Insulating Glazing...

334

Oxidation Behavior of Metallic Glass - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of ...

335

Fabrication of Bulk Metallic Glass Foams via Severe Plastic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation Behavior of ...

336

Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Fabricated within the Supercooled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, lightweight magnesium base Bulk Metallic Glass Composites ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: Oxidation ...

337

Understanding Structure of Glass from Its Response to External Stimuli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

338

Corrosion of Photomultiplier Tube Glasses in High Purity Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

339

M. Bulk Metallic Glasses, Nanocrystalline Materials, and Ultrafine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Age Hardening of 7075 Alloy Processed by High-pressure Sliding (HPS) ... Atomic Structure and its Change during Glass Transition of Metallic Glasses.

340

China Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra Photovoltaic Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name China Glass Solar (aka CG Solar, formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

209- Development of Borosilicate Glasses for the Immobilization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

027- Search for the Rigidity Transition and Intermediate Phase in Lithium Oxide Silicate Glass Systems Using .... 101- Viscous Silicate SOFC Glass Sealants.

342

Fogged Glass by Biofilm Formation and Its Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion Exchanged Mixed Glass Cullet Proppants for Stimulation of Oil and Natural Gas Bearing Shales · Modeling the Electrical Conductivity in Glass Melts.

343

Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

344

Aeromagnetic Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

345

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

346

Integrated resonant micro-optical gyroscope and method of fabrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated optic gyroscope is disclosed which is based on a photonic integrated circuit (PIC) having a bidirectional laser source, a pair of optical waveguide phase modulators and a pair of waveguide photodetectors. The PIC can be connected to a passive ring resonator formed either as a coil of optical fiber or as a coiled optical waveguide. The lasing output from each end of the bidirectional laser source is phase modulated and directed around the passive ring resonator in two counterpropagating directions, with a portion of the lasing output then being detected to determine a rotation rate for the integrated optical gyroscope. The coiled optical waveguide can be formed on a silicon, glass or quartz substrate with a silicon nitride core and a silica cladding, while the PIC includes a plurality of III V compound semiconductor layers including one or more quantum well layers which are disordered in the phase modulators and to form passive optical waveguides.

Vawter, G. Allen (Albuquerque, NM); Zubrzycki, Walter J. (Sandia Park, NM); Guo, Junpeng (Albuquerque, NM); Sullivan, Charles T. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

347

Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence  

SciTech Connect

Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Gas separation with glass membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop high temperature, high pressure inorganic membrane technology to perform a variety of gas separation processes to improve the efficiency and economics of advanced power generation systems such as direct coal-fueled turbines (DCFT) and the integrated gasification combined cycle process (IGCC). The temperatures encountered in these power generation systems are far above the temperature range for organic membrane materials. Inorganic materials such as ceramics are therefore the most likely membrane materials for use at high temperatures. This project focussed on silica glass fiber membranes made by PPG Industries (Pittsburgh, PA). The goals were both experimental and theoretical. The first objective was to develop a rational theory for the performance of these membranes. With existing theories as a starting point, a new theory was devised to explain the unusual molecular sieving'' behavior exhibited by these glass membranes. An apparatus was then devised for making permeation performance measurements at conditions of interest to DOE (temperatures to 2000[degrees]F; pressures to 1000 psia). With this apparatus, gas mixtures could be made typical of coal combustion or coal gasification processes, these gases could be passed into a membrane test cell, and the separation performance determined. Data were obtained for H[sub 2]/CO,N[sub 2]/CO[sub 2], 0[sub 2]/N[sub 2], and NH[sub 3]/N[sub 2] mixtures and for a variety of pure component gases (He, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], N[sub 2], CO, NH[sub 3]). The most challenging part of the project turned out to be the sealing of the membrane at high temperatures and pressures. The report concludes with an overview of the practical potential of these membranes and of inorganic membranes in general of DOE and other applications.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, L.C.; Blum, Y.; Way, J.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Formation of silver nanoparticles inside a soda-lime glass matrix in the presence of a high intensity Ar{sup +} laser beam  

SciTech Connect

Formation and motion of the silver nanoparticles inside an ion-exchanged soda-lime glass in the presence of a focused high intensity continuous wave Ar{sup +} laser beam (intensity: 9.2 x 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2}) have been studied in here. One-dimensional diffusion equation has been used to model the diffusion of the silver ions into the glass matrix, and a two-dimensional reverse diffusion model has been introduced to explain the motion of the silver clusters and their migration toward the glass surface in the presence of the laser beam. The results of the mentioned models were in agreement with our measurements on thickness of the ion-exchange layer by means of optical microscopy and recorded morphology of the glass surface around the laser beam axis by using a Mirau interferometer. SEM micrographs were used to extract the size distribution of the migrated silver particles over the glass surface.

Niry, M. D.; Khalesifard, H. R. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Optics Research Center, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Ahangary, A. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences (IASBS), Zanjan 45137-66731 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili (UMA), P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Glass, Plastic and Semiconductors: Packaging Techniques for Miniature Optoelectric Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, they have extensive experience with the design and development of miniature photonic systems which require novel packaging schemes. Over the years they have developed silicon micro-optical benches to serve as a stable platform for precision mounting of optical and electronic components. They have developed glass ball lenses that can be fabricated in-situ on the microbench substrate. They have modified commercially available molded plastic fiber ribbon connectors (MT) and added thin film multilayer semiconductor coatings to create potentially low-cost wavelength combiners and wavelength selective filters. They have fabricated both vertical-cavity and in-plane semiconductor lasers and amplifiers, and have packaged these and other components into several miniature photonics systems. For example, they have combined the silicon optical bench with standard electronic packaging techniques and the custom-made wavelength-selective filters to develop a four-wavelength wavelength-division-multiplexing transmitter module mounted in a standard 120-pin ceramic PGA package that couples light from several vertical-cavity-surface-emitting-laser arrays into one multimode fiber-ribbon array. The coupling loss can be as low as 2dB, and the transmitters can be operated at over 1.25 GHz. While these systems were not designed for biomedical or environmental applications, the concepts and techniques are general and widely applicable.

Pocha, M.D.; Garrett, H.E.; Patel, R.R.; Jones II, L.M.; Larson, M.C.; Emanuel, M.A.; Bond, S.W.; Deri, R.J.; Drayton, R.F.; Peterson, H.E.; Lowry, M.E.

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

351

Efficient Graffiti Image Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research of graffiti character recognition and retrieval, as a branch of traditional optical character recognition (OCR), has started to gain attention in recent years. We have investigated the special challenge of the graffiti image retrieval problem and propose a series of novel techniques to overcome the challenges. The proposed bounding box framework locates the character components in the graffiti images to construct meaningful character strings and conduct image-wise and semantic-wise retrieval on the strings rather than the entire image. Using real world data provided by the law enforcement community to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, we show that the proposed framework outperforms the traditional image retrieval framework with better retrieval results and improved computational efficiency.

Yang, Chunlei; Wong, Pak C.; Ribarsky, William; Fan, Jianping

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

352

Virtual Optical Comparator  

SciTech Connect

The Virtual Optical Comparator, VOC, was conceived as a result of the limitations of conventional optical comparators and vision systems. Piece part designs for mechanisms have started to include precision features on the face of parts that must be viewed using a reflected image rather than a profile shadow. The VOC concept uses a computer generated overlay and a digital camera to measure features on a video screen. The advantage of this system is superior edge detection compared to traditional systems. No vinyl charts are procured or inspected. The part size and expensive fixtures are no longer a concern because of the range of the X-Y table of the Virtual Optical Comparator. Product redesigns require only changes to the CAD image overlays; new vinyl charts are not required. The inspection process is more ergonomic by allowing the operator to view the part sitting at a desk rather than standing over a 30 inch screen. The procurement cost for the VOC will be less than a traditional comparator with a much smaller footprint with less maintenance and energy requirements.

Thompson, Greg

2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Energy implications of glass-container recycling  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Critical review of glass performance modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Borosilicate glass is to be used for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. Mechanistic chemical models are used to predict the rate at which radionuclides will be released from the glass under repository conditions. The most successful and useful of these models link reaction path geochemical modeling programs with a glass dissolution rate law that is consistent with transition state theory. These models have been used to simulate several types of short-term laboratory tests of glass dissolution and to predict the long-term performance of the glass in a repository. Although mechanistically based, the current models are limited by a lack of unambiguous experimental support for some of their assumptions. The most severe problem of this type is the lack of an existing validated mechanism that controls long-term glass dissolution rates. Current models can be improved by performing carefully designed experiments and using the experimental results to validate the rate-controlling mechanisms implicit in the models. These models should be supported with long-term experiments to be used for model validation. The mechanistic basis of the models should be explored by using modern molecular simulations such as molecular orbital and molecular dynamics to investigate both the glass structure and its dissolution process.

Bourcier, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Replication of high density optical disc using injection mold with MEMS heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, an injection mold equipped with a MEMS heater was designed and constructed to raise the stamper surface temperature over the glass transition temperature during the filling stage of the injection molding. First, high density optical disc ... Keywords: High density optical disc, Injection mold, MEMS RTD sensor, MEMS heater, Solidified layer, Stamper surface temperature

Youngmin Kim; Yong Choi; Shinill Kang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Method of making an integral window hermetic fiber optic component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam.

Dalton, Rick D. (Miamisburg, OH); Kramer, Daniel P. (Centerville, OH); Massey, Richard T. (Hamilton, OH); Waker, Damon A. (Bellbrook, OH)

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

Method of making an integral window hermetic fiber optic component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the fabrication of igniters, actuators, detonators, and other pyrotechnic devices to be activated by a laser beam, an integral optical glass window is formed by placing a preform in the structural member of the device and then melting the glass and sealing it in place by heating at a temperature between the ceramming temperature of the glass and the melting point of the metal, followed by rapid furnace cooling to avoid devitrification. No other sealing material is needed to achieve hermeticity. A preferred embodiment of this type of device is fabricated by allowing the molten glass to flow further and form a plano-convex lens integral with and at the bottom of the window. The lens functions to decrease the beam divergence caused by refraction of the laser light passing through the window when the device is fired by means of a laser beam. 9 figs.

Dalton, R.D.; Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.; Waker, D.A.

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

358

Melting of foaming batches: Nuclear waste glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is presented for the rate of melting of a batch blanket in an electric glassmelting furnace. The melting process is assumed to be jointly controlled by the heat transfer from the pool of molten glass and the batch-to-glass conversion kinetics. Factors affecting the melting rate in the conversion-controlled regime are discussed. Attention is paid to gas evolution from redox reactions in waste glass batches and component accumulation within the blanket. It is suggested that the high rate of the blanket-free melting in a mechanically agitated furnace is made possible by increasing the rate of melt surface renewal. 27 refs.

Hrma, P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Color Glass Condensate at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Color Glass Condensate formalism and its application to high energy heavy ion collisions at RHIC are discussed. We argue that the RHIC data supports the view that the Color Glass Condensate provides the initial conditions for gold-gold collisions at RHIC while final state (Quark Gluon Plasma) effects are responsible for the high $p_t$ suppression in mid rapidity. At forward rapidities in deuteron-gold collisions, however, Color Glass Condensate is the underlying physics of the observed suppression of the particle spectra and their centrality dependence.

Jamal Jalilian-Marian

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

Glass melter off-gas system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus and method for melting glass in a glass melter in such a way as to reduce deposition of particulates in the off-gas duct. Deposit accumulation is reduced by achieving an off-gas velocity above approximately 15 meters/second and an off-gas temperature as close as possible to, but not higher than, the glass softening point. Because the deposits are largely water-soluble, those that do form on the interior surface of the duct can be readily removed by injecting water or steam directly into the off-gas duct from its entrance or exit.

Jantzen, C.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

GLASS COMPOSITION AND PROCESS OF MAKING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions are described which are suitable for scintillators of thermal-neutron counters. The glass consists of from 70 to 75 mole% of B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, from 7 to 9 mole% of Ce/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and from 23 to 16 mole% of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ plus Na/sub 2 /O in a mole ratio of 1 to 1.5. The process of making the glass from cerous oxalate, ammonium pentaborate, sodium carbonate, and hydrated alumina in a nonoxidizing atmosphere at 1400-1500 deg C is given. (AEC)

Bishay, A.M.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Microsoft Word - Nanocrystal-in-glass-composites bh  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 2013 October 2013 Figure 1: ITO nanocrystals covalently linked to amorphous NbO x . [NbO 6 ] octahedral units are shown in green, ITO nanocrystals in blue. In the inset, the niobium atoms are located at the center of the green octahedra, oxygen atoms are red and indium atoms are blue. Tunable Transmittance of Near-infrared and Visible Light in Reconstructed Nanocrystal-in-Glass Composite Films The bonding arrangement in amorphous materials plays a dominant role in determining their electrochemical, optical and transport properties. However, it remains a challenge to manipulate amorphous structures in a controlled manner. Recently, scientists at the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed synthetic protocols for incorporating well-defined nanocrystals into amorphous materials [1,2]. This

363

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Homeland Security; Chem., Bio, and Other Threats; Standards for Radiation Detection. ...

365

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. No 72 DPI Version No 150 DPI Version 300 DPI Image. Title: Gold Nano Anchors Put Nanowires in Their Place. ...

366

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Iron-based and Copper-Oxide High-Temperature Superconductors. ...

367

High throughput optical scanner  

SciTech Connect

A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

369

Fabrication of an optical component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming optical parts used in laser optical systems such as high energy lasers, high average power lasers, semiconductor capital equipment and medical devices. The optical parts will not damage during the operation of high power lasers in the ultra-violet light range. A blank is first ground using a fixed abrasive grinding method to remove the subsurface damage formed during the fabrication of the blank. The next step grinds and polishes the edges and forms bevels to reduce the amount of fused-glass contaminants in the subsequent steps. A loose abrasive grind removes the subsurface damage formed during the fixed abrasive or "blanchard" removal process. After repolishing the bevels and performing an optional fluoride etch, the surface of the blank is polished using a zirconia slurry. Any subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind will be removed during this zirconia polish. A post polish etch may be performed to remove any redeposited contaminants. Another method uses a ceria polishing step to remove the subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind. However, any residual ceria may interfere with the optical properties of the finished part. Therefore, the ceria and other contaminants are removed by performing either a zirconia polish after the ceria polish or a post ceria polish etch.

Nichols, Michael A. (Livermore, CA); Aikens, David M. (Pleasanton, CA); Camp, David W. (Oakland, CA); Thomas, Ian M. (Livermore, CA); Kiikka, Craig (Livermore, CA); Sheehan, Lynn M. (Livermore, CA); Kozlowski, Mark R. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Glass/polymer composites and methods of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to new glass/polymer composites and methods for making them. More specifically, the invention is glass/polymer composites having phases that are at the molecular level and thereby practicably indistinguishable. The invention further discloses making molecular phase glass/polymer composites by mixing a glass and a polymer in a compatible solvent.

Samuels, W. D. (Richland, WA); Exarhos, Gregory J. (Richland, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Community Geothermal Technology Program: Hawaii glass project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective was to develop a glass utilizing the silica waste material from geothermal energy production, and to supply local artists with this glass to make artistic objects. A glass composed of 93% indigenous Hawaiian materials was developed; 24 artists made 110 objects from this glass. A market was found for art objects made from this material.

Miller, N. [comp.; Irwin, B.

1988-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

374

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

375

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area (Redirected from Glass Buttes Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

376

Cooperative motions in supercooled liquids and glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Far ir-spectra and heat-capacities for propylene carbonateO. & Suga, H. Heat-capacities and glass transitions of 1-1999). [70] Johari, G. P. Heat capacity and entropy of an

Stevenson, Jacob D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

378

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Bioactive Glass Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Print Natural materials are renowned for their unique combination of outstanding mechanical properties and exquisite microstructure. For example, bone, cork, and wood are porous biological materials with high specific stiffness (stiffness per unit weight) and specific strength. The outstanding mechanical properties of these materials are attributed to their anisotropic structures, which have optimized strength-to-density and stiffness-to-density ratios. Working at ALS Beamline 8.3.2, researchers from Berkeley Lab and the Imperial College London have created bioactive glass scaffolds that mirror nature's efficient materials. The three-dimensional glass scaffold is as porous as trabecular bone, has a compressive strength comparable to that of cortical bone, and a strength-to-porosity ratio higher than any previously reported scaffolds.

379

Preparation of fullerene/glass composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Synthesis of fullerene/glass composites. A direct method for preparing solid solutions of C.sub.60 in silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2) glass matrices by means of sol-gel chemistry is described. In order to produce highly concentrated fullerene-sol-gel-composites it is necessary to increase the solubility of these "guests" in a delivery solvent which is compatible with the starter sol (receiving solvent). Sonication results in aggregate disruption by treatment with high frequency sound waves, thereby accelerating the rate of hydrolysis of the alkoxide precursor, and the solution process for the C.sub.60. Depending upon the preparative procedure, C.sub.60 dispersed within the glass matrix as microcrystalline domains, or dispersed as true molecular solutions of C.sub.60 in a solid glass matrix, is generated by the present method.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Love, Steven P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Bipolaron Model of Superconductivity in Chalcogenide Glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a small bipolaron model for the superconductivity in the Chalcogenide glasses (c-As2Te3 and c-GeTe). The results are agree with the experiments.

Liang-You Zheng; Bo-Cheng Wang; Shan T. Lai

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Measurement of DWPF glass viscosity - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report details the results of a scoping study funded by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for the measurement of melt viscosities for simulated glasses representative of Macrobatch 2 (Tank 42/51 feed).

Harbour, J.R.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

382

ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF GLASS. A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography on the electrical properties of glass is presented. The 267 references covering the period from 1930 through 1960 are arranged according to subject. An author index is included. (M.C.G.)

Kepple, R.

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Glassy and Glass Composite Nuclear Wasteforms ... for aqueous wastes which should be solidified for safe storage and disposal. ... Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Applications.

384

JOINT SESSION: Bioactive Glasses: Structure and Bioactivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Solid state NMR investigating 29Si, 31P and 19F nucleii has been used to characterize both the structure of the glasses and follow the ...

385

Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using collected data from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The College of Optics & Photonics Industrial Affiliates Day  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wavelength Sunlight Unclad fiber under UV light Concentrating fiber fabric First complete solar The College of Optics & Photonics Infrared Systems Lab Solar X-ray Imager Near-field Scanning Optical crystals) · OPTICAL DIAGNOSTICS · LIGHT PROCESSING TECH · Laser Energetics · POLARA · Applied Photonics

Van Stryland, Eric

388

High expansion, lithium corrosion resistant sealing glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO in various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with pin materials of 446 Stainless Steel and Alloy-52 rather than molybdenum, for use in harsh chemical environments, specifically in lithium batteries.

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); Watkins, Randall D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

THE COLOUR GLASS CONDENSATE: AN INTRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these lectures, the authors develop the theory of the Colour Glass Condensate. This is the matter made of gluons in the high density environment characteristic of deep inelastic scattering or hadron-hadron collisions at very high energy. The lectures are self contained and comprehensive. They start with a phenomenological introduction, develop the theory of classical gluon fields appropriate for the Colour Glass, and end with a derivation and discussion of the renormalization group equations which determine this effective theory.

IANCU,E.; LEONIDOV,A.; MCLERRAN,L.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

390

Resolving permutation ambiguity in correlation-based blind image separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of permutation ambiguity in blind separation of multiple mixtures of multiple images (resulting, for instance, from multiple reflections through a thick grass plate or through two overlapping glass plates) with unknown mixing coefficients. ... Keywords: Blind image separation, Generalized multiple correlation, Permutation ambiguity, Pruning scheme, Separation of reflection

Kenji Hara; Kohei Inoue; Kiichi Urahama

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A molecular view of vapor deposited glasses  

SciTech Connect

Recently, novel organic glassy materials that exhibit remarkable stability have been prepared by vapor deposition. The thermophysical properties of these new ''stable'' glasses are equivalent to those that common glasses would exhibit after aging over periods lasting thousands of years. The origin of such enhanced stability has been elusive; in the absence of detailed models, past studies have discussed the formation of new polyamorphs or that of nanocrystals to explain the observed behavior. In this work, an atomistic molecular model of trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose, is used to examine the properties of vapor-deposited stable glasses. Consistent with experiment, the model predicts the formation of stable glasses having a higher density, a lower enthalpy, and higher onset temperatures than those of the corresponding ''ordinary'' glass formed by quenching the bulk liquid. Simulations reveal that newly formed layers of the growing vapor-deposited film exhibit greater mobility than the remainder of the material, thereby enabling a reorganization of the film as it is grown. They also reveal that ''stable'' glasses exhibit a distinct layered structure in the direction normal to the substrate that is responsible for their unusual properties.

Singh, Sadanand; Pablo, Juan J. de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Cordierite Glass-Ceramics for Dielectric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to examine the potential of using Malaysian silica sand deposit as SiO2 raw material in producing cordierite glass-ceramics (2MgO-2Al2O3-5SiO2) for dielectric materials. Upgraded silica sands from Terengganu and ex-mining land in Perak were used in the test-works. The glass batch of the present work has a composition of 45.00% SiO2, 24.00% Al2O3, 15.00% MgO and 8.50% TiO2 as nucleation agent. From the differential thermal analysis results, the crystallization temperature was found to start around 900 deg. C. The glass samples were heat-treated at 900 deg. C and 1000 deg. C. The X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) results showed glass-ceramics from Terengganu samples containing mainly cordierite and minor {beta}-quartz crystals. However, glass-ceramics from ex-mining land samples contained mainly {alpha}-quartz and minor cordierite crystals. Glass-ceramics with different crystal phases exhibit different mechanical, dielectric and thermal properties. Based on the test works, both silica sand deposits, can be potentially used to produce dielectric material component.

Siti Mazatul Azwa Saiyed Mohd Nurddin; Selamat, Malek; Ismail, Abdullah [Minerals Research Centre, Department of Minerals and Geoscience Malaysia, Jalan Sultan Azlan Shah, 31400 Ipoh (Malaysia)

2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

393

Intrinsic Feature-Based Pose Measurement for Medical Imaging ...  

Tracking is done without using extrinsic markers, fiducials, or other added features. Optical images are acquired from two or more cameras with infrared or visible

394

HIGH-SPEED IMAGER FOR FAST, TRANSIENT EVENTS AT NIF  

Facility. HIGH-SPEED IMAGER . FOR FAST, TRANSIENT ... GATOR can convert x rays and other types of radiation to coherent optical radiation, which can be transported and

395

Sealed glass coating of high temperature ceramic superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and article of manufacture of a lead oxide based glass coating on a high temperature superconductor. The method includes preparing a dispersion of glass powders in a solution, applying the dispersion to the superconductor, drying the dispersion before applying another coating and heating the glass powder dispersion at temperatures below oxygen diffusion onset and above the glass melting point to form a continuous glass coating on the superconductor to establish compressive stresses which enhance the fracture strength of the superconductor.

Wu, Weite (Tainan, TW); Chu, Cha Y. (Garnerville, NY); Goretta, Kenneth C. (Downers Grove, IL); Routbort, Jules L. (Darien, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Nanotechnology;Nanomanufacturing;Optical Nano Vision; Checkerboard Scattering Pattern. Description: Resembling ...

397

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Materials Science, carbon nanotubes, buckypapers. ... MSEL, carbon nanotubes, bucky papers, electrical, optical behavior, network. ...

398

Medical imaging systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

399

Overview of image reconstruction  

SciTech Connect

Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on R/sup n/ is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ..integral..f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references. (RWR)

Marr, R.B.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan to look more closely at Vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2-8(H2O)] and Siderite [FeCO3] in the next stage of the project.

Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Optical Technology Division 2000 - Image descriptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The radiation dose was varied by changing the number of excimer laser pulses ... varying amounts of decreased responsivity at doses as low as 100 ...

402

Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing  

SciTech Connect

For many decades, various radiation detecting material have been extensively researched, to find a better material or mechanism for radiation sensing. Recently, there is a growing need for a smaller and effective material or device that can perform similar functions of bulkier Geiger counters and other measurement options, which fail the requirement for easy, cheap and accurate radiation dose measurement. Here arises the use of thin film chalcogenide glass, which has unique properties of high thermal stability along with high sensitivity towards short wavelength radiation. The unique properties of chalcogenide glasses are attributed to the lone pair p-shell electrons, which provide some distinctive optical properties when compared to crystalline material. These qualities are derived from the energy band diagram and the presence of localized states in the band gap. Chalcogenide glasses have band tail states and localized states, along with the two band states. These extra states are primarily due to the lone pair electrons as well as the amorphous structure of the glasses. The localized states between the conductance band (CB) and valence band (VB) are primarily due to the presence of the lone pair electrons, while the band tail states are attributed to the Van der Waalâ??s forces between layers of atoms [1]. Localized states are trap locations within the band gap where electrons from the valence band can hop into, in their path towards the conduction band. Tail states on the other hand are locations near the band gap edges and are known as Urbach tail states (Eu). These states are occupied with many electrons that can participate in the various transformations due to interaction with photons. According to Y. Utsugi et. al.[2], the electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the generation of the Urbach tails. These states are responsible for setting the absorption edge for these glasses and photons with energy near the band gap affect these states. We have studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals â?? materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

Optical memory  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

404

An Insulating Glass Knowledge Base  

SciTech Connect

This report will discuss issues relevant to Insulating Glass (IG) durability performance by presenting the observations and developed conclusions in a logical sequential format. This concluding effort discusses Phase II activities and focuses on beginning to quantifying IG durability issues while continuing the approach presented in the Phase I activities (Appendix 1) which discuss a qualitative assessment of durability issues. Phase II developed a focus around two specific IG design classes previously presented in Phase I of this project. The typical box spacer and thermoplastic spacer design including their Failure Modes and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Fault Tree diagrams were chosen to address two currently used IG design options with varying components and failure modes. The system failures occur due to failures of components or their interfaces. Efforts to begin quantifying the durability issues focused on the development and delivery of an included computer based IG durability simulation program. The focus/effort to deliver the foundation for a comprehensive IG durability simulation tool is necessary to address advancements needed to meet current and future building envelope energy performance goals. This need is based upon the current lack of IG field failure data and the lengthy field observation time necessary for this data collection. Ultimately, the simulation program is intended to be used by designers throughout the current and future industry supply chain. Its use is intended to advance IG durability as expectations grow around energy conservation and with the growth of embedded technologies as required to meet energy needs. In addition the tool has the immediate benefit of providing insight for research and improvement prioritization. Included in the simulation model presentation are elements and/or methods to address IG materials, design, process, quality, induced stress (environmental and other factors), validation, etc. In addition, acquired data is presented in support of project and model assumptions. Finally, current and suggested testing protocol and procedure for future model validation and IG physical testing are discussed.

Michael L. Doll; Gerald Hendrickson; Gerard Lagos; Russell Pylkki; Chris Christensen; Charlie Cureija

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Breast Tissue Imaging | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neutron scattering measures samples too hot to hold Neutron scattering measures samples too hot to hold Research Contact: Kenneth Kelton August 2013 Liquids and glasses can have unique optical, electronic, and structural applications but are poorly understood compared to crystalline materials, limiting the ability to take advantage of the characteristics of glasses in a range of applications. Containers can react with molten samples at high temperatures or can favor the growth of crystals over the formation of glasses. Using the chemical and isotopic sensitivity of neutron scattering to understand these disordered structures requires a new capability to hold samples in a neutron beam at high temperature without using a solid physical container. New sample environment equipment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) enables scientists to

406

Nano-engineering by optically directed self-assembly.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lack of robust manufacturing capabilities have limited our ability to make tailored materials with useful optical and thermal properties. For example, traditional methods such as spontaneous self-assembly of spheres cannot generate the complex structures required to produce a full bandgap photonic crystals. The goal of this work was to develop and demonstrate novel methods of directed self-assembly of nanomaterials using optical and electric fields. To achieve this aim, our work employed laser tweezers, a technology that enables non-invasive optical manipulation of particles, from glass microspheres to gold nanoparticles. Laser tweezers were used to create ordered materials with either complex crystal structures or using aspherical building blocks.

Furst, Eric (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Dunn, Elissa (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Park, Jin-Gyu (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Sainis, Sunil (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Merrill, Jason (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Dufresne, Eric (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Reichert, Matthew D.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Molecke, Ryan A.; Koehler, Timothy P.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Grillet, Anne Mary; Gorby, Allen D.; Singh, John (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Lele, Pushkar (University of Delaware, Newark, DE); Mittal, Manish (University of Delaware, Newark, DE)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Speckle-free laser imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many imaging applications require increasingly bright illumination sources, motivating the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with light emitting diodes (LEDs), superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and lasers. Despite their brightness, lasers and SLDs are poorly suited for full-field imaging applications because their high spatial coherence leads to coherent artifacts known as speckle that corrupt image formation. We recently demonstrated that random lasers can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence. Here, we exploit the low spatial coherence of specifically-designed random lasers to perform speckle-free full-field imaging in the setting of significant optical scattering. We quantitatively demonstrate that images generated with random laser illumination exhibit higher resolution than images generated with spatially coherent illumination. By providing intense laser illumination without the drawback of coherent artifacts, random lasers are well suited for a host of full-field imaging applicatio...

Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Computational studies of the glass-forming ability of model bulk metallic glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are produced by rapidly thermally quenching supercooled liquid metal alloys below the glass transition temperature at rates much faster than the critical cooling rate R_c below which crystallization occurs. The glass-forming ability of BMGs increases with decreasing R_c, and thus good glass-formers possess small values of R_c. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures to quantify how key parameters, such as the stoichiometry, particle size difference, attraction strength, and heat of mixing, influence the glass-formability of model BMGs. For binary LJ mixtures, we find that the best glass-forming mixtures possess atomic size ratios (small to large) less than 0.92 and stoichiometries near 50:50 by number. In addition, weaker attractive interactions between the smaller atoms facilitate glass formation, whereas negative heats of mixing (in the experimentally relevant regime) do not change R_c significantly. These studies represent a first step in the development of computational methods for quantitatively predicting glass-formability.

Kai Zhang; Minglei Wang; Stefanos Papanikolaou; Yanhui Liu; Jan Schroers; Mark D. Shattuck; Corey S. O'Hern

2013-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 4, commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a manual for a workshop on commercial glass melting and associated air emission issues. Areas covered include: An overview of the glass industry; Furnace design and construction practices; Melting furnace operation; Energy input methods and controls; Air legislation and regulations; Soda lime emission mechanisms; and, Post furnace emission controls. Supporting papers are also included.

Kruger, A.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Velocity map imaging of ions and electrons using electrostatic lenses: Application in photoelectron and photofragment ion imaging of molecular oxygen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of electrostatic lenses is demonstrated to give a substantial improvement of the two-dimensional (2D) ion/electron imaging technique. This combination of ion lens optics and 2D detection makes “velocity map imaging” possible

André T. J. B. Eppink; David H. Parker

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Slowing Down Near the Glass Transition | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus Assembly Increasing Magnetic Response of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors under High Pressure Better Switching Through Chemistry in Thin Ferroelectrics First Molecular-Level Enzyme Images Could Improve Breast-Cancer Therapy Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Slowing Down Near the Glass Transition MARCH 5, 2009 Bookmark and Share Upper panel: Capillary waves on liquid surfaces. Lower panel: Frequency ranges of capillary wave measured by XPCS far above and near Tg. Researchers using an x-ray beamline at the U.S. Department of Energy's

412

Glass and glass-derivative seals for use in energy-efficient fuel cells and lamps  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), a series of 18 sealing glasses have been prepared and characterized. From the whole design space, several glasses were ''downselected'' and studied in detail to describe their behaviors in simulated fuel cell environments. One of the glasses was found to outperform all others, including the well-known G18 sealant developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The new glass composition showed lower bulk electrical conductivity, excellent sealing and wetting behavior when sealing under applied load, and qualitatively superior performance when exposed to wet hydrogen for 800 hours. Traditional melting was used to prepare all of the glasses that were studied in detail. The sol-gel approach was used to synthesize several compositions, but it was found that the glasses crystallized very rapidly during heating, precluding sealing. The glass characterization included measurements of the viscosity and thermal expansion of the glasses, as well as the thermal expansion of the partly crystalline glass ceramics. In addition, the wetting and sintering behavior of all glasses has been measured, as well as the crystallization behavior. The time and temperature at which crystalline phases form from the glasses has been determined for all of the glasses. Each glass ceramic contains at least two crystalline phases, and most of the crystalline phases have been positively identified. The body of fundamental data provides a platform for future developments for high temperature sealants, and the newly-developed glass compositions appear promising for large-scale testing. The second component of the work, focused on seals for higher-temperature discharge lighting, has focused on determining the phase relations in the yttria-alumina-silica system at various silica levels. Functional testing of one of the candidate sealants demonstrated that it performs well in current HID lighting applications. Further testing is required to evaluate its performance in next-generation lamps that operate at higher temperatures, but the baseline phase equilibria and crystallization behavior has been established for additional development. Again, traditional melting and sol-gel synthesis have been employed, and the sol-gel method was successful for preparing new phases that were discovered during the work. Four new phases have been identified and synthesized in pure form, from which full structure solutions were obtained as well as the anisotropic thermal expansion for each phase.

Scott Misture; Arun Varshineya; Matthew Hall; Sylvia DeCarr; Steve Bancheri

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Device for imaging scenes with very large ranges of intensity  

SciTech Connect

A device for imaging scenes with a very large range of intensity having a pair of polarizers, a primary lens, an attenuating mask, and an imaging device optically connected along an optical axis. Preferably, a secondary lens, positioned between the attenuating mask and the imaging device is used to focus light on the imaging device. The angle between the first polarization direction and the second polarization direction is adjustable.

Deason, Vance Albert (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Optical pumping production of spin polarized hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been much interest recently in the production of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen in various fields, including controlled fusion, quantum fluids, high energy, and nuclear physics. One promising method for the development of large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen is the utilization of optical pumping with a laser. Optical pumping is a process in which photon angular momentum is converted into electron and nuclear spin. The advent of tunable CW dye lasers (approx. 1 watt) allows the production of greater than 10/sup 18/ polarized atoms/sec. We have begun a program at Princeton to investigate the physics and technology of using optical pumping to produce large quantities of spin polarized hydrogen. Initial experiments have been done in small closed glass cells. Eventually, a flowing system, open target, or polarized ion source could be constructed.

Knize, R.J.; Happer, W.; Cecchi, J.L.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Solid-state optical microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state optical microscope is described wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. Means for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions are provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

Young, I.T.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

416

Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach  

SciTech Connect

A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

Fluegel, Alex

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

GLASS AND GLASS-DERIVATIVE SEALS FOR USE IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT FUEL CELLS AND LAMPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the project approaches the end of the first year, the materials screening components of the work are ahead of schedule, while all other tasks are on schedule. For solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), a series of 16 sealing glasses have been prepared and characterized. Traditional melting was used to prepare all of the glasses, and the sol-gel approach has been used to prepare some of the glasses as well as other compositions that might be viable because of the low processing temperatures afforded by the sol-gel method. The glass characterization included measurements of the viscosity and thermal expansion of the glasses, as well as the thermal expansion of the partly crystalline glass ceramics. In addition, the wetting and sintering behavior of all glasses has been measured, as well as the crystallization behavior. The time and temperature at which crystalline phases form from the glasses has been determined for all of the glasses. Each glass ceramic contains at least two crystalline phases, and most of the crystalline phases have been positively identified. Room temperature leak testing has been completed for all sealants, and experiments are in progress to determine the DC electrochemical degradation and degradation in wet hydrogen. The second component of the work, focused on seals for higher-temperature discharge lighting, has focused on determining the phase relations in the yttria--alumina--silica system at various silica levels. Again, traditional melting and sol-gel synthesis have been employed, and the sol-gel method was successful for preparing new phases that were discovered during the work. High temperature diffraction and annealing studies have clarified the phase relations for the samples studies, although additional work remains. Four new phases have been identified and synthesized in pure form, from which full structure solutions were obtained as well as the anisotropic thermal expansion for each phase. Functional testing of lamps are on on-going and will be analyzed during year 2 of the contract.

Scott Misture; Arun Varshneya; Matthew Hall; Sylvia DeCarr; Steve Bancheri

2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Vacuum fusion bonding of glass plates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method for vacuum fusion bonding of large, patterned glass plates. One or both glass plates are patterned with etched features such as microstructure capillaries and a vacuum pumpout moat, with one plate having at least one hole therethrough for communication with a vacuum pumpout fixture. High accuracy alignment of the plates is accomplished by a temporary clamping fixture until the start of the fusion bonding heat cycle. A complete, void-free fusion bond of seamless, full-strength quality is obtained through the plates; because the glass is heated well into its softening point and because of a large, distributed force that is developed that presses the two plates together from the difference in pressure between the furnace ambient (high pressure) and the channeling and microstructures in the plates (low pressure) due to the vacuum drawn. The apparatus and method may be used to fabricate microcapillary arrays for chemical electrophoresis; for example, any apparatus using a network of microfluidic channels embedded between plates of glass or similar moderate melting point substrates with a gradual softening point curve, or for assembly of glass-based substrates onto larger substrates, such as in flat panel display systems.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, James C. (Livermore, CA); Balch, Joseph W. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Dynamics of window glass fracture in explosions  

SciTech Connect

An exploratory study was conducted under the Architectural Surety Program to examine the possibility of modifying fracture of glass in the shock-wave environment associated with terrorist bombings. The intent was to explore strategies to reduce the number and severity of injuries resulting from those attacks. The study consisted of a series of three experiments at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology at Socorro, NM, in which annealed and tempered glass sheets were exposed to blast waves at several different levels of overpressure and specific impulse. A preliminary assessment of the response of tempered glass to the blast environment suggested that inducing early failure would result in lowering fragment velocity as well as reducing the loading from the window to the structure. To test that possibility, two different and novel procedures (indentation flaws and spot annealing) were used to reduce the failure strength of the tempered glass while maintaining its ability to fracture into small cube-shaped fragments. Each experiment involved a comparison of the performance of four sheets of glass with different treatments.

Beauchamp, E.K.; Matalucci, R.V.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Properties of glass-bonded zeolite monoliths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been shown that mineral waste forms can be used to immobilize waste salt generated during the pyrochemical processing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Solid, leach resistant monoliths were formed by hot-pressing mixtures of salt-occluded zeolite A powders and glass frit at 990 K and 28 MPa. Additional samples have now been fabricated and tested. Normalized release rates for all elements, including iodide and chloride, were less than 1 g/m{sup 2}d in 28-day tests in deionized water and in brine at 363 K (90{degrees}C). Preliminary results indicate that these rates fall with time with both leachants and that the zeolite phase in the glass-bonded zeolite does not function as an ion exchanger. Some material properties were measured. The Poisson ratio and Young`s modulus were slightly smaller in glass-bonded zeolite than in borosilicate glass. Density depended on zeolite fraction. The glass-bonded zeolite represents a promising mineral waste form for IFR salt.

Lewis, M.A.; Fischer, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Murphy, C.D. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

Brow, Richard K. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Howard L. (Albuquerque, NM); Phifer, Carol C. (Albuquerque, NM); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900 C, and generally about 700--800 C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 1 fig.

Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE/EA-0821 FOR THE OPERATION OF THE GLASS MELTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. - . - ..... . - ... .,. ..... .. :,! ~ ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT DOE/EA-0821 FOR THE OPERATION OF THE GLASS MELTER THERMAL TREATMENT UNIT AT THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S MOUND PLANT, MIAMISBURG, OHIO . JUNE,1995 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY L..-_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ DIS _TRIBunON OF !HIS DocM~Sbli R DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. , ' .. TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE . . . .. ..... . .. . ...... .. . . .. .. . . ... . ....... ..*..... ... 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...... .. . .. . . ...... . .. . .. *.. .. . . . ***....... 1·1 1.1 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION .. . . * . . . . . . . . . . * . . . . . .. 1-1 1.2 BACKGROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * . * . . . . * * . * * . . . . . . .. 1·2

425

Broadband phase-preserved optical elevator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase-preserved optical elevator is an optical device to lift up an entire plane virtually without distortion in light path or phase. Using transformation optics, we have predicted and observed the realization of such a broadband phase-preserved optical elevator, made of a natural homogeneous birefringent crystal without resorting to absorptive and narrowband metamaterials involving time-consuming nano-fabrication. In our demonstration, the optical elevator is designed to lift a sheet upwards, and the phase is verified to be preserved always. The camouflage capability is also demonstrated in the presence of adjacent objects of the same scale at will. The elevating device functions in different surrounding media over the wavelength range of 400-700 nm. Our work opens up prospects for studies of light trapping, solar energy, illusion optics, communication, and imaging.

Yuan Luo; Tiancheng Han; Baile Zhang; Cheng-Wei Qiu; George Barbastathis

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

427

Irradiation effects on borosilicate waste glasses  

SciTech Connect

The effects of alpha decay on five borosilicate glasses containing simulated nuclear high-level waste oxides were studied. Irradiations carried out at room temperature were achieved by incorporating 1 to 8 wt % /sup 244/Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/ in the glasses. Density changes and stored-energy build-up saturated at doses less than 2 x 10/sup 21/ alpha decays/kg. Damage manifested by stored energy was completely annealed at 633/sup 0/K. Positive and negative density changes were observed which never exceeded 1%. Irradiation had very little effect on mechanical strength or on chemical durability as measured by aqueous leach rates. Also, no effects were observed on the microstructure for vitreous waste glasses, although radiation-induced microcracking could be achieved on specimens that had been devitrified prior to irradiation.

Roberts, F.P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

OPTICAL analysis of solar facility heliostats  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimentally verified simple analytical model, based on classical optical aberrations, is derived and predicts the power reception of a central receiver solar facility. A laboratory simulation was made of a typical heliostat, and its images were photographed and measured at several angles of incidence. The analytically predicted image size is in agreement with experiment to within less than 10% over an incident angle range of 60 degrees. Image size for several of the heliostats in the Sandia-ERDA Solar Thermal Test Facility array were calculated throughout a day and compared with ideal images and the size of the receiver. The optical parameters of the system and the motion of the sun were found to severely affect the design and optimization of any solar thermal facility. This analysis shows that it is the aberration astigmatism which governs the solar image size at the receiver. Image growth is minimal when heliostats are used at small angles of incidence, which usually corresponds to a limited operating time of two to three hours. However, image size is markedly increased at large angles of incidence. The principal result is that the predominant sources of image enlargement are identified and measures for minimizing these enlargements are presented. This analysis considers only the idealized optical problem and does not consider the pragmatic errors associated with implementation and operation of a heliostat array.

Igel, E.; Hughes, R.L.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Glass material oxidation and dissolution system: Converting miscellaneous fissile materials to glass  

SciTech Connect

The cold war and the development of nuclear energy have resulted in significant inventories of miscellaneous fissile materials (MFMs). MFMs include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel (SNF), (3) certain hot cell wastes, and (4) many one-of-a-kind materials. Major concerns associated with the long-term management of these materials include: safeguards and nonproliferation issues; health, environment, and safety concerns. waste management requirements; and high storage costs. These issues can be addressed by converting the MFMs to glass for secure, long-term storage or repository disposal; however, conventional glass-making processes require oxide-like feed materials. Converting MFMs to oxide-like materials with subsequent vitrification is a complex and expensive process. A new vitrification process has been invented, the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS), which directly converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; and converts chlorides to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium chloride (NaCl) stream. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, stainless steel, multiple oxides, and other materials to glass. However, significant work is required to develop GMODS further for applications at an industrial scale. If implemented, GMODS will provide a new approach to manage these materials.

Forsberg, C.W.; Ferrada, J.J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

430

Direction of CRT waste glass processing: Electronics recycling industry communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Given a large flow rate of CRT glass {approx}10% of the panel glass stream will be leaded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The supply of CRT waste glass exceeded demand in 2009. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclers should use UV-light to detect lead oxide during the separation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling market analysis techniques and results are given for CRT glass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Academic initiatives and the necessary expansion of novel product markets are discussed. - Abstract: Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased.

Mueller, Julia R., E-mail: mueller.143@osu.edu [Ohio State University, William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, OH (United States) and University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia) and Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States); Boehm, Michael W. [University of Queensland, School of Chemical Engineering (Australia); Drummond, Charles [Ohio State University, Materials Science and Engineering, OH (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Method and apparatus for dispensing small quantities of mercury from evacuated and sealed glass capsules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique is disclosed for opening an evacuated and sealed glass capsule containing a material that is to be dispensed which has a relatively high vapor pressure such as mercury. The capsule is typically disposed in a discharge tube envelope. The technique involves the use of a first light source imaged along the capsule and a second light source imaged across the capsule substantially transversely to the imaging of the first light source. Means are provided for constraining a segment of the capsule along its length with the constraining means being positioned to correspond with the imaging of the second light source. These light sources are preferably incandescent projection lamps. The constraining means is preferably a multiple looped wire support. 6 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.; Pai, R.Y.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Properties of low cost, high volume glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of new and weathered samples of low cost, high volume glasses have been studied to determine their usefulness for solar energy applications. Glasses of varying compositions produced by float, drawn, rolled fusion, and twin ground techniques were examined. Spectral transmittance and reflectance were measured and solar weighted values calculated. Laser raytrace techniques were used to evaluate surface parallelism and bulk homogeneity. Compositional changes were examined with scanning electron microscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and Auger electron spectroscopy. These techniques were used in conjunction with ellipsometry to study the surface effects associated with weathering.

Lind, M. A.; Hartman, J. S.; Buckwalter, C. Q.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nonlinear mechanics of thermoreversibly associating dendrimer glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We model the mechanics of associating trivalent dendrimer network glasses with a focus on their energy dissipation properties. Various combinations of sticky bond (SB) strength and kinetics are employed. The toughness (work-to-fracture) of these systems displays a surprising deformation-protocol dependence; different association parameters optimize different properties. In particular, "strong, slow" SBs optimize strength, while "weak, fast" SBs optimize ductility via self-healing during deformation. We relate these observations to breaking, reformation, and partner-switching of SBs during deformation. These studies point the way to creating associating-polymer network glasses with tailorable mechanical properties.

Arvind Srikanth; Robert S. Hoy; Berend C. Rinderspacher; Jan W. Andzelm

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

434

PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS  

SciTech Connect

The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt % Pu in the glass did not adversely impact glass viscosity (as assessed using Hf surrogate) or glass durability. Finally, evaluation of DWPF glass pour samples that had Pu concentrations below the 897 g/m{sup 3} limit showed that Pu concentrations in the glass pour stream were close to targeted compositions in the melter feed indicating that Pu neither volatilized from the melt nor stratified in the melter when processed in the DWPF melter.

Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy transfer and non-linear optical properties at near ultraviolet wavelengths: rare earth 4f->5d transitions in crystals and glasses. Progress report, June 1, 1985-May 31, 1986. [Ce-doped CaF2 and LiYF4  

SciTech Connect

The project has considered several aspects of how high-fluence, near-ultraviolet laser light modifies the optical properties of cerium-doped crystals. Illumination of CeT :CaF2 at 308 nm leads to a two-photon photoionization and the subsequent creation of photochromic color centers. A one-photon photobleaching of these centers and the finite electron acceptor density leads to a complex but solvable rate equation. The electron acceptors are trivalent cerium ions at quasi-cubic sites, which become divalent following the electron capture. The photo-bleaching involves the photoionization of the divalent cerium ions, with the electron returning to the original tetragonal symmetry site. Thermoluminescence measurements are used to study the thermally activated recombination radiation. Measurements of optical gain and loss in CeT :LiYF4 are presented.

Hamilton, D.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radiation damage in optical fibers  

SciTech Connect

While plastic-clad-silica (PCS) fiber shows the greatest radiation resistance, PCS fiber has been difficult to reliably connectorize for routine field operations. For this reason, all-glass fibers have been studied as an alternative to PCS. Based on available literature and some preliminary tests at Los Alamos, we have concentrated on fluorosilicate clad, step index, pure silica core fibers. This paper reviews recent laboratory data for these fibers relative to the PCS fibers. This paper also discusses use of a fiber (or any optical medium) on a Cerenkov radiation-to-light transducer. Since the radiation induces attenuation in the medium, the light output is not proportional to the radiation input. The nonlinearity introduced by this attenuation is calculated.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.; Ogle, J.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: NIST Finds that Ethanol-Loving Bacteria Accelerate Cracking of Pipeline Steels. ...

438

IMPACTS OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE STREAMS ON DWPF GLASS FORMULATION KT07-SERIES GLASS COMPOSITIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the third in a series of studies of the impacts of the addition of Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) and Monosodium Titanate (MST) from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass waste form and the applicability of the DWPF process control models. MST from the Salt Waste Processing Facility is also considered in the study. The KT07-series glasses were selected to evaluate any potential impacts of noble metals on their properties and performance. The glasses characterized thus far for the SCIX study have not included noble metals since they are not typically tracked in sludge batch composition projections. However, noble metals can act as nucleation sites in glass melts, leading to enhanced crystallization. This crystallization can potentially influence the properties and performance of the glass, such as chemical durability, viscosity, and liquidus temperature. The noble metals Ag, Pd, Rh, and Ru were added to the KT07-series glasses in concentrations based on recent measurements of Sludge Batch 6, which was considered to contain a high concentration of noble metals. The KT04-series glasses were used as the baseline compositions. After fabrication, the glasses were characterized to determine their homogeneity, chemical composition, durability, and viscosity. Liquidus temperature measurements are also underway but were not complete at the time of this report. The liquidus temperature results for the KT07-series glasses, along with several of the earlier glasses in the SCIX study, will be documented separately. All of the KT07-series glasses, both quenched and slowly cooled, were found to be amorphous by X-ray diffraction. Chemical composition measurements showed that all of the glasses met their targeted compositions. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results showed that all of the glasses had chemical durabilities that were far better than that of the Environmental Assessment benchmark glass. The measured PCT responses were well predicted by the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models. The measured viscosity values for each KT07-series glass were acceptable for DWPF processing and were well predicted by the current PCCS model. Overall, the results show that the inclusion of relatively high concentrations of noble metals (in terms of expected values for a DWPF sludge batch) had no significant impact on the properties and performance of these glass compositions. There were no significant differences in the measured properties when compared to those of the KT04-series glasses, which did not contain noble metals. Liquidus temperature measurements are still underway and there may be an impact of the noble metals on those measurements. However, no adverse effects were noted in terms of crystallization after slow cooling. At the completion of these studies, all of the data generated will be reviewed with regard to the applicability of the DWPF PCCS models and recommendations will be made as to whether the validation ranges of the current models can be extended, or whether some or all of the models need to be refit to allow for the incorporation of the SCIX streams. As changes are made to the projected sludge compositions and the volume of the SCIX material, additional evaluations should be performed.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

439

Photonic Astronomy and Quantum Optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum optics potentially offers an information channel from the Universe beyond the established ones of imaging and spectroscopy. All existing cameras and all spectrometers measure aspects of the first-order spatial and/or temporal coherence of light. However, light has additional degrees of freedom, manifest in the statistics of photon arrival times, or in the amount of photon orbital angular momentum. Such quantum-optical measures may carry information on how the light was created at the source, and whether it reached the observer directly or via some intermediate process. Astronomical quantum optics may help to clarify emission processes in natural laser sources and in the environments of compact objects, while high-speed photon-counting with digital signal handling enables multi-element and long-baseline versions of the intensity interferometer. Time resolutions of nanoseconds are required, as are large photon fluxes, making photonic astronomy very timely in an era of large telescopes.

Dainis Dravins

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

440

Glass Transition by Gelation in a Phase Separating Binary Alloy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use molecular dynamics simulations to show that glass transition in a model phase separating amorphous alloy, Cu50Nb50, occurs by gelation. At the glass transition, a mechanically stiff, percolating network of atoms ...

Baumer, Richard E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the U.S. Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio EA-0821: Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment...

442

Weathering and leaching of glass for solar heliostats  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to assess the effects of weathering on the transmittance of glass, several old samples were collected from two desert environments for evaluation. The glass obtained by PNL at the Hanford reservation in Washington came from south-facing, vertical windows which were known to be over forty years old. The glass obtained by Sandia from Barstow, California, is estimated to be over twenty years old. To determine the durability of glasses proposed for heliostat mirrors, selected samples were leached in a Soxhlet apparatus and pH 4 and pH 9 buffer solutions. The glass samples produced by the float process are soda-lime-silica glasses, whereas the glass samples produced by the fusion process are aluminosilicate glasses. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Rusin, J. M.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Metallic Glass: A Crystal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metallic Glass: A Crystal at Heart June 16, 2011 Menlo Park, Calif.-Glass, by definition, is amorphous; its atoms lack order and are arranged every which way. But when scientists...

444

The Development of Glass Compositions for the Vitrification of Ion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation explores the development of a glass system intended for the ... The Effects of Lithium Nitrate on Highly Active Liquor in the Calcination Process ... Viscosity of Multicomponent Glasses as a Function of Temperature and ...

445

Science and Technology of Chemical Strengthening of Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of Cooper's contributions to glass was the scientific understanding of the ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass ... Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in ...

446

Conversion of Rare Earth Doped Borate Glass to Rare Earth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A History of the Theories of Glass Structure: Can We Really Believe What is ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass ... Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in ...

447

Advanced Characterization as Applied to the Corrosion of Glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A History of the Theories of Glass Structure: Can We Really Believe What is ... Field Assisted Viscous Flow and Crystallization in a Sodium Aluminosilicate Glass ... Mechanisms of the Conversion Reaction in FeF2 Cathodes Exposed to Li in ...

448

Nano-structured self-cleaning superhydrophobic glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

glass have been fabricated by Teflon coating, polystyrene-block-blocks, and RIE processes. Teflon nanopillars- decorated glassblock-poly (4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b- P4VP) coatings on a glass

Kim, Jin Yeol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Factors Affecting the Dissolution of Resorbable Bioactive Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factors affecting dissolution are numerous: residual stress, composition, ... and manufacturing method on the dissolution behaviour of glasses with fixed overall ...

450

Space-time thermodynamics of the glass transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space-time Thermodynamics of the Glass Transition Maurobehavior in terms of a thermodynamics of trajectory space.

Merolle, Mauro; Garrahan, Juan P.; Chandler, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Glass Ion Exchange: One Century of "Tough" Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ion-exchange to glass components such as pharmaceutical packaging, transparent lightweight armor, transparencies for private vehicles, trains and aircrafts, ...

452

Glass manufacturing is an energy-intensive industry mainly ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... There is substantial potential for energy efficiency improvements in glass manufacturing. Estimates range from ...

453

Ceramic and Glass Composite Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells. Presentation Title, Ceramic and Glass ...

454

Glass-Ceramic Seal for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells - Available ...  

Computers & Electronics; Consumer Products; Energy & Utilities; Manufacturing & Warehousing; Video(s) Glass frit is dispersed in a ...

455

Window selection: problems and promise of glass  

SciTech Connect

In the past few years, technical innovations in glass and window design have made windows more energy efficient, reducing energy costs and increasing the comfort levels in buildings. These innovations make it possible for occupants to enjoy the benefits of real windows while enabling owners and managers to lower overall operating costs. 1 figure, 1 table.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Bioactive glass coatings with hydroxyapatite and Bioglass ...  

Table 1 Composition and main properties of glasses and HA Composition (wt%) a „ 4 E (10~63C~1)(3C) (GPa) SiO 2 Na 2 OK 2 O CaO MgO P 2 O 5 6P57 56.5 11.0 3.0 15.0 8 ...

457

DWPF Glass Melter Technology Manual: Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details information about the design of a glass melter to be used at the Defense Waste Processing Facility located at the Savannah River Site. Topics discussed include: Information collected during testing, equipment, materials, design basis, feed tubes, and an evaluation of the performance of various components. Information is conveyed using many diagrams and photographs.

Iverson, D.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Polymers replace glass in Nova fuel capsules  

SciTech Connect

The glass fuel-capsule designs used in previous laser-fusion research are not adaptable to the implosion-physics requirements of Nova and other more powerful laser facilities that may be available in the future. As one tries to learn more about the physics of high-density compression, it becomes increasingly important to replace the glass with lower-Z material. Accordingly, the authors have shut down the high-temperature drop-tower furnaces they used to make glass capsules, and they are focusing all their efforts on developing new techniques for making polymer capsules. These capsules are ten times larger in diameter than the glass capsules used in the early days of laser-fusion research, but they are still only one-tenth as large as a high-gain capsule must be. The polymer capsules will be used in classified indirect-drive targets. This article describes how the decisions were made on which polymers to use in the NOVA fuel capsules, the techniques explored, and the properties of the prototype capsules.

Burnham, A.K.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Glass molding process with mold lubrication  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improvements are provided in glass forming processes of the type wherein hot metal blank molds are employed by using the complementary action of a solid film lubricant layer, of graphite dispersed in a cured thermoset organopolysiloxane, along with an overspray of a lubricating oil.

Davey, Richard G. (Toledo, OH)

1978-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

460

DWPF Glass Melter Technology Manual: Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document details information about the design of a glass melter to be used at the Defense Waste Processing Facility located at the Savannah River Plant. Information contained in this document consists solely of a machine drawing and parts list and purchase orders with specifications of equipment used in the development of the melter.

Iverson, D.C.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "image optical glass" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The Conservation of Seventeenth Century Archaeological Glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of the conservator is to stabilize and conserve artifacts with the best possible treatment available. Ideally, these treatments are noninvasive and reversible, and maintain the integrity of the object as a top priority. In this respect, it is the responsibility of the conservator to research other possible treatments when traditional methods prove to be insufficient to properly stabilize and conserve an object. Sometimes choosing to treat with a seemingly unorthodox method is the only chance for the objects survival. Though glass is considered one of the most stable archaeological materials, noninvasive, reversible treatments are not always possible given the level of deterioration glass objects undergo within the archaeological setting, specifically the underwater or waterlogged archaeological setting. This research is a consideration and investigation of the use of silicone polymers and silanes as consolidation materials for 17th-century glass recovered from aqueous environments. Working within the Conservation Research Laboratory and the Archaeological Preservation Research Laboratory at Texas A and M University, a newly developed polymer passivation technique utilizing materials acquired from the Dow Corning Corporation was applied to archaeological glass recovered from the 1686 shipwreck La Belle, excavated in Matagorda Bay off the coast of Texas by the Texas Historical Commission from 1996 to 1997. The successful application of a hydroxyl ended silicone polymer Q-1 3563, combined with a methyltrimethoxysilane intermediate crosslinker, Q-9 1315, at a 15% solution by weight and catalyzed with dibutyltin diacetate (DBTDA Fascat 4200) occurred in 1999. This project was the first large scale application of silicone polymers and silanes to 17th-century archaeological glass recovered from a marine site. Through this investigation we answered a number of questions regarding the use and application of the silicone technologies and confirmed that these materials are a viable resource for glass consolidation and conservation in terms of the suggested conservation guidelines of the IIC. The silicone technology was successfully applied to numerous types, forms, colors and degradation levels of glass. This included successful application to composite artifacts and the retreatment of objects unsuccessfully treated with a "traditional" method.

Arcak, Cory

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Energy efficient residential new construction: market transformation. Spectral selective glass. Final project report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the following tasks associated with this project: cost and availability of spectrally selective glass (SSG); window labeling problem and field verification of glass; availability of SSG replacement glass and tempered glass; HVAC load reduction due to spectrally selective glass; and comsumer appreciation of spectrally selective glass. Also included in the report are four attachments: builder and HVAC subcontractor presentation, sample advertisements, spectrally selective glass demonstration model, and invitation to SCE Glass mini trade-show.

Hammon, Robert

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

463

CADMIUM-RARE EARTH BORATE GLASS AS REACTOR CONTROL MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor control rod fabricated from a cadmiumrare earth-borate glass is presented. The rare earth component of this glass is selected from among those rare earths having large neutron capture cross sections, such as samarium, gadolinium or europium. Partlcles of this glass are then dispersed in a metal matrix by standard powder metallurgy techniques.

Ploetz, G.L.; Ray, W.E.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews the achievements of this program with emphasis on the recent enhancements in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loadings in HLW glass and its processing characteristics. Glass formulation development included crucible-scale preparation and characterization of glass samples to assess compliance with all melt processing and product quality requirements, followed by small-scale screening tests to estimate processing rates. These results were used to down-select formulations for subsequent engineering-scale melter testing. Finally, further testing was performed on the DM1200 vitrification system installed at VSL, which is a one-third scale (1.20 m{sup 2}) pilot melter for the WTP HLW melters and which is fitted with a fully prototypical off-gas treatment system. These tests employed glass formulations with high waste loadings and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of {approx}25 wt%, which represents a near-doubling of the present WTP baseline maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading. In addition, these formulations were processed successfully at glass production rates that exceeded the present requirements for WTP HLW vitrification by up to 88%. The higher aluminum loading in the HLW glass has an added benefit in that the aluminum leaching requirements in pretreatment are reduced, thus allowing less sodium addition in pretreatment, which in turn reduces the amount of LAW glass to be produced at the WTP. The impact of the results from this ORP program in reducing the overall cost and schedule for the Hanford waste treatment mission will be discussed.

KRUGER AA; JOSEPH I; BOWMAN BW; GAN H; KOT W; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

465

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Scanning tunneling microscope; Semiconductor; Spintronics. Description: [Left] A high resolution STM image of a manganese ...

466

SPIE Medical Imaging Medical Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 1 Medical Imaging Fundamentals Kenneth H. Wong, Ph.D. Division of Computer Assisted Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR) Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center Department of Radiology Georgetown University SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 2 Main Themes · Describe

Miga, Michael I.

467

Relationship between the shear viscosity and heating rate in metallic glasses below the glass transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been shown that first-order irreversible structural relaxation with distributed activation energies must lead to a linear decrease of the logarithm of Newtonian shear viscosity with the logarithm of heating rate upon linear heating of glass. Such a behavior is indeed observed in the experiments on metallic glasses. Structural relaxation-induced viscous flow leads to infra-low-frequency Maxwell viscoelastic internal friction, which is predicted to increase with the heating rate.

Khonik, Vitaly A.; Kobelev, N. P. [Department of General Physics, State Pedagogical University, Lenin Street 86, 394043 Voronezh (Russian Federation); Institute for Solid State Physics, Chernogolovka, 142432 Moscow District (Russian Federation)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Aging in attraction-driven colloidal glasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging in an attraction-driven colloidal glass is studied by computer simulations. The system is equilibrated without attraction and instantaneously ``quenched'', at constant colloid volume fraction, to one of two states beyond the glass transition; one is close to the transition, and the other one deep in the glass. The evolution of structural properties shows that bonds form in the system, increasing the local density, creating density deficits (holes) elsewhere. This process slows down with the time elapsed since the quench. As a consequence of bond formation, there is a slowing down of the dynamics, as measured by the mean squared displacement and the density, bond, and environment correlation functions. The density correlations can be time-rescaled to collapse their long time (structural) decay. The time scale for structural relaxation shows for both quenches a super-linear dependence on waiting time; it grows faster than the bond lifetime, showing the collective origin of the transition. At long waiting times and high attraction strength, we observe {\\rem completely} arrested dynamics for more than three decades in time, although individual bonds are not permanent on this time scale. The localization length decreases as the state moves deeper in the glass; the non-ergodicity parameter oscillates in phase with the structure factor. Our main results are obtained for systems with a barrier in the pair potential that inhibits phase separation. However, when this barrier is removed for the case of a deep quench, we find changes in the static structure but almost none in the dynamics. Hence our results for the aging behavior remain relevant to experiments in which the glass transition competes with phase separation.

Antonio M. Puertas; Matthias Fuchs; Michael E. Cates

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

469

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter.

Rushford, Michael C. (Livermore, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Techniques for optically compressing light intensity ranges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pin hole camera assembly for use in viewing an object having a relatively large light intensity range, for example a crucible containing molten uranium in an atomic vapor laser isotope separator (AVLIS) system is disclosed herein. The assembly includes means for optically compressing the light intensity range appearing at its input sufficient to make it receivable and decipherable by a standard video camera. A number of different means for compressing the intensity range are disclosed. These include the use of photogray glass, the use of a pair of interference filters, and the utilization of a new liquid crystal notch filter in combination with an interference filter. 18 figs.

Rushford, M.C.

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

471

Using Designed Residual Stress Profiles to Produce Flaw-Tolerant Glass  

SciTech Connect

A processing approach has been identified and reduced to practice in which a residual stress profile can be designed such that cracks in a brittle material are arrested or grow in a stable fashion. In the procedure, cracks in the body encounter an increase in the magnitude of residual compression as the crack propagates. If correctly designed, the process increases strength, significantly decreases strength variability and gives rise to multiple cracking. This approach is demonstrated for an ion-exchanged silicate glass using four-point and biaxial flexure strength testing. Optical microscopy was used to study the morphology and development of the multiple cracking that precedes the final failure.

BEAUCHAMP, E.K.; GLASS, S. JILL; GREEN, D.J.; SGLAVO, M.

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

472

Imaging the Surface of Altair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spatially resolving the surfaces of nearby stars promises to advance our knowledge of stellar physics. Using optical long-baseline interferometry, we present here a near-infrared image of the rapidly rotating hot star Altair with results, requiring differential rotation, alternative gravity darkening laws, or both.

John D. Monnier; M. Zhao; E. Pedretti; N. Thureau; M. Ireland; P. Muirhead; J. -P. Berger; R. Millan-Gabet; G. Van Belle; T. ten Brummelaar; H. McAlister; S. Ridgway; N. Turner; L. Sturmann; J. Sturmann; D. Berger

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

473

Multi-channel medical imaging system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in the subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

Frangioni, John V

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Multi-channel medical imaging system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in the subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitatio