Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

ILC Positron source simualtion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(DOE Review 2007) (DOE Review 2007) Wanming Liu, Haitao Wang, Sergey Antipov, Wei Gai, Kwang-Je Kim HEP, ANL 04/27/2007 Where we are making contribution * Undulator radiation modeling * Adiabatic Matching Device modeling * Keep alive source simulation * Thermal dynamic study on windows * Eddy current simulation * Laser compton scheme positron production simulation for KEK/CLIC Where we are making contributions Outline Undulator and e+ yield OMD/AMD modeling and designing Thermal dynamic of target chamber window Energy deposition profile of target Collaboration with KEK/CLIC Comparison of positron yield from different undulators High K Devices Low K Devices BCD UK I UK II UK III Cornell I Cornell II Cornell III Period (mm) 10.0 11.5 11.0 10.5 10.0 12.0 7 0.3 0.46 28 ~0.54 Yield(Low Pol, 500m drift) ~2.13

2

Photon collimator system for the ILC Positron Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High energy e+e- linear colliders are the next large scale project in particle physics. They need intense sources to achieve the required luminosity. In particular, the positron source must provide about 10E+14 positrons per second. The positron source for the International Linear Collider (ILC) is based on a helical undulator passed by the electron beam to create an intense circularly polarized photon beam. With these photons a longitudinally polarized positron beam is generated; the degree of polarization can be enhanced by collimating the photon beam. However, the high photon beam intensity causes huge thermal load in the collimator material. In this paper the thermal load in the photon collimator is discussed and a flexible design solution is presented.

Riemann, S; Moortgat-Pick, G; Ushakov, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target  

SciTech Connect

The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

ILC Polarized Electron Source Design and R&D Program  

SciTech Connect

The R and D program for the ILC electron focuses on three areas. These are the source drive laser system, the electron gun and photo cathodes necessary to produce a highly polarized electron beam. Currently, the laser system and photo cathode development take place at SLAC's 'ILC Injector Test facility', which is an integrated lab (laser and gun) that allows the production of the electron beam and is equipped with a set of diagnostics, necessary to characterize the source performance. Development of the ILC electron gun takes place at Jefferson Lab, where advanced concepts and technologies for HV DC electron guns for polarized beams are being developed. The goal is to combine both efforts at one facility to demonstrate an electron beam with ILC specifications, which are electron beam charge and polarization as well as the cathode's lifetime. The source parameters are summarized in Table 1. The current schematic design of the ILC central complex is depicted in Figure 1. The electron and positron sources are located and laid out approximately symmetric on either side of the damping rings.

Brachmann, A.; Sheppard, J.; Zhou, F.; Poelker, M.; /SLAC

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

5

ILC Electron Source Gets Help from JLab | Jefferson Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electrode The cathode electrode is being put to the test in Jefferson Lab's electron gun test stand. This work is part of a research project on the ILC's electron source, which...

6

Electron cooling for positron sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electron cooling of positrons should make possible a large increase in the luminosity of future high-energy linear colliders, leading to greatly enhanced event rates at these machines. An evaluation of the electron-cooling-time requirement indicates that a positron-source repetition rate of 100 Hz is possible. Final positron-beam normalized emittances of 10-7 m rad should result, implying a tremendous increase in positron-beam density over that currently obtained.

D. J. Larson

1988-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

Positron source position sensing detector and electronics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positron source, position sensing device, particularly with medical applications, in which positron induced gamma radiation is detected using a ring of stacked, individual scintillation crystals, a plurality of photodetectors, separated from the scintillation crystals by a light guide, and high resolution position interpolation electronics. Preferably the scintillation crystals are several times more numerous than the photodetectors with each crystal being responsible for a single scintillation event from a received gamma ray. The light guide will disperse the light emitted from gamma ray absorption over several photodetectors. Processing electronics for the output of the photodetectors resolves the location of the scintillation event to a fraction of the dimension of each photodetector. Because each positron absorption results in two 180.degree. oppositely traveling gamma rays, the detection of scintillation in pairs permits location of the positron source in a manner useful for diagnostic purposes. The processing electronics simultaneously responds to the outputs of the photodetectors to locate the scintillations to the source crystal. While it is preferable that the scintillation crystal include a plurality of stacked crystal elements, the resolving power of the processing electronics is also applicable to continuous crystal scintillators.

Burnham, Charles A. (South Essex, MA); Bradshaw, Jr., John F. (Winthrop, MA); Kaufman, David E. (Brockton, MA); Chesler, David A. (Newton Highlands, MA); Brownell, Gordon L. (Cambridge, MA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Electron and positron impact experiments on metallic foils at the giessen positron source TEPOS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sources TEPOS for slow positrons were installed at the Giessen 65 MeV electron linear accelerator. Ratios of K- and L-shell ionization cross-sections by electron and positron impact were measured on Au-...?)/...

W. Faust; C. Hahn; M. Rückert; H. Schneider…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Electron and positron impact experiments on metallic foils at the giessen positron source TEPOS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sources TEPOS for slow positrons were installed at the Giessen 65 MeV electron linear accelerator. Ratios of K- and L-shell ionization cross-sections by electron and positron impact were measured on Au-...-)/...

W. Faust; C. Hahn; M. Rückert; H. Schneider…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Positron yield as a function of energy at \\{APosS\\} – The Argonne Positron Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of the Argonne Positron Source (APosS) at the Argonne National Laboratory low-energy electron linac is discussed. We describe the measurement of the yield of slow positrons as a function of electron-beam energy and compare these results with theoretical calculations. Those results were used to establish the optimal regime for positron production.

Sergey D. Chemerisov; Charles D. Jonah; Hongmin Chen; Yanching C. Jean; David M. Schrader; Alan W. Hunt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

FEASIBILITY AND CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF A C.W. POSITRON SOURCE AT CEBAF  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study of a CW positron source for the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) is provided. The proposed ? 100 nA Continuous Wave (CW) positron source at JLAB has several unique and challenging characteristics: high current incident electron beam at 126 MeV with a high beam power (up to a MW); CW e? beam and CW e+ production. The multiple scattering is a dominant process when creating e+ in a target, which results a large phase space area of the emitted positrons. An admittance study was done at CEBAF to find the maximum phase space area, which is tolerated in the machine. The measured geometrical transverse admittance (A) were Ax =10 and Ay = 5 mm?mrad at the injector. Energy spread measurement was also done at the ARC1. The fractional spread limit in the ARC1 was measured as ? = 3×10?3 at 653 MeV. By using the optimized results and the CEBAF parameters, three positron injector configurations are proposed; Combined Function Magnet, Two-Dipole and Microtron Dipole configurations. With the assumptions made, by using 126 MeV 10 mA e? beam impinging on a 2 mm W target with a 100 ?m spot size, we can get up to 3 ?A useful e+ current at the North Linac connection. One of the biggest challenges is the target design, which the deposited power is about 60 kW. ILC designs project power deposition up to 13 kW, which would allow the creation of a e+ beam of up to 650 nA otherwise. The results of analytic and monte carlo simulations of the positron production, capture and acceleration are presented. For the target design, a review is presented of solutions for the high power production target. Portions of this dissertation work have been published in two conference proceedings.

Serkan Golge

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Electron-positron annihilation and hadronic sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The canonical leading light-cone contribution ???+(x)p?f(x·p)+? to the electroproduction [?(q)+h(p)?anything;?=photon, h=hadron] matrix element ?h(p)|J?(x)J?(0)|h(p)? is such that f(?), by virtue of the J?J? operator-product expansion (OPE), is analytic for small ?. The corresponding contribution ???+(x)p?f¯(x·p)+? to the annihilation [e+e-??(q)?h(p)+anything] matrix element ?0|R(J?(x)S^(p))R(J?(x)S^†(-p))|0?, where S^(p) is the Fourier transform of a source operator S(y) for h(p), is such that f¯(?) can be singular for ??0; f¯(?)??-?. We show how the multiple OPE's among the operators involved can determine the degree ? of this short-distance singularity provided long-distance effects are not important. We refer to ? as the "slant" of the matrix element and we explicitly calculate ? in terms of the minimal dimension d of the source S(y). In the canonical case, we find ?=d-12 if h is a pseudoscalar particle and ?=d-1 if h is a spinor particle. These singularities imply that the scaling functions behave like ?? for ??q22q·p?? and that the multiplicities behave like (q2)?-3 for q2??. These results provide handles on the heretofore elusive source dimensions d. For example, if logarithmic or greater multiplicities are observed (??3) along with canonical scaling, it can be concluded that d cannot have its canonical elementary value (d=52 for spinors, d=3 for scalars) but rather d?72 (spinors) or d?4 (scalars). These results can be readily generalized to noncanonical cases. For example, they lead to simple explanations of known results in renormalized perturbation theory (?3 theory, ?4 theory, pseudoscalar-meson theory, quantum electrodynamics). Since ? (and ?) is dimensionless, the dimensional analysis involved in our treatment is on a different footing from that which determines the usual short-distance and light-cone singularities of current products. The slants are nevertheless simple functions of the field and source dimensions. Phenomenologically, the operatorial nature of our approach makes it easily extendable to the treatment of other inclusive lepton hadron processes with one or more particles observed in the final state.

Richard A. Brandt and Ng Wing-Chiu

1974-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Brilliant positron sources for CLIC and other collider projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider), as future linear collider, requires an intense positron source. A brief history is given up to the present baseline configuration which assumes unpolarized beams. A conventional scheme, with a single tungsten target as source of e-e+ pairs, has been studied several years ago. But, in order to reduce the beam energy deposition on the e+ target converter, a double-target system has been studied and proposed as baseline for CLIC. With this ‘‘hybrid target’’, the positron production scheme is based on the channeling process. A 5 GeV electron beam impinges on a thin crystal tungsten target aligned along its axis, enhancing the photon production by channeling radiation. A large number of photons are sent to a thick amorphous tungsten target, generating large number of e-e+ pairs, while the charged particles are bent away, reducing the deposited energy and the PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density). The targets parameters are optimized for the positron production. Polarize...

Rinolfi, Louis; Dadoun, Olivier; Kamitani, Takuya; Strakhovenko, Vladimir; Variola, Alessandro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON  

SciTech Connect

We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Development of the Argonne positron source \\{APosS\\}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the progress at Argonne National Laboratory with the APosS. We outline possible improvements that can increase the flux of positrons by increasing the electron current on target or by modification of the positron converter. We discuss some new techniques that could increase moderation efficiency and thus further increase positron flux two to three orders of magnitude by making use of modern accelerator techniques.

Charles D. Jonah; Sergey Chemerisov; Jidong Long; Wei Gai; Y.C. Jean; David Schrader

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Delayed ILC Roadmap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ILCTA plans and opportunities ILCTA plans and opportunities ILCTA plans and opportunities November 27, 2007 Sergei Nagaitsev FNAL S. Nagaitsev 2 ILC ILC Cryomodule Cryomodule Cryomodules are complex 8 or 9 Cavities, ultra clean surfaces Operate in 2K superfluid He Quad Focusing magnets Couplers feed RF energy to cavities Tuners adjust cavity resonant frequency to match klystron 1200 parts ! Cryomodules are expensive Single most expensive component of the ILC About 2000 are needed for the ILC, 40 for Project X FNAL leads an international team working to improve the TESLA CM design for ILC (DESY, INFN, KEK, CERN, SLAC, India, etc ILC must industrialize cavities, components, & maybe assembly Developing the extensive infrastructure to build and test CM's

17

Positron Source from Betatron X-rays Emitted in a Plasma Wiggler  

SciTech Connect

In the E-167 plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), an ultra-short, 28.5 GeV electron beam field ionizes a neutral column of Lithium vapor. In the underdense regime, all plasma electrons are expelled creating an ion column. The beam electrons undergo multiple betatron oscillations leading to a large flux of broadband synchrotron radiation. With a plasma density of 3 x 10{sup 17}cm{sup -3}, the effective focusing gradient is near 9 MT/m with critical photon energies exceeding 50 MeV for on-axis radiation. A positron source is the initial application being explored for these X-rays, as photo-production of positrons eliminates many of the thermal stress and shock wave issues associated with traditional Bremsstrahlung sources. Photo-production of positrons has been well-studied; however, the brightness of plasma X-ray sources provides certain advantages. In this paper, we present results of the simulated radiation spectra for the E-167 experiments, and compute the expected positron yield.

Johnson, D.K.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; Krejcik, P.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

ILC Citizens' Task Force  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force June 2008 Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force 3 Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 Chapter 1 Purpose 7 Chapter 2 Origins and Purpose of the Fermilab Citizens' Task Force 15 Chapter 3 Setting the Stage 19 Chapter 4 Current Status of High Energy Physics Research 25 Chapter 5 Bringing the Next-Generation Accelerator to Fermilab 31 Chapter 6 Learning from Past Projects 37 Chapter 7 Location, Construction and Operation of Facilities Beyond Fermilab's Borders 45 Chapter 8 Health and Safety 49 Chapter 9 Environment 53 Chapter 10 Economics 59 Chapter 11 Political Considerations 65 Chapter 12 Community Engagement 77 Chapter 13 Summary 81 Appendices Appendix A. Task Force Members Appendix B. Task Force Meetings and Topics

19

Electroweak Physics at the ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some aspects of electroweak physics at the International Linear Collider (ILC) are reviewed. The importance of precision measurements in the Higgs sector and in top-quark physics is emphasized, and the physics potential of the GigaZ option of the ILC is discussed. It is shown in particular that even in a scenario where the states of new physics are so heavy that they would be outside of the reach of the LHC and the first phase of the ILC, the GigaZ precision on the effective weak mixing angle may nevertheless allow the detection of quantum effects of new physics.

Georg Weiglein

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

20

The LHC and the ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The synergy between the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider during concurrent running of the two machines has the potential to maximise the physics gain from both facilities. Some examples of detailed case studies of the interplay between the LHC and ILC are given, with a particular emphasis on new results that have been obtained after the first LHC / ILC Study Group report was released.

Georg Weiglein

2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Connecting LHC, ILC, and Quintessence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If the cold dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), anticipated measurements of the WIMP properties at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC) will provide an unprecedented experimental probe of cosmology at temperatures of order 1 GeV. It is worth emphasizing that the expected outcome of these tests may or may not be consistent with the picture of standard cosmology. For example, in kination-dominated quintessence models of dark energy, the dark matter relic abundance can be significantly enhanced compared to that obtained from freeze out in a radiation-dominated universe. Collider measurements then will simultaneously probe both dark matter and dark energy. In this article, we investigate the precision to which the LHC and ILC can determine the dark matter and dark energy parameters under those circumstances. We use an illustrative set of four benchmark points in minimal supergravity in analogy with the four LCC benchmark points. The precision achievable together at the LHC and ILC is sufficient to discover kination-dominated quintessence, under the assumption that the WIMPs are the only dark matter component. The LHC and ILC can thus play important roles as alternative probes of both dark matter and dark energy.

Daniel J. H. Chung; Lisa L. Everett; Kyoungchul Kong; Konstantin T. Matchev

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Dark matter conversion as a source of boost factor for explaining the cosmic ray positron and electron excesses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In interacting multi-component dark matter (DM) models, if the DM components are nearly degenerate in mass and the interactions between them are strong enough, the relatively heavy DM components can be converted into lighter ones at late time after the thermal decoupling. Consequently, the relic density of the lightest DM component can be considerably enhanced at late time. This may contribute to an alternative source of boost factor required to explain the positron and electron excesses reported by the recent DM indirect search experiments such as PAMELA, Fermi-LAT and HESS etc..

Ze-Peng Liu; Yue-Liang Wu; Yu-Feng Zhou

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

Availability and Reliability Issues for ILC  

SciTech Connect

The International Linear Collider (ILC) will be the largest most complicated accelerator ever built. For this reason extensive work is being done early in the design phase to ensure that it will be reliable enough. This includes gathering failure mode data from existing accelerators and simulating the failures and repair times of the ILC. This simulation has been written in a general fashion using MATLAB and could be used for other accelerators. Results from the simulation tool have been used in making some of the major ILC design decisions and an unavailability budget has been developed.

Himel, T.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; /SLAC; Ross, M.; /Fermilab

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

24

About Fermilab | Fermilab and the Community | ILC Citizens' Task Force |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Materials Meeting Materials January 27, 2007 Retreat and Tour Agenda (pdf) Presentation by Judy Jackson, Fermilab Director of Communication (pdf) Photos Video March 1, 2007 Introduction to Particle Physics Agenda (pdf) Presentation by Pier Oddone, Fermilab Director (ppt - 13.5M) Presentation by Fermilab Physicist Chris Quigg (pdf - 12M) Photos March 27, 2007 Introduction to the ILC Agenda (pdf) Fermilab Area map with outlines (jpg) ILC by the Numbers (pdf) How does the ILC work? (pdf) ILC Reference Design Companion Document (pdf) Results of Task Force Dialogue on Community Values(pdf) May 1, 2007 The ILC Global Design Effort Agenda (pdf) Presentation by GDE Director Barry Barish (pdf) Photos Video: Part 1 | Part 2 May 22, 2007 Locating the ILC at Fermilab Agenda (pdf) Maps of potential locations for the ILC:

25

Proposed ILC Parameters T.O. Raubenheimer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-05-98 -05-98 Proposed ILC Parameters T.O. Raubenheimer and K. Yokoya Introduction In this note, we describe the proposed working parameter set for the KEK-SLAC ILC linear collider and discuss the reasons leading to the values listed; more ex- tensive discussion of the optimization process will be found in subsequent notes. The parameter set is listed in Table 1 and is compared with the JLC 3-97 parameters and the NLC ZDR parameters in Table 2. The new parameter set has an operating plane which ranges from low IP emittances and high luminosity (cases A) to large IP emittances and smaller luminosity (cases C). Over this range, the bunch charge, bunch length, and IP beta functions are varied, however, the parameters have been chosen so that the tolerances on the accelerating structures are roughly constant. The collider must be designed to operate over the entire parameter range. In all cases,

26

Vertical Arc for ILC Low Emittance Transport  

SciTech Connect

The design and parameters of a vertical arc for the ILC Low Emittance Transport (LET) are reviewed. A 1 TeV CM ILC which relies upon 30 MV/m accelerating cavities with a packing fraction of 65% will require almost 48 km of main linac, which suggests that the total site length including BDS and bunch compressors will be on the order of 53 km. If built in a laser-straight tunnel with the low-energy ends near the surface, and assuming a perfectly spherical ''cue ball'' planetary surface with radius 6370 km, the collider halls will necessarily be 55 meters below grade, as shown in the top plot of Figure 1. Such depths would demand extensive use of deep tunneling, which would potentially drive up the cost and difficulty of ILC construction. An alternate solution is to use discrete vertical arcs at a few locations to allow a ''piecewise straight'' construction in which the depth of the tunnel below grade does not vary by more than a few meters. This approach is shown schematically in the bottom plot of Figure 1. In this Note we consider the issues for a design with one such vertical arc at the 250 GeV/c point (ie, midway down the linac for 1 TeV CM), and a second arc at the entrance to the BDS (ie, the entire BDS lies in one plane, with vertical arcs at each end).

Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

Calibration and operational data for a compact photodiode detector useful for monitoring the location of moving sources of positron emitting radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

D-Pace has developed a compact cost-effective gamma detector system based on technology licensed from TRIUMF. These photodiode detectors are convenient for detecting the presence of positron emitting radioisotopes, particularly for the case of transport of radioisotopes from a PET cyclotron to hotlab, or from one location to another in an automated radiochemistry processing unit. This paper describes recent calibration experiments undertaken at the Turku PET Centre for stationary and moving sources of F18 and C11 in standard setups. The practical diagnostic utility of using several of these devices to track the transport of radioisotopes from the cyclotron to hotlab is illustrated. For example, such a detector system provides: a semi-quantitative indication of total activity, speed of transport, location of any activity lost en route and effectiveness of follow-up system flushes, a means of identifying bolus break-up, feedback useful for deciding when to change out tubing.

Marsland, M. G.; Dehnel, M. P.; Theroux, J.; Christensen, T.; Hollinger, C. [D-Pace, Inc. P.O. Box 201, Nelson, B.C., V1L 5P9 (Canada); Johansson, S.; Rajander, J.; Solin, O. [Turku PET Center, Abo Akademi University, Porthansgatan 3, Turku FI-20500 (Finland); Stewart, T. M. [D-Pace, Inc. P.O. Box 201, Nelson, B.C., V1L 5P9 (Canada)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

Recommendation for Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Instability in the ILC  

SciTech Connect

Electron cloud has been identified as one of the highest priority issues for the international Linear Collider (ILC) Damping Rings (DR). An electron cloud Working Group (WG) has evaluated the electron cloud effect and instability, and mitigation solutions for the electron cloud formation. Working group deliverables include recommendations for the baseline and alternate solutions to the electron cloud formation in various regions of the ILC Positron DR, which is presently assumed to be the 3.2 km design. Detailed studies of a range of mitigation options including coatings, clearing electrodes, grooves and novel concepts, were carried out over the previous several years by nearly 50 researchers, and the results of the studies form the basis for the recommendation. The recommendations are the result of the working group discussions held at numerous meetings and during a dedicated workshop. In addition, a number of items requiring further investigation were identified during the discussions at the Cornell meeting and studies will be carried out at CesrTA, a test accelerator dedicated to electron cloud studies, and other institutions.

Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Demma, T.; Guiducci, S.; Suetsugu, Y.; Shibata, K.; Ohmi, K.; Dugan, G.; Palmer, M.; Crittenden, J. A.; Harkay, K.; Boon, L.; Furman, M. A.; Yin Vallgren, A. C.

2011-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

About Fermilab | Fermilab and the Community | ILC Citizens' Task Force |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expected Topics of the ILC Citizens' Task Force Topic Informal Input Community Concerns Formal Recomm. Orientation of the ILC Location of the underground tunnel X Community issues related to locating an underground tunnel X Potential impacts on groundwater and the environment X X Issues relating to property rights X X X Surface Structures off Fermilab property Locations X X Aesthetic issues X X Environmental impacts X X Features that could be included to benefit communities X X Construction of the ILC Timing of activities X X Safety X X Mitigating noise, traffic, environmental, and other impacts X X Fermilab-Community Relationships Maximizing economic benefits to the region X X

30

Methods and apparatus for producing and storing positrons and protons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for producing and storing positrons may include a trap that defines an interior chamber therein and that contains an electric field and a magnetic field. The trap may further include a source material that includes atoms that, when activated by photon bombardment, become positron emitters to produce positrons. The trap may also include a moderator positioned adjacent the source material. A photon source is positioned adjacent the trap so that photons produced by the photon source bombard the source material to produce the positron emitters. Positrons from the positron emitters and moderated positrons from the moderator are confined within the interior chamber of the trap by the electric and magnetic fields. Apparatus for producing and storing protons are also disclosed.

Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

31

The role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the Linear Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

G. Moortgat-Pick; T. Abe; G. Alexander; B. Ananthanarayan; A. A. Babich; V. Bharadwaj; D. Barber; A. Bartl; A. Brachmann; S. Chen; J. Clarke; J. E. Clendenin; J. Dainton; K. Desch; M. Diehl; B. Dobos; T. Dorland; H. Eberl; J. Ellis; K. Flöttmann; H. Fraas; F. Franco-Sollova; F. Franke; A. Freitas; J. Goodson; J. Gray; A. Han; S. Heinemeyer; S. Hesselbach; T. Hirose; K. Hohenwarter-Sodek; J. Kalinowski; T. Kernreiter; O. Kittel; S. Kraml; W. Majerotto; A. Martinez; H. -U. Martyn; W. Menges; A. Mikhailichenko; K. Mönig; K. Moffeit; S. Moretti; O. Nachtmann; F. Nagel; T. Nakanishi; U. Nauenberg; T. Omori; P. Osland; A. A. Pankov; N. Paver; R. Pitthan; R. Pöschl; W. Porod; J. Proulx; P. Richardson; S. Riemann; S. D. Rindani; T. G. Rizzo; P. Schüler; C. Schwanenberger; D. Scott; J. Sheppard; R. K. Singh; H. Spiesberger; A. Stahl; H. Steiner; A. Wagner; G. Weiglein; G. W. Wilson; M. Woods; P. Zerwas; J. Zhang; F. Zomer

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nondestructive examination using neutron activated positron annihilation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for performing nondestructive examination of a metal specimen using neutron activated positron annihilation wherein the positron emitter source is formed within the metal specimen. The method permits in situ nondestructive examination and has the advantage of being capable of performing bulk analysis to determine embrittlement, fatigue and dislocation within a metal specimen.

Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Denison, Arthur B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Pinning Down the Invisible Sneutrino at the ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the event generator WHIZARD we study in a realistic ILC environment the prospects of measuring properties of sneutrinos that decay invisibly into the lightest neutralino and the neutrino.

J. Kalinowski; W. Kilian; J. Reuter; T. Robens; K. Rolbiecki

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

Injection and Extraction Lines for the ILC Damping Rings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INJECTION AND EXTRACTION LINES FOR THE ILC DAMPING RINGS ?the injection and extraction lines into and out of the ILCas the design for the abort line. Due to changes of the geo-

Reichel, Ina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

About Fermilab | Fermilab and the Community | ILC Citizens' Task Force |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2007 Meeting Calendar and Topics 2007 Meeting Calendar and Topics January 27, 2007 - Retreat and Tour March 1, 2007 - Particle Physics Overview of Particle Physics and Fermilab's contribution Introduction of Meeting Calendar March 27, 2007 - The ILC Introduction to the ILC May 1, 2007 - The Global Design Effort Conversation with GDE Director Barry Barish May 22, 2007 - Property Rights and Locating the ILC at Fermilab Understanding legal implications of property rights Identify criteria for siting Best orientations for the tunnel June 26, 2007 - Environmental Issues Managing potential environmental impacts of the ILC July 24, 2007 - Construction-Related Issues Timing Safety Mitigating impacts September 25, 2007 - Surface Structures Facility sizes and needs Aesthetic issues Features that could be included to benefit communities

36

ILC RF System R and D  

SciTech Connect

The Linac Group at SLAC is actively pursuing a broad range of R&D to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of the L-band (1.3 GHz) rf system proposed for the ILC linacs. Current activities include the long-term evaluation of a 120 kV Marx Modulator driving a 10 MW Multi-Beam Klystron, design of a second-generation Marx Modulator, testing of a sheet-beam gun and beam transport system for a klystron, construction of an rf distribution system with remotely-adjustable power tapoffs, and development of a system to combine the power from many klystrons in low-loss circular waveguide where it would be tapped-off periodically to power groups of cavities. This paper surveys progress during the past few years.

Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

37

High-yield positron systems for linear colliders  

SciTech Connect

Linear colliders, such as the SLC, are among those accelerators for which a high-yield positron source operating at the repetition rate of the accelerator is desired. The SLC, having electron energies up to 50 GeV, presents the possibility of generating positron bunches with useful charge even exceeding that of the initial electron bunch. The exact positron yield to be obtained depends on the particular capture, transport and damping system employed. Using 31 GeV electrons impinging on a W-type converter phase-space at the target to the acceptance of the capture rf section, the SLC source is capable of producing, for every electron, up to two positrons within the acceptance of the positron damping ring. The design of this source and the performance of the positron system as built are described. Also, future prospects and limitations for high-yield positron systems are discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Clendenin, J.E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Estimation of LHC and ILC Capabilities for Precision Higgs Boson Coupling Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses some aspects of the estimates of Higgs boson coupling sensitivities for LHC and ILC presented at the Snowmass 2013 meeting. I estimate the measurement accuracies underlying the CMS presentation to Snowmass. I present new fits for the ILC capabilities. I present some joints fits to prospective LHC and ILC data that demonstrates the synergy of the High-Luminosity LHC and ILC programs. Contributed to the proceedings of the Snowmass 2013 Community Summer Study.

Michael E. Peskin

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

Simulations of the ILC Electron Gun and ElectronBunching System  

SciTech Connect

The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed electron-positron collider, expected to provide insight into important questions in particle physics. A part of the global R&D effort for the ILC is the design of its electron gun and electron bunching system. The present design of the bunching system has two sub-harmonic bunchers, one operating at 108 MHz and one at 433MHz, and two 5-cell 1.3 GHz (L-band) bunchers. This bunching system has previously been simulated using the Phase and Radial Motion in Electron Linear Accelerators (PARMELA) software, and those simulations indicated that the design provides sufficient bunching and acceleration. Due to the complicated dynamics governing the electrons in the bunching system we decided to verify and expand the PARMELA results using the more recent and independent simulation software General Particle Tracer (GPT). GPT tracks the motion and interactions of a set of macro particles, each of which represent a number of electrons, and provides a variety of analysis capabilities. To provide initial conditions for the macro particles, a method was developed for deriving the initial conditions from detailed simulations of particle trajectories in the electron gun. These simulations were performed using the Egun software. For realistic simulation of the L-band bunching cavities, their electric and magnetic fields were calculated using the Superfish software and imported into GPT. The GPT simulations arrived at similar results to the PARMELA simulations for sub-harmonic bunching. However, using GPT it was impossible to achieve an efficient bunching performance of the first L-band bunching cavity. To correct this, the first L-band buncher cell was decoupled from the remaining 4 cells and driven as an independent cavity. Using this modification we attained results similar to the PARMELA simulations. Although the modified bunching system design performed as required, the modifications are technically challenging to implement. Further work is needed to optimize the L-Band buncher design.

Haakonsen, C.B.; /McGill U.

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

What Will The Neighbors Think? A Discussion with the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What Will The Neighbors Think? A Discussion with the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force July 27 community play in working directly with the local community to bring the ILC to Fermilab? 5. Why should we build the ILC at Fermilab? What are the benefits for the local community? Why is Fermilab the best site

Quigg, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE R&D Accomplishments DOE R&D Accomplishments Search All Database Web Pages for Go The Basics Home About What's New FAQ Contact Us Laureates Nobel Laureates Fermi Laureates Nobel Physicists Nobel Chemists Medicine Nobels Explore Insights SC Stories Snapshots R&D Nuggets Database Search Browse Reports Database Help Finding Aids Site Map A - Z Index Menu Synopsis Blog Archive QR Code RSS Archive Tag Cloud Videos Widget XML Bookmark and Share Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning Resources with Additional Information Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanner Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 'Positron Emission Tomography ... [is a medical imaging technique that] can track chemical reactions in living tissues and merges chemistry with biological imaging. Its strength has been in studies of the brain where there has been significant progress in investigations of drug addiction, aging, mental illness, and neurogenic disorders. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) had its genesis in hot-atom chemical research supported by the Chemical Sciences Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Through this research it was learned, over many years, how to prepare short-lived positron emitters such as 18F whose half-life is 110 minutes. In 1975, the molecule [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose was successfully synthesized at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and set the stage for Positron Emission Tomography of the human brain.'

42

Present Status of the ILC Project and Development  

SciTech Connect

The Technical Design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) Project will be finished in late 2012. The Technical Design Report (TDR) will include a description of the updated design, with a cost estimate and a project plan, and the results of research and development (R & D) done in support of the ILC. Results from directed ILC R & D are used to reduce the cost and risk associated with the ILC design. We present a summary of key challenges and show how the global R & D effort has addressed them. The most important activity has been in pursuit of very high gradient superconducting RF linac technology. There has been excellent progress toward the goal of practical industrial production of niobium sheet-metal cavities with gradient performance in excess of 35 MV/m. In addition, three purpose-built beam test facilities have been constructed and used to study and demonstrate high current linac performance, electron-cloud beam dynamics and precision beam control. The report also includes a summary of component design studies and conventional facilities cost optimization design studies.

Ross, M.; /Fermilab; Walker, N.; /DESY; Yamamoto, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

SM Precision Constraints at the LHC/ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prospects for electroweak precision physics at the LHC and the ILC are reviewed. This includes projections for measurements of the effective Z pole weak mixing angle, sin^2 theta_W (eff.), as well as top quark, W boson, and Higgs scalar properties. The upcoming years may also see very precise determinations of sin^2 theta_W (eff.) from lower energies.

Erler, J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Design of the ILC RTML Extraction Lines  

SciTech Connect

The ILC [1] Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) contains three extraction lines (EL). Each EL can be used both for an emergency abort dumping of the beam and tune-up continual train-by-train extraction. Two of the extraction lines are located downstream of the first and second stages of the RTML bunch compressor, and must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spreads of 2.5% and 0.15%, respectively. In this paper we report on an optics design that allowed minimizing the length of the extraction lines while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by the distance required for acceptable radiation levels in the service tunnel. The proposed extraction lines can accommodate beams with different energy spreads while at the same time providing the beam size acceptable for the aluminum dump window. The RTML incorporates three extraction lines, which can be used for either an emergency beam abort or for a train-by-train extraction. The first EL is located downstream of the Damping Ring extraction arc. The other two extraction lines are located downstream of each stage of the two-stage bunch compressor. The first extraction line (EL1) receives 5GeV beam with an 0.15% energy spread. The extraction line located downstream of the first stage of bunch compressor (ELBC1) receives both compressed and uncompressed beam, and therefore must accept beam with both 5 and 4.88GeV energy, and 0.15% and 2.5% energy spread, respectively. The extraction line located after the second stage of the bunch compressor (ELBC2) receives 15GeV beam with either 0.15 or 1.8% energy spread. Each of the three extraction lines is equipped with the 220kW aluminum ball dump, which corresponds to the power of the continuously dumped beam with 5GeV energy, i.e., the beam trains must be delivered to the ELBC2 dump at reduced repetition rate.

Seletskiy, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

45

Apparatus for photon activation positron annihilation analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-destructive testing apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a photon source. The photon source produces photons having predetermined energies and directs the photons toward a specimen being tested. The photons from the photon source result in the creation of positrons within the specimen being tested. A detector positioned adjacent the specimen being tested detects gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons. A data processing system operatively associated with the detector produces output data indicative of a lattice characteristic of the specimen being tested.

Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

High Availability Instrumentation Packaging Standards for the ILC and Detectors  

SciTech Connect

ILC designers are exploring new packaging standards for Accelerator Controls and Instrumentation, particularly high-speed serial interconnect systems for intelligent instruments versus the existing parallel backplanes of VME, VXI and CAMAC. The High Availability Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) system is a new industrial open standard designed to withstand single-point hardware or software failures. The standard crate, controller, applications module and sub-modules are being investigated. All modules and sub-modules are hot-swappable. A single crate is designed for a data throughput in communications applications of 2 Tb/s and an Availability of 0.99999, which translates into a downtime of five minutes per year. The ILC is planning to develop HA architectures for controls, beam instrumentation and detector systems.

Downing, R.W.; Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory convened the ILC Citizens' Task Force to provide guidance and advice to the laboratory to ensure that community concerns and ideas are included in all public aspects of planning and design for a proposed future accelerator, the International Linear Collider. In this report, the members of the Task Force describe the process they used to gather and analyze information on all aspects of the proposed accelerator and its potential location at Fermilab in northern Illinois. They present the conclusions and recommendations they reached as a result of the learning process and their subsequent discussions and deliberations. While the Task Force was charged to provide guidance on the ILC, it became clear during the process that the high cost of the proposed accelerator made a near-term start for the project at Fermilab unlikely. Nevertheless, based on a year of extensive learning and dialogue, the Task Force developed a series of recommendations for Fermilab to consider as the laboratory develops all successor projects to the Tevatron. The Task Force recognizes that bringing a next-generation particle physics project to Fermilab will require both a large international effort and the support of the local community. While the Task Force developed its recommendations in response to the parameters of a future ILC, the principles they set forth apply directly to any large project that may be conceived at Fermilab, or at other laboratories, in the future. With this report, the Task Force fulfills its task of guiding Fermilab from the perspective of the local community on how to move forward with a large-scale project while building positive relationships with surrounding communities. The report summarizes the benefits, concerns and potential impacts of bringing a large-scale scientific project to northern Illinois.

None

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Reference Design for the ILC, Costs, and What's Next  

SciTech Connect

A Reference Design for the International Linear Collider was recently released. The scale of the ILC is such that it must be built by an international collaboration and the design is the culmination of a unique global effort. Through ICFA, a decision was made to base the design on superconducting RF technology and then the Global Design Effort (GDE) was created to coordinate the actual accelerator design toward a construction proposal. The reference design establishes all the features of the machine, and defines both the R&D program and engineering design that will now follow over the next few years.

Barish, Barry

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

About Fermilab | Fermilab and the Community | ILC Citizens' Task Force |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Member Commitments Member Commitments It is anticipated that serving on the Task Force will require a commitment of 8-10 hours per month throughout 2007. Activities will include: Attend monthly meetings with a maximum of two excused absences Participate fully in meetings and work with all members to identify shared values and interests and strive for consensus on important issues Read all provided materials in preparation for meetings Read all materials and summaries for any meetings missed Stay in contact with neighbors and associates to bring broader community perspectives to the discussion and inform the community about the ILC Ground Rules This is a safe place to share ideas We will attack issues, never individuals Openness is the rule, not the exception Everyone participates

50

Probing WWgamma coupling through e gamma --> nu W at ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The anomalous WWgamma coupling is probed through e gamma--> nu W at the ILC. With a spectacular single lepton final state, this process is well suited to study the above coupling. Within the narrow-width approximation, a semi-analytical study of the secondary lepton energy-angle double distribution is performed. Cross section measurements can probe delta-kappa-gamma to about +/- 0.004 for a luminosity of 100 /fb at 500 GeV center of mass energy with unpolarised electron beam. The limits derivable on lambda-gamma are comparatively more relaxed. These limits can be improved significantly by considering the angle and energy distributions of the final state muon. More importantly, the angular distributions at fixed energy values, and energy distribution at fixed angles present very interesting possibility of distinguishing the case of lambda-gamma=0, lambda-gamma 0.

Kumar, Satendra

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D  

SciTech Connect

The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

Harrison, M.

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Positron annihilation rates in materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of positron annihilation rate is one subject of a relatively new method of material structure analysis â?? positron annihilation spectroscopy. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films have been studied by positron annihilation rate measurement. The correlation between annihilation rates and the PET film thickness was established. Similar studies were carried out for aluminium foils and water. The results give information on the probability of positron annihilation per unit of time and per unit of material thickness that is described by an explicit function of the energy transfer model.

Tran Dai Nghiep; Khuong Thanh Tuan; Ngo Danh Du

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Positron Emission Tomography (PET)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

Welch, M. J.

1990-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

54

Effects of Magnet Errors in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line  

SciTech Connect

The ILC baseline extraction line is designed for 14 mrad horizontal crossing angle between e{sup +} and e{sup -} colliding beams at Interaction Point (IP). The extraction optics in the Interaction Region (IR) includes a detector integrated dipole field (anti-DID) to reduce orbit perturbation caused by the detector solenoid and minimize detector background. This paper presents a study of random field and alignment errors in the extraction magnets, compensation of the induced orbit perturbation, and effects of errors on extraction beam power loss. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

55

Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

1962-03-00T23:59:59.000Z

56

Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

1987-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

58

Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); MacGregor, Robert R. (Sag Harbor, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY); Langstrom, Bengt (Upsala, SE)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Study of scattering in positron emission tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas A&M University positron emission tomograph (TAMU PET) is an experimental, medical-imaging instrument designed to detect gamma rays produced by positron-electron annihilation. Each annihilation yields two coincident gamma rays...

Aguiar, James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

60

Probing top-Z dipole moments at the LHC and ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the weak electric and magnetic dipole moments of top quark-Z boson interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Their vanishingly small magnitude in the Standard Model makes these couplings ideal for probing New Physics interactions and for exploring the role of top quarks in electroweak symmetry breaking. In our analysis, we consider the production of two top quarks in association with a Z boson at the LHC, and top quark pairs mediated by neutral gauge bosons at the ILC. These processes yield direct sensitivity to top quark-Z boson interactions and complement indirect constraints from electroweak precision data. Our computation is accurate to next-to-leading order in QCD, we include the full decay chain of top quarks and the Z boson, and account for theoretical uncertainties in our constraints. We find that LHC experiments will soon be able to probe weak dipole moments for the first time.

Raoul Röntsch; Markus Schulze

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Probing top-Z dipole moments at the LHC and ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the weak electric and magnetic dipole moments of top quark-Z boson interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Their vanishingly small magnitude in the Standard Model makes these couplings ideal for probing New Physics interactions and for exploring the role of top quarks in electroweak symmetry breaking. In our analysis, we consider the production of two top quarks in association with a Z boson at the LHC, and top quark pairs mediated by neutral gauge bosons at the ILC. These processes yield direct sensitivity to top quark-Z boson interactions and complement indirect constraints from electroweak precision data. Our computation is accurate to next-to-leading order in QCD, we include the full decay chain of top quarks and the Z boson, and account for theoretical uncertainties in our constraints. We find that LHC experiments will soon be able to probe weak dipole moments for the first time.

Röntsch, Raoul

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Optics of the ILC Extraction Line for 2mrad Crossing Angle  

SciTech Connect

The ILC extraction line for 2 mrad crossing angle is under development by the SLAC-BNL-UK-France task force collaboration. This report describes the progress in the 2 mrad optics design which includes the changes to the final focus doublet, the complete optics for the extraction diagnostics, and the changes to the sextupole and collimation systems. The results of disrupted beam tracking simulations are presented.

Nosochkov, Y.; Moffeit, K.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, C.; Woods, M.; /SLAC; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Appleby, R.; /Daresbury; Parker, B.; /Brookhaven

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SLAC-TN-03-072 November 2003 Abstract This note documents a set of expressions used to explore the issue of whether or not it is reasonable to consider a conventional positron source for a Tesla formatted beam. The critical issue is that of energy deposition in the conversion target and the comparison of the induced stress with the ultimate tensile strength of the target material. Since the length of the incident beam pulse is large in comparison to the ratio of beam size to the speed of sound, the concurrent pressure pulse dissipates in a time short compared to the overall pulse duration and one is left with only the Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam John C. Sheppard Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

64

Design Considerations for a PEBB-Based Marx-Topology ILC Klystron Modulator  

SciTech Connect

The concept of Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) has its origin in the U.S. Navy during the last decade of the past century. As compared to a more conventional or classical design approach, a PEBB-oriented design approach combines various potential advantages such as increased modularity, high availability and simplified serviceability. This relatively new design paradigm for power conversion has progressively matured since then and its underlying philosophy has been clearly and successfully demonstrated in a number of real-world applications. Therefore, this approach has been adopted here to design a Marx-topology modulator for an International Linear Collider (ILC) environment where easy serviceability and high availability are crucial. This paper describes various aspects relating to the design of a 32-cell Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator. The concept of nested droop correction is introduced and illustrated. Several design considerations including cosmic ray withstand, power cycling capability, fault tolerance, etc., are discussed. Details of the design of a Marx cell PEBB are included.

Macken, K.; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.A.; Nguyen, M.N.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

65

Potential Precision on Higgs Couplings and Total Width at the ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We outline a systematic approach to the determination of the Standard Model-like Higgs boson total width and measurable coupling parameters in a model-independent manner at the International Linear Collider (ILC) and illustrate the complementarity for operating the ILC at $250$ GeV near the $Zh$ threshold and at $500$ GeV and $1$ TeV utilizing the $WW, ZZ$ fusion processes. We perform detailed simulations for an important contributing channel to the coupling determination and for invisible decays. Without model assumptions, and combining the information for the coupling ratios from the LHC, the total width can be determined to an accuracy of about $6%$, and the couplings for the observable channels can be measured to the $(3-5)%$ level at 250 GeV, reaching $(1-3)%$ level including the 500 GeV results, with further improvements possible with a $1$ TeV run. The best precision for the branching fraction measurement of the Higgs to invisible modes can be reached at $0.5-0.7%$ around the $Zh$ threshold. Further studies from $ZZ$ fusion at higher energies may provide significant improvement for the measurements. With modest theory assumptions, the width and coupling determinations can be further improved to the percent or sub-percent level.

Tao Han; Zhen Liu; Josh Sayre

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Hierarchical Control Architecture for a PEBB-Based ILC Marx Modulator  

SciTech Connect

The idea of building power conversion systems around Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) was initiated by the U.S. Office of Naval Research in the mid 1990s. A PEBB-based design approach is advantageous in terms of power density, modularity, reliability, and serviceability. It is obvious that this approach has much appeal for pulsed power conversion including the International Linear Collider (ILC) klystron modulator application. A hierarchical control architecture has the inherent capability to support the integration of PEBBs. This has already been successfully demonstrated in a number of industrial applications in the recent past. This paper outlines the underlying concepts of a hierarchical control architecture for a PEBB-based Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator. The control in PEBB-based power conversion systems can be functionally partitioned into (three) hierarchical layers; system layer, application layer, and PEBB layer. This has been adopted here. Based on such a hierarchical partition, the interfaces are clearly identified and defined and, consequently, are easily characterised. A conceptual design of the hardware manager, executing low-level hardware oriented tasks, is detailed. In addition, the idea of prognostics is briefly discussed.

Macken, K.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Nguyen, M.N.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Conceptual design of an L-band recirculating superconducting traveling wave accelerating structure for ILC  

SciTech Connect

With this paper, we propose the conceptual design of a traveling wave accelerating structure for a superconducting accelerator. The overall goal is to study a traveling wave (TW) superconducting (SC) accelerating structure for ILC that allows an increased accelerating gradient and, therefore reduction of the length of the collider. The conceptual studies were performed in order to optimize the acceleration structure design by minimizing the surface fields inside the cavity of the structure, to make the design compatible with existing technology, and to determine the maximum achievable gain in the accelerating gradient. The proposed solution considers RF feedback system redirecting the accelerating wave that passed through the superconducting traveling wave acceleration (STWA) section back to the input of the accelerating structure. The STWA structure has more cells per unit length than a TESLA structure but provides an accelerating gradient higher than a TESLA structure, consequently reducing the cost. In this paper, the STWA cell shape optimization, coupler cell design and feedback waveguide solution are considered. We also discuss the field flatness in the superconducting TW structure, the HOM modes and multipactor performance have been studied as well. The proposed TW structure design gives an overall 46% gain over the SW ILC structure if the 10 m long TW structure is employed.

Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Liu, Z.; Kazakov, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab; Yakovlev, V.; /Omega-P, New Haven /Yale U.; Gai, W.; /Argonne

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Characterization and Comparison of Control Units for Piezo Actuators to be used for Lorentz Force Compensation inth ILC  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting accelerators, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), rely on very high Q accelerating cavities to achieve high electric fields at low RF power. Such cavities have very narrow resonances: a few kHz with a 1.3GHz resonance frequency for the ILC. Several mechanical factors cause tune shifts much larger than this: pressure variations in the liquid helium bath; microphonics from pumps and other mechanical devices; and for a pulsed machine such as the ILC, Lorentz force detuning (pressure from the contained RF field). Simple passive stiffening is limited by many manufacturing and material considerations. Therefore, active tuning using piezo actuators is needed. Here we study a supply for their operation. Since commercial power amplifiers are expensive, we analyzed the characteristics of four power amplifiers: (iPZD) built by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Sezione di Pisa); and a DC-DC converter power supply built in Fermilab (Piezo Master); and two commercial amplifiers, Piezosystem jena and Piezomechanik. This paper presents an analysis and characterization of these amplifiers to understand the cost benefit and reliability when using in a large scale, pulsed beam accelerator like the ILC.

Bhattacharyya, Sampriti; Pilipenko, Roman; /Fermilab

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Confronting recent AMS-02 positron fraction and Fermi-LAT Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background measurements with gravitino dark matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The positron fraction measured by the space-based detectors PAMELA, Fermi-LAT and AMS-02 presents anomalous behaviour as energy increase. In particular AMS-02 observations provide compelling evidence for a new source of positrons and electrons. Its origin is unknown, it can be non-exotic (e.g. pulsars), be dark matter or maybe a mixture. We prove the gravitino of R-parity violating supersymmetric models as this source. As the gravitino is a spin 3/2 particle, it offers particular decay channels. We compute the electron, positron and gamma-ray fluxes produced by each gravitino decay channel as it would be detected at the Earth's position. Combining the flux from the different decay modes we can fit AMS-02 measurements of the positron fraction, as well as the electron and positron fluxes, with a gravitino dark matter mass in the range $1-2$ TeV and lifetime of $\\sim 1.0-0.8\\times 10^{26}$ s. The high statistics measurement of electron and positron fluxes, and the flattering in the behaviour of the positron frac...

Carquin, Edson; Gomez-Vargas, German A; Panes, Boris; Viaux, Nicolas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Induced Positron Annihiliation Investigation of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Crystal Microstructures  

SciTech Connect

Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) crystals are used in semiconductor radiation detectors for the detection of x-ray and gamma radiation. However, production of detector grade crystals is difficult as small variations in compositional uniformity and primarily the zinc content can significantly affect the ability of the CZT crystal to function as a radiation detector. Currently there are no known nondestructive methods that can be used to identify detector grade crystals. The current test method is to fabricate and test the detector to determine if the crystal is sufficiently uniform and of the correct composition to be considered a detector grade crystal. Consequently, nondestructive detection methods are needed to identify detector grade crystals prior to the fabrication process. The purpose of this feasibility study was to perform a preliminary assessment of the ability of several new, nondestructive technologies based on Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA) to determine if detector grade CZT crystals can be identified. Results of measurements performed on specimens from Fisk University and EV Products, Inc. indicate that both the near surface Distributed Source Positron Annihilation (up to 3 mm penetration) and the volumetric Photon Induced Positron Annihilation methods may be suitable for determining CZT crystal quality. Further work on CZT crystals with a broader range of compositions and detector characteristics is needed to provide a well defined, calibrated, method for assessing CZT crystal quality.

D. W. Akers

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

AMS-02 Results Support the Secondary Origin of Cosmic Ray Positrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the recent AMS-02 positron fraction measurement is consistent with a secondary origin for positrons and does not require additional primary sources such as pulsars or dark matter. The measured positron fraction at high energy saturates the previously predicted upper bound for secondary production, obtained by neglecting radiative losses. This coincidence, which will be further tested by upcoming AMS-02 data at higher energy, is a compelling indication for a secondary source. Within the secondary model, the AMS-02 data imply a cosmic ray propagation time in the Galaxy of <106??yr and an average traversed interstellar matter density of ?1??cm-3, comparable to the density of the Milky Way gaseous disk, at a rigidity of 300 GV.

Kfir Blum; Boaz Katz; Eli Waxman

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

Positron emission tomography wrist detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY); Woody, Craig (Setauket, NY); Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang (Sound Beach, NY); Radeka, Veljko (Bellport, NY); Vaska, Paul (Sound Beach, NY); Pratte, Jean-Francois (Stony Brook, NY)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Beam Ion Instability in ILC Damping Ring with Multi-Gas Species  

SciTech Connect

Ion induced beam instability is one critical issue for the electron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC) due to its ultra small emittance of 2 pm. The beam ion instability with various beam filling patterns for the latest lattice DTC02 is studied using PIC code. The code has been benchmarked with SPEAR3 experimental data and there is a good agreement between the simulation and observations. It uses the optics from MAD and can handle arbitrary beam filling pattern and vacuum. Different from previous studies, multi-gas species and exact beam filling patterns have been modeled simultaneously in the study. This feature makes the study more realistic. Analyses have been done to compare with the simulations.

Wang, Lanfa; Pivi, Mauro; /SLAC

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Complete one-loop electroweak corrections to ZZZ production at the ILC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the complete O(?ew) electroweak (EW) corrections to the production of three Z0 bosons in the framework of the standard model (SM) at the ILC. The leading-order and the EW next-to-leading-order corrected cross sections are presented, and their dependence on the colliding energy s and Higgs-boson mass mH is analyzed. We investigate also the LO and one-loop EW corrected distributions of the transverse momentum of the final Z0 boson, and the invariant mass of the Z0Z0 pair. Our numerical results show that the EW one-loop correction generally suppresses the tree-level cross section, and the relative correction with mH=120??GeV(150??GeV) varies between -15.8%(-13.9%) and -7.5%(-6.2%) when s goes up from 350 GeV to 1 TeV.

Su Ji-Juan; Ma Wen-Gan; Zhang Ren-You; Wang Shao-Ming; Guo Lei

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Longitudinal Single-Bunch Instability in the ILC Damping Rings: Estimate of Current Threshold  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of single-bunch instabilities in the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping rings (DRs) has been indicated as a high-priority activity toward completion of an engineering design. In this paper we report on a first estimate ofthe current thresholds for the instability using numerical and analytical models of the wake potentials associated with the various machine components. The numerical models were derived (upon appropriate scaling) from designs of the correspondingcomponents installed in existing machines. The current thresholds for instabilities were determined by numerical solution of the Vlasov equation for the longitudinal dynamics. For the DR baseline lattice as of Feb. 2007 we find the critical current forinstability to be safely above the design specifications leaving room for further optimization of the choice of the momentum compaction.

Venturini, Marco; Venturini, Marco

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

Intrabeam Scattering Studies for the ILC Damping Rings Using a NewMATLAB Code  

SciTech Connect

A new code to calculate the effects of intrabeam scattering (IBS) has been developed in MATLAB based on the approximation suggested by K. Bane. It interfaces with the Accelerator Toolbox but can also read in lattice functions from other codes. The code has been benchmarked against results from other codes for the ATF that use this approximation or do the calculation in a different way. The new code has been used to calculate the emittance growth due to intrabeam scattering for the lattices currently proposed for the ILC Damping Rings, as IBS is a concern, especially for the electron ring. A description of the code and its user interface, as well as results for the Damping Rings, will be presented.

Reichel, I.; Wolski, A.

2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

77

Study of electron-positron interactions  

SciTech Connect

For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.

Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

1990-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Electron Positron Annihilation Radiation from SgrA East at the Galactic Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maps of the Galactic electron-positron annihilation radiation show evidence for three distinct and significant features: (1) a central bulge source, (2) emission in the Galactic plane, and (3) an enhancement of emission at positive latitudes above the Galactic Center. In this paper, we explore the possibility that Sgr A East, a very prominent radio structure surrounding the Galactic nucleus, may be a significant contributer to the central bulge feature. The motivation for doing so stems from a recently proposed link between this radio object and the EGRET gamma-ray source 2EG J1746-2852. If this association is correct, then Sgr A East is also expected to be a source of copious positron production. The results presented here show that indeed Sgr A East must have produced a numerically significant population of positrons, but also that most of them have not yet had sufficient time to thermalize and annihilate. As such, Sgr A East by itself does not appear to be the dominant current source of annihilation radiation, but it will be when the positrons have cooled sufficiently and they have become thermalized. This raises the interesting possibility that the bulge component may be due to the relics of earlier explosive events like the one that produced Sgr A East.

Marco Fatuzzo; Fulvio Melia; Johann Rafelski

2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

79

Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

Joanna Fowler

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

80

Early Work on the Positron and Muon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Early work on the positron and muon is described in an informal way with emphasis on those aspects of the work which normally would not find their way into the literature.

C. D. Anderson

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Positron Emission Tomography Physics, Instrumentation, Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Positron Emission Tomography Physics, Instrumentation, Data Analysis Carl K. Hoh, MD Department fast computer Filtered Back Projection Iterative Reconstruction PET Image Reconstruction #12 PET Scanner Design · Smaller individual crystal size = better spatial resolution · Physical limit

Liu, Thomas T.

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha-11cmethyl-l-tryptophan positron emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 4 Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography Summary: Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography Positron Annihilation 180 o 1...

83

The positron accumulator ring for the APS  

SciTech Connect

The Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) is designed to accumulate and damp positrons from the 450-MeV linac during the 0.5-s cycle time of the injector synchrotron for the APS 7-GeV storage ring. During 0.4 s of each synchrotron cycle, up to 24 linac pulses are injected into the horizontal phase space of the PAR at a 60-Hz rate. Each injected pulse occupies about 1.3 of the circumference of the accumulator ring. After 0.1 s for longitudinal damping, the single accumulated bunch is transferred to one of the 353-MHz buckets of the injector synchrotron RF system. The bunch is accelerated to 7 GeV and transferred to the storage ring, while the PAR accumulates the next bunch of positrons. 2 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Crosbie, E.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Probing space-time structure of new physics with polarized beams at the ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the International Linear Collider large beam polarization of both the electron and positron beams will enhance the signature of physics due to interactions that are beyond the Standard Model. Here we review our recently obtained results on a general model independent method of determining for an arbitary one-particle inclusive state the space-time structure of such new physics through the beam polarization dependence and angular distribution of the final state particle.

B. Ananthanarayan

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

Channeling Radiation from Relativistic Positrons in LiF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unusual features of radiation spectra from relativistic positrons channeled in the ionic crystal LiF have been observed.

B. L. Berman; S. Datz; R. W. Fearick; J. O. Kephart; R. H. Pantell; H. Park; R. L. Swent

1982-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Studies of positron identification with the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and PAMELA has been acquiring data for approximately four years. The detector was designed and optimised production in hadronic cascades within the context of positron identification. The number of 0 s produced Collaboration in 2009 were applied to simulations in the energy range 20 - 100 GeV. Results of this analysis

Haviland, David

87

Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

1985-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

88

Positron Beam Propagation in a Meter Long Plasma Channel  

SciTech Connect

Recent experiments and simulations have shown that positron beams propagating in plasmas can be focused and also create wakes with large accelerating gradients. For similar parameters, the wakes driven by positron beams are somewhat smaller compared to the case of an electron beam. Simulations have shown that the wake amplitude can be increased if the positron beam is propagated in a hollow plasma channel (Ref. 1). This paper, compares experimentally, the propagation and beam dynamics of a positron beam in a meter scale homogeneous plasma, to a positron beam hollow channel plasma. The results show that positron beams in hollow channels are less prone to distortions and deflections. Hollow channels were observed to guide the positron beam onto the channel axis. Beam energy loss was also observed implying the formation of a large wake amplitude. The experiments were carried out as part of the E-162 plasma wakefield experiments at SLAC.

Marsh, K.A.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W.B.; /UCLA; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; O'Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

89

The development of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imaging  

SciTech Connect

We give design details and expected image results of a compact positron tomograph designed for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair of external curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis). The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. Each bank is composed of two rows (axially) of 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors, forming two arcs that can be tilted to minimize attenuation. Compared to a conventional PET system, our camera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and has almost two times higher solid angle coverage for a central point source, because the detectors are close to the patient. The detectors are read out by modified CTI HRRT data acquisition electronics. The individual detectors are angled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize reso

Huber, Jennifer S.; Qi, Jinyi; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Budinger, Thomas F.

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

90

Study of Higgs-gauge boson anomalous couplings through $e^-e^+ \\rightarrow W^-W^+H$ at ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, Higgs couplings with gauge bosons is probed through $e^-e^+ \\rightarrow W^-W^+H$ in an effective Lagrangian framework. An ILC of 500 $GeV$ center of mass energy with possible beam polarization is considered for this purpose. The reach of ILC with integrated luminosity of 300 $fb^{-1}$ in the determination of both the CP-conserving and CP-violating parameters are obtained. Sensitivity of the probe of each of these couplings on the presence of other couplings is investigated. The most influential couplings parameters are $\\bar c_W=-\\bar c_B$. Other parameters of significant effect are $\\bar c_{HW}$ and $\\bar c_{HB}$ among the CP-conserving ones, and $\\tilde c_{HW}$ and $\\tilde c_{HB}$ among the CP-violating ones. CP-violating parameter, $\\tilde c_\\gamma$ seems to have very little influence on the process considered. Detailed study of the angular distributions have presented a way to disentangle the effect of some of these couplings.

Kumar, Satendra; Sahoo, Shibananda

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing positron annihilation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1995 Summary: Positron Annihilation Characteristics in Perfect and Imperfect Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides M... kova 22, CZ-616 62 Bmo, CzechRepublic **PositronAnnihilatio...

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing positron lifetime Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with recent positron lifetime measurements for group IV and V refractory metal carbides and in hexagonal WC... a very high electronic density. The corresponding positron ......

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - axillary region positron Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1995 Summary: Positron Annihilation Characteristics in Perfect and Imperfect Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides M... kova 22, CZ-616 62 Bmo, CzechRepublic **PositronAnnihilatio...

94

Next Generation Fast RF Interlock Module and ATCA Adapter for ILC High Availability RF Test Station Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

High availability interlocks and controls are required for the ILC (International Linear Collider) L-Band high power RF stations. A new F3 (Fast Fault Finder) VME module has been developed to process both fast and slow interlocks using FPGA logic to detect the interlock trip excursions. This combination eliminates the need for separate PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control of slow interlocks. Modules are chained together to accommodate as many inputs as needed. In the next phase of development the F3's will be ported to the new industry standard ATCA (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture) crate (shelf) via a specially designed VME adapter module with IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface). The goal is to demonstrate auto-failover and hot-swap for future partially redundant systems.

Larsen, R

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Elastic Scattering of Slow Positrons by Hydrogen Atoms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Slow Positrons by Hydrogen Atoms W. J. Cody Joan...of slow positrons by hydrogen atoms by the use of...virtual positronium production and polarization of...the latter by the method of polarized orbitals...comparison with other methods. The Royal Society...

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Channeling of positrons from. mu. /sup +/ decay  

SciTech Connect

The first attempt to observe the steering or channeling effect of a host crystal lattice on the trajectories of decay positrons from interstitial positive muons is described. An enhanced (flux peaking) or diminished (blocking) positron counting rate for emission along a low index crystalline axis would be evidence of such an effect and would help to determine the lattice location of the emitting muon. The expected angular widths of these features is approximately 0.2/sup 0/. A 29.8 MeV/c surface ..mu../sup +/ beam was stopped in a high quality silicon crystal wafer which was elastically bent to a good approximation to a spherical cap. This brought the (100) axes, which were initially normal to the wafer surface, to a focus at the radius of curvature R = 110 cm. The normalized e/sup +/ rate was measured as a function of position with a small two-counter scintillation telescope which was moved through the focus. We found no evidence for channeling at the 17% level, suggesting that the ..mu../sup +/ in Si either (1) makes large vibratory excursions, (2) occupies a site of low symmetry, or (3) occupies one of several possible inequivalent stopping sites.

Patterson, B.D. (Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, British Columbia); Arrott, A.S.; Wichert, T.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

Schyler, David J. (Bellport, NY); O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY); Woody, Craig (Setauket, NY); Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang (Sound Beach, NY); Radeka, Veljko (Bellport, NY); Vaska, Paul (Sound Beach, NY); Pratte, Jean-Francois (Stony Brook, NY); Volkow, Nora (Chevy Chase, MD)

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

98

An electrostatically-focused beam for reemitted positron energy spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

An ultrahigh vacuum system has been constructed in which 2 keV positrons are electrostatically transported and focused onto a solid surface which has been characterised by LEED and Auger spectroscopies. Slow positrons reemitted from the surface traverse a field-free region and enter the transport lens system of a hemispherical energy analyser. This last device potentially enables high-resolution measurements of the energy spectrum of the reemitted positrons. Preliminary low-resolution measurements of positron spectra from Cu(110) and polycrystalline W surfaces have been made under various conditions; the system is currently being developed and upgraded to improve the beam brightness as well as the energy and angular resolution.

Goodyear, A.; Farthing, I.R.; Coleman, P.G. (School of Physics, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ (U.K.))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Functional lung imaging in humans using Positron Emission Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis deals with a method of functional lung imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this technique, a radioactive tracer, nitrogen-13, is dissolved in saline solution, and injected into a peripheral ...

Layfield, Dominick, 1971-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Positron Computed Tomography: Current State, Clinical Results and Future Trends  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

1980-09-00T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies  

SciTech Connect

This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

Zalutsky, M.R.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Dissecting cosmic-ray electron-positron data with Occam's Razor: the role of known Pulsars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that both the positron fraction measured by PAMELA and the peculiar spectral features reported in the total electron-positron (e+e-) flux measured by ATIC have a very natural explanation in electron-positron pairs produced by nearby pulsars. While this possibility was pointed out a long time ago, the greatly improved quality of current data potentially allow to reverse-engineer the problem: given the regions of pulsar parameter space favored by PAMELA and by ATIC, are there known pulsars that explain the data with reasonable assumptions on the injected e+e- pairs? In the context of simple benchmark models for estimating the e+e- output, we consider all known pulsars, as listed in the most complete available catalogue. We find that it is unlikely that a single pulsar be responsible for both the PAMELA e+ fraction anomaly and for the ATIC excess, although two single sources are in principle enough to explain both experimental results. The PAMELA excess e+ likely come from a set of mature pulsars (age ~ 10^6 yr), with a distance of 0.8-1 kpc, or from a single, younger and closer source like Geminga. The ATIC data require a larger (and less plausible) energy output, and favor an origin associated to powerful, more distant (1-2 kpc) and younger (age ~ 10^5$ yr) pulsars. We list several candidate pulsars that can individually or coherently contribute to explain the PAMELA and ATIC data. Although generally suppressed, we find that the contribution of pulsars more distant than 1-2 kpc could contribute for the ATIC excess. Finally, we stress the multi-faceted and decisive role that Fermi-LAT will play in the very near future by (1) providing an exquisite measurement of the e+e- flux, (2) unveiling the existence of as yet undetected pulsars, and (3) searching for anisotropies in the arrival direction of high-energy e+e-.

Stefano Profumo

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography  

SciTech Connect

The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

Conti, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Perez-Mendez, V. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Theoretical Power Law Exponent for Electron and Positron Cosmic Rays: A Comment on the Recent Letter of the AMS Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a recent letter, the AMS collaboration reported the detailed and extensive data concerning the distribution in energy of electron and positron cosmic rays. A central result of the experimental work resides in the energy regime $30\\ {\\rm GeV} < E < 1\\ {\\rm TeV}$ wherein the power law exponent of the energy distribution is measured to be $\\alpha ({\\rm experiment})=3.17$. In virtue of the Fermi statistics obeyed by electrons and positrons, a theoretical value was predicted as $\\alpha ({\\rm theory})=3.151374$ in very good agreement with experimental data. The consequences of this agreement between theory and experiment concerning the sources of cosmic ray electrons and positrons are briefly explored.

Swain, A Widom J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The focusing properties of the positron-capture solenoidal lens  

SciTech Connect

This note concerns the focusing properties of the positron-capture solenoid. Such a solenoid will be placed before the entrance of the 450 MeV positron linear-accelerator injector in the APS. The 1.25 A, 40 ns electron beam is accelerated in the 200 MeV electron linac. This beam is then focused onto a 3 mm diameter spot at the 7 mm thick tungsten target. By the process of multiple nuclear-scattering the target generates the positron particles. These positrons, in general, can have a large diverging angle. In order to capture these rapidly diverging positrons, a relatively strong focusing lens is placed close to the converter. In this case a magnetic solenoidal lens has an advantage over the usual quadrupole lens because of its larger phase-space acceptance. In particular, the solenoidal lens is noted for its capability of controlling the spin direction of polarized ions. The authors first wrote down the expression for the magnetic field distribution on the axis for the solenoidal lens. From this expression they derive the expressions for the first- and second-order field distributions at any point in the region. They then calculate and compare the focal powers at various distances off the axis. Further, they calculate and include the third- and fourth-order components of the fields and compare them with the previous results. Finally, they briefly consider the particle trajectories through these fields and present the result in terms of the particle motion in phase space.

Yoon, M.; Mavrogenes, G.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons  

SciTech Connect

The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index ? on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

Saha, Asit, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, Rangpo, East-Sikkim 737136 (India); Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India); Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: asit-saha123@rediffmail.com, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan-731235 (India)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Anomalous positrons from heavy ion collisions: Past results and future plans  

SciTech Connect

The current status of the experimental study of anomalous lines observed in the spectra of positrons produced in heavy ion collisions is reviewed. A new experiment to measure positron-electron coincidences is discussed. 26 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Betts, R.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Reduction of the trapping of positrons in dislocated single crystals of iron when charged with hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The positron annihilation measurement was carried out with the pure iron single crystals deformed in various ways before and after hydrogen permeation. The positron trapping intensity was reduced more in the screw dislocation than in the edge dislocation by hydrogen charging. The trap occupancy by hydrogen was very close to the fraction of the reduction in positron trapping intensity.

Park, Y.K.; Waber, J.T.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a positron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The purposes of this study were to estimate the radiation-absorbed doses of 18 F-SP203 in humans. Radiation-absorbed doses were estimated by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose scheme. Results AfterORIGINAL ARTICLE Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a positron emission tomographic ligand

Shen, Jun

110

Spindependent deep inelastic positron scattering from ~ Dirk De Schepper a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The cell has no exit windows but the target gas is pumped away by means of a differential pumping system collaboration 1 #12; The polarisation of the target was measured in the pumping cell and in the storage cell population necessary for the laser pumping. In the storage cell the excitation was caused by the positron

111

Linear-drifting subpulse sources in radio pulsars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......accelerated ion-proton plasma. Recent operation...altitude of the 40-MHz emission from several...electron-positron plasma cannot be the source...extremity of the ion atmosphere which we assume to...frequency, 48-MHz, is rather larger...decouples from the plasma over a finite interval......

P. B. Jones

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Short pulse laser produced energetic electron and positron measurements  

SciTech Connect

Very energetic (>MeV) electrons are commonly produced from ultraintense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions. Diagnosing these so-called hot electrons is of fundamental importance in understanding the detailed laser plasma physics present in these interactions, as well as in potential applications. Interestingly, positrons can also be produced in these interactions if the number and effective temperature of hot electrons exceed a threshold value. This additional information may help to better determine the effective electron temperature that exists in these targets. We have designed and constructed a compact spectrometer that can simultaneously measure the energy spectra of both electrons and positrons. Presented here are the principles of the spectrometer together with its experimental results obtained on the ultraintense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Vulcan petawatt laser.

Chen, Hui; Wilks, Scott C.; Patel, Parvesh K.; Shepherd, Ronnie [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Near-threshold positron impact ionization of hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

The hyperspherical hidden crossing method (HHCM) is used to investigate positron impact ionization of hydrogen near threshold. An important feature of this method is that it can provide valuable insight into scattering processes. In the calculation of positron-hydrogen ionization, the adiabatic Hamiltonian is expanded about the Wannier saddle point; anharmonic corrections are treated perturbatively. The S-wave results are consistent with the Wannier threshold law and with the extended threshold law that was previously derived using the HHCM. We have extended the previous HHCM calculation to higher angular momenta L and have calculated the absolute ionization cross-section for L = 0, 1 and 2. The HHCM calculation confirms that the S-wave ionization cross-section is small and provides the reason why it is small. The HHCM ionization cross-section (summed over the lowest partial waves) is compared with a convergent close-coupling calculation, a 33-state close-coupling calculation and experimental data.

Macek, Joseph H [ORNL; Ward, S.J. [University of North Texas; Jansen, Krista [University of North Texas; Shertzer, J. [College Holy Cross, Worcester, MA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Storing Electrons Instead of Positrons Without Trapping of Positive Ions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrons Instead of Positrons Without Electrons Instead of Positrons Without Trapping of Positive Ions LS-75 T. K. Khoe October, 1986 In this note, a procedure to inject and store electrons in the ring without trapping ions will be described. The minimum injection current per bunch below which ion trapping occur will be determined. Since the vertical beam size is smaller than the horizontal beam size, we will consider the vertical motion only. The following assumptions are made: 1. The bunch period is much longer than the bunch length. This assumption allow us to use the thin lens approximation for the focusing effect of the electron bunch. 2. The bunch length is much larger than the transverse dimensions of the beam. A two-dimensional calculation can then be used to obtain the

115

Searching for a U-boson with a positron beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high sensitivity search for a light \\Ub{} by means of a positron beam incident on a hydrogen target is proposed. We described a concept of the experiment and two possible realizations. The projected result of this experiment corresponds to an upper limit on the square of coupling constant $ |f_{_{eU}}|^2 = 3 \\times 10^{-9}$ with a signal to noise ratio of five.

B. Wojtsekhowski

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Degradation process of fuel cell membrane observed by positron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To investigate degradation process due to radicals in fuel cell membrane by means of positron annihilation spectroscopy, three kinds of radicals, HO•, H• and O2•- are produced through water radiolysis. The results show that the cluster structure and proton conductivity was greatly affected by reductive radicals. This is because the oxidative radical is responsible for the dissociation of sulfonic group, whereas the reductive radical breaks down the cluster in the membrane and disrupts proton conduction, which is consistent with solution analysis.

Y Honda; Y Aoyagi; S Tojo; G Watanabe; Y Akiyama; S Nishijima

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Particle acceleration in double radio sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Further study has been made of a model of extragalactic double radio sources in which the magnetized accretion disc of a massive black hole acts as an electric dynamo producing oppositely directed beams of relativistic particles. An empty region of small angular size—a vortice core—is shown to be a possible consequence of the hydrodynamics of accretion of gas with angular momentum. An ambient magnetic field in the gas tends to accumulate in the core region. The acceleration of electrons in the dynamo electric field gives rise to oppositely directed electron beams which in turn produce synchroton gamma rays collimated along the core. Collisions between the gamma rays and low energy photons caN initiate an electromagnetic cascade shower. The cascade acts to produce a collimated relativistic electron?positron beam. If the current flow in the dynamo occurs in surges then the outward propagation of the head of the electron–positron beams may produce expanding compact radio components. The electron–positron beam is ballistic in nature and it is electrically neutral and carries no current. Such a beam appears to have favorable stability properties. The beam is eventually stopped and spread out in pitch angle by the ram pressure of the external medium. Synchrotron radiated lobes of double radio sources.

R. V. E. Lovelace; J. MacAuslan; M. Burns

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Optimization of drift bias in an UHV based pulsed positron beam system  

SciTech Connect

We report here the design of ultra high vacuum (UHV) compatible pulsed positron beam lifetime system, which combines the principles of a conventional slow positron beam and RF based pulsing scheme. The mechanical design and construction of the UHV system to house the beam has been completed and it has been tested for a vacuum of {approx} 10{sup -10} mbar. The voltages applied to the drift tube as a function of positron energies have been optimized using SIMION.

Anto, C. Varghese; Rajaraman, R.; Rao, G. Venugopal; Abhaya, S.; Parimala, J.; Amarendra, G. [Materials Physics Division, Material Science Group, I GCAR, Kalpakkam - 603102, T.N (India); Materials Physics Division, Material Science Group, I GCAR, Kalpakkam - 603102, T.N. (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

119

Intense slow positron production at the 15 MeV LINAC at Argonne National Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An intense slow positron beam using a 15 MeV LINAC (average current 1.25 × 1015 e?/s) at the Radiation and Photochemistry Group, Chemistry Division of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been proposed and studied. Computer simulated results optimizing the positron yield and distribution of energy and angle show that a slow positron production at 1010 e+/s is possible. A proposed design of an intense slow positron beam with optimal conditions of incident electron, converter/moderator configurations, and extraction/transportation is presented.

H.M. Chen; Y.C. Jean; C.D. Jonah; S. Chemerisov; A.F. Wagner; D.M. Schrader; A.W. Hunt

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Strong drive compression of a gas-cooled positron plasma  

SciTech Connect

The use of rotating electric fields to control plasmas has found numerous applications in the manipulation and storage of antimatter. When used in strong magnetic fields plasma heating caused by the applied field is mitigated by cyclotron cooling, leading to an efficient broadband mode of compression known as the strong drive regime. We have found that it is possible to access the strong drive regime in a low field trap where cyclotron cooling is negligible and a gas is used for cooling, and we have been able to compress positron plasmas to more than 10% of the Brillouin density limit.

Cassidy, D. B.; Mills, A. P. Jr. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521-0413 (United States); Greaves, R. G. [First Point Scientific, Inc., 5330 Derry Avenue, Suite J, Agoura Hills, California 91301 (United States); Meligne, V. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521-0413 (United States); First Point Scientific, Inc., 5330 Derry Avenue, Suite J, Agoura Hills, California 91301 (United States)

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Optical distortions in electron/positron storage rings  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the optical distortions in the PEP electron/positron storage ring for various optical configurations using the computer programs DIMAT, HARMON, PATRICIA, and TURTLE. The results are shown graphically by tracing several thousand trajectories from one interaction region to the next using TURTLE and by tracing a few selected rays several hundred turns using the programs DIMAT and PATRICIA. The results show an interesting correlation between the calculated optical cleanliness of a particular lattice configuration and the observed operating characteristics of the machine.

Brown, K.L.; Donald, M.; Servranckx, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Magnetically bound states of electronic and positronic hydrogen ions: The case of zero orbital angular momentum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orbital angular momentum J, and zero net spin i.e., it is a singlet state 2 . Furthermore a positronMagnetically bound states of electronic and positronic hydrogen ions: The case of zero orbital in a uniform magnetic field B, concentrating on states with zero orbital angular momentum J. It is shown

California at San Diego, University of

123

Resonant versus nonresonant nuclear excitation of 115 In by positron annihilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, giving rise to nuclear excitation, if the incident positron energy meets the nuclear resonance criteria the effects of the irradiation in a low background environment. Although the multipolarity of this stateResonant versus nonresonant nuclear excitation of 115 In by positron annihilation D. B. Cassidy,1

Golovchenko, Jene A.

124

PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda J.S.T. Ng, P. Chen, W, for the first time, positron beams. We also discuss measure­ ments on plasma lens­induced synchrotron radiation and laser­ and beam­plasma interactions. 1 INTRODUCTION The plasma lens was proposed as a final focusing

125

Operating instructions for ORELA (Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator) positron beam line  

SciTech Connect

This report will contain details of the construction and operation of the positron beam line. Special procedures which are performed on a less frequent basis will also be described. Appendices will contain operating instructions for experiments which make use of the positron beam and are connected to the beam line. Finally, a review of safety-related considerations will be presented.

Donohue, D.L.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks? Hong Qin,1,2,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

positrons have been generated in accelerators for scien- tific research, in nuclear reactors or on the first wall of the vacuum chamber? Because the annihilation probability dependents on the path and veloc to runaway velocity by the loop voltage. In the toroidal direction, the runaway positrons are accelerated

127

Full variational molecular orbital method: Application to the positron-molecule complexes  

SciTech Connect

Optimal Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis sets of positron and electron in positron-molecule complexes are proposed by using the full variational treatment of molecular orbital (FVMO) method. The analytical expression for the energy gradient with respect to parameters of positronic and electronic GTO such as the orbital exponents, the orbital centers, and the linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) coefficients, is derived. Wave functions obtained by the FVMO method include the effect of electronic or positronic orbital relaxation explicitly and satisfy the virial and Hellmann-Feynman theorems completely. The authors have demonstrated the optimization of each orbital exponent in various positron-atomic and anion systems, and estimated the positron affinity (PA) as the difference between their energies. The PA obtained with small basis set is in good agreement with the numerical Hartree-Fock result. They have calculated the OH{sup {minus}} and [OH{sup {minus}}; e{sup +}] species as the positron-molecular system by the FVMO method. This result shows that the positronic basis set not only becomes more diffuse but also moves toward the oxygen atom. Moreover, they have applied this method to determine both the nuclear and electronic wave functions of LiH and LiD molecules simultaneously, and obtained the isotopic effect directly.

Tachikawa, Masanori [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Chemistry] [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Chemistry; [Waseda Computational Science Consortium, Tokyo (Japan); Mori, Kazuhide [Waseda Computational Science Consortium, Tokyo (Japan)] [Waseda Computational Science Consortium, Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Kazunari [Takachiho Univ., Tokyo (Japan)] [Takachiho Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Iguchi, Kaoru [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Chemistry] [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Chemistry

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

The production and decay of the top partner $T$ in the left-right twin higgs model at the ILC and CLIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The left-right twin Higgs model (LRTHM) predicts the existence of the top partner $T$. In this work, we make a systematic investigation for the single and pair production of this top partner $T$ through the processes: $e^{+}e^{-}\\to t\\ov{T} + T\\bar{t}$ and $ T\\ov{T}$, the neutral scalar (the SM-like Higgs boson $h$ or neutral pseudoscalar boson $\\phi^{0}$) associate productions $e^{+}e^{-}\\to t\\ov{T}h +T\\bar{t}h$, $T\\ov{T}h$, $t\\ov{T}\\phi^{0}+T\\bar{t}\\phi^{0}$ and $ T\\ov{T}\\phi^{0}$. From the numerical evaluations for the production cross sections and relevant phenomenological analysis we find that (a) the production rates of these processes, in the reasonable parameter space, can reach the level of several or tens of fb; (b) for some cases, the peak value of the resonance production cross section can be enhanced significantly and reaches to the level of pb; (c) the subsequent decay of $T\\to \\phi^{+}b \\to t\\bar{b}b$ may generate typical phenomenological features rather different from the signals from other new physics models beyond the standard model(SM); and (d) since the relevant SM background is generally not large, some signals of the top partner $T$ predicted by the LRTHM may be detectable in the future ILC and CLIC experiments.

Yao-Bei Liu; Zhen-Jun Xiao

2014-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

129

Experimental results obtained with the positron-annihilation-radiation telescope of the Toulouse-Argonne collaboration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present laboratory measurements obtained with a ground-based prototype of the focusing positron-annihilation-radiation telescope developed by the Toulouse-Argonne collaboration. This instrument has been designed to collect 511-keV photons from astrophysical sources when operating as a balloon borne observatory. The ground-based prototype consists of a crystal lens holding small cubes of diffracting germanium crystals and a 3×3 germanium array that detects the concentrated beam in the focal plane. Measured performances of the instrument at different line energies (511 and 662 keV) are presented and compared with Monte Carlo simulations; also the advantages of combining the lens with a detector array are discussed. The results obtained in the laboratory have strengthened interest in a crystal-diffraction telescope: the balloon instrument will provide a combination of high spatial and energy resolution (15 arc sec and 2 keV, respectively) with an extremely low instrumental background resulting in a sensitivity of ?3 × 10?5 photons cm?2s?1. These features will allow us to resolve a possible narrow 511-keV line both energetically and spatially within a Galactic center “microquasar” or in other broad-class annihilators.

J.E. Naya; P. von Ballmoos; R.K. Smither; M. Faiz; P.B. Fernandez; T. Graber; F. Albernhe; G. Vedrenne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Solitary and shock waves in magnetized electron-positron plasma  

SciTech Connect

An Ohm's law for electron-positron (EP) plasma is obtained. In the framework of EP magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate nonrelativistic nonlinear waves' solutions in a magnetized EP plasma. In the collisionless limit, quasistationary propagating solitary wave structures for the magnetic field and the plasma density are obtained. It is found that the wave amplitude increases with the Mach number and the Alfvén speed. However, the dependence on the plasma temperature is just the opposite. Moreover, for a cold EP plasma, the existence range of the solitary waves depends only on the Alfvén speed. For a hot EP plasma, the existence range depends on the Alfvén speed as well as the plasma temperature. In the presence of collision, the electromagnetic fields and the plasma density can appear as oscillatory shock structures because of the dissipation caused by the collisions. As the collision frequency increases, the oscillatory shock structure becomes more and more monotonic.

Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Abdukerim, Nuriman; Xie, Bai-Song, E-mail: bsxie@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, and College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, and College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Search for muon-electron and muon-positron conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Limits on the lepton-flavor-violating reactions ?-+Z?e-+Z and ?-+Z?e++(Z-2), muon-electron and muon-positron conversion, have been obtained from a search performed at TRIUMF using a time-projection chamber. Upper limits (90% C.L.) for the branching ratios compared to ordinary muon capture for a titanium target are R—(Ti)=?(?-Ti?e-Ti)/?(?-Ti capture)<4.6×10-12 and R+(Ti)=?(?-Ti?e+Ca*)/?(?-Ti capture)<.1.7×10-10 A smaller data set obtained using a lead target yielded R-(Pb)<4.9×10-10. The implications of these results for extensions of the standard model which allow lepton-flavor violation are discussed.

S. Ahmad; G. Azuelos; M. Blecher; D. A. Bryman; R. A. Burnham; E. T. H. Clifford; P. Depommier; M. S. Dixit; K. Gotow; C. K. Hargrove; M. Hasinoff; M. Leitch; J. A. Macdonald; H. Mes; I. Navon; T. Numao; J-M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; P. Schlatter; J. Spuller; J. Summhammer

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Design Considerations for High Energy Electron -- Positron Storage Rings  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

High energy electron-positron storage rings give a way of making a new attack on the most important problems of elementary particle physics. All of us who have worked in the storage ring field designing, building, or using storage rings know this. The importance of that part of storage ring work concerning tests of quantum electrodynamics and mu meson physics is also generally appreciated by the larger physics community. However, I do not think that most of the physicists working tin the elementary particle physics field realize the importance of the contribution that storage ring experiments can make to our understanding of the strongly interacting particles. I would therefore like to spend the next few minutes discussing the sort of things that one can do with storage rings in the strongly interacting particle field.

Richter, B.

1966-11-00T23:59:59.000Z

133

Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography  

SciTech Connect

Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas.

Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. (National Institute of Aging, Baltimore, MD (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Measurement of low energy longitudinal polarised positron beams via a Bhabha polarimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The introduction of a longitudinal polarised positron beam in an $e^+e^-$ linear collider calls for its polarisation monitoring and measurement at low energies near its production location. Here it is shown that a relatively simple Bhabha scattering polarimeter allows, at energies below 5000 MeV, a more than adequate positron beam longitudinal polarisation measurement by using only the final state electrons. It is further shown that out of the three, 10, 250 or 5000 MeV positron beam energy locations, where the polarisationmeasurement in the TESLA linear collider can be performed, the 250 MeV site is best suited for this task.

Gideon Alexander; Erez Reinherz-Aronis

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

135

Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AB, Elson LM. The human brain coloring book. 1st ed. New21. Toga AW, Mazziotta JC. Brain mapping : the systems. SanSR, Phelps ME. Imaging Brain Function with Positron Emission

Wardak, Mirwais

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Positron Production by X Rays Emitted by Betatron Motion in a Plasma Wiggler  

SciTech Connect

Positrons in the energy range of 3-30 MeV, produced by x rays emitted by betatron motion in a plasma wiggler of 28.5 GeV electrons from the SLAC accelerator, have been measured. The extremely high-strength plasma wiggler is an ion column induced by the electron beam as it propagates through and ionizes dense lithium vapor. X rays in the range of 1-50 MeV in a forward cone angle of 0.1 mrad collide with a 1.7 mm thick tungsten target to produce electron-positron pairs. The positron spectra are found to be strongly influenced by the plasma density and length as well as the electron bunch length. By characterizing the beam propagation in the ion column these influences are quantified and result in excellent agreement between the measured and calculated positron spectra.

Johnson, D. K.; Auerbach, D.; Clayton, C. E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhou, M. [University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Blumenfeld, I.; Barnes, C. D.; Decker, F. J.; Emma, P.; Hogan, M. J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Kirby, N.; Krejcik, P.; O'Connell, C. L.; Siemann, R. H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)] (and others)

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Positron Production by X Rays Emitted By Betatron Motion in a Plasma Wiggler  

SciTech Connect

Positrons in the energy range of 3-30 MeV, produced by x rays emitted by betatron motion in a plasma wiggler of 28.5 GeV electrons from the SLAC accelerator, have been measured. The extremely high-strength plasma wiggler is an ion column induced by the electron beam as it propagates through and ionizes dense lithium vapor. X rays in the range of 1-50 MeV in a forward cone angle of 0.1 mrad collide with a 1.7 mm thick tungsten target to produce electron-positron pairs. The positron spectra are found to be strongly influenced by the plasma density and length as well as the electron bunch length. By characterizing the beam propagation in the ion column these influences are quantified and result in excellent agreement between the measured and calculated positron spectra.

Johnson, D.K.; Auerbach, D.; Blumenfeld, I.; Barnes, C.D.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Deng, S.; Emma, P.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Kirby, N.; Krejcik, P.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P.; O'Connell, C.L.; /UCLA /SLAC /Southern California U.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

138

Experimental Results Obtained with the Positron-Annihilation Radiation Telescope of the Toulouse-Argonne Collaboration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present laboratory measurements obtained with a ground-based prototype of a focusing positron-annihilation-radiation telescope developed by the Toulouse-Argonne collaboration. This balloon-borne telescope has ...

J. E. Naya; P. von Ballmoos; F. Albernhe; G. Vedrenne…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Radiative Corrections in Electron-Positron Collisions at Present and Future Energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The various ingredients, which make up a radiative correction calculation are discussed. Known results for electron-positron collisions at PETRA/PEP energies are reviewed. From this an extrapolation to LEP/SLC...

F. A. Berends

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Thermal evolution of boron irradiation induced defects in predoped Si revealed by positron annihilation experiments  

SciTech Connect

The isochronal annealing behavior of high energy (25-72 MeV) boron ion irradiation induced defects in boron-doped silicon is monitored through measurements of positron lifetimes and three distinct defect-evolution stages are identified. The initial boron doping created a defect environment where positrons could sensitively annihilate with the boron electrons, suggesting boron-decorated Si monovacancies as potential trapping sites. The irradiation results in the dissolution of boron from these sites and positrons are then trapped by the empty divacancies of Si. Charge neutralization of divacancies through interaction with boron atoms leads to enhanced positron trapping in the initial stages of isochronal annealing. The divacancies start annealing above 673 K. However, a remarkable defect evolution stage due to the diffusion of the boron atoms beyond their initial depths of penetration is seen above 873 K and it leaves the sample with defects still present even at the highest annealing temperature 1273 K used in this work.

Nambissan, P. M. G.; Bhagwat, P. V.; Kurup, M. B. [Nuclear and Atomic Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Positron acceleration by plasma wake fields driven by a hollow electron beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A scheme of wake field generation for positron acceleration using hollow or donut shaped electron driver beams is studied. An annular shaped, electron free region forms around a hollow driver beam creating a favorable region (longitudinal field is accelerating and transverse field is focusing and radially linear) for positron acceleration. Accelerating gradients of the order of 10 GV/m are produced by a hollow electron beam driver with FACET like parameters. The peak accelerating field increases linearly with the total charge in the beam driver while the axial size of the favorable region ($\\sim$ one plasma wavelength) remains approximately fixed. The radial size drops with the total charge but remains large enough for the placement of a witness positron beam. We simulate an efficient acceleration of a 23 GeV positron beam to 35.4 GeV with a maximum energy spread of 0.4\\% and very small emittance over a plasma length of 140 cm.

Jain, Neeraj; Palastro, J P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Energy-resolved annihilation studies : vibrational Feshbach resonances and positron- molecule bound states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P. Liebermann, V. Melnikov, M. Tachikawa, L. Pichland and M.L. Pichl, J. -M. Rost, M. Tachikawa and M. Kimura. Positron1045–1053 (2004). [75] M. Tachikawa, R. J. Buenker and M.

Young, Jason Asher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Positron and gamma-ray signatures of dark matter annihilation and big-bang nucleosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

The positron excess observed by the PAMELA experiment may come from dark matter annihilation, if the annihilation cross section is large enough. We show that the dark matter annihilation scenarios to explain the positron excess may also be compatible with the discrepancy of the cosmic lithium abundances between theory and observations. The winolike neutralino in the supersymmetric standard model is a good example for it. This scenario may be confirmed by Fermi satellite experiments.

Hisano, Junji; Kawasaki, Masahiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8568 (Japan); Kohri, Kazunori [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Nakayama, Kazunori [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Contaminant Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contaminant sources include almost every component in the manufacturing process: people, materials, processing equipment, and manufacturing environments. People can generate contaminating particles, gases, conden...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Conceptual design of a compact positron tomograph for prostateimaging  

SciTech Connect

We present a conceptual design of a compact positron tomograph for prostate imaging using a pair of external curved detector banks, one placed above and one below the patient. The lower detector bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank adjusts vertically for maximum sensitivity and patient access. Each bank is composed of 40conventional block detectors, forming two arcs (44 cm minor, 60 cm major axis) that are tilted to minimize attenuation and positioned as close as possible to the patient to improve sensitivity. The individual detectors are angled to point towards the prostate to minimize resolution degradation in that region. Inter-plane septa extend 5 cm beyond the scintillator crystals to reduce random and scatter backgrounds. A patient is not fully encircled by detector rings in order to minimize cost,causing incomplete sampling due to the side gaps. Monte Carlo simulation (including random and scatter) demonstrates the feasibility of detecting a spherical tumor of 2.5 cm diameter with a tumor to background ratio of2:1, utilizing the number of events that should be achievable with a6-minute scan after a 10 mCi injection (e.g., carbon-11 choline or fluorine-18 fluorocholine).

Huber, J.S.; Derenzo, S.E.; Qi, J.; Moses, W.W.; Huesman, R.H.; Budinger, T.F.

2000-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ Report on Competitive Sourcing Results Fiscal Year 2006 May 2007 Executive Office of the President Office of Management and Budget TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ...................................................................................... 1 Introduction................................................................................................. 4 I. The big picture ......................................................................................... 4 II. How public-private competition was used in FY 2006 .................................... 6 A. Anticipated benefits from competition in FY 2006

148

A Gamma-Ray Burst/Pulsar for Cosmic-Ray Positrons with a Dark Matter-like Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that a nearby gamma-ray burst (GRB) or GRB-like (old, single and short-lived) pulsar/supernova remnant/microquasar about 10^{5-6} years ago may be responsible for the excesses of cosmic-ray positrons and electrons recently observed by the PAMELA, ATIC/PPB-BETS, Fermi and HESS experiments. We can reproduce the smooth Fermi/HESS spectra as well as the spiky ATIC/PPB-BETS spectra. The spectra have a sharp cutoff that is similar to the dark matter predictions, sometimes together with a line (not similar), since higher energy cosmic-rays cool faster where the cutoff/line energy marks the source age. A GRB-like astrophysical source is expected to have a small but finite spread in the cutoff/line as well as anisotropy in the cosmic-ray and diffuse gamma-ray flux, providing a method for the Fermi and future CALET experiments to discriminate between dark matter and astrophysical origins.

Kunihito Ioka

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Heating and Non-thermal Particle Acceleration in Relativistic, Transverse Magnetosonic Shock Waves in Proton-Electron-Positron Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of 1D particle-in-cell simulations of ultrarelativistic shock waves in proton-electron-positron plasmas. We consider magnetized shock waves, in which the upstream medium carries a large scale magnetic field, directed transverse to the flow. Relativistic cyclotron instability of each species as the incoming particles encounter the increasing magnetic field within the shock front provides the basic plasma heating mechanism. The most significant new results come from simulations with mass ratio $m_p/m_\\pm = 100$. We show that if the protons provide a sufficiently large fraction of the upstream flow energy density (including particle kinetic energy and Poynting flux), a substantial fraction of the shock heating goes into the formation of suprathermal power-law spectra of pairs. Cyclotron absorption by the pairs of the high harmonic ion cyclotron waves, emitted by the protons, provides the non-thermal acceleration mechanism. As the proton fraction increases, the non-thermal efficiency increases and the pairs' power-law spectra harden. We suggest that the varying power law spectra observed in synchrotron sources powered by magnetized winds and jets might reflect the correlation of the proton to pair content enforced by the underlying electrodynamics of these sources' outflows, and that the observed correlation between the X-ray spectra of rotation powered pulsars with the X-ray spectra of their nebulae might reflect the same correlation.

Elena Amato; Jonathan Arons

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Linac Injector For The ANL 7 Ge V Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injector For The ANL 7 Ge V Injector For The ANL 7 Ge V Advanced Photon Source A. Nassiri, W. Wesolowski, and G. Mavrogenes Argonne National Laboratory Submitted to the 1990 LINAC Conferece Albuquerque, New Mexico LS-154 9/28/90 TEE LINAC INJECTOR FOR TEE ANL 7 G<.iJ,V ADVANCED PHOTON SOORCE* A. Nassiri, W. Wesolowski, and G. Mavrogenes Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 USA Abstract The Argonne Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac system consists of a 200 MeV electron linac, a positron converter, and a 450 MeV positron linac. Design parameters and computer simulations of the two linac systems are presented. Introduction The Argonne Advanced Photon Source is a 7 GeV synchrotron X-Ray facility. The APS machine parameters have been described.

151

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competitive Sourcing Competitive Sourcing The Department of Energy's (DOE) Competitive Sourcing program is a management initiative aimed at improving DOE's performance and reducing the Department's operational costs. The program is governed by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A- 76, Performance of Commercial Activities, dated May 29, 2003. The commercial activities selected for review and competition include functions performed by government employees that are readily available in the private sector, and where the potential for efficiencies, regardless of the winning provider, are highly likely. The candidate functions are chosen from the Department's annual Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act Inventory and subjected to a feasibility review to determine if a prudent business case can be made to enter

152

Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging  

SciTech Connect

The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data and (c) mash the in plane projections, i.e. 2D data, with the projection data from the first oblique angles, which are then used to reconstruct the preliminary image in the 3D Reprojection Projection algorithm. The author presents reconstructed images of point sources and extended sources in both 2D and 3D. The images show that the camera is anticipated to eliminate radial elongation and produce artifact free and essentially spatially isotropic images throughout the entire FOV. It has a resolution of 1.50 {+-} 0.75 mm FWHM near the center, 2.25 {+-}0.75 mm FWHM in the bulk of the FOV, and 3.00 {+-} 0.75 mm FWHM near the edge and corners of the FOV.

Virador, Patrick R.G.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Low-energy positron-diffraction study of NaF and LiF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a magnetically transported beam of slow positrons, we have measured the elastic backscattering probability versus energy for positrons normally incident on air-cleaved and vacuum-cleaved (100) surfaces of NaF and LiF. We observe enormous first-order Bragg peaks and several higher-order peaks, the positions of which imply an inner potential of -0.5±0.2 and -0.1±0.2 eV for NaF and LiF, respectively. The atomic plane spacings are equal to the bulk values within 1/2%. There are only slight differences between the data obtained using the freshly air-cleaved and the vacuum-cleaved surfaces. Surface disorder may be responsible for the presence of some weak Bragg reflections corresponding to directions that would otherwise be inaccessible to the incident positron beam. The temperature dependence indicates that the disorder would not have a thermal origin.

A. P. Mills; Jr. and W. S. Crane

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Positron annihilation in Al single crystals from 85 mK to 300K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Doppler-broadening and positron lifetime data have been taken for well annealed ultra-pure Al(110) crystals from 85 mK to 300K. The Doppler-broadening data are independent of specimen temperature from 85 mK to 77K, while they show an increase between 77K and 300K consistent with the linear slope observed previously by Hood and Schultz (1979). Over the whole temperature range studied, the Doppler data scale to the static thermal expansion coefficient. The lifetime data also show no obvious dependence on temperature over the entire range studied, although they were statistically limited by the cryostat geometry. These results, which represent the lowest temperatures studied by any positron annihilation technique, provide no evidence for positron localisation at low temperatures in very well annealed single crystals.

P J Schultz; A Vehanen; W Thomlinson; K G Lynn; I K MacKenzie

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

>18F-labeled BPA positron emmision tomography (PET) based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy on malignant glioma patients in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Development, Sep 12-15, 2006 18F-labeled BPA positron emmision tomography (PET) based...borocaptate (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA), both of which have been used clinically...at Osaka Medical College.18F-labeled BPA positron emmision tomography (BPA-PET...

Shinji Kawabata; Shin-Ichi Miyatake; Minoru Miyashita; Atsushi Doi; Kyouko Iida; Toshihiko Kuroiwa; Yoshio Imahori; Koji Ono

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

F Labeling of a Near-Infrared Fluorophore Enables Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Nodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast 18 F Labeling of a Near-Infrared Fluorophore Enables Positron Emission Tomography and Optical- with a near-infrared fluorophore into a single molecule. Attachment to targeting ligands enables localization by positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF). Our first application

Tsien, Roger Y.

157

On the fully nonlinear acoustic waves in a plasma with positrons beam impact and superthermal electrons  

SciTech Connect

Arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions, superthermal electrons, and positrons beam are reported. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to an energy-balance like equation. The latter is numerically analyzed to examine the existence regions for solitary and shock waves. It is found that only solitary waves can propagate, however, the model cannot support shocks. The effects of superthermality and beam parameters (via, positrons concentration and streaming velocity) on the existence region, as well as solitary wave profile have been discussed.

Ali Shan, S. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan) [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre For Physics (NCP), Shahdra Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Size of nanoobjects in oil and gas species and materials with positron annihilation spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytical method to determine geometry and size of nano-scale defects in oil and gas species and materials is proposed. The modeling is carried out with the parameters of the positron spectra in the angular distribution method of positron annihilation spectroscopy, and is based on the 'free electron' approximation. From the annihilation decay kinetics, it is possible to express the trapping velocity of parapositronium in pores via intensities of the positronium components and to define the concentration and radii of pores in a porous layer. As the result, size and the concentration of micro-porous cylindrical nano-objects in the silicon samples are estimated.

Grafutin, V I; Elnikova, L V

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Positron binding to atoms and apolar molecules: A convergence of theory and experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of the bound states of a positron with atoms and apolar molecules is studied with a regularized polarization potential V=Vrc??r?42, where Vrc is a repulsive hard-core potential. A continuous relation between the core radius and the target polarizability is identified for alkanes, leading to the observed linear relation between their experimental binding energies and polarizabilities. New values for the binding energies for I and Pt atoms are suggested. Some predictions for related molecules are made, suggesting positron binding to GeH4 and, possibly, to C2F6.

Paulo H. R. Amaral and José R. Mohallem

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

Positron binding to alkali-metal hydrides: The role of molecular vibrations  

SciTech Connect

The bound vibrational levels for J=0 have been computed for the series of alkali-metal hydride molecules from LiH to RbH, including NaH and KH. For all four molecules the corresponding potential-energy curves have been obtained for each isolated species and for its positron-bound complex (e{sup +}XH). It is found that the calculated positron affinity values strongly depend on the molecular vibrational state for which they are obtained and invariably increase as the molecular vibrational energy content increases. The consequences of our findings on the likelihood of possibly detecting such weakly bound species are briefly discussed.

Gianturco, Franco A.; Franz, Jan; Buenker, Robert J.; Liebermann, Heinz-Peter; Pichl, Lukas; Rost, Jan-Michael; Tachikawa, Masanori; Kimura, Mineo [Department of Chemistry and INFM, University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Fachbereich C-Mathematik und Naturwissenschaften, Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal, Gaussstrasse 20, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer St. 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Graduate School of Science, Yokohama-city University, Seto 22-2, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Many-body effects on the electron-positron momentum density in simple and transition metals: Comparison with positron annihilation spectroscopy data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the influence of many-body effects on the electron-positron (e-p) momentum density in simple and transition metals. Five theoretical approaches to calculating e-p momentum densities are confronted with three-dimensional densities, reconstructed from two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation experimental spectra in Mg, Cd, Cu, and Y. It is shown that a proper description of e-p correlations has to include the lattice-periodical crystal potential as is done, e.g., in the Bloch-modified ladder theory. Moreover, it is demonstrated that electron-electron correlations are visible not only in Compton scattering but also in positron annihilation experiments.

H. Sormann and G. Kontrym-Sznajd

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Quench studies of ILC cavities  

SciTech Connect

Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

COMPETITIVE SOURCING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING EXECUTIVE STEERING GROUP MEETING PROCEEDINGS June 17, 2002 8:30 am - 11:00 am Room 5E-069 ATTENDEES John Gordon Robert Card Bruce Carnes Kathy Peery Brendan Danaher, AFGE Tony Lane Karen Evans Bill Sylvester Claudia Cross Brian Costlow Laurie Smith Helen Sherman Frank Bessera Rosalie Jordan Dennis O'Brien Mark Hively Robin Mudd Steven Apicella AGENDA 8:30 a.m. - 8:35 a.m. Opening Remarks 8:35a.m. - 8:55 a.m. Executive Steering Group roles and responsibilities, A-76 status, and talking points Team Briefings 8:55 a.m. - 9:20 a.m. Information Technology Study 9:20 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. Financial Services Study

164

Solitons and shocks in dense astrophysical magnetoplasmas with relativistic degenerate electrons and positrons  

SciTech Connect

The linear and nonlinear properties of the ion-acoustic (IA) waves are investigated in a relativistically degenerate magnetoplasma, whose constituents are the electrons, positrons, and ions. The electrons and positrons are assumed to obey the Fermi-Dirac statistics, whereas the cold ions are taken to be inertial and magnetized. In linear analysis, various limiting cases are discussed both analytically and numerically. However, for nonlinear studies, the well-known reductive perturbation technique is employed to derive the Zakharov-Kuznetsov and Zakharov-Kuznetsov Burgers equations in the presence of relativistically degenerate electrons and positrons. Furthermore, with the use of hyperbolic tangent method, the equations are simplified to admit the soliton and shock wave solutions. Numerically, it is shown that the amplitude, width, and phase speed associated with the localized IA solitons and shocks are significantly influenced by the various intrinsic plasma parameters relevant to our model. The present analysis can be useful for understanding the collective processes in dense astrophysical environments like neutron stars, where the electrons and positrons are expected to be relativistic and degenerate.

Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)] [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ata-ur-Rahman [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan) [National Centre for Physics at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

EERAD3: Event shapes and jet rates in electron-positron annihilation at order $?_s^3$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The program EERAD3 computes the parton-level QCD contributions to event shapes and jet rates in electron-positron annihilation through to order $\\alpha_s^3$. For three-jet production and related observables, this corresponds to next-to-next-to-leading order corrections, and allows for precision QCD studies. We describe the program and its usage in detail.

A. Gehrmann-De Ridder; T. Gehrmann; E. W. N. Glover; G. Heinrich

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Comparison of positron-impact vibrational excitation cross sections with the Born-dipole model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from reasonable to excellent agreement for CO2 and CF4 to poor agreement for CO and CH4. In contrast been studied including CF4, CO, H2, CH4 and CO2. A study of vibrational excitation of the m3 asymmetric stretch mode in CF4 by both positron- and electron-impact was recently conducted in the same apparatus

Gribakin, Gleb

167

Investigation of focusing of relativistic electron and positron bunches moving in cold plasma. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report on a project to study focusing effects of relativistic beams of electrons and positrons interacting with a cold plasma. The authors consider three different models for the overdense cold plasma - electron bunch interaction. They look at coulomb effects, wakefield effects, bunch parameters, and the effects of trains of pulses on focusing properties.

Amatuni, A.Ts.; Elbakian, S.S.; Khachatryan, A.G.; Sekhpossian, E.V.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Functional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission and are best understood in the context of the underlying 3D brain anatomy. In this paper, we present a novel Brain Mapping, Functional Imaging 1 INTRODUCTION Although the human brain is no longer the black box

Mueller, Klaus

169

Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Functional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Brain imaging methods used in experimental brain research such as Positron Emission of methods create statistical parametric maps (SPMs) of the brain on a voxel- basis. In our approach, they are best understood in the context of the underly- ing 3-D brain anatomy. However, despite the power

Mueller, Klaus

170

Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Facilitates Tumor Detection by Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...l-arabinose-inducible PBAD promoter system. Results: We showed...studies for the detection of solid tumors...tumor-bearing mice. Vehicle control mice were...facilitates tumor detection by positron emission...BAD) promoter system. We showed that...studies for the detection of solid tumors...

Peter Brader; Jochen Stritzker; Christopher C. Riedl; Pat Zanzonico; Shangde Cai; Eva M. Burnazi; E.Rashid Ghani; Hedvig Hricak; Aladar A. Szalay; Yuman Fong; and Ronald Blasberg

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Antiproton, positron, and electron imaging with a microchannel plate/phosphor detector ALPHA; accepted 2 November 2009; published online 1 December 2009 A microchannel plate MCP /phosphor screen Microchannel plate MCP /phosphor screen based diag- nostics have proved invaluable in studying the evolution

Fajans, Joel

172

Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons  

SciTech Connect

Electrostatic ion-acoustic periodic (cnoidal) waves and solitons in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons are investigated. Using the reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived with appropriate boundary conditions for periodic waves. The corresponding analytical and various numerical solutions are presented with Sagdeev potential approach. Differences between the results caused by the kappa and Maxwell distributions are emphasized. It is revealed that only hump (compressive) structures of the cnoidal waves and solitons are formed. It is shown that amplitudes of the cnoidal waves and solitons are reduced in an EPI plasma case in comparison with the ordinary electron-ion plasmas. The effects caused by the temperature variations of the warm ions are also discussed. It is obtained that the amplitude of the cnoidal waves and solitons decreases for a kappa distributed (nonthermal) electrons and positrons plasma case in comparison with the Maxwellian distributed (thermal) electrons and positrons EPI plasmas. The existence of kappa distributed particles leads to decreasing of ion-acoustic frequency up to thermal ions frequency.

Kaladze, T. [Department of Physics, Government College University (GCU), Lahore 54000 (Pakistan) [Department of Physics, Government College University (GCU), Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); I.Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics, Tbilisi State University, 0186 Georgia (United States); Mahmood, S., E-mail: shahzadm100@gmail.com [Theoretical Physics Division (TPD), PINSTECH P.O. Nilore Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Vacancy profile in reverse osmosis membranes studied by positron annihilation lifetime measurements and molecular dynamics simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The positron annihilation technique using a slow positron beam can be used for the study of the vacancy profiles in typical reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this study, the vacancy profile in the polyamide membrane that exhibits a high permselectivity between ions and water was studied using the positron annihilation technique and molecular dynamics simulations. Ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetimes in the surface region of the membranes were evaluated by using a slow positron beam. The diffusion behavior of Na+ and water in the polyamides was simulated by molecular dynamics (MD) methods using the TSUBAME2 supercomputer at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and discussed with the vacancy profile probed by the o-Ps. The results suggested that the large hydration size of Na+ compared to the vacancy size in the polyamides contributes to the increased diffusivity selectivity of water/Na+ that is related to the NaCl desalination performance of the membrane. Both the hydration size of the ions and the vacancy size appeared to be significant parameters to discuss the diffusivity selectivity of water/ions in typical polyamide membranes.

A Shimazu; H Goto; T Shintani; M Hirose; R Suzuki; Y Kobayashi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Positron annihilation studies of defects in molecular beam epitaxy grown III-V layers  

SciTech Connect

A summary of recent positron annihilation experiments on molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown III-V layers is Presented. Variable energy positron beam measurements on Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}As undoped and Si doped have been completed. Positron trapping at a open volume defect in Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}:Si for temperatures from 300 to 25 K in the dark was observed. The positron trap was lost after 1.3 eV illumination at 25K. These results indicate an open volume defect is associated with the local structure of the deep donor state of the DX center. Stability of MBE GaAs to thermal annealing war, investigated over the temperature range of 230 to 700{degrees}C, Proximity wafer furnace anneals in flowing argon were used, Samples grown above 450{degrees}C were shown to be stable but for sample below this temperature an anneal induced vacancy related defect was produced for anneals between 400 and 500{degrees}C. The nature of the defect was shown to be different for material grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C. Activation energies of 2.5 eV to 2.3 eV were obtained from isochronal anneal experiments for samples grown at 350 and 230{degrees}C, respectively.

Umlor, M.T.; Keeble, D.J. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Asoka-Kumar, P.; Lynn, K.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Cooke, P.W. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Eatontown, NJ (United States). Fort Monmouth Operation

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SHIELDING ESTIMATES FOR THE ANL 6.0 GeV SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE H. J. Moe V. R. Veluri LS-55-Revised Harch 1987 2 1.0 Introduction Shielding estimates for the linac, positron converter, booster synchrotron and the positron storage ring have been computed using preliminary design information. Calculations have been made of the resulting radiation for several types of operations involving normal beam loss, as well as, certain accidental beam losses. When available, experimental data from existing accelerator and light source facilities have been used in lieu of theoretical estimates. 2.0 Shielding Design Objective The Department of Energy's basic occupational exposure limit is 5 rem per year (DOE 81). However, in its guidance for maintaining exposures "as

176

Shielding design for the proposed Advanced Photon Source at Argonne  

SciTech Connect

Bulk shielding was designed for the proposed Argonne Advanced Photon Source. The shielding is for two linacs, the positron converter, booster synchrotron, and the storage ring. Shielding design limits exposure to 20 mrem/wk for occupational and 25 mrem/y for an individual member of the public from the radiation products, which include high energy neutrons (HEN), giant resonance neutrons (GRN), and Bremsstrahlung radiation (BR). The beam loss parameters at various components were estimated. Dose rates were computed for continuous loss during beam decay using an empirical method. Normal operational losses and certain accidental beam losses were also considered.

Moe, H.J.; Veluri, V.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Emission of Band-Gap-Energy Positrons from Surfaces of LiF, NaF, and Other Ionic Crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energetic positrons implanted into various ionic crystal surfaces are reemitted with a maximum kinetic energy (14.7 ± 0.7 eV for LiF) near the band-gap energy. The evidence suggests that, at least for LiF and NaF, the emission originates from bulk-formed positronium (Ps) breaking up after diffusing to the surface. In our model, the positrons are Auger emitted when the Ps electrons recombine with holes at the surface, and the spectrum of positron energies thus reflects the density of empty surface states.

A. P. Mills; Jr. and William S. Crane

1984-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

COMPETITIVE SOURCING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EXECUTIVE STEERING GROUP Meeting Proceedings October 30, 2002 Room 6E-069, 10:30 - 12:00 Agenda Opening Remarks Bruce Carnes Competitive Sourcing Update Denny O'Brien Team Briefings Team Leads ESG Discussion/Wrap up Bruce Carnes Attendees Bruce Carnes, Acting Chair MaryAnn Shebek Robert Card Prentis Cook Ambassador Brooks Tony Lane Kyle McSlarrow Karen Evans Suzanne Brennan, NTEU Claudia Cross Brian Costlow Helen Sherman Frank Bessera Laurie Morman Denny O'Brien Travis McCrory Bill Pearce Jeff Dowl Mark Hively Steven Apicella Robin Mudd Bruce Carnes chaired the meeting and began with welcoming NTEU to the meeting. In regard to the OMB's Balanced Scorecard, the Department has achieved a Green on progress and we are close to achieving a yellow on status.

179

Radiation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, April 15, 1992--October 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

Zalutsky, M.R.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Study of microvoids in high-rate a-Si:H using positron annihilation  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the authors have carried out the positron annihilation measurement on high-rate and low-rate a-Si:H thin films deposited by PECVD. By means of the slow positron beam Doppler-broadening technique, the depth profiles of microvoids in a-Si:H have been determined. They have also studied the vacancy-type defect in the surface region in high-rate grown a-Si:H, making comparison between high-rate and low-rate a-Si:H. By plotting S and W parameters in the (S, W) plane, they have shown that the vacancies in all of the high-rate and low-rate deposited intrinsic samples, and in differently doped low-rate samples are of the same nature.

Zou, X.; Webb, D.P.; Lin, S.H.; Lam, Y.W.; Chan, Y.C.; Hu, Y.F.; Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Evidence for threshold effects in positron diffraction from NaF and LiF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the energy dependence of the intensity of a positron beam specularly reflected from the (100) surfaces of NaF and LiF. A 1-eV-wide peak located at an energy that decreases with increasing angle of incidence ? is qualitatively identified as a beam threshold effect. Given the known small positron affinity for the solids, the narrowness of the peak is consistent with its being due to a true surface resonance. However, the dispersion appears to depart from the expected energy versus ? trajectory parallel to the kinematic threshold. Additionally, a search in 50-meV steps did not reveal any fine structure in the peaks, possibly due to our 0.3-eV effective instrumental resolution. Further experiments to map the dispersion with greater precision, to measure the binding energies of the resonances, and to search for possible fine structure are proposed.

T. N. Horsky; G. R. Brandes; K. F. Canter; P. H. Lippel; A. P. Mills; Jr.

1989-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Searches for muon-electron and muon-positron conversion in titanium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Searches have been performed for neutrinoless muon-electron conversion and muon-positron conversion using a time projection chamber. An upper limit on the branching ratio for the coherent reaction R(?- +Ti?e-+Ti)muon capture was obtained. For the process ?-+Ti?e++Ca no events were observed for positron momenta p>96 MeV/c leading to an upper limit on the partial branching ratio relative to ordinary muon capture ?p>96(?-+Ti?e+ +Ca)/?(?-+Ti?capture) <9×10-12 (90% C.L.). With the assumption of a giant-resonance-excitation model the integrated limit would be ?(?-+Ti?e++Ca)/?(?- +Ti?capture)<1.7×10-10 (90% C.L.).

S. Ahmad; G. Azuelos; M. Blecher; D. Bryman; R. A. Burnham; E. T. H. Clifford; P. Depommier; M. S. Dixit; K. Gotow; C. K. Hargrove; M. Hasinoff; J. A. Macdonald; H. Mes; T. Numao; J.-M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; J. Spuller; J. Summhammer

1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Systematic comparison of positron- and electron-impact excitation of the ?3 vibrational mode of CF4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absolute measurements are presented for the excitation of the ?3 vibrational mode in CF4 by positron and electron impact from 0.1 to 2 eV. To minimize systematic differences, these measurements were made using the same trap-based electron or positron beam, associated experimental apparatus, and procedures. Unlike other vibrational excitation cross sections studied to date, the near-threshold cross section for the ?3 vibrational mode in CF4 is similar, both in magnitude and shape, for positrons and electrons. Comparison of the cross sections with an analytic Born dipole model yields good agreement, while comparison of this model with other measured positron-impact vibrational cross sections indicates that the contribution of this long-range dipole coupling varies widely. The maximum value of the cross section in CF4 is the largest of any positron-impact vibrational excitation cross section measured to date. This provides a likely explanation of the observation that CF4 is very effective when used as a buffer gas to cool positron gases and plasmas.

J. P. Marler and C. M. Surko

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study  

SciTech Connect

An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I. [Nuclear Reactor Program, Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

186

Study of single top production at high energy electron positron colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Top production will play a important role in future high energy electron--positron colliders. Detailed calculations are already available for the process $e^+e^-\\rightarrow t\\bar{t}$, but single top events have mostly been neglected so far. We evaluate the relevance of these events and advocate the exploration of the related process $e^+e^-\\rightarrow W^+bW^-\\bar{b}$.

Ignacio Garcia; Martin Perello; Eduardo Ros; Marcel Vos

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer for use at Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

SciTech Connect

The Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer (EPPS) is mounted in a TIM (Ten-Inch Manipulator) system on the Omega-60 or Omega-EP laser facilities at the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), when in use, see Fig. 1. The Spectrometer assembly, shown in Fig. 2, is constructed of a steel box containing magnets, surrounded by Lead 6% Antimony shielding with SS threaded insert, sitting on an Aluminum 6061-T6 plate.

Ayers, S L

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Electroweak 2 -> 2 amplitudes for electron-positron annihilation at TeV energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-radiative scattering amplitudes for electron-positron annihilation into quark and lepton pairs in the TeV energy range are calculated in the double-logarithmic approximation. The expressions for the amplitudes are obtained using infrared evolution equations with different cut-offs for virtual photons and for W and Z bosons, and compared with previous results obtained with an universal cut-off.

A. Barroso; B. I. Ermolaev; M. Greco; S. M. Oliveira; S. I. Troyan

2003-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography [PET] in Man Using Small Bismuth Germanate Crystals  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Primary considerations for the design of positron emission tomographs for medical studies in humans are the need for high imaging sensitivity, whole organ coverage, good spatial resolution, high maximum data rates, adequate spatial sampling with minimum mechanical motion, shielding against out of plane activity, pulse height discrimination against scattered photons, and timing discrimination against accidental coincidences. We discuss the choice of detectors, sampling motion, shielding, and electronics to meet these objectives.

Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.; Huesman, R. H.; Cahoon, J. L.

1982-04-00T23:59:59.000Z

190

Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms  

SciTech Connect

Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1s?nlm excitations of hydrogen, for arbitrary n, l, m, by positron impact in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated using a distorted-wave theory in the momentum space. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined wave function for the hydrogen atom, it has been possible to obtain the distorted-wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made on the effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300?eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1s?nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions for arbitrary n, l, m in weakly coupled plasmas is the first reported in the literature.

Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit, E-mail: aghoshal@math.buruniv.ac.in [Department of Mathematics, Burdwan University, Golapbag, Burdwan 713 104, West Bengal (India)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Slow positron annihilation spectroscopy and electron microscopy of electron beam evaporated cobalt and nickel silicides  

SciTech Connect

Metal silicide thin films on single-crystal silicon substrates are the subject of much research, due to their applications as electrical contacts and interconnects, diffusion barriers, low resistance gates, and field-assisted positron moderators, among others. Defects within the silicide layer and/or at the silicide/silicon interface are detrimental to device performance, since they can act as traps for charge carriers, as well as positrons. Pinholes penetrating the film are another detriment particularly for cobalt silicide films, since they allow electrons to permeate the film, rather than travel ballistically, in addition to greatly increasing surface area for recombination events. A series of epitaxial cobalt and nickel silicide thin films, deposited via electron-beam evaporation and annealed at various temperatures, have been grown on single-crystal silicon (111) substrates, in an effort to establish a relationship between deposition and processing parameters and film quality. The films have been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, sputter depth profile Auger, and slow positron annihilation spectroscopy. The latter has been shown to both correlate and complement the traditional electron microscopy results.

Frost, R.L.; DeWald, A.B. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (USA)); Zaluzec, M.; Rigsbee, J.M. (University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)); Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Structural transition in rare earth doped zirconium oxide: A positron annihilation study  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: New microstructural analysis and phase transition of rare earth doped mixed oxide compounds such as: Sm{sub 2?x}Dy{sub x}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (where x = 0.0 ? x ? 2.0) that are potentially useful as solid oxide fuels, ionic conductors, optoelectronic materials and most importantly as radiation resistant host for high level rad-waste disposal, structural transition in the system is reported through positron annihilation spectroscopy as there is an indication in the X-ray diffraction analysis. Highlights: ? Zirconium oxide material doped with rare earth ions. ? The method of positron annihilation spectroscopy suggests a phase transition in the system. ? The crystal structure transformation from pure pyrochlore to defect fluorite type of structure is shown by X-ray diffraction results. -- Abstract: A series of compounds with the general composition Sm{sub 2?x}Dy{sub x}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (where 0 ? x ? 2.0) were synthesized by chemical route and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The rare earth ion namely Sm{sup +3} in the compound was gradually replaced with another smaller and heavier ion, Dy{sup +3} of the 4f series, there by resulting in order–disorder structural transition, which has been studied by positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. This study reveals the subtle electronic micro environmental changes in the pyrochlore lattice (prevalent due to the oxygen vacancy in anti-site defect structure of the compound) toward its transformation to defect fluorite structure as found in Dy{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. A comparison of the changes perceived with PAS as compared to XRD analysis is critically assayed.

Chakraborty, Keka [Applied Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)] [Applied Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bisoi, Abhijit [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)] [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ganguly, Bichitra Nandi, E-mail: bichitra.ganguly@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Grover, Vinita; Sayed, Farheen Nasir; Tyagi, A.K. [Applied Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)] [Applied Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

MAGNETIC FIELD GENERATION AND PARTICLE ENERGIZATION AT RELATIVISTIC SHEAR BOUNDARIES IN COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON-POSITRON PLASMAS  

SciTech Connect

Using particle-in-cell simulations, we study the kinetic physics of relativistic shear flow in collisionless electron-positron (e+e-) plasmas. We find efficient magnetic field generation and particle energization at the shear boundary, driven by streaming instabilities across the shear interface and sustained by the shear flow. Nonthermal, anisotropic high-energy particles are accelerated across field lines to produce a power-law tail turning over just below the shear Lorentz factor. These results have important implications for the dissipation and radiation of jets in blazars and gamma-ray bursts.

Liang, Edison; Smith, Ian [Rice University, MS 108, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Boettcher, Markus, E-mail: liang@rice.edu, E-mail: iansmith@rice.edu, E-mail: boettchm@ohio.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nondestructive Induced Residual Stress Assessment in Superalloy Turbine Engine Components Using Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA)  

SciTech Connect

Induced Positron Analysis (IPA) has demonstrated the ability to nondestructively quantify shot peening/surface treatments and relaxation effects in single crystal superalloys, steels, titanium and aluminum with a single measurement as part of a National Science Foundation SBIR program and in projects with commercial companies. IPA measurement of surface treatment effects provides a demonstrated ability to quantitatively measure initial treatment effectiveness along with the effect of operationally induced changes over the life of the treated component. Use of IPA to nondestructively quantify surface and subsurface residual stresses in turbine engine materials and components will lead to improvements in current engineering designs and maintenance procedures.

Rideout, C. A.; Ritchie, S. J.; Denison, A. [Positron Systems, Inc., 411 S. Fifth St., Boise, Idaho 83702 (United States)

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

Positron-annihilation measurements of vacancy formation in Ni and Ni(Ge)  

SciTech Connect

Vacancy formation in Ni and in dilute Ni(Ge) alloys was studied under thermal equilibrium conditions using positron-annihilation Doppler broadening. A monovacancy formation enthalpy of 1.8 +- 0.1 eV was determined for pure Ni; combining this result with that from previous tracer self-diffusion measurements, a monovacancy migration enthalpy of 1.1 +- 0.1 eV was also deduced. Analysis of the vacancy formation measurements in Ni(0.3 at.% Ge) and Ni(1 at.% Ge) yielded a value for the vacancy-Ge binding enthalpy of 0.20 +- 0.04 eV.

Smedskjaer, L.C.; Fluss, M.J.; Legnini, D.G.; Chason, M.K.; Siegel, R.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Positron Emission Tomography-Scanner at Children`s Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0795, to support the DOE decision to provide a grant of $7,953,600 to be used in support of a proposed Positron Emission Tomography Scanner at Children`s Hospital of Michigan at Detroit, Michigan. Based upon the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affected the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques applied to the study of an HPGe detector  

SciTech Connect

Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy of the large Ge crystal of an HPGe detector was performed using positrons from pair production of 6.13 MeV {gamma}-rays from the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction. Two HPGe detectors facing opposite sides of the Ge crystal acting as target provided both coincidence and singles spectra. Changes in the shape of the annihilation peak were observed when the high voltage applied to the target detector was switched on or off, amounting to somewhat less than 20% when the areas of equivalent energy intervals in the corresponding normalized spectra are compared.

Nascimento, E. do; Vanin, V. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Silva, T. F.; Rizzutto, M. A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandez-Varea, J. M. [Facultat de Fisica (ECM), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

198

Measurement of high-Q2 deep inelastic scattering cross sections with longitudinally polarised positron beams at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first measurements of the cross sections for neutral and charged current deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions with longitudinally polarised positron beams are presented. The total cross section for e+p charged current deep inelastic scattering is presented at positive and negative values of positron beam longitudinal polarisation for an integrated luminosity of 37.0 pb^-1 H1 data and 30.5 pb^-1 ZEUS data collected in 2003 and 2004 at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. In addition, the ZEUS collaboration measured the single differential cross sections for charged and neutral current deep inelastic scattering in the kinematic region Q^2>200 GeV^2. The measured cross sections are compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. The H1 collaboration extrapolate the cross section to a fully left handed positron beam and find it to be consistent with the Standard Model expectation.

Julian Rautenberg

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electronic structure calculations of positron lifetimes in SiC: Self-consistent schemes and relaxation effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We present electronic structure calculations of positron lifetimes in various neutral and negative monovacancies in 3C and 6H silicon carbide. Self-consistent positron lifetime calculation schemes were used and full defect relaxation due to the creation of the vacancy and the presence of the positron was considered. Formation energies of the various possible charges of the defects were also calculated to predict their detectability in PAS. Lifetimes between 170 ps and 195 ps for VC and between 222 ps and 227 ps for \\{VSi\\} were obtained. Based on these results we propose new interpretations of the experimental PAS signals observed in n-type 3C and 6H-SiC samples.

J. Wiktor; G. Jomard; M. Bertolus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Positron lifetime in vacancy-impurity complexes (*) Section d'Etudes des Solides Irradis, Centre d'Etudes Nuclaires, Boite Postale n 6, 92260 Fontenay aux Roses, France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-547 Positron lifetime in vacancy-impurity complexes (*) C. Corbel Section d'Etudes des Solides positon. Abstract. 2014 We calculate the positron lifetime in vacancy-solute (Na, Mg, Zn) complexes in Al of the same order as for the divacancy. These results indicate that vacancy complexes and vacancy

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Standing electromagnetic solitons in hot ultra-relativistic electron-positron plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Using a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model, we investigate standing relativistic bright solitons in hot electron-positron plasmas. The positron dynamics is taken into account. A set of nonlinear coupled differential equations describing the evolution of electromagnetic waves in fully relativistic two-fluid plasma is derived analytically and solved numerically. As a necessary condition for the existence of standing solitons the system should be relativistic. For the case of ultra-relativistic plasma, we investigate non-drifting bright solitary waves. Detailed discussions of the acceptable solutions are presented. New single hump non-trivial symmetric solutions for the scalar potential were found, and single and multi-nodal symmetric and anti-symmetric solutions for the vector potential are presented. It is shown that for a fixed value of the fluid velocity excited modes with more zeros in the profile of the vector potential show a higher magnitude for the scalar potential. An increase in the plasma fluid velocity also increases the magnitude of the scalar potential. Furthermore, the Hamiltonian and the first integral of the system are given.

Heidari, E., E-mail: ehphys75@iaubushehr.ac.ir [Department of Sciences, Bushehr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aslaninejad, M. [Plasma Physics Research Centre, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Plasma Physics Research Centre, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eshraghi, H. [Physics Department, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), P.O. Box 1684613114, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Physics Department, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), P.O. Box 1684613114, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rajaee, L. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Qom, Qom (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Qom, Qom (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data  

There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentum transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ? at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2?1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.

Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W; Adhikari, K; Afanasev, A; Amaryan, M; Anderson, M; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W; Burkert, V; Carman, D; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Gilfoyle, G; Giovanetti, K; Girod, F; Goetz, J; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R; Griffioen, K; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D; Ishkhanov, B; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Kalantarians, N.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S; Livingston, K.; Lu, H; MacGregor, I; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M; Meyer, C; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R; Moody, C; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, E; Smith, G; Sober, D; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N; Watts, D; Wei, X.; Wood, M; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z; Zonta, I.

2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

Capital Sources and Providers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The most important elements of a clean energy lending program are the capital source and the capital provider. The capital source provides the funding to pay for clean energy projects, and the capital provider manages those funding sources. For example, a bank might use its customers' deposits as a capital source, but as the capital provider, the bank manages the investment of that capital.

204

GEOMETRIC SOURCE SEPARATION: MERGING CONVOLUTIVE SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adaptive beamforming algorithms by a cross-power criteria, we gain new geometric source separation with convo- lutive blind source separation. We concentrate on cross-power spectral min- imization which is su to ambiguities in the choice of separating lters. There are in theory multiple lters that invert the room

Parra, Lucas C.

205

Energy spectrum and angular distribution of muons from the decay of heavy leptons produced in colliding electron-positron beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of an arbitrary (V, A) structure of the neutral weak ¯ee and LL currents (L=??, M0) a study is made of the processes of production in colliding electron-positron beams of pairs of heavy leptons with ...

T. M. Aliev; N. A. Guliev; I. G. Dzhafarov; F. T. Khalil-Zade

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Drug Release from Self-Assembled Inorganic?Organic Hybrid Gels and Gated Porosity Detected by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drug Release from Self-Assembled Inorganic?Organic Hybrid Gels and Gated Porosity Detected by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy ... Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Münster, Corrensstrasse 36, 48149 Münster, Germany, CSIRO Manufacturing and Infrastructure Technology, Victoria, Australia, and School of Chemistry, Monash University, Clayton Victoria, Australia ...

Ansgar Bögershausen; Steven J. Pas; Anita J. Hill; Hubert Koller

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

207

Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses  

SciTech Connect

High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R. [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yamamoto, N. [Nagoya University Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M. [UVSOR, Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

September 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 SLAC-TN-04-04 September 2004 Abstract This note documents a set of expressions used to explore the issue of whether or not it is reasonable to consider a conventional positron source for a Tesla formatted beam. The critical issue is that of energy deposition in the conversion target and the comparison of the induced stress with the ultimate tensile strength of the target material. Since the length of the incident beam pulse is large in comparison to the ratio of beam size to the speed of sound, the concurrent pressure pulse dissipates in a time short compared to the overall pulse duration and one is left with only the ILC Conventional Positron Source: Long Drive Pulse Option V. Bharadwaj, Y. Batygin, D.C. Schultz, J.C. Sheppard

209

Causal approach for the electron-positron scattering in Generalized Quantum Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the generalized electrodynamics contribution for the electron-positron scattering process, $e^{-}e^{+}\\rightarrow e^{-}e^{+}$, the Bhabha scattering. Within the framework of the standard model, for energies larger when compared to the electron mass, we calculate the cross section expression for the scattering process. This quantity is usually calculated in the framework of the Maxwell electrodynamics and, by phenomenological reasons, corrected by a cut-off parameter. On the other hand, by considering the generalized electrodynamics instead of Maxwell's, we can show that the effects played by the Podolsky mass is actually a natural cut-off parameter for this scattering process. Furthermore, by means of experimental data of Bhabha scattering we will estimate its lower bound value. Nevertheless, in order to have a mathematically well defined description of our study we shall present our discussion in the framework of the Epstein-Glaser causal theory.

R. Bufalo; B. M. Pimentel; D. E. Soto

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Kinetics of electron-positron pair plasmas using an adaptive Monte Carlo method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new algorithm for implementing the adaptive Monte Carlo method is given. It is used to solve the relativistic Boltzmann equations that describe the time evolution of a nonequilibrium electron-positron pair plasma containing high-energy photons and pairs. The collision kernels for the photons as well as pairs are constructed for Compton scattering, pair annihilation and creation, bremsstrahlung, and Bhabha & Moller scattering. For a homogeneous and isotropic plasma, analytical equilibrium solutions are obtained in terms of the initial conditions. For two non-equilibrium models, the time evolution of the photon and pair spectra is determined using the new method. The asymptotic numerical solutions are found to be in a good agreement with the analytical equilibrium states. Astrophysical applications of this scheme are discussed.

Ravi P. Pilla; Jacob Shaham

1997-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Scattering of near-zero-energy electrons and positrons by H2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The parameters for S-wave elastic scattering of near-zero-energy electrons and positrons by H2 molecules are calculated using the stabilization method with explicitly correlated Gaussians. The confined variational method is applied to optimize the Gaussians to describe the short-range interaction of incident e± with H2 in the fixed-nuclei approximation. For e+-H2 scattering the scattering length of previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 223202 (2009)] is substantially improved. More importantly, for e?-H2 scattering, from first principles, the scattering length is computed as a function of the internuclear distance. In the case that the two nuclei are at the equilibrium distance the results are in a good agreement with values derived from fitting experimental total and diffusion cross sections to the modified effective range theory.

J.-Y. Zhang; Y.-J. Yang; Y. Qian; Z.-C. Yan; U. Schwingenschlögl

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Phase-mixing of Langmuir oscillations in cold electron-positron-ion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Space-time evolution of Langmuir oscillations in a cold homogeneous electron-positron-ion plasma has been analyzed by employing a straightforward perturbation expansion method, showing phase-mixing and, thus, wave-breaking of excited oscillations at arbitrary amplitudes. Within an assumption of infinitely massive ions, an approximate phase-mixing time is found to scale as ?{sub pe}t{sub mix}?[(6/?{sup 2})((2??){sup 5/2}/(1??))]{sup 1/3}, where “?” and “?” (= n{sub 0i}/n{sub 0e}) are the amplitude of perturbation and the ratio of equilibrium ion density to equilibrium electron density, respectively, and ?{sub pe}??(4?n{sub 0e}e{sup 2}/m) is the electron plasma frequency. The results presented on phase-mixing of Langmuir modes in multispecies plasmas are expected to be relevant to laboratory and astrophysical environments.

Maity, Chandan [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Absolute cross section for positron-impact ionization of hydrogen near threshold  

SciTech Connect

We investigate positron-impact ionization of hydrogen near threshold using the hyperspherical hidden crossing method (HHCM). Previously, Ihra et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 4027 (1997) used the HHCM to obtain the extended Wannier threshold law for zero angular momentum. We extend their analysis to higher angular momentum L and show that the extended Wannier threshold law is L independent. We also calculate the absolute partial-wave ionization cross sections for L=0, 1, 2, and 3 and compare our results with other calculations and with experimental measurements. The HHCM calculation provides an explanation for the very small S-wave and large D-wave contributions to the ionization cross section in terms of destructive and constructive interference, respectively.

Jansen, Krista [University of North Texas; Ward, S.J. [University of North Texas; Macek, Joseph H [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electron and Positron Capture Rates on $\\bf{^{55}}$Co in Stellar Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cobalt-55 is not only present in abundance in presupernova phase but is also advocated to play a decisive role in the core collapse of massive stars. The spectroscopy of electron capture and emitted neutrinos yields useful information on the physical conditions and stellar core composition. B(GT) values to low-lying states are calculated microscopically using the pn-QRPA theory. Our rates are enhanced compared to the shell model rates. The enhancement is attributed partly to the liberty of selecting a huge model space, allowing consideration of many more parent excited states in our rate calculation. Unlike previous calculations, the so-called Brink's hypothesis is not assumed leading to a more realistic estimate of the rates. The electron and positron capture rates are calculated over a wide temperature and density grid.

Nabi, Jameel-Un; Sajjad, Muhammad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Electron and Positron Capture Rates on $\\bf{^{55}}$Co in Stellar Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cobalt-55 is not only present in abundance in presupernova phase but is also advocated to play a decisive role in the core collapse of massive stars. The spectroscopy of electron capture and emitted neutrinos yields useful information on the physical conditions and stellar core composition. B(GT) values to low-lying states are calculated microscopically using the pn-QRPA theory. Our rates are enhanced compared to the shell model rates. The enhancement is attributed partly to the liberty of selecting a huge model space, allowing consideration of many more parent excited states in our rate calculation. Unlike previous calculations, the so-called Brink's hypothesis is not assumed leading to a more realistic estimate of the rates. The electron and positron capture rates are calculated over a wide temperature and density grid.

Jameel-Un Nabi; Muneeb-Ur Rahman; Muhammad Sajjad

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring  

SciTech Connect

We report modeling results for electron cloud buildup and instability in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring. Updated optics, wiggler magnets, and vacuum chamber designs have recently been developed for the 5 GeV, 3.2-km racetrack layout. An analysis of the synchrotron radiation profile around the ring has been performed, including the effects of diffuse and specular photon scattering on the interior surfaces of the vacuum chamber. The results provide input to the cloud buildup simulations for the various magnetic field regions of the ring. The modeled cloud densities thus obtained are used in the instability threshold calculations. We conclude that the mitigation techniques employed in this model will suffice to allow operation of the damping ring at the design operational specifications

Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.; Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Low-energy positron scattering from methanol and ethanol: Total cross sections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report total cross sections for positron scattering from two primary alcohols, methanol (CH3OH) and ethanol (C2H5OH). The energy range of the present study is 0.1–40eV. The ethanol measurement appears to be original while for methanol we compare our data to the only previous result from Kimura and colleagues [Adv. Chem. Phys. 111, 537 (2000)], with a significant discrepancy between them being found at the lower energies. Positronium formation threshold energies for both species, deduced from the present respective total cross section data sets, are found to be consistent with those expected on the basis of their known ionization energies. There are currently no theoretical results against which we can compare our total cross sections.

Antonio Zecca, Luca Chiari, A. Sarkar, Kate L. Nixon, and Michael J. Brunger

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

218

Magnetic field calculation for a 10 MeV positron emission tomography cyclotron  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic field calculation and correction for a 10 MeV positron emission tomography cyclotron is presented. 3D TOSCA analysis results are compared with the measured data, and the calculation error is used to calibrate the B-H curve to obtain a very precise finite element method estimator, which is used to predict the correction of the magnet pole for achieving the isochronous field. The isochronous field error is approximated with the effects of a set of standard patches. On the assumption that the effect of each small patch is proportional to its surface, the correction of the magnet pole is found by solving a system of equations using the least square scheme. The magnet shimming is performed and the measured magnetic field is found in good agreement with the prediction, with an error less than 2 G.

Chen Dezhi; Liu Kaifeng; Yang Jun; Li Dong; Qin Bin; Xiong Yongqian [State Key Lab of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen Zihao [Central Southern Electrical Power Design Institute, Wuhan 430071 (China)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Real world issues for the new soft x-ray synchrotron sources  

SciTech Connect

A new generation of synchrotron radiation light sources covering the VUV, soft x-ray and hard x-ray spectral regions is under construction in several countries. They are designed specifically to use periodic magnetic undulators and low-emittance electron or positron beams to produce high-brightness near-diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation beams. An introduction to the properties of undulator radiation is followed by a discussion of some of the challenges to be faced at the new facilities. Examples of predicted undulator output from the Advanced Light Source, a third generation 1--2 GeV storage ring optimized for undulator use, are used to highlight differences from present synchrotron radiation sources, including high beam power, partial coherence, harmonics, and other unusual spectral and angular properties of undulator radiation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

Kincaid, B.M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Ion Sources - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources Sources The 88-Inch Cyclotron is fed by three Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) high-charge-state ion sources, the ECR, the AECR, and VENUS, currently the most powerful ECR ion source in the world. Built to answer the demand for intense heavy ion beams, these high performance ion sources enable the 88-Inch Cyclotron to accelerate beams of ions from hydrogen to uranium. The ECR ion sources allow the efficient use of rare isotopes of stable elements, either from natural or enriched sources. A variety of metallic ion beams are routinely produced in our low temperature oven (up to 600°C) and our high temperature oven (up to 2100°C). Furthermore, the ability to produce "cocktails" (mixtures of beams) for the Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Facility adds tremendously to the flexibility of the 88-Inch Cyclotron.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Oblique propagation of ion acoustic soliton-cnoidal waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with superthermal electrons  

SciTech Connect

The oblique propagation of ion-acoustic soliton-cnoidal waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with superthermal electrons is studied. Linear dispersion relations of the fast and slow ion-acoustic modes are discussed under the weak and strong magnetic field situations. By means of the reductive perturbation approach, Korteweg-de Vries equations governing ion-acoustic waves of fast and slow modes are derived, respectively. Explicit interacting soliton-cnoidal wave solutions are obtained by the generalized truncated Painlevé expansion. It is found that every peak of a cnoidal wave elastically interacts with a usual soliton except for some phase shifts. The influence of the electron superthermality, positron concentration, and magnetic field obliqueness on the soliton-cnoidal wave are investigated in detail.

Wang, Jian-Yong; Cheng, Xue-Ping; Tang, Xiao-Yan, E-mail: xytang@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Yang, Jian-Rong [Department of Physics and Electronics, Shangrao Normal University, Jiangxi, Shangrao 334001 (China)] [Department of Physics and Electronics, Shangrao Normal University, Jiangxi, Shangrao 334001 (China); Ren, Bo [Institute of Nonlinear Science, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China)] [Institute of Nonlinear Science, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Experimental study of the atmospheric neutrino backgrounds for proton decay to positron and neutral pion searches in water Cherenkov detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The atmospheric neutrino background for proton decay to positron and neutral pion in ring imaging water Cherenkov detectors is studied with an artificial accelerator neutrino beam for the first time. In total, about 314,000 neutrino events corresponding to about 10 megaton-years of atmospheric neutrino interactions were collected by a 1,000 ton water Cherenkov detector (KT). The KT charged-current single neutral pion production data are well reproduced by simulation programs of neutrino and secondary hadronic interactions used in the Super-Kamiokande (SK) proton decay search. The obtained proton to positron and neutral pion background rate by the KT data for SK from the atmospheric neutrinos whose energies are below 3 GeV is about two per megaton-year. This result is also relevant to possible future, megaton-scale water Cherenkov detectors.

Mine, S; Andringa, S; Aoki, S; Argyriades, J; Asakura, K; Ashie, R; Berghaus, F; Berns, H; Bhang, H; Blondel, A; Borghi, S; Bouchez, J; Burguet-Castell, J; Casper, D; Catala, J; Cavata, C; Cervera-Villanueva, Anselmo; Chen, S M; Cho, K O; Choi, J H; Dore, U; Espinal, X; Fechner, M; Fernández, E; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Gomez-Cadenas, J; Gran, R; Hara, T; Hasegawa, M; Hasegawa, T; Hayato, Y; Helmer, R L; Hiraide, K; Hosaka, J; Ichikawa, A K; Iinuma, M; Ikeda, A; Ishida, T; Ishihara, K; Ishii, T; Ishitsuka, M; Itow, Y; Iwashita, T; Jang, H I; Jeon, E J; Jeong, I S; Joo, K K; Jover, G; Jung, C K; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kaneyuki, K; Kato, I; Kearns, E; Kim, C O; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kim, J Y; Kim, S B; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, T; Konaka, A; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kudenko, Yu; Kuno, Y; Kurimoto, Y; Kutter, T; Learned, J; Likhoded, S; Lim, I T; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Maesaka, H; Mallet, J; Mariani, C; Matsuno, S; Matveev, V; McConnel, K; McGrew, C; Mikheyev, S; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Mitsuda, C; Miura, M; Moriguchi, Y; Moriyama, S; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Nakaya, T; Nakayama, S; Namba, T; Nambu, R; Nawang, S; Nishikawa, K; Nitta, K; Nova, F; Novella, P; Obayashi, Y; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Oser, S M; Oyama, Y; Pac, M Y; Pierre, F; Rodríguez, A; Saji, C; Sakuda, M; Sánchez, F; Scholberg, K; Schroeter, R; Sekiguchi, M; Shiozawa, M; Shiraishi, K; Sitjes, G; Smy, M; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Stone, J; Sulak, L; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, Y; Tada, M; Takahashi, T; Takenaga, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Taki, K; Takubo, Y; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Terri, R; T'Jampens, S; Tornero-Lopez, A; Totsuka, Y; Vagins, M; Whitehead, L; Walter, C W; Wang, W; Wilkes, R J; Yamada, S; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, S; Yanagisawa, C; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, H; Yokoyama, M; Yoo, J; Yoshida, M; Zalipska, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Computed vibrational excitation of CF4 by low-energy electrons and positrons: Comparing calculations and experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantum calculations for the excitation of the asymmetric modes of the CF4 target gas, ?3 and ?4, by impact of low-energy electrons and positrons are carried out in the energy range around 1 eV and are compared with recent experimental findings. The similarities and differences between the two types of projectiles, and the two different modes, are analyzed and discussed vis à vis the present accord with the experimental results.

J. Franz; I. Baccarelli; S. Caprasecca; F. A. Gianturco

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

High-speed digitization readout of silicon photomultipliers for time of flight positron emission tomography  

SciTech Connect

We report on work to develop a system with about 100 picoseconds (ps) time resolution for time of flight positron emission tomography [TOF-PET]. The chosen photo detectors for the study were Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM's). This study was based on extensive experience in studying timing properties of SiPM's. The readout of these devices used the commercial high speed digitizer DRS4. We applied different algorithms to get the best time resolution of 155 ps Guassian (sigma) for a LYSO crystal coupled to a SiPM. We consider the work as a first step in building a prototype TOF-PET module. The field of positron-emission-tomography (PET) has been rapidly developing. But there are significant limitations in how well current PET scanners can reconstruct images, related to how fast data can be acquired, how much volume they can image, and the spatial and temporal resolution of the generated photons. Typical modern scanners now include multiple rings of detectors, which can image a large volume of the patient. In this type of scanner, one can treat each ring as a separate detector and require coincidences only within the ring, or treat the entire region viewed by the scanner as a single 3 dimensional volume. This 3d technique has significantly better sensitivity since more photon pair trajectories are accepted. However, the scattering of photons within the volume of the patient, and the effect of random coincidences limits the technique. The advent of sub-nanosecond timing resolution detectors means that there is potentially much better rejection of scattered photon events and random coincidence events in the 3D technique. In addition, if the timing is good enough, then the origin of photons pairs can be determined better, resulting in improved spatial resolution - so called 'Time-of-Flight' PET, or TOF-PET. Currently a lot of activity has occurred in applications of SiPMs for TOF-PET. This is due to the devices very good time resolution, low profile, lack of high voltage needed, and their non-sensitivity to magnetic fields. While investigations into this technique have begun elsewhere, we feel that the extensive SiPM characterization and data acquisition expertise of Fermilab, and the historical in-depth research of PET imaging at University of Chicago will combine to make significant strides in this field. We also benefit by a working relationship with the SiPM producer STMicroelectronics (STM).

Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Martens, M.; Ramberg, E.; /Fermilab; Kim, H.; Chen, C.; Kao, C.; /Chicago U.; Niessen, K.; /SUNY, Buffalo; Zatserklyaniy, A.; /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez; Mazzillo, M.; Carbone, B.; /SGS Thomson, Catania

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutron Source Spallation Neutron Source Providing the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world... Accumulator Ring Commissioning Latest Step for Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has passed another milestone on the way to completion this year--the commissioning of the proton accumulator ring. Brookhaven led the design and construction of the accumulator ring, which will allow an order of magnitude more beam power than any other facility in the world. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by the U.S. Department of Energy. The figure on the right shows a schematic of the accumulator ring and transport beam lines that are being designed and built by Brookhaven

226

Sources and Electrodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new kind of particle theory is being explored, one that is intermediate in concept between the extremes of S matrix and field theory. It employs the methods of neither approach. There are no operators, and there is no appeal to analyticity in momentum space. It is a phenomenological theory, and cognizant that measurements are operations in space and time. Particles are defined realistically by reference to their creation or annihilation in suitable collisions. The source is introduced as an abstraction of the role played by all the other particles involved in such acts. Through the use of sources the production and detection of particles, as well as their interaction, are incorporated into the theoretical description. There is a creative principle that replaces the devices of other formulations. It is an insistence upon the generality of the space-time description of the coupling among sources that is inferred from a specific spatio-temporal arrangement, in which various particles propagate between sources. Standard quantum-mechanical and relativistic requirements, imposed on the source description of noninteracting particles, imply the existence of the two statistics and the connection with spin. In this situation sources are only required to emit and absorb the mass of the corresponding particle. Particle dynamics is introduced by an extension of the source concept. It is considered meaningful for a source to emit several particles with the same total quantum numbers as a single particle, if sufficient mass is available. This is most familiar as the photon radiation that accompanies the emission of charged particles. The new types of sources introduced in this way imply new couplings among sources, which supply still further varieties of sources. This proliferation of interactions spans the full dynamical content of the initial primitive interaction. The ambition of the phenomenological source theory is to represent all dynamical aspects of particles, within a certain context, by a suitable primitive interaction. This paper is devoted to the reconstruction of electrodynamics.

Julian Schwinger

1967-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

227

The electronic structure and positron annihilation characteristics of positronium halides, [X?; e +]. I. Hartree–Fock calculations and stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of the atom/positron systems [F?;e +] [Cl?;e +] [Br?;e +] and [I?;e +] are examined by means of restricted Hartree–Fock calculations on the ...n s 2 n p 6(n l)+ 2 L and...n s 2 n p 5 (n+1) s l s + 2 P 4 P states. A modified version of the numerical MCHF72 program of Froese–Fischer was used in these calculations. Our theoretical investigations suggest that...n s 2 n p 61s + 2 S is the ground state of the system. It is shown that X? ions have a substantial positron affinity (e.g. ?5 eV for F? to 3.3 eV for I?) and arguments based on pair?correlation and many?electron perturbation theory are used to obtain hard lower limit estimates of the binding energy of Ps to the X atom. We thus find that the ground state of [X?:e +] is stable with respect to dissociation into X and Ps with binding energies of at l e a s t 1.66 0.80 0.19 and ?0.45 eV for [F?:e +] [Cl?:e +] [Br?:e +] and [I?:e +] respectively. The details of the positronic orbitals are presented and discussed.

Paul E. Cade; Abbas Farazdel

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Publications | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research at the APS. It is the official source for listing APS-related journal articles, conference proceedings and papers, dissertations, books, book chapters, technical reports,...

229

Microsoft PowerPoint - April_07_DOENSF_rev [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Systems Global Systems John Carwardine, Claude Saunders, Frank Lenkszus 10 May 2007 Americas ILC Schematic Americas 11km SC linacs operating at 31.5 MV/m for 500 GeV Centralized injector j Circular damping rings for electrons and positrons Undulator-based positron source Single IR with 14 mrad crossing angle Dual tunnel configuration for safety and availability Global design effort 2007 DOE/NSF review Global design effort Slide 2 Americas RDR Design & "Value" Costs Americas Summary RDR "Value" Costs The reference design was "frozen" as of 1-Dec-06 for the RDR Value Costs T t l V l C t (FY07) purpose of producing the RDR, including costs. Total Value Cost (FY07) $4.87B Shared The RDR is a snapshot and the design will continue to evolve, due to results of the

230

Arbitrary amplitude solitary and shock waves in an unmagnetized quantum dusty electron-positron-ion plasma  

SciTech Connect

The behavior of quantum dust ion acoustic soliton and shocks in a plasma including inertialess quantum electrons and positrons, classical cold ions, and stationary negative dust grains are studied, using arbitrary amplitude approach. The effect of dissipation due to viscosity of ions is taken into account. The numerical analysis of Sagdeev potential for small value of quantum diffraction parameter (H) shows that for chosen plasma, only compressive solitons can exist and the existence domain of this type of solitons is decreased by increasing dust density (d). Additionally, the possibility of propagation of both subsonic and supersonic compressive solitons is investigated. It is shown that there is a critical dust density above which only supersonic solitons are observed. Moreover, increasing d leads to a reduction in the existence domain of compressive solitons and the possibility of propagation of rarefactive soliton is provided. So, rarefactive solitons are observed only due to the presence of dust particles in this model quantum plasma. Furthermore, numerical solution of governed equations for arbitrary amplitude shock waves has been investigated. It is shown that only compressive large amplitude shocks can propagate. Finally, the effects of plasma parameters on these structures are investigated. This research will be helpful in understanding the properties of dense astrophysical (i.e., white dwarfs and neutron stars) and laboratory dusty plasmas.

Rouhani, M. R.; Akbarian, A.; Mohammadi, Z. [Department of Physics, Alzahra University, P. O. Box 1993891176, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Alzahra University, P. O. Box 1993891176, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud density In the Positron Ring of PEP-II  

SciTech Connect

Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electrons clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appears to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regionsif the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

Pivi, Mauro T.F.; Krasnykh, Anatoly K.; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnaad, Kiran G.; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

232

An investigation into positron emission tomography contouring methods across two treatment planning systems  

SciTech Connect

Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to provide additional information regarding patient tumor location, size, and staging for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes. This additional information reduces interobserver variability and produces more consistent contouring. It is well recognized that different contouring methodology for PET data results in different contoured volumes. The goal of this study was to compare the difference in PET contouring methods for 2 different treatment planning systems using a phantom dataset and a series of patient datasets. Contouring methodology was compared on the ADAC Pinnacle Treatment Planning System and the CMS XiO Treatment Planning System. Contours were completed on the phantom and patient datasets using a number of PET contouring methods—the standardized uptake value 2.5 method, 30%, 40%, and 50% of the maximum uptake method and the signal to background ratio method. Differences of >15% were observed for PET-contoured volumes between the different treatment planning systems for the same data and the same PET contouring methodology. Contoured volume differences between treatment planning systems were caused by differences in data formatting and display and the different contouring tools available. Differences in treatment planning system as well as contouring methodology should be considered carefully in dose-volume contouring and reporting, especially between centers that may use different treatment planning systems or those that have several different treatment planning systems.

Young, Tony, E-mail: Tony.Young@sswahs.nsw.gov.au [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales (Australia); Som, Seu [Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Liverpool Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, New South Wales (Australia); Sathiakumar, Chithradevi [Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Liverpool Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Center for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because 134Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as 40K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi4 Ge 3O12 (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from 134Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

Seiichi Yamamoto; Yoshimune Ogata

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

236

Neutron sources and applications  

SciTech Connect

Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electromagnetic Interference from the ILC Beams  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic interference is an emerging problem of the future. This investigation analyzed the data collected from airborne radiation waves that caused electronic devices to fail. This investigation was set up at SLAC in End Station A and the data collected from the electromagnetic waves were received from antennas. In order to calibrate the antennas it required a signal generator to transmit the signals to the antenna and a digital oscilloscope to receive the radiation waves from the other antenna. The signal generator that was used was only able to generate signals between 1 and 1.45 GHz; therefore, the calibrations were not able to be completed. Instead, excel was used to create a curve fitting for the attenuation factors that were already factory calibrated. The function from the curve fitting was then used to extend the calibrations on the biconical and yagi antennas. A fast Fourier Transform was then ran in Matlab on the radiation waves received by the oscilloscope; in addition, the attenuation factors were calculated into the program to show the actual amplitudes of these radiation waves. For future research, the antennas will be manually calibrated and the results will be reanalyzed.

Brown, LaVonda N.; /Norfolk State U. /SLAC

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

E-Print Network 3.0 - aniquilacao eletron-positron em Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ao foi realizada ate hoje devido a dificuldade em se medir quadratura fase, o que, neste caso, ... Source: Nussenzveig, Alberto - Departamento de Fsica Experimental,...

239

Tunable terahertz radiation source  

SciTech Connect

Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ultracold Electron Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a technique for producing electron bunches that has the potential for advancing the state-of-the-art in brightness of pulsed electron sources by orders of magnitude. In addition, this method leads to femtosecond bunch lengths without the use of ultrafast lasers or magnetic compression. The electron source we propose is an ultracold plasma with electron temperatures down to 10 K, which can be fashioned from a cloud of laser-cooled atoms by photoionization just above threshold. Here we present results of simulations in a realistic setting, showing that an ultracold plasma has an enormous potential as a bright electron source.

B. J. Claessens; S. B. van der Geer; G. Taban; E. J. D. Vredenbregt; O. J. Luiten

2005-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Particles and Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is proposed that the phenomenological theory of particles be based on the source concept, which is abstracted from the physical possibility of creating or annihilating any particle in a suitable collision. The source representation displays both the momentum and the space-time characteristics of particle behavior. Topics discussed include: spin and statistics, charge and the Euclidean postulate, massless particles, and SU3 and spin. It is emphasized that the source description is logically independent of hypotheses concerning the fundamental nature of particles.

Julian Schwinger

1966-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York This Environmental Assessment addresses the proposed action by the U.S. Department of Energy to upgrade the facilities of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the Accelerator Test Facility and the Source Development Laboratory. The environmental effects of a No-Action Alternative as well as a Proposed Action are evaluated in the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet” link below leads to a one-page summary of the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment” link below leads to the whole 41-page

243

SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

311 of P.L. 112-74 and as continued in P.L. 113-6 in excess of 1,000,000. This information is source selection information related to the conduct of a Federal agency...

244

SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

budget authority that is not fully funded under P.L. 113-76 Section 301(c). This information is source selection information related to the conduct of a Federal agency...

245

National Synchrotron Light Source  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

ION SOURCES FOR CYCLOTRONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These utilize lasers, plasma focus, sparks, and ex­ plodingextractor voltage A plasma focus device has been used byf n a s Fig. 22: The plasma focus high charge state source

Clark, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Electron Beam Ion Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron beam ion sources (EBISs) are ion sources that work based on the principle of electron impact ionization, allowing the production of very highly charged ions. The ions produced can be extracted as a DC ion beam as well as ion pulses of different time structures. In comparison to most of the other known ion sources, EBISs feature ion beams with very good beam emittances and a low energy spread. Furthermore, EBISs are excellent sources of photons (X-rays, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, visible light) from highly charged ions. This chapter gives an overview of EBIS physics, the principle of operation, and the known technical solutions. Using examples, the performance of EBISs as well as their applications in various fields of basic research, technology and medicine are discussed.

Zschornacka, G; Thorn, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fine-grid calculations for stellar electron and positron capture rates on Fe isotopes  

SciTech Connect

The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y{sub e}) of the corematerial. It is suggested that the temporal variation of Y{sub e} within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly {sup 54-56}Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling Y{sub e} ratio via electron capture on these nuclides. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak-interaction-mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the Y{sub e} ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on {sup 54-56}Fe. The sensitivity of the pn-QRPA calculated capture rates to the deformation parameter is also studied in this work. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

Nabi, Jameel-Un, E-mail: jameel@giki.edu.pk [Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Engineering Sciences (Pakistan)] [Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Engineering Sciences (Pakistan); Tawfik, Abdel Nasser, E-mail: a.tawfik@eng.mti.edu.eg [MTI University, Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP) (Egypt)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Fine-Grid Calculations for Stellar Electron and Positron Capture Rates on Fe-Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio ($Y_{e}$) of the core material. It is suggested that the temporal variation of $Y_{e}$ within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly $^{54,55,56}$Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling $Y_{e}$ ratio via electron capture on these nuclide. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak interaction mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic \\textit{state-by-state} calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the $Y_{e}$ ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on $^{54,55,56}$Fe. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

Jameel-Un Nabi; Abdel Nasser Tawfik

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

250

Spallation Neutron Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D/gim D/gim Spallation Neutron Source SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source. This one-of-a-kind facility pro- vides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. When ramped up to its full beam power of 1.4 MW, SNS will be eight times more powerful than today's best facility. It will give researchers more detailed snapshots of the smallest samples of physical and biological materials than ever before

251

Magnetron sputtering source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, WA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Grabner, R. Fred (Brentwood, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

National Synchrotron Light Source  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

BNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

16 - Alternative energy sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter describes alternative energy sources. The substantial potential of the world's alternative energy sources are still comparatively little exploited, even in countries with limited conventional energy resources. Although this interest was heightened during the mid-1970s because of the oil price shock, most of the technologies are still at an early stage of development. While much research and development work has been undertaken by governments and industry throughout the world, the technical transfer process is comparatively slow. There are a number of abstracting services available in both the United States and the United Kingdom devoted wholly or in part to alternative energy sources. The most useful of the general abstract journals are the Renewable Energy Bulletin, Energy Review, and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis. The principal source of information for all aspects of alternative energy sources is the Energy Data Base, established in 1974 b the U.S. Department of Energy, which is the online version of Energy Research Abstracts. There are very few good comprehensive books covering all the alternative energy sources, perhaps understandably given the scope of the subject.

Alan Heyes

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Point defects introduced by InN alloying into In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N probed using a monoenergetic positron beam  

SciTech Connect

Native defects in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x = 0.06-0.14) grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition were studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Measurements of Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation as a function of incident positron energy for In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N showed that vacancy-type defects were introduced with increasing InN composition, and the major defect species was identified as complexes between a cation vacancy and a nitrogen vacancy. The concentration of the divacancy, however, was found to be suppressed by Mg doping. The momentum distribution of electrons at the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface was close to that in defect-free GaN or In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, which was attributed to localization of positrons at the interface due to the built-in electric field, and to suppression of positron trapping by vacancy-type defects. We have also shown that the diffusion property of positrons is sensitive to an electric field near the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN interface.

Uedono, A. [Division of Applied Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Tsutsui, T.; Watanabe, T.; Kimura, S.; Zhang, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Lozac'h, M. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Sang, L. W.; Sumiya, M. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Ishibashi, S. [Nanosystem Research Institute (NRI) 'RICS,' National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

Reinforcement Mechanism Of Polyurethane-Urea/Clay Nanocomposites Probed By Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy And Dynamic Mechanical Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A basis for quantitative analysis of the reinforcement mechanism of polyurethane-urea/clay nanocomposites using two characterization methods, positron annihilation life time spectroscopy (PALS) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) is provided. DMA was used to measure the constrained volume fraction of amorphous soft segments induced by nanoclay and the storage modulus of the nanocomposites. The interfacial interactions in the nanocomposites were investigated by PALS. The modulus enhancement of the organoclay nanocomposites was found to have a good correlation with the volume fraction of the constrained region and the interfacial interactions.

Rath, S. K.; Patri, M. [Naval Materials Research Laboratory, Shil-Badlapur Road, Ambernath 421506, Maharastra (India); Sudarshan, K.; Pujari, P. K. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Khakhar, D. V. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Powai-76 (India)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Pulsed ion beam source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

Greenly, J.B.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Photon Source Parameters Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

259

Source Emissions and Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation Source Emissions and Transport Investigators conduct research here to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment. This research includes studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential human health effects. Contacts Randy Maddalena RLMaddalena@lbl.gov (510) 486-4924 Mark Mendell MJMendell@lbl.gov (510) 486-5762 Links Pollutant Sources, Dynamics and Chemistry Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy Technologies Environmental Impacts

260

Heat Source Lire,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Lire, Source Lire, (liayrICS-25 ) tooling Tulles (Ai 1,06:1) - 11 (31.118 Module Stack Thermoelectric Module:, (14) ltcal L/Mr r a it i lli tisli Block Mounting Interface MMRTG Design Housing (At 2219) Fin (At Go63) Thermal Insulation (Min-K & Microtherm) Space Radioisotope Power Systems Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator January 2008 What is a Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator? Space exploration missions require safe, reliable, long-lived power systems to provide electricity and heat to spacecraft and their science instruments. A uniquely capable source of power is the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) - essentially a nuclear battery that reliably converts heat into electricity. The Department of Energy and NASA are developing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Source Selection Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Source Selection Overview This chapter provides guidance to the acquisition team on conducting source selection in accordance with Part 15 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR). Background The mid 1990's was a time of significant change in many areas of procurement, particularly in the introduction of new tools and processes that help the procurement professional better meet the needs of demanding customers. The passage of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act in 1994 and the Federal Acquisition Reform Act in 1995 , coupled with Government-wide and Department of Energy (DOE) contract reform efforts not only changed traditional procurement processes but also changed the role of the procurement professional. No longer are procurement

262

ISG8-RF Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RF Sources - (WG3) RF Sources - (WG3) Orange Rm Yong Ho Chin, Christopher Nantista, and Sami G. Tantawi Parallel Sessions: Working Groups: WG1: Parameters, Design, Instrumentation and Tuning WG2: Damping Rings and ATF WG3: RF Sources WG4:Structures WG5: Ground Motion; Site Requirements and Investigations Monday Morning 9:00-10:30 Plenary Coffee Break 11:00-12:00 Planning Session. Monday Afternoon 13:30-15:30 High Gradient Issues (Joint with working group 4) Coffee Break 16:00-16:30 The 8-Pack Project -- D. Atkinson 16:30-17:30 High Gradient Issues and Discussions Continued. Tuesday Morning 9:30-10:30 Klystrons 9:30-10:00 Status of PPM Klystron Development for JLC -- Y. H. Chin 10:00-10:30 Design of 150MW Multi-Beam Klystron -- S. Matsumoto Coffee Break 11:00-11:30 Klystron Development at SLAC -- G. Caryotakis

263

Sources and Magnetic Charge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A beginning is made on a phenomenological reconstruction of the theory of magnetic charge. The concept is introduced by reference to a new kind of photon source. It is shown that photon exchange between different source types is relativistically invariant. The space-time generalization of this coupling involves an arbitrary vector. The only way to remove a corresponding arbitrariness of physical predictions is to recognize the localization of charge and impose a charge quantization condition. The consideration of particles that carry both kinds of charge loosens the charge restrictions. The great strength of magnetic attraction indicated by g24?=4(137) suggests that ordinary matter is a magnetically neutral composite of magnetically charged particles that carry fractional electric charge. There is a brief discussion of such a magnetic model of strongly interacting particles, which makes contact with empirical classification schemes. Additional remarks on notation, and on the general nature of the source description, are appended.

Julian Schwinger

1968-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

OLED area illumination source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

265

Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements for ?+?+ and ??+ modes of neutrinoless positron double-? decay within the projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uncertainties in the nuclear transition matrix elements M(0?) and M(0N) of the double-positron emission (?+?+)0? and electron-positron conversion (??+)0? modes owing to the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos, respectively, are calculated for 96Ru, 102Pd, 106Cd, 124Xe, 130Ba, and 156Dy isotopes by employing the PHFB model with four different parametrizations of the pairing plus multipolar two-body interactions and three different parametrizations of the Jastrow short-range correlations. In all cases but for 130Ba the uncertainties are smaller than 14% for light Majorana neutrino exchange and 35% for the exchange of a heavy Majorana neutrino.

P. K. Rath, R. Chandra, K. Chaturvedi, P. Lohani, P. K. Raina, and J. G. Hirsch

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

(/sup 11/C)clorgyline and (/sup 11/C)-L-deprenyl and their use in measuring functional monoamine oxidase activity in the brain using positron emission tomography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention involves a new strategy for imaging the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase in the living body by using /sup 11/C-labeled enzyme inhibitors which bind irreversibly to an enzyme as a result of catalysis. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

1986-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

267

Strategic Sourcing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Sourcing Strategic Sourcing Strategic Sourcing Energy Wide Strategic Sourcing (EWSS) DOE leadership has recognized that benefits could be achieved at the federal level through an organized, systematic and collaborative approach to acquiring commonly used goods and services. The DOE strategic sourcing program builds upon historical accomplishments as well as establishes a more cohesive and disciplined program, consistent with OMB's direction, for the conduct of DOE future strategic sourcing efforts. The DOE and NNSA Senior Procurement Executives have created a strategic sourcing capability and organizational components to identify federal strategic sourcing opportunities and coordinate strategic thinking. To date, this program has identified a number of opportunities; particularly in the areas of

268

Energy Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Sources Energy Sources Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Learn more about energy from solar, wind, water, geothermal and biomass. Read more Nuclear Nuclear Learn more about how we...

269

The Orsay Polarized Electron Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A polarized electron source is developed at Orsay to equip existing ... have chosen to adapt the flowing helium afterglow source working at Rice University: it is able...

S. Essabaa; C. G. Aminoff; J. Arianer; I. Brissaud

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Low energy positron diffraction from Cu(111): Importance of surface loss processes at large angles of incidence  

SciTech Connect

Intensities of positrons specularly diffracted from Cu(111) were measured at the Brandeis positron beam facility and analyzed in the energy range 8eV40{degree}. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Lessor, D.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Duke, C.B. (Xerox Corp., Webster, NY (USA). Webster Research Center); Lippel, P.H.; Brandes, G.R.; Canter, K.F.; Horsky, T.N. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Chapter 2 - Energy Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In today’s industrialized world, energy became vital to all human activities including manufacturing, data processing, heating, cooling, lighting, transportation, food processing, etc., yet it is invisible for most of us. Today’s energy generation technologies are undergoing a paradigm shift; the solution to our current dilemma requires more renewable contribution as well as the more efficient utilization of conventional energy sources. Recognizing this importance, this chapter focuses on energy sources and energy generation technologies including, coal, hydroelectric, nuclear, solar, wind, ocean, and several others. Alternative energy technologies received great interest in recent years due to environmental impact, greenhouse gas emissions, national energy security, and increasing cost of fossil fuel-based sources. With particular emphasis on renewable and alternative energy systems, characteristic features of the renewable energy sources have been reviewed. Since power electronics is a key enabling technology for renewable energy utilization, power electronic converters and interfaces that are used for grid interconnection and stand-alone operation have been presented.

Omer C. Onar; Alireza Khaligh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Notice extends DOE N 5400.9, Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability, of 12-24-91, until 12-24-95, unless sooner superseded or rescinded. The contents of DOE N 5400.9 will be updated and incorporated in the revised DOE O 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

273

New Sources of Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and new ideas on recent progress in the applications of solar energy, wind power and geothermal energy, and held in Rome during August 21-31. The term 'new is ... power resources. These three forms of energy are very different in their characteristics; a geothermal energy source is a gift for any nation fortunate enough to possess such a site ...

H. HEYWOOD

1961-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

274

SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

P.L. 113-6 or P.L. 112-74 Section 301(b) to include P.L. 113-76 Section 301(c). This information is source selection information related to the conduct of a Federal agency...

275

Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) interim policy and to provide guidance for sealed radioactive source accountability. The directive does not cancel any directives. Extended by DOE N 5400.10 to 12-24-93 & Extended by DOE N 5400.12 to 12-24-94.

1991-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

276

Selective ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

Leung, K.N.

1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

277

Selective ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Superluminal sources in astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......February-March 1997 news News Superluminal sources...manifestations of natural violence in recorded...RAS Librarian. NEWS It is now 30 years...magnetic pres- sure drives a rapid outflow...resulting outflow of gas drags with it small......

Peter Wilkinson; Ralph Spencer

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

280

Overview | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Overview: APS Overview: Introduction APS Systems Map LINAC Booster Synchrotron Storage Ring Insertion Devices Experiment Hall LOMs & Beamlines Overview of the APS The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage ring-generated x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. Photo: Aerial Photo of APS Aerial photo of the Advanced Photon Source These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The knowledge gained from this research can impact the evolution of combustion engines and microcircuits, aid in the development of new pharmaceuticals, and pioneer nanotechnologies whose

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report 2001 Report 2001 National Synchrotron Light Source For the period October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001 Introduction Science Highlights Year in Review Operations Publications Abstracts Nancye Wright & Lydia Rogers The National Synchrotron Light Source Department is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences United States Department of Energy Washington, D.C. Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven Science Associates, Inc. Upton, New York 11973 Under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 Mary Anne Corwin Steven N. Ehrlich & Lisa M. Miller Managing Editor Science Editors Production Assistants Cover images (clockwise from top left) 1. from Science Highlight by K.R. Rajashankar, M.R. Chance, S.K. Burley, J. Jiang, S.C. Almo, A. Bresnick, T. Dodatko, R. Huang, G. He,

282

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tomography Interest Group Contact: Robert Winarski, Center for Nanoscale Materials winarski@anl.gov Contact: Francesco De Carlo, Advanced Photon Source decarlo@aps.anl.gov The tomography special interest group of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory has been created to promote awareness of the tomography facilities at the APS and to foster communications between the various research groups. Through this group, we believe we can build a strong user community for tomography. The following beamlines have active tomography research programs: 2-BM-B (XOR) http://www.aps.anl.gov/Xray_Science_Division/Xray_Microscopy_and_Imaging/Science_and_Research/Techniques/Tomography/index.html Information about the beamline: http://beam.aps.anl.gov/pls/apsweb/beamline_display_pkg.display_beamline?p_beamline_num_c=31

283

Posters | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Cart (0 Posters) Your Cart (0 Posters) Your cart is empty. checkout Subtotal: $0.00 update empty Posters Order a printed APS poster! 11 in. x 17 in. prints will be mailed in the order requests are received. 36 in. x 36 in. posters will be sent to school addresses once all orders are processed. The Advanced Photon Source Is The Advanced Photon Source Is Qty: 1 add to cart Technologies from Materials Science Technologies from Materials Science Qty: 1 add to cart Materials Under Extreme Pressure Materials Under Extreme Pressure Qty: 1 add to cart Biological Macromolecules in Action Biological Macromolecules in Action Qty: 1 add to cart Journey to the Center of the Earth Journey to the Center of the Earth Qty: 1 add to cart Earthshaking Monitor Earthshaking Monitor Qty: 1 add to cart Imaging with X-rays

284

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

285

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

286

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Group Members Accelerator Magnets Insertion Devices Facilities Presentations & Publications Internal Magnetic Devices Group The primary mission of the Magnetic Devices (MD) Group is to design, build, and maintain Insertion Devices (IDs) that are reliable and transparent to the electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The majority of IDs at the APS are conventional planar hybrid undulators, but an essential part of the mission is to develop novel IDs, such as short-period superconducting undulators and long-period electromagnetic undulators. The capabilities of APS IDs are matched to users' experimental needs. The mission also includes magnetic tuning of the IDs to ensure their near-ideal performance as x-ray sources and calculations to predict the radiation

287

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

288

Evaluated teletherapy source library  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Evaluated Teletherapy Source Library (ETSL) is a system of hardware and software that provides for maintenance of a library of useful phase space descriptions (PSDs) of teletherapy sources used in radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The PSDs are designed to be used by PEREGRINE, the all-particle Monte Carlo dose calculation system. ETSL also stores other relevant information such as monitor unit factors (MUFs) for use with the PSDs, results of PEREGRINE calculations using the PSDs, clinical calibration measurements, and geometry descriptions sufficient for calculational purposes. Not all of this information is directly needed by PEREGRINE. It also is capable of acting as a repository for the Monte Carlo simulation history files from which the generic PSDs are derived.

Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Voltage controlled current source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seven decade, voltage controlled current source is described for use in testing intermediate range nuclear instruments that covers the entire test current range of from 10 picoamperes to 100 microamperes. High accuracy is obtained throughout the entire seven decades of output current with circuitry that includes a coordinated switching scheme responsive to the input signal from a hybrid computer to control the input voltage to an antilog amplifier, and to selectively connect a resistance to the antilog amplifier output to provide a continuous output current source as a function of a preset range of input voltage. An operator controlled switch provides current adjustment for operation in either a real-time simulation test mode or a time response test mode.

Casne, Gregory M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Advanced Photon Source 0 Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button About Welcome Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User Information Prospective Users New Users Current Users APS User Portal Macromolecular Crystallographers Administrators Find a Beamline Apply for Beam Time Contacts Calendars Community Scientific Access Site Access Training Science & Education Science & Research Highlights Conferences Seminars Publications Annual Reports APS Upgrade Courses and Schools Graduate Programs Scientific Software Media Center Calendar of Events APS News User News Argonne/APS Press Releases Argonne/APS Feature Stories Argonne/APS In The News

292

Comparisons with Other sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimates Compared with Other sources Estimates Compared with Other sources The following seven graphs were prepared to give a sense of the variation and confidence level of the EIA-914 estimates. Each graph shows the reported sample production (the starting point for making an estimate), the EIA-914 estimates, State reported data, HPDI reported data, and Lippman Consulting data for comparison. State data are obtained directly from the States usually via a State agency web site as a monthly total. HPDI is a commercial data vender. They acquire data from all the States and provide it to EIA in a single format and query system at the well or lease level. EIA then sums this data to the operator level and State level. HPDI data typically lag the State data by 1 or 2 months.

293

The European Spallation Source  

SciTech Connect

The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a 5 MW, 2.5 GeV long pulse proton linac, to be built and commissioned in Lund, Sweden. The Accelerator Design Update (ADU) project phase is under way, to be completed at the end of 2012 by the delivery of a Technical Design Report. Improvements to the 2003 ESS design will be summarised, and the latest design activities will be presented.

Peggs, S; Eshraqi, M; Hahn, H; Jansson, A; Lindroos, M; Ponton, A; Rathsman, K; Trahern, G; Bousso, S; Calaga, R; Devanz, G; Duperrier, R D; Eguia, J; Gammino, S; Moller, S P; Oyon, C; Ruber, R.J.M.Y.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Sources and Gravitons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gravitational theory is reconstructed from the source description of gravitons. As indirect evidence for this starting point, the theoretical basis for the four tests of Einsteinian gravitational theory is produced by elementary arguments. Following the electromagnetic example, the source description is recast as a numerical field theory characterized by an action principle. After recognizing that the physically restricted theory possesses invariance with respect to infinitesimal coordinate transformations, it is generalized to exhibit invariance under arbitrary coordinate transformations, which supplies the primitive interactions for multigraviton processes. There is a discussion of the necessary dependence of graviton sources upon the gravitational field, and a simple model is constructed. The qualitative structure of the modification that multiparticle exchange introduces in the graviton-propagation function is exhibited, with the corresponding modification in the Newtonian potential. There are some speculative remarks about Mach's principle and the accompanying interpretation of the gravitational constant. The paper concludes by pointing out empirical scaling laws that interconnect the cosmos, the laboratory, and the atom.

Julian Schwinger

1968-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of patients immediately following injection. This value can then be reliably scaled to the desired time and distance for planning and staff dose evaluation purposes. At distances closer than 1 m, a distance-specific dose rate constant of 0.367 {mu}Sv/MBq h at 30 cm is recommended for accurate calculations. An accurate patient-specific dose rate constant that accounts for patient-specific variables (e.g., distribution and attenuation) will allow an accurate evaluation of the dose rate from a patient injected with an isotope rather than simply utilizing a physical constant.

Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

The International Large Detector: Letter of Intent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC. The ILC will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV. The ILC has an ambitious physics program, which will extend and complement that of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hallmark of physics at the ILC is precision. The clean initial state and the comparatively benign environment of a lepton collider are ideally suited to high precision measurements. To take full advantage of the physics potential of ILC places great demands on the detector performance. The design of ILD is driven by these requirements. Excellent calorimetry and tracking are combined to obtain the best possible overall event reconstruction, including the capability to reconstruct individual particles within jets for particle ow calorimetry. This requires excellent spatial resolution for all detector systems. A highly granular calorimeter system is combined with a central tracker which st...

Abe, Toshinori; Abramowicz, Halina; Adamus, Marek; Adeva, Bernardo; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Alabau Pons, Carmen; Albrecht, Hartwig; Andricek, Ladislav; Anduze, Marc; Aplin, Steve J.; Arai, Yasuo; Asano, Masaki; Attie, David; Attree, Derek J.; Burger, Jochen; Bailey, David; Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Ball, Markus; Ballin, James; Barbi, Mauricio; Barlow, Roger; Bartels, Christoph; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassignana, Daniela; Bates, Richard; Baudot, Jerome; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Jeannine; Beckmann, Moritz; Bedjidian, Marc; Behnke, Ties; Belkadhi, Khaled; Bellerive, Alain; Bentvelsen, Stan; Bergauer, Thomas; Berggren, C.Mikael U.; Bergholz, Matthias; Bernreuther, Werner; Besancon, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biebel, Otmar; Bilki, Burak; Blair, Grahame; Blumlein, Johannes; Bo, Li; Boisvert, Veronique; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Boos, Eduard; Boudry, Vincent; Bouquet, Bernard; Bouvier, Joel; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Brient, Jean-Claude; Brock, Ian; Brogna, Andrea; Buchholz, Peter; Buesser, Karsten; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Buzulutskov, A.F.; Caccia, Massimo; Caiazza, Stefano; Calcaterra, Alessandro; Caldwell, Allen; Callier, Stephane L.C.; Calvo Alamillo, Enrique; Campbell, Michael; Campbell, Alan J.; Cappellini, Chiara; Carloganu, Cristina; Castro, Nuno; Castro Carballo, Maria Elena; Chadeeva, Marina; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chang, Paoti; Charpy, Alexandre; Chen, Xun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Hongfang; Cheon, Byunggu; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, B.C.; Christen, Sandra; Ciborowski, Jacek; Ciobanu, Catalin; Claus, Gilles; Clerc, Catherine; Coca, Cornelia; Colas, Paul; Colijn, Auke; Colledani, Claude; Combaret, Christophe; Cornat, Remi; Cornebise, Patrick; Corriveau, Francois; Cvach, Jaroslav; Czakon, Michal; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Da Silva, Wilfrid; Dadoun, Olivier; Dam, Mogens; Damerell, Chris; Danilov, Mikhail; Daniluk, Witold; Daubard, Guillaume; David, Dorte; David, Jacques; De Boer, Wim; De Groot, Nicolo; De Jong, Sijbrand; De Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De Masi, Rita; De Roeck, Albert; Decotigny, David; Dehmelt, Klaus; Delagnes, Eric; Deng, Zhi; Desch, Klaus; Dieguez, Angel; Diener, Ralf; Dima, Mihai-Octavian; Dissertori, Gunther; Dixit, Madhu S.; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris A.; Dollan, Ralph; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doublet, Philippe; Doyle, Tony; Doziere, Guy; Dragicevic, Marko; Drasal, Zbynek; Drugakov, Vladimir; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Dulucq, Frederic; Dumitru, Laurentiu Alexandru; Dzahini, Daniel; Eberl, Helmut; Eckerlin, Guenter; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eigen, Gerald; Eklund, Lars; Elsen, Eckhard; Elsener, Konrad; Emeliantchik, Igor; Engels, Jan; Evrard, Christophe; Fabbri, Riccardo; Faber, Gerard; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Feege, Nils; Feng, Cunfeng; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Garcia, Marcos; Filthaut, Frank; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischer, Manfred; Fleta, Celeste; Fleury, Julien L.; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Foster, Brian; Fourches, Nicolas; Fouz, Mary-Cruz; Frank, Sebastian; Frey, Ariane; Frotin, Mickael; Fujii, Hirofumi; Fujii, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Junpei; Fujita, Yowichi; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gaddi, Andrea; Gaede, Frank; Galkin, Alexei; Galkin, Valery; Gallas, Abraham; Gallin-Martel, Laurent; Gamba, Diego; Gao, Yuanning; Garrido Beltran, Lluis; Garutti, Erika; Gastaldi, Franck; Gaur, Bakul; Gay, Pascal; Gellrich, Andreas; Genat, Jean-Francois; Gentile, Simonetta; Gerwig, Hubert; Gibbons, Lawrence; Ginina, Elena; Giraud, Julien; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Gladilin, Leonid; Goldstein, Joel; Gonzalez Sanchez, Francisco Javier; Gournaris, Filimon; Greenshaw, Tim; Greenwood, Z.D.; Grefe, Christian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Philippe; Grondin, Denis; Grunewald, Martin; Grzelak, Grzegorz; Gurtu, Atul; Haas, Tobias; Haensel, Stephan; Hajdu, Csaba; Hallermann, Lea; Han, Liang; Hansen, Peter H.; Hara, Takanori; Harder, Kristian; Hartin, Anthony; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harz, Martin; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hauschild, Michael; He, Qing; Hedberg, Vincent; Hedin, David; Heinze, Isa; Helebrant, Christian; Henschel, Hans; Hensel, Carsten; Hertenberger, Ralf; Herve, Alain; Higuchi, Takeo; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hironori, Kazurayama; Hlucha, Hana; Hommels, Bart; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horvath, Dezso; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Wei-Shu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Huang, Xingtao; Huppert, Jean Francois; Ide, Yasuhiro; Idzik, Marek; Iglesias Escudero, Carmen; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Igonkina, Olga; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Ikuno, Toshinori; Imbault, Didier; Imhof, Andreas; Imhoff, Marc; Ingbir, Ronen; Inoue, Eiji

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A status update on the Advanced Photon Source Project--Summer 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source Project has passed the mid-point in its construction. The linac and synchrotron booster enclosures are complete. A portion of the experiment hall has been completed and put into use to support accelerator component assembly, test, and installation. Plans for the user lab/office modules and the central laboratory/office complex are well advanced. Installation of the linac injection system has been completed and commissioning is beginning. Installation and commissioning of the positron accumulator ring, the booster synchrotron, the storage ring, and the rf power systems will follow. Accelerator operations capable of supporting the commissioning of the experimental beamlines is planned for the summer of 1995. A strong research program is continuing to produce results supportive of both accelerator and beamline construction and operations. Collaborative Access Teams have been formed to conduct research with the initial set of 32 beamlines that will be available at the completion of the first phase of construction.

Moncton, D.E.; Fenner, R.B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons  

SciTech Connect

The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

Roy, Kaushik, E-mail: kaushikbolpur@rediffmail.com [Beluti M. K. M. High School, P.O. Beluti, Birbhum, West Bengal 731301 (India); Chatterjee, Prasanta, E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar [Department of Mathematics, Siksha Bhavana Visva Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Relativistic nonlinear dynamics of an intense laser beam propagating in a hot electron-positron magnetoactive plasma  

SciTech Connect

The present study is devoted to investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of an intense laser beam interacting with a hot magnetized electron-positron plasma. Propagation of the intense circularly polarized laser beam along an external magnetic field is studied using a relativistic two-fluid model. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived based on the quasi-neutral approximation, which is valid for hot plasma. Light envelope solitary waves and modulation instability are studied, for one-dimensional case. Using a three-dimensional model, spatial-temporal development of laser pulse is investigated. Occurrence of some nonlinear phenomena such as self-focusing, self-modulation, light trapping, and filamentation of laser pulse is discussed. Also the effect of external magnetic field and plasma temperature on the nonlinear evolution of these phenomena is studied.

Sepehri Javan, N.; Adli, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil 56199-11367 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil 56199-11367 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The European Spallation Source  

SciTech Connect

In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

Lindroos M.; Calaga R.; Bousson S.; Danared H.; Devanz G. et al

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

302

A surface ionization source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Einzel Lens. 2 The Quadrupole Triplet . . 3. The Beam Scanner. . . 4 The Four-plate Detectors and Faraday Cups. III TESTING AND OPTIMIZING THE BEAM LINE 10 12 13 A. Initial Results. IV THE THEORY OF SURFACE IONIZATION . . . . . V ION SOURCES. 21... aperture and through a beam scanner. The scanner translates the beam's cross-section to an image visible on the oscilloscope A movable Faraday cup connected to a sensitive electrometer is used to maximize the beam transmission at the opening into the 2...

Buzatu, Daniel J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Compact ion accelerator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source includes a conductive substrate, the substrate including a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips formed on the substrate. A conductive catalytic coating is formed on the nanostructures and substrate for dissociation of a molecular species into an atomic species, the molecular species being brought in contact with the catalytic coating. A target electrode placed apart from the substrate, the target electrode being biased relative to the substrate with a first bias voltage to ionize the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips and attract the ionized atomic species from the substrate in the direction of the target electrode.

Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

304

Optimization of neutron source  

SciTech Connect

I consider here the optimization of the two component neutron source, allowing beam species and energy to vary. A simple model is developed, based on the earlier publications, that permits the optimum to be obtained simply. The two component plasma, with one species of hot ion (D{sup +} or T{sup +}) and the complementary species of cold ion, is easy to analyze in the case of a spatially uniform cold plasma, as to good approximation the total number of hot ions is important but not their spatial distribution. Consequently, the optimization can ignore spatial effects. The problem of a plasma with both types of hot ions and cold ions is rather more difficult, as the neutron production by hot-hot interactions is sensitive to their spatial distributions. Consequently, consideration of this problem will be delayed to a future memorandum. The basic model is that used in the published articles on the two-component, beam-plasma mirror source. I integrate the Fokker-Planck equation analytically, obtaining good agreement with previous numerical results. This simplifies the optimization, by providing a functional form for the neutron production. The primary result is expressed in terms of the power efficiency: watts of neutrons/watts of primary power. The latter includes the positive ion neutralization efficiency. At 150 keV, the present model obtains an efficiency of 0.66%, compared with 0.53% of the earlier calculation.

Hooper, E.B.

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

305

Federal Funding Sources of Information Sources for Automatic Funding Notices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Federal Funding Sources of Information r Grant Programs & Deadlines q World Health Organization - GrantFederal Funding Sources of Information Sources for Automatic Funding Notices q Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance q Grants.Gov q FedBizOpps q The Foundation Center r RFP Bulletin r Philanthropy News

306

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Home HSS Logo Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive sealed sources identified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), Appendix E, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sealed sources identified in Attachment 5, Appendix A of O 321.1B, will submit information to the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) System.

307

Manhattan Project: Sources and Notes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SOURCES AND NOTES SOURCES AND NOTES Resources > Sources Below are the collected specific notes for the text and images used on the pages of this web site. For a discussion of the most important works on the Manhattan Project, see the "Suggested Readings." For a general discussion of the use of sources in this web site, see "A Note on Sources." To scan the sources and notes for various categories, choose from the list below. To view the sources and notes for a specific web page, see the footnote at the bottom of each page (exceptions include this page and the home page; the sources and notes for the home page are the first ones listed below). Home Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries 1939-1942: Early Government Support 1942: Difficult Choices

308

Carbon nanotube electron source technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The carbon nanotube embodies a unique combination of properties which make it potentially an extraordinary field emission electron source. These properties include small tip radii (and small source size), high el...

Kenneth Teo

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The SLC Polarized Electron Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A polarized electron source consisting of a 3-electrode photocathode gun ... SLC and is currently undergoing commissioning. The source is described, and the operating configuration is discussed. The present statu...

J. E. Clendenin

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and will be updated as needed. Photon Sciences ESH Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) SOP No. Standard Operating Procedure for: LS-ES-0002 Procedure for Acid Etching of Silicon and Germanium Crystals LS-ESH-0004 NSLS Operations Group Chemical Spill and Gas Release Response LS-ESH-0010 VUV Injection Shutter LOTO LS-ESH-0012 LINAC LOTO LS-ESH-0013 Controlled Access to the VUV Ring LS-ESH-0014 Radiation Safety Interlocks at the National Synchrotron Light Source LS-ESH-0019 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements LS-ESH-0020 Biosafety Requirements at the NSLS LS-ESH-0021 Biosafety Level 2 work at the NSLS/ A Technical Basis LS-ESH-0022 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements

311

Welcome | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome Aerial view of APS Aerial view of the APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Whether you are a current or potential scientific user of our unique facility or are simply interested in learning more about the APS, we are delighted that you are visiting our website. The APS is funded by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy. We operate a National User Facility that is open to everyone who has a need for extremely brilliant x-ray photon beams. The APS is one of the most technologically complex machines in the world. This premier national research facility provides the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere to more than 5,000 (and growing) scientists from

312

Infrared source test  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

Ott, L.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Thulium-170 heat source  

SciTech Connect

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, C.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; VanSant, J.H.

1990-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

314

Thulium-170 heat source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Advanced Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next >> Next >> Visitors Access to the ALS Gate Access guest-house Guest House lab-shuttles Lab Shuttles maps-and-directions Maps and Directions Parking Safety Safety for Users safety-for-staff Safety for Staff In Case of Emergency Resources Acronyms Multimedia Employment staff-intranet Staff Intranet Site Map Contact Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource January 2014 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Recent Science Highlights Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Using novel materials to develop thin, flexible, and more efficient photovoltaic cells is one of the hottest topics in current materials research. A class of transition metals undergo a dramatic change that makes them ideal for solar energy applications.

316

Treatment of resonances in the scattering of a heavy positron by H{sub 2} that are due to interaction with vibrationally excited quasibound states  

SciTech Connect

For a positron with wave number k, the rate of annihilation when scattered by an atom or molecule is proportional to Z{sub eff}(k), the effective number of electrons in the target that are available to the positron for annihilation. There is currently great interest in the very large positron annihilation rates, and hence values of Z{sub eff}(k), that have been observed in low-energy positron scattering by some molecules. These are observed experimentally to occur at energies just below the energies of excited vibrational states of the molecule concerned. This has been explained by Gribakin [Phys. Rev. A 61, 022720 (2000)] and Gribakin and Lee [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 193201 (2006)] as being due to Feshbach resonances involving excited quasibound vibrational states. These treatments make skilful use of approximate methods. It is of interest to determine how the expression obtained for the resonant contribution to Z{sub eff}(k) from a quasibound state using a very accurate method is related to the expressions obtained in the previously mentioned articles. In view of this, in this article I carry out a detailed ab initio theoretical treatment of positron scattering by H{sub 2} using the Kohn variational method. H{sub 2} is the simplest molecule, which makes it easier to take into account all the interactions involved. However, a positron does not form a bound state with H{sub 2}. To investigate resonant behavior in Z{sub eff}(k), I increase the mass m{sub p} of the positron so that it forms a weakly bound state with H{sub 2}. This gives rise to excited quasibound vibrational states. The expression I obtain for the resonant contribution to Z{sub eff}(k) has some similarity with the expressions obtained by Gribakin and Lee. This gives some support to their explanation of the very large values of Z{sub eff}(k). However, they make no explicit mention of corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation. These play a key role in my treatment as they couple the quasibound states to the continuum. I am able to show how the BO corrections are taken into account implicitly in calculating the expressions obtained by Gribakin and Lee. The most important difference between my treatment and their treatments is that in my treatment Z{sub eff}(k) may be infinite at the resonant energy, whereas in the other treatments it is likely to be large, but can never be infinite. Further investigation is necessary to determine the origin of this infinity in my treatment. My treatment could be applied to positron scattering by molecules such as methyl halides in which very high Z{sub eff}(k) values are observed, though using the Kohn variational method would be considerably more complicated than in the case of H{sub 2}.

Armour, E. A. G. [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Measurement of the Azimuthal Correlation between the most Forward Jet and the Scattered Positron in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep-inelastic positron-proton scattering events at low photon virtuality Q^2 with a forward jet, produced at small angles with respect to the proton beam, are measured with the H1 detector at HERA. A subsample of events with an additional jet in the central region is also studied. For both samples differential cross sections and normalised distributions are measured as a function of the azimuthal angle difference, Delta phi, between the forward jet and the scattered positron. The sensitivity to QCD evolution mechanisms is tested by comparing the data to predictions of Monte Carlo generators based on different evolution approaches as well as to next-to-leading order calculations.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baghdasaryan, S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Belov, P; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, D; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Ceccopieri, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dobre, M; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Grebenyuk, A; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Huber, F; Jacquet, M; Janssen, X; Jonsson, L; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Kogler, R; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Kretzschmar, J; Kruger, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Lipka, K; List, B; List, J; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikitin, D; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Pahl, P; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pirumov, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Radescu, V; Raicevic, N; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sykora, T; Thompson, P D; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vazdik, Y; Wegener, D; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Sources Directorate Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 ii | Vision and Mission Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan The VISION of the Light Sources Directorate is: to be a provider of choice for world-class photon science and facilities that deliver outstanding scientific productivity and impact, and to be recognized as a leader in developing innovative techniques and ap- plications of photon science Our MISSION is defined by the set of activities that are required to realize this vision: to advance scientific knowledge and to solve critical problems through the design, construction, operation, and use of premier photon science facilities | Table of Contents Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan

319

Metrology Sources for EUV Lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mask inspection and validation are key elements of the EUV lithography infrastructure. Requirements for the light sources to enable these tools will be ...

Home, Steve; Blackborow, Paul; Bensen, Matthew M; Partlow, Matthew J; Gustafson, Deborah; Goldstein, Michael

320

Sponsored E-Source Membership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Reports DSMdat - Exclusive DSM Programs Database E Source Efficiency & Demand-Response Programs Service (EDRP) With EDRP, you'll discover ways to make your EE and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Source Selection | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Status Reporting Requirement (pdf) Source Evaluation Board (SEB) Secretariat and Knowledge Manager - Acquisition Guide Chapter 1.4 (pdf) Acquisition Planning - Acquisition...

322

Presentation: Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources delivered by Patricia Dehmer, U.S. Department of Energy

323

Linac Coherent Light Source Overview  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Video Library | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video Library Related Links: APS Colloquium APS Podcasts APS Today More videos: Introduction to the APS Physics of the Blues Now Playing: Building the Advanced Photon Source This...

325

Alternative Energy Sources – Myths and Realities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative Energy Sources - Myths and Realities Walterneed to think about alternative energy sources; the worlddepletion of oil? Alternative energy sources can be divided

Youngquist, Walter

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ideas for Future Synchrotron Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of very-high-brightness electron sources, it is anticipatedcharacteristics for the electron source, given in u_ble 1.Table 1 Electron Source Characteristics Characteristic f

Jackson, A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Direct constraints on diffusion models from cosmic-ray positron data: Excluding the minimal model for dark matter searches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Galactic cosmic-ray (CR) transport parameters are usually constrained by the boron-to-carbon ratio. This procedure is generically plagued with degeneracies between the diffusion coefficient and the vertical extent of the Galactic magnetic halo. The latter is of paramount importance for indirect dark matter (DM) searches because it fixes the amount of DM annihilation or decay that contributes to the local antimatter CR flux. These degeneracies could be broken by using secondary radioactive species, but the current data still have large error bars, and this method is extremely sensitive to the very local interstellar medium properties. Here, we propose to use the low-energy CR positrons in the GeV range as another direct constraint on diffusion models. We show that the PAMELA data disfavor small diffusion halo (L?3??kpc) and large diffusion slope models and exclude the minimal configuration [Maurin et al. Astrophys. J. 555, 585 (2001); Donato et al. Phys. Rev. D 69, 063501 (2004)] widely used in the literature to bracket the uncertainties in the DM signal predictions. This is complementary to indirect constraints (diffuse radio and gamma-ray emissions) and has a strong impact on DM searches. Indeed, this makes the antiproton constraints more robust while enhancing the discovery/exclusion potential of current and future experiments, like AMS-02 and GAPS, especially in the antiproton and antideuteron channels.

Julien Lavalle; David Maurin; Antje Putze

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Detailed microscopic calculation of stellar electron and positron capture rates on $^{24}$Mg for O+Ne+Mg core simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Few white dwarfs, located in binary systems, may acquire sufficiently high mass accretion rates resulting in the burning of carbon and oxygen under nondegenerate conditions forming a O+Ne+Mg core. These O+Ne+Mg cores are gravitationally less bound than more massive progenitor stars and can release more energy due to the nuclear burning. They are also amongst the probable candidates for low entropy r-process sites. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g., 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br, 1997D) were able to rekindle the interest in 8 -- 10 M$_{\\odot}$ which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. Microscopic calculations of capture rates on $^{24}$Mg, which may contribute significantly to the collapse of O+Ne+Mg cores, using shell model and proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory, were performed earlier and comparisons made. Simulators, however, may require these capture rates on a fine scale. For the first time a detailed microscopic calculation of the electron and positron captur...

Nabi, Jameel-Un

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

First year of Mark-J: physics with high energy electron-positron colliding beams. Report No. 107  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the experimental investigation of high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions by the MARK J collaboration at PETRA, the electron-positron colliding beam accelerator at DESY in Hamburg, West Germany. The physics objectives include studies of several purely electromagnetic processes and hadronic final states, which further our knowledge of the nature of the fundamental constituents and of their strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. Before discussing the physics results, the main features and the principal components of the MARK J detector are discussed in terms of design, function, and performance. Several aspects of the online data collection and the offline analysis are also outlined. Results are presented on tests of quantum electrodynamics using e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. e/sup +/e/sup -/, ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/ and tau/sup +/tau/sup -/, on the measurement of R, the ratio of the hadronic to the point-like muon pair cross section, on the search for new quark flavors, on the discovery of three jet events arising from the radiation of hard noncollinear gluons as predicted by quantum chromodynamics, and on the determination of the strong coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub s/.

Aachen DESY M.I.T. NIKHEF Peking Collaboration

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Modeling and simulation of longitudinal dynamics for Low Energy Ring–High Energy Ring at the Positron-Electron Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A time domain dynamic modeling and simulation tool for beam-cavity interactions in the Low Energy Ring (LER) and High Energy Ring (HER) at the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) is presented. Dynamic simulation results for PEP-II are compared to measurements of the actual machine. The motivation for this tool is to explore the stability margins and performance limits of PEP-II radio-frequency (RF) systems at future higher currents and upgraded RF configurations. It also serves as a test bed for new control algorithms and can define the ultimate limits of the low-level RF (LLRF) architecture. The time domain program captures the dynamic behavior of the beam-cavity-LLRF interaction based on a reduced model. The ring current is represented by macrobunches. Multiple RF stations in the ring are represented via one or two macrocavities. Each macrocavity captures the overall behavior of all the 2 or 4 cavity RF stations. Station models include nonlinear elements in the klystron and signal processing. This enables modeling the principal longitudinal impedance control loops interacting via the longitudinal beam model. The dynamics of the simulation model are validated by comparing the measured growth rates for the LER with simulation results. The simulated behavior of the LER at increased operation currents is presented via low-mode instability growth rates. Different control strategies are compared and the effects of both the imperfections in the LLRF signal processing and the nonlinear drivers and klystrons are explored.

C. Rivetta; T. Mastorides; J. D. Fox; D. Teytelman; D. Van Winkle

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

331

Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511~keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps

L. Raczynski; P. Moskal; P. Kowalski; W. Wislicki; T. Bednarski; P. Bialas; E. Czerwinski; L . Kaplon; A. Kochanowski; G. Korcyl; J. Kowal; T. Kozik; W. Krzemien; E. Kubicz; M. Molenda; I. Moskal; Sz. Niedzwiecki; M. Palka; M. Pawlik-Niedzwiecka; Z. Rudy; P. Salabura; N. G. Sharma; M. Silarski; A. Slomski; J. Smyrski; A. Strzelecki; A. Wieczorek; M. Zielinski; N. Zon

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Creation of Electron--Positron Wind in Gamma-Ray Bursts and Its Effect on the Early Afterglow Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the creation of electron--positron pairs in Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) resulting from the collision between scattered and outward moving gamma-ray photons. The number of pairs exceeds the number of ambient medium electrons encountered by the GRB ejecta up to ~ 10^{16} cm from the center of explosion. The shock resulting from the interaction of the ejecta with the pair-wind may brighten the afterglow synchrotron emission during the first few minutes. Even without this effect, the peak intensity of the optical afterglow increases with the density of the surrounding medium. Therefore, observations of the optical flux at early times constrain the density of the circumburst medium. If the electron and magnetic field energies behind the forward shock sweeping-up the pair-wind and the circumburst medium are as inferred from fits to the broadband afterglow emission at 0.5-100 days, then the current upper limits on the optical counterpart emission, set by the ROTSE and LOTIS experiments, indicate that the circumburst medium within 0.01 pc is less dense than 100 cm^{-3} or, if a wind, corresponds to a progenitor mass-loss to wind speed ratio below 10^{-6} M_sun/yr/(1000 km/s).

P. Kumar; A. Panaitescu

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

333

Direct constraints on diffusion models from cosmic-ray positron data: Excluding the Minimal model for dark matter searches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Galactic Cosmic-ray (CR) transport parameters are usually constrained by the boron-to-carbon ratio. This procedure is generically plagued with degeneracies between the diffusion coefficient and the vertical extent of the Galactic magnetic halo. The latter is of paramount importance for indirect dark matter (DM) searches, because it fixes the amount of DM annihilation or decay that contributes to the local antimatter CR flux. These degeneracies could be broken by using secondary radioactive species, but the current data still have large error bars, and this method is extremely sensitive to the very local interstellar medium (ISM) properties. Here, we propose to use the low-energy CR positrons in the GeV range as another direct constraint on diffusion models. We show that the PAMELA data disfavor small diffusion halo ($L\\lesssim 3$ kpc) and large diffusion slope models, and exclude the minimal ({\\em min}) configuration (Maurin et al. 2001, Donato et al. 2004) widely used in the literature to bracket the uncertainties in the DM signal predictions. This is complementary to indirect constraints (diffuse radio and gamma-ray emissions) and has strong impact on DM searches. Indeed this makes the antiproton constraints more robust while enhancing the discovery/exclusion potential of current and future experiments, like AMS-02 and GAPS, especially in the antiproton and antideuteron channels.

Julien Lavalle; David Maurin; Antje Putze

2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

334

Hollow electrode plasma excitation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

Ballou, N.E.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

335

Building the Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

This timelapse video shows the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) rising from an empty field at Argonne National Laboratory to become the source of the Western Hemisphere's brightest x-rays for research. The video was compiled from still photographs taken from 1990-1996.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Perytons and their Possible Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perytons are terrestrial signals that exhibit dispersion measure (DM) similar to pulsars. In trying to identify terrestrial sources of such perytons, investigation into signals from airborne equipment (aircraft), RFI emissions from electronics and lightning phenomenon reveals that the possible sources of perytons could be lightning phenomenon. Narrow Bipolar Pulses (NBPs) and Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs) are good investigational candidates.

Khan, Mohammad Danish

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings 2012 Bacterial Source Tracking State Conference Conference Proceedings Prepared by: Lucas Gregory, Texas Water Resources Institute Courtney Smith of the Science Conference Texas Water Resources Institute TR-427 June 2012 #12;#12;Texas Water Resources

338

Fourth Generation Light Source Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light Sources October 27 to 29, 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This workshop is being co-hosted by APS, NSLS, SSRL and TJNAF. FGLSlogo This workshop will explore the phenomenology of interactions with ultra-high-power, -brilliance, and -coherence light sources in the DUV, soft x-ray, and x-ray regimes, as well as the scientific opportunities they provide. The workshop will begin with tutorials on the generation and properties of these sources and identify issues in their use in experimentation. Also included will be an overview of current efforts to develop these sources and a review of the scientific opportunities defined by previous research and workshops. These background talks will be followed

339

Sealed source peer review plan  

SciTech Connect

Sealed sources are known quantities of radioactive materials that have been encapsulated in quantities that produce known radiation fields. Sealed sources have multiple uses ranging from instrument calibration sources to sources that produce radiation fields for experimental applications. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), created in 1999, under the direction of the Waste Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque has been assigned the responsibility to recover and manage excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources from the public and private sector. LANL intends to ship drums containing qualified sealed sources to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Prior to shipping, these drums must be characterized with respect to radiological content and other parameters. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that ten radionulcides be quantified and reported for every container of waste to be disposed in the WIPP. The methods traditionally approved by the EPA include non-destructive assay (NDA) in accordance with Appendix A of the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE, 2002) (CH WAC). However, because of the nature and pedigree of historical records for sealed sources and the technical infeasibility of performing NDA on these sources, LANL proposes to characterize the content of these waste drums using qualified existing radiological data in lieu of direct measurement. This plan describes the process and documentation requirements for the use of the peer review process to qualify existing data for sealed radiological sources in lieu of perfonning radioassay. The peer review process will be performed in accordance with criteria provided in 40 CFR {section} 194.22 which specifies the use of the NUREG 1297 guidelines. The plan defines the management approach, resources, schedule, and technical requirements for the subject peer review.

Feldman, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Leonard, Lee [RETIRED; Burns, Ron [CONTRACTOR

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies 2005 Diesel Engine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Advanced Photon Source Industrial Liaison Office | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Liaison Office Industrial Liaison Office registration page New to Synchrotron Radiation New to the APS Already a User Advanced Photon Source Industrial Liaison Office APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. We are one of five synchrotron radiation light sources operated as national user facilities by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. The APS is open to everyone who can utilize extremely bright x-ray photon beams for high-value research. This premier national research facility provides these x-ray beams to more than 5,000 scientists from all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and several foreign countries. These scientists come to the APS from industry, universities,

342

Three chamber negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

1983-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Detailed microscopic calculation of stellar electron and positron capture rates on $^{24}$Mg for O+Ne+Mg core simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Few white dwarfs, located in binary systems, may acquire sufficiently high mass accretion rates resulting in the burning of carbon and oxygen under nondegenerate conditions forming a O+Ne+Mg core. These O+Ne+Mg cores are gravitationally less bound than more massive progenitor stars and can release more energy due to the nuclear burning. They are also amongst the probable candidates for low entropy r-process sites. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g., 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br, 1997D) were able to rekindle the interest in 8 -- 10 M$_{\\odot}$ which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. Microscopic calculations of capture rates on $^{24}$Mg, which may contribute significantly to the collapse of O+Ne+Mg cores, using shell model and proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory, were performed earlier and comparisons made. Simulators, however, may require these capture rates on a fine scale. For the first time a detailed microscopic calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on $^{24}$Mg on an extensive temperature-density scale is presented here. This type of scale is more appropriate for interpolation purposes and of greater utility for simulation codes. The calculations are done using the pn-QRPA theory using a separable interaction. The deformation parameter, believed to be a key parameter in QRPA calculations, is adopted from experimental data to further increase the reliability of the QRPA results. The resulting calculated rates are up to a factor of 14 or more enhanced as compared to shell model rates and may lead to some interesting scenario for core collapse simulators.

Jameel-Un Nabi

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Clinical Application of In-Room Positron Emission Tomography for In Vivo Treatment Monitoring in Proton Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of using in-room positron emission tomography (PET) for treatment verification in proton therapy and for deriving suitable PET scan times. Methods and Materials: Nine patients undergoing passive scattering proton therapy underwent scanning immediately after treatment with an in-room PET scanner. The scanner was positioned next to the treatment head after treatment. The Monte Carlo (MC) method was used to reproduce PET activities for each patient. To assess the proton beam range uncertainty, we designed a novel concept in which the measured PET activity surface distal to the target at the end of range was compared with MC predictions. The repositioning of patients for the PET scan took, on average, approximately 2 minutes. The PET images were reconstructed considering varying scan times to test the scan time dependency of the method. Results: The measured PET images show overall good spatial correlations with MC predictions. Some discrepancies could be attributed to uncertainties in the local elemental composition and biological washout. For 8 patients treated with a single field, the average range differences between PET measurements and computed tomography (CT) image-based MC results were <5 mm (<3 mm for 6 of 8 patients) and root-mean-square deviations were 4 to 11 mm with PET-CT image co-registration errors of approximately 2 mm. Our results also show that a short-length PET scan of 5 minutes can yield results similar to those of a 20-minute PET scan. Conclusions: Our first clinical trials in 9 patients using an in-room PET system demonstrated its potential for in vivo treatment monitoring in proton therapy. For a quantitative range prediction with arbitrary shape of target volume, we suggest using the distal PET activity surface.

Min, Chul Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zhu, Xuping [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Winey, Brian A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Grogg, Kira [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Testa, Mauro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); El Fakhri, Georges [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bortfeld, Thomas R.; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A., E-mail: hshih@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

APS Upgrade | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop on new science opportunities provided by a multi-bend achromat lattice at the APS APS-U MBA Lattice Workshop Registration is now closed. Please contact Diane Wilkinson ext. 7810 or a member of the Workshop Organizing Committee for changes or modifications to your registration. Submit Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas for MBA Lattice Workshop October 21-22 Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Lab The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade is focused on delivering a powerful, versatile facility for science using high-brightness, high-energy X-rays. At APS, and around the light source community, scientists have been developing storage ring designs that push closer to the ultimate diffraction limit for X-ray sources. A recent report by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, which advises the Director of the U.S.

346

Carbon-Neutral Energy Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Among the main approaches to decarbonizing global economy, the switching to carbon-neutral energy sources such as nuclear and renewables (solar, wind, biomass, etc.) is mentioned most often. Nuclear energy is ...

Nazim Muradov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Reordering with source language collocations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel reordering model for statistical machine translation (SMT) by means of modeling the translation orders of the source language collocations. The model is learned from a word-aligned bilingual corpus where the collocated words ...

Zhanyi Liu; Haifeng Wang; Hua Wu; Ting Liu; Sheng Li

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

349

Renewable energy sources for Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of present consumption patterns and reserve estimates, Selim Estefan predicts that Egypt and other developing countries will face severe fossil fuel supply problems unless they invest now in rapid development of renewable sources. He outlines some of the Egyptian renewable energy projects currently underway or being studied, and argues that the immediate exploitation of indigenous renewable sources is both economically feasible and can be achieved with existing technology.

Selim F. Estefan

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

Welton, Robert F [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Roseberry, Ron T [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiolabeling of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles with biotinylated F-18 prosthetic groups and imaging of their delivery to the brain with positron emission tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiolabeling of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles with biotinylated F-18 prosthetic groups and imaging of their delivery to the brain with positron emission tomography ... The attachment of the [18F]NPB4 radioligand to avidin-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles was tested by using PET imaging of the rat brain to measure the kinetics of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of nanoparticles of varying size. ... This work thus validates new methods for radiolabeling PEG-biotin derivatives and also provides insight into the fate of nanoparticles that have been infused directly into the brain. ...

Rachael Weiss Sirianni; MingQiang Zheng; Toral Patel; Thomas Schafbauer; Jiangbing Zhou; W. Mark Saltzman; Richard E Carson; Yiyun Henry Huang

2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance, X-ray and Positron Emission Particle Tracking Measurements of a Single Jet of Gas Entering a Bed of Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resolution ~1.5 ms ~0.2 ms ~1 ms spatial resolution ~1 mm ~0.1 mm ~0.5 mm velocity yes no yes dispersion yes no yes granular temperature yes no yes scale (bed dia.) 50 mm 270 mm 750 mm 3 Image Analysis 3.1 MRI MR images were processed using... .R., McNeil, P. (1993) Positron emission particle tracking - a technique for studying flow within engineering equipment. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment. 326...

Pore, M.; Ong, G. H.; Boyce, C. M.; Materazzi, M.; Gargiuli, J.; Leadbeater, T.; Sederman, A. J.; Dennis, J. S.; Holland, D. J.; Ingram, A.; Lettieri, P.; Parker, D. J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Two dark matter components in dark matter extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model and the high energy positron spectrum in PAMELA/HEAT data  

SciTech Connect

We present a dark matter extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model to give the recent trend of the high energy positron spectrum of the PAMELA/HEAT experiments. If the trend is caused indeed by dark matter, the minimal supersymmetric standard model needs to be extended. Here, we minimally extend the minimal supersymmetric standard model with one more dark matter component N together with a heavy lepton E and introduce the coupling e{sub R}E{sub R}{sup c}N{sub R}. This coupling naturally appears in the flipped SU(5) grand unification models. We also present the needed parameter ranges of these additional particles.

Huh, Ji-Haeng; Kim, Jihn E.; Kyae, Bumseok [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation  

SciTech Connect

When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Video Library | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media Center: Media Center: Calendar of Events APS News User News Article Archives APS Brochure Annual Reports Posters Podcasts Image Gallery external site Video Library Syndicated Feeds (RSS) Featured Videos: Introduction to the Advanced Photon Source The Advanced Photon Source An introduction and overview of the technology that produces the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those x-rays. Timelapse of the APS construction Building the APS A timelapse video from 1990-1995 that shows the Advanced Photon Source rising from an empty field to become the site of a national synchrotron x-ray research facility. Physics of the Blues Physics of the Blues In looking at commonalities between music and science, former PSC Director

356

Energy Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Sources Energy Sources Energy Sources December 12, 2013 AEMC Summit Slideshow: Innovation in the Manufacturing Sector Learn how advanced technologies are helping manufacturers reduce waste, increase productivity and become leaders in the clean energy economy. October 16, 2013 West Penn Power SEF Commercial Loan Program The West Penn Power Sustainable Energy Fund (WPPSEF) promotes the use of renewable energy and clean energy among commercial, industrial, institutional and residential customers in the West Penn market region. Eligible technologies include solar, wind, low-impact hydro, and sustainable biomass such as closed-loop biomass and biomass gasification, as well as energy efficiency. October 16, 2013 UES - Renewable Energy Credit Purchase Program '''''Note: The Arizona Corporation Commission (ACC) is in the process of

357

E Source | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source Source Jump to: navigation, search Name E Source Address 1965 North 57th Court Place Boulder, CO Zip 80301 Product Research firm Year founded 1986 Number of employees 51-200 Phone number 303.345.9000 Website [www.esource.com www.esource.com ] Coordinates 40.01895°, -105.2207964° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.01895,"lon":-105.2207964,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

358

SNS | Spallation Neutron Source | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNS SNS Instruments Working with SNS Contact Us User Program Manager Laura Morris Edwards 865.574.2966 Spallation Neutron Source Home | User Facilities | SNS SNS | Spallation Neutron Source SHARE SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. This one-of-a-kind facility provides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and industrial development. The 80-acre SNS site is located on Chestnut Ridge and is part of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Although most people don't know it, neutron scattering research has a lot to do with our everyday lives. For example, things like medicine, food, electronics, and cars and airplanes have all been improved by neutron scattering research. Neutron research also helps scientists improve materials used in a

359

Miniature x-ray source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Compact portable electric power sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of recent advances in portable electric power source (PEPS) technology and an assessment of emerging PEPS technologies that may meet US Special Operations Command`s (SOCOM) needs in the next 1--2- and 3--5-year time frames. The assessment was performed through a literature search and interviews with experts in various laboratories and companies. Nineteen PEPS technologies were reviewed and characterized as (1) PEPSs that meet SOCOM requirements; (2) PEPSs that could fulfill requirements for special field conditions and locations; (3) potentially high-payoff sources that require additional R and D; and (4) sources unlikely to meet present SOCOM requirements. 6 figs., 10 tabs.

Fry, D.N.; Holcomb, D.E.; Munro, J.K.; Oakes, L.C.; Matson, M.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

Park, Hae Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan, E-mail: radiat@ncc.re.kr [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung [Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Best Management Practice #14: Alternate Water Sources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Many Federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from alternate water sources. Potentially available alternative water sources for Federal sources include...

363

4th Generation ECR Ion Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4th Generation ECR Ion Sources Claude M Lyneis, D. Leitner,to developing a 4 th generation ECR ion source with an RFover current 3 rd generation ECR ion sources, which operate

Lyneis, Claude M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Consistency tests for Planck and WMAP in the low multipole domain  

SciTech Connect

Recently, full sky maps from Planck have been made publicly available. In this paper, we do consistency tests for the three Planck CMB sky maps. We assume that the difference between two maps represents the contributions from systematics, noise, foregrounds and other sources, and that a precise representation of the Cosmic Microwave Background should be uncorrelated with it. We investigate the cross correlation in pixel space between the difference maps and the various Planck maps and find no significant correlations, in comparison to 10000 random Gaussian simulated maps. Additionally we investigate the difference map between the WMAP ILC 9 year map and the ILC 7 year map. We perform cross correlations between this difference map, and the ILC9 and ILC7, and find significant correlations only for the ILC9, at more than the 99.99% level. Likewise, a comparison between the Planck NILC map and the WMAP ILC9 map, shows a strong correlation for the ILC9 map with the difference map, also at more than the 99.99% level. Thus the ILC9 appears to be more contaminated than the ILC7, which should be taken into consideration when using WMAP maps for cosmological analyses.

Frejsel, A.; Hansen, M.; Liu, H., E-mail: frejsel@nbi.dk, E-mail: kirstejn@nbi.dk, E-mail: liuhao@nbi.dk [Niels Bohr Institute and Discovery Center, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Apparatus and method for preparing oxygen-15 labeled water H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] in an injectable form for use in positron emission tomography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A handling and processing apparatus is revealed for preparing Oxygen-15 labeled water (H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O]) in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography from preferably H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] produced by irradiating a flowing gas target of nitrogen and hydrogen. The apparatus includes a collector for receiving and directing a gas containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] gas and impurities, mainly ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas into sterile water to trap the H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] and form ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) in the sterile water. A device for displacing the sterile water containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] and NH{sub 4}{sup +} through a cation resin removes NH{sub 4}{sup +} from the sterile water. A device for combining the sterile water containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] with a saline solution produces an injectable solution. Preferably, the apparatus includes a device for delivering the solution to a syringe for injection into a patient. Also, disclosed is a method for preparing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography in which the method neither requires isotopic exchange reaction nor application of high temperature. 7 figs.

Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.J.; Alexoff, D.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

366

Apparatus and method for preparing oxygen-15 labeled water H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] in an injectable form for use in positron emission tomography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A handling and processing apparatus for preparing Oxygen-15 labeled water (H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O]) in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography from preferably H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] produced by irradiating a flowing gas target of nitrogen and hydrogen. The apparatus includes a collector for receiving and directing a gas containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] gas and impurities, mainly ammonia (NH.sub.3) gas into sterile water to trap the H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] and form ammonium (NH.sub.4.sup.+) in the sterile water. A device for displacing the sterile water containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] and NH.sub.4.sup.+ through a cation resin removes NH.sub.4.sup.+ from the sterile water. A device for combining the sterile water containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] with a saline solution produces an injectable solution. Preferably, the apparatus includes a device for delivering the solution to a syringe for injection into a patient. Also, disclosed is a method for preparing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography in which the method neither requires isotopic exchange reaction nor application of high temperature.

Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Alexoff, David (Westhampton, NY)

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mercury Effects, Sources and Control Measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury Effects, Sources and Control Measures Prepared by Alan B. Jones, Brooks Rand, Ltd., Seattle ................................................................................................................................1 MERCURY SOURCES....................................................................................................................................................................................8 Mercury dumping from naval vessels

368

LightSource Renewables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LightSource Renewables Jump to: navigation, search Name: LightSource Renewables Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92121 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind project developer...

369

Controlling proton source speeds catalyst | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling proton source speeds catalyst Controlling proton source speeds catalyst Nickel-based catalyst three times faster with adjustments to key acid Research showing that...

370

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Technology of Future Light Sources   Far from Equilibrium Chemical Processes in a Functional Solar Cellsolar cell (DSSC). [Source: Michael Graetzel, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology,

Bergmann, Uwe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

RECENT PROGRESS IN HEAVY ION SOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of hydrogen into thermonuclear fusion reactors. A summary ofFusion Plasma Sources Other sources of high charge state ions include the dense plasma in magnetic confinement thermonuclear

Clark, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Alternative Energy Sources - An Interdisciplinary Module for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Energy Sources - An Interdisciplinary Module for Energy Education Alternative Energy Sources - An Interdisciplinary Module for Energy Education Below is information...

373

Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source Print Wednesday, 28 November 2007 00:00 Diamondoids are...

374

Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish U.S. Department of Energy requirements for inventory reporting, transaction reporting, verification of reporting, and assign responsibilities for reporting of radioactive sealed sources. DOE N 251.86 extends this notice until 5-6-11. No cancellations. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

MIT inverse Compton source concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compact X-ray source based on inverse Compton scattering of a high-power laser on a high-brightness linac beam is described. The facility can operate in two modes: at high (MHz) repetition rate with flux and brilliance ...

Graves, William S.

376

Known and unknown SCUBA sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary and discussion of some projects to use SCUBA to target sources selected at other wavebands, as well as to find new sub-mm galaxies in `blank fields': FIRBACK galaxies; Lyman break galaxies and `the Blob'; HDF flanking fields and the Groth Strip; survey of lensing cluster fields.

Douglas Scott; Colin Borys; Mark Halpern; Anna Sajina; Scott Chapman; Greg Fahlman

2000-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

Lesson 2: Energy Sources Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth's internal heat; ­solar energy from the Sun; ­gravitaDonal energy · There are three sources of external energy: ­ solar energy: radiant energy from and some is converted to tsunami #12;Overview · Solar Energy: ­ Of the three

Chen, Po

378

Focused X-ray source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

379

EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1- EAT SMART Sources: Heart Health American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide and Promotion; Home and Garden Bulletin Number 252; August 1992. Heart Attach Signs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Institutes of Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH Publication No. 01

380

Energy Sources: A Realistic Outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1990 ). YERASHALMI, J, 11TH P INT FBC C MON 553 ( 1991 ). Energy sources...electricity gen-983 ofoil shales in utility boilers becomes margin-ally economic (6...Proceedings of the 11th Interna-tional FBC Conference, Montreal, Canada (Amer-ican...

Chauncey Starr; Milton F. Searl; Sy Alpert

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

8, 80918118, 2008 Aerosol source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and markers are discussed. 1 Introduction Biomass combustion is a major global source of particulate matter for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Internal Combustion Engines, 8600 Duebendorf, Switzerland Discussion Abstract Residential wood combustion has only recently been recognized as a major contributor

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Sources of Weakness in Glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...October 1964 research-article Sources of Weakness in Glass C. Gurney The theoretical strength of glass is of the order of 2 to 5 MLb./in.$^2$ At room temperature, common glasses with undamaged surfaces give breaking stresses of about...

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gamma ray burst positrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The international network of gamma ray burst detectors has provided redundant localizations for six gamma ray bursts with accuracies in the arcminute range. Catalog radio soft X?ray and optical searches have been performed for some of these events. The results of these searches are reviewed. Although radio X?ray and optical candidates are found in the error boxes no clear association between gamma ray bursts and other forms of emission has emerged to date. Optical radio searches are continuing.

K. Hurley

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F/gim F/gim Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) gives researchers more detailed informa- tion on the structure and dynamics of physical and biological materials than ever before possible. This accelerator- based facility provides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. Scien- tists are able to count scattered neutrons, measure their energies and the angles at which they scatter, and map their final positions. SNS enables measurements of greater sensitivity, higher speed, higher resolution, and in more complex sample environments than have been possible at existing neutron facilities. Future Growth SNS was designed from the outset to accommodate a second target station, effectively doubling the capacity of the

386

Linear-drifting subpulse sources in radio pulsars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ion-proton plasma. Recent operation...of the 40-MHz emission from...electron-positron plasma cannot be...limits the area of the active...of the ion atmosphere which we assume...accelerated plasma. Our Green...of the LTE atmosphere and there...formed per unit area in an ion...over a fairly large surface area......

P. B. Jones

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Best Management Practice #14: Alternative Water Sources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Many federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from alternative water sources. Potentially available alternative water sources for Federal sources include municipal-supplied reclaimed water, treated gray water from on-site sanitary sources, and storm water.

388

National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report contains abstracts from research conducted at the national synchrotron light source. (LSP)

Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.N. (eds.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fusion-A Potential Power Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fusion-A Potential Power Source ... Nuclear energy, fusion reactions, magnetic confinement, and tokamaks. ...

Torkil H. Jensen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the scientific needs into the technical performance requirements. Feedback from these workshops will provide important input for advancing the design of the facility. Workshops are planned in the following areas Fundamental Atomic, Molecular, Optical Physics & Combustion Dynamics Mon. Aug. 20 - Tues. Aug 21, 2012 Physical Chemistry, Catalysis, & Photosynthesis Thurs. Aug. 23 - Fri. Aug 24, 2012 Quantum Materials, Magnetism & Spin Dynamics Mon. Aug. 27 - Tues. Aug 28, 2012 Materials & Bio-imaging at the Nanoscale Thurs. Aug. 30 - Fri. Aug 31, 2012 Further information is available on the workshop website:

391

Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of the technique of laser resonance ionization to the production of singly charged ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an important component of many radioactive ion beam facilities. At CERN, for example, the RILIS is the most commonly used ion source of the ISOLDE facility, with a yearly operating time of up to 3000 hours. For some isotopes the RILIS can also be used as a fast and sensitive laser spectroscopy tool, provided that the spectral resolution is sufficiently high to reveal the influence of nuclear structure on the atomic spectra. This enables the study of nuclear properties of isotopes with production rates even lower than one ion per second and, in some cases, enables isomer selective ionization. The solutions available for the implementation of resonance laser ionization at radioactive ion beam facilities are summarized. Aspects such as the laser r...

Marsh, B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Evaluation of Treatment-Associated Inflammatory Response on Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and 2-[18F]-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-d-Glucose-Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Biomarkers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CS , Young H, O'Reilly SM, et al. Early evaluation...TZ , Turkington TG, Hawk TC Coleman RE. PET and brain...0 Antineoplastic Agents 0 Radiopharmaceuticals 154-93-8 Carmustine 50-02-2...Positron-Emission Tomography Radiopharmaceuticals diagnostic use Rats

Craig J. Galbán; Mahaveer S. Bhojani; Kuei C. Lee; Charles R. Meyer; Marcian E. Van Dort; Kyle K. Kuszpit; Robert A. Koeppe; Rajesh Ranga; Bradford A. Moffat; Timothy D. Johnson; Thomas L. Chenevert; Alnawaz Rehemtulla; and Brian D. Ross

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Compact x-ray source and panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

New Analysis of SUSY Dark Matter Scenarios at ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applying realistic veto efficiencies for the low angle electromagnetic calorimeter located in the very forward direction of the future international linear collider, we revisited the Standard Model background contributions studied previously in stau analyses with supersymmetrical dark matter scenarios.

Zhiqing Zhang

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Neutralinos betray their singlino nature at the ILC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is one of the most challenging tasks at the Large Hadron Collider and at a future Linear Collider not only to observe physics beyond the Standard Model, but to clearly identify the underlying new physics model. In this paper we concentrate on the distinction between two different supersymmetric models, the MSSM and the NMSSM, as they can lead to similar low energy spectra. The NMSSM adds a singlet superfield to the MSSM particle spectrum and simplifies embedding a SM-like Higgs candidate with the measured mass of about 125.5 GeV. In parts of the parameter space the Higgs sector itself does not provide sufficient indications for the underlying model. We show that exploring the gaugino/higgsino sectors could provide a meaningful way to distinguish the two models. Assuming that only the lightest chargino and neutralino masses and polarized cross sections $e^+e^-\\to \\tilde{\\chi}^0_i\\tilde{\\chi}^0_j$, $\\tilde{\\chi}^+_i\\tilde{\\chi}^-_j$ are accessible at the linear collider, we reconstruct the fundamental MSSM p...

Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Measurement of high-Q2 neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering cross sections with a longitudinally polarised positron beam at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of neutral current cross sections for deep inelastic scattering in e+p collisions at HERA with a longitudinally polarised positron beam are presented. The single-differential cross-sections d(sigma)/dQ2, d(sigma)/dx and d(sigma)/dy and the reduced cross-section were measured in the kinematic region Q2 > 185 GeV2 and y energy of 318 GeV. The structure functions F3 and F3(gamma)Z were determined by combining the e+p results presented in this paper with previously published e-p neutral current results. The asymmetry parameter A+ is used to demonstrate the parity violation predicted in electroweak interactions. The measurements are well described by the predictions of the Standard Model.

ZEUS Collaboration; H. Abramowicz; I. Abt; L. Adamczyk; M. Adamus; R. Aggarwal; S. Antonelli; P. Antonioli; A. Antonov; M. Arneodo; O. Arslan; V. Aushev; Y. Aushev; O. Bachynska; A. Bamberger; A. N. Barakbaev; G. Barbagli; G. Bari; F. Barreiro; N. Bartosik; D. Bartsch; M. Basile; O. Behnke; J. Behr; U. Behrens; L. Bellagamba; A. Bertolin; S. Bhadra; M. Bindi; C. Blohm; V. Bokhonov; T. Bold; K. Bondarenko; E. G. Boos; K. Borras; D. Boscherini; D. Bot; I. Brock; E. Brownson; R. Brugnera; N. Brummer; A. Bruni; G. Bruni; B. Brzozowska; P. J. Bussey; B. Bylsma; A. Caldwell; M. Capua; R. Carlin; C. D. Catterall; S. Chekanov; J. Chwastowski; J. Ciborowski; R. Ciesielski; L. Cifarelli; F. Cindolo; A. Contin; A. M. Cooper-Sarkar; N. Coppola; M. Corradi; F. Corriveau; M. Costa; G. D'Agostini; F. Dal Corso; J. del Peso; R. K. Dementiev; S. De Pasquale; M. Derrick; R. C. E. Devenish; D. Dobur; B. A. Dolgoshein; G. Dolinska; A. T. Doyle; V. Drugakov; L. S. Durkin; S. Dusini; Y. Eisenberg; P. F. Ermolov; A. Eskreys; S. Fang; S. Fazio; J. Ferrando; M. I. Ferrero; J. Figiel; B. Foster; G. Gach; A. Galas; E. Gallo; A. Garfagnini; A. Geiser; I. Gialas; A. Gizhko; L. K. Gladilin; D. Gladkov; C. Glasman; O. Gogota; Yu. A. Golubkov; P. Gottlicher; I. Grabowska-Bold; J. Grebenyuk; I. Gregor; G. Grigorescu; G. Grzelak; O. Gueta; M. Guzik; C. Gwenlan; T. Haas; W. Hain; R. Hamatsu; J. C. Hart; H. Hartmann; G. Hartner; E. Hilger; D. Hochman; R. Hori; A. Huttmann; Z. A. Ibrahim; Y. Iga; R. Ingbir; M. Ishitsuka; H. -P. Jakob; F. Januschek; T. W. Jones; M. Jungst; I. Kadenko; B. Kahle; S. Kananov; T. Kanno; U. Karshon; F. Karstens; I. I. Katkov; M. Kaur; P. Kaur; A. Keramidas; L. A. Khein; J. Y. Kim; D. Kisielewska; S. Kitamura; R. Klanner; U. Klein; E. Koffeman; N. Kondrashova; O. Kononenko; P. Kooijman; Ie. Korol; I. A. Korzhavina; A. Kotanski; U. Kotz; H. Kowalski; O. Kuprash; M. Kuze; A. Lee; B. B. Levchenko; A. Levy; V. Libov; S. Limentani; T. Y. Ling; M. Lisovyi; E. Lobodzinska; W. Lohmann; B. Lohr; E. Lohrmann; K. R. Long; A. Longhin; D. Lontkovskyi; O. Yu. Lukina; J. Maeda; S. Magill; I. Makarenko; J. Malka; R. Mankel; A. Margotti; G. Marini; J. F. Martin; A. Mastroberardino; M. C. K. Mattingly; I. -A. Melzer-Pellmann; S. Mergelmeyer; S. Miglioranzi; F. Mohamad Idris; V. Monaco; A. Montanari; J. D. Morris; K. Mujkic; B. Musgrave; K. Nagano; T. Namsoo; R. Nania; A. Nigro; Y. Ning; T. Nobe; D. Notz; R. J. Nowak; A. E. Nuncio-Quiroz; B. Y. Oh; N. Okazaki; K. Olkiewicz; Yu. Onishchuk; K. Papageorgiu; A. Parenti; E. Paul; J. M. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; P. G. Pelfer; A. Pellegrino; W. Perlanski; H. Perrey; K. Piotrzkowski; P. Plucinski; N. S. Pokrovskiy; A. Polini; A. S. Proskuryakov; M. Przybycien; A. Raval; D. D. Reeder; B. Reisert; Z. Ren; J. Repond; Y. D. Ri; A. Robertson; P. Roloff; I. Rubinsky; M. Ruspa; R. Sacchi; U. Samson; G. Sartorelli; A. A. Savin; D. H. Saxon; M. Schioppa; S. Schlenstedt; P. Schleper; W. B. Schmidke; U. Schneekloth; V. Schonberg; T. Schorner-Sadenius; J. Schwartz; F. Sciulli; L. M. Shcheglova; R. Shehzadi; S. Shimizu; I. Singh; I. O. Skillicorn; W. Slominski; W. H. Smith; V. Sola; A. Solano; D. Son; V. Sosnovtsev; A. Spiridonov; H. Stadie; L. Stanco; N. Stefaniuk; A. Stern; T. P. Stewart; A. Stifutkin; P. Stopa; S. Suchkov; G. Susinno; L. Suszycki; J. Sztuk-Dambietz; D. Szuba; J. Szuba; A. D. Tapper; E. Tassi; J. Terron; T. Theedt; H. Tiecke; K. Tokushuku; J. Tomaszewska; V. Trusov; T. Tsurugai; M. Turcato; O. Turkot; T. Tymieniecka; M. Vazquez; A. Verbytskyi; O. Viazlo; N. N. Vlasov; R. Walczak; W. A. T. Wan Abdullah; J. J. Whitmore; K. Wichmann; L. Wiggers; M. Wing; M. Wlasenko; G. Wolf; H. Wolfe; K. Wrona; A. G. Yagues-Molina; S. Yamada; Y. Yamazaki; R. Yoshida; C. Youngman; O. Zabiegalov; A. F. . Zarnecki; L. Zawiejski; O. Zenaiev; W. Zeuner; B. O. Zhautykov; N. Zhmak; A. Zichichi; Z. Zolkapli; D. S. Zotkin

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

397

Detecting fission from special nuclear material sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a graphing component that displays the plot of the neutron distribution from the unknown source over a Poisson distribution and a plot of neutrons due to background or environmental sources. The system further includes a known neutron source placed in proximity to the unknown source to actively interrogate the unknown source in order to accentuate differences in neutron emission from the unknown source from Poisson distributions and/or environmental sources.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

398

Relating to monitoring ion sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus and method provide techniques for monitoring the position on alpha contamination in or on items or locations. The technique is particularly applicable to pipes, conduits and other locations to which access is difficult. The technique uses indirect monitoring of alpha emissions by detecting ions generated by the alpha emissions. The medium containing the ions is moved in a controlled manner frog in proximity with the item or location to the detecting unit and the signals achieved over time are used to generate alpha source position information.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Nomenclature of The Galactic Center Radio Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since its identification as the Galactic Center, the radio source Sagittarius A has been a target of intense research. Due to the high density of sources in the Galactic Center and differing observing techniques, the nomenclature of sources in this region has changed over the years, with sources having several names, as well as the same names being used for different sources. We review this historical evolution in the context of current and previous scientific discussions, and outline how, why and when some of the commonly accepted names of Galactic Center sources were established.

Patrick Palmer; W. Miller Goss

1996-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

400

Repatriation of US sources from Brazil  

SciTech Connect

IAEA's interest in excess and unwanted sealed sources extends back to when radium sources were a problem throughout the world. Sta11ing in 1994, world wide IAEA member states inventoried and consolidated radium (Ra)-226 sources. IAEA then trained Regional Teams in the conditioning of Ra-226 sealed sources for long term storage, which resulted in the Regional Teams conditioning about 14,000 radium sources. These sources remained in their respective IAEA member state locations. Regional teams were seen as a way to encourage member state (local) management of a world wide problem, as well as a more cost effective solution.

Tompkins, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

5 - Surface Wave Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter summarizes the advantages of the surface wave (SW) plasma sources. It includes a summary of the wave and plasma properties of SW sustained plasma columns, review of the essential parts composing a SW plasma source; describes a family of efficient SW launchers for such plasma sources, dwells on three typical experimental arrangements and a brief summary recalling the advantages of SW plasma sources. Surface wave discharges have the advantage of the broadest operating conditions in terms of frequency, tube dimensions and shape, and gas pressure. For example they can be utilized over both the RF (radiofrequency) and microwave domains, which permits one to optimize given processes as a function of frequency (generally through changes in the electron energy distribution function). A further advantage of SW plasmas is that they are the best modeled HF plasmas. This provides insight into HF discharges in general since, to a first approximation, the local plasma properties of SW discharges are the same as in all RF and microwave discharges under given discharge conditions, and for a given HF power density deposited in the plasma. Compared to other RF and microwave plasma sources, SW discharges are undoubtedly the most flexible ones. They also are efficient discharges since very little HF power is lost in the impedance matching circuit. Finally, a major future avenue for these discharges is their operation as magnetized plasmas. As a first approach to presenting surface wave (SW) plasma sources, let us consider their distinctive features with respect to the other plasma sources described in the book:o1. The discharge can be sustained far away from the active zone of the field applicator. This is because the electric field supporting the discharge is provided by a wave that carries away the power from the applicator. It is an electromagnetic surface wave whose sole guiding structure is the plasma column that it sustains and the dielectric tube enclosing it [1]–[3]. This is, thus, a non-cumbersome method for producing long plasma columns; plasma columns up to 6 meters in length have been achieved in our laboratory while launching the wave with a field applicator that surrounded the discharge tube over a few centimeters in length only. [4][5] 2. The range of the applied field frequency f=?/2? is the broadest of all kinds of high frequency (HF) sustained plasma sources. We have succeeded in realizing HF power transfer to the discharge efficiently from approximately 10 \\{MHz\\} to 10 \\{GHz\\} [6] and, with impaired coupling efficiency, down to 200 kHz [7]. This frequency range includes radiofrequencies (RF) and the lower part of the microwave frequency spectrum; we use the term high frequencies to designate RF as well as microwave frequencies. An interesting aspect of this frequency flexibility is the possibility of acting on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) to optimize a given plasma process [8]. 3. The gas pressure range is extremely large. On the one hand, one can operate SW discharges in the sub-mtorr range under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions, [9] while, on the other hand, it is possible to sustain a stable plasma of a few millimeters diameter at pressures at least a few times atmospheric pressure [10]. 4. The range of plasma, density, n, is very large. At reduced pressure and with f in the few \\{MHz\\} range, n, can be as low as 108 cm?3, [7] while at atmospheric pressure it can exceed 1015 cm?3[10] A related parameter is the degree of ionization ?i, i.e. the plasma density relative to the initial neutral atom concentration. Under ECR conditions, for example with f=2.45 \\{GHz\\} where n can reach up to a few 1012 cm?3, ?i ranges approximately from 0.1–10%, whereas in the above-mentioned atmospheric pressure case, it is smaller than 10?4. The higher n, the higher the rate of plasma processes depending on ions or on neutral particles (e.g., atoms, radicals) when the latter are obtained through electron collisions [8]. Large ?i values favor the existence of

Michel Moisan; Joëlle Margot; Zenon Zakrzewski

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement Tempe AZ USA 85287 rajub@asu.edu, rao@asu.edu ABSTRACT One immediate challenge in searching the deep web-similarity-based relevance assess- ment. When applied to the deep web these methods have two deficiencies. First

Kambhampati, Subbarao

403

SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement. Existing methods have two deficiencies for applying to the open col- lections like the deep web. First query in the deep web, the agreements between theses an- swer sets are likely to be helpful in assessing

Kambhampati, Subbarao

404

Air Permitting for Stationary Sources (New Hampshire)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The permitting system implements the permitting requirements of RSA 125-C and 125-I to regulate the operation and modification of new and existing stationary sources, area sources, and devices to...

405

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Source prestige and target reactions to threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 3 by 2 design was employed to study the effects of source capability and of punishment magnitude on the compliance of target individuals to contingent threats intermittently sent by a simulated source in...

Thomas V. Bonoma; Barry R. Schlenker; R. Bob Smith…

1970-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Colorado Nonpoint Source Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Nonpoint Source Website Abstract This is the website of the Colorado Nonpoint Source...

408

A Micromachined Electron Beam Ion Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The complete ion source consists of two parts: an RF-plasma electron source, the linked up optic which focuses the electron beam into the second part, the ionization...

G. Petzold; P. Siebert; J. Müller

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

MIS-1 electron-beam ion source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) has developed and produced electron-beam multiply charged ion sources. These ion sources give the electron beam its high density in the ionization...3 A/cm2.... They produce...

V. G. Abdulmanov; N. S. Dikansky

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Ground Source Heat Pump Demonstration Projects.

411

Dairy Biomass as a Renewable Fuel Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass. This publication explains the properties of dairy manure that could make it an excellent source of fuel....

Mukhtar, Saqib; Goodrich, Barry; Engler, Cady; Capareda, Sergio

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

Ground Source Heat Pump Subprogram Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This overview of GTP's Ground Source Heat Pump subprogram was given at GTP's Program Peer Review on May 18, 2010.

413

North Village Ground Source Heat Pumps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview: Installation of Ground Source Heat Pumps. Replacement of Aging Heat Pumps. Alignment with Furmans Sustainability Goals.

414

RECENT PROGRESS IN HEAVY ION SOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improved Bevalac Fusion reactors Vi Q) U .c. Laser, expl.into thermonuclear fusion reactors. A summary of ion sources

Clark, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

APS News | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS News Archives: APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed APS News Kim of ASD Awarded 2014 Wilson Prize for Achievement in Physics of Particle Accelerators Kim of ASD Awarded 2014 Wilson Prize for Achievement in Physics of Particle Accelerators January 7, 2014 Kwang-Je Kim of the Advanced Photon Source has been named the recipient of the 2014 Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators, Harkay of ASD Elected to Fellowship in the American Physical Society Harkay of ASD Elected to Fellowship in the American Physical Society December 18, 2013 Katherine Harkay of the Accelerator Systems Division has been elected to Fellowship in the American Physical Society for

416

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

417

Detectors (XSD) | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Detector Pool (X-ray Science Division) The Detector Pool provides many different types of x-ray detectors to beamline scientists at the Advanced Photon Source. These detectors are made available for short term loans (typically several days to a week or two, but this is flexible). The detector pool also coordinates loans between sectors, helps sectors repair equipment, and coordinates group purchases. Depending on budgets, we purchase new equipment, based largely on suggestions from the beamline scientists. Requests for detectors are submitted by beamline scientists at the sectors on behalf of general users. General Users are free to contact us regarding detector capabilities and other questions. The Detector Pool is staffed during normal working hours,

418

Energy Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Pilot Program Renewable Energy Pilot Program In June 2010, the Louisiana Public Service Commission (LPSC) unanimously approved a Renewable Energy Pilot Program for the state. The final implementation plan was adopted in November 2010. The goal of the pilot program is to determine whether a renewable portfolio standard is suitable for Louisiana. The pilot program has two major components: the Research Component and the Request for Proposal (RFP) Component. October 16, 2013 Renewable Energy Goal In May 2010, Oklahoma established a renewable energy goal for electric utilities operating in the state. The goal calls for 15% of the total installed generation capacity in Oklahoma to be derived from renewable sources by 2015. There are no interim targets, and the goal does not extend

419

NGLS: Next Generation Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo NGLS logo NGLS Science NGLS Technology Seminars Workshop/Reports Related Links Further Info NGLS Facility Combustion Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Today is a golden age for light sources. Storage ring-based synchrotrons routinely provide X-ray beams exploited by thousands of scientists annually to answer fundamental questions in diverse fields including human health, energy, and electronics and information processing. MORE > NGLS Science Science section chart NGLS CD-0 Proposal NGLS Technology Technology section chart Seminars Science section chart Workshops Science section chart Last updated 06/21/2013 Top A U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory Operated by the University

420

Conventional power sources for colliders  

SciTech Connect

At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

Allen, M.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Solenoid and monocusp ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

Brainard, John Paul (Albuquerque, NM); Burns, Erskine John Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Draper, Charles Hadley (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Solenoid and monocusp ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures. 6 figs.

Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

423

Energy Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 20, 2011 July 20, 2011 Today's Forecast: Improved Wind Predictions Accurate weather forecasts are critical for making energy sources -- including wind and solar -- dependable and predictable. July 8, 2011 Energy Matters Mailbag This edition of the mailbag tackles follow-up questions from our Energy Matters discussion on breaking our reliance on foreign oil. June 30, 2011 Energy Matters: Our Energy Independence June 22, 2011 Distributed Energy Distributed energy consists of a range of smaller-scale and modular devices designed to provide electricity, and sometimes also thermal energy, in locations close to consumers. They include fossil and renewable energy technologies (e.g., photovoltaic arrays, wind turbines, microturbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells, combustion turbines, and steam

424

Issues, Challenges, and Opportunities for Open Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;2 Background · What is Free/Open Source Software Development? · FOSSD project characteristics and practices in "freedom" or liberty) vs. open source ­ Freedom to access, browse/view, study, modify and redistribute;4 Collaborative OSS tools #12;5 SourceForge Topic Map #12;6 FOSSD Project Characteristics · Operational code early

Scacchi, Walt

425

Josephson device with a matched rf source  

SciTech Connect

Analog simulation of a resistance-shunted ac Josephson junction coupled to an rf source with matching impedance reveals (1) added structure in the device's V-I curve even when the source is quiescent and (2) rf-induced steps with peak amplitudes between those produced by voltage and current rf sources. Both results are consistent with experimental data.

Longacre, A. Jr.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Memorandum, Reporting of Radiological Sealed Sources Transactions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The requirements for reporting transactions involving radiological sealed sources are identified in Department of Energy (DOE) Notice (N) 234.1, Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources. The data reported in accordance with DOE N 234.1 are maintained in the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) database by the Office of Information Management, within the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

427

Spallation Neutron Sources Around the World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spallation Neutron Sources Around the World Bernie Riemer Thanks to others for the many shamelessly Laboratory #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Spallation Neutron Source Facilities Spallation Neutron Source Facilities Serve Neutron Science Programs · Neutron beams to suites

McDonald, Kirk

428

Ion source based on the cathodic arc  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Ion source based on the cathodic arc  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles.

Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

International workshop on cold neutron sources  

SciTech Connect

The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. (comps.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)) [comps.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

An Empirical Study of Open-Source and Closed-Source Software Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the study of Mockus et al. [7]. System growth is estimated and compared by using the metric of percentageAn Empirical Study of Open-Source and Closed-Source Software Products James W. Paulson, Member Abstract--This paper describes an empirical study of open-source and closed-source software projects

Eberlein, Armin

432

Nonlinear structures of the Korteweg-de Vries and modified Korteweg-de Vries equations in non-Maxwellian electron-positron-ion plasma: Solitons collision and rogue waves  

SciTech Connect

Solitons (small-amplitude long-lived waves) collision and rogue waves (large-amplitude short-lived waves) in non-Maxwellian electron-positron-ion plasma have been investigated. For the solitons collision, the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method is used to derive the coupled Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations with the quadratic nonlinearities and their corresponding phase shifts. The calculations reveal that both positive and negative polarity solitons can propagate in the present model. At critical value of plasma parameters, the coefficients of the quadratic nonlinearities disappear. Therefore, the coupled modified KdV (mKdV) equations with cubic nonlinearities and their corresponding phase shifts have been derived. The effects of the electron-to-positron temperature ratio, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, the positron-to-ion concentration, and the nonextensive parameter on the colliding solitons profiles and their corresponding phase shifts are examined. Moreover, generation of ion-acoustic rogue waves from small-amplitude initial perturbations in plasmas is studied in the framework of the mKdV equation. The properties of the ion-acoustic rogue waves are examined within a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) that has been derived from the mKdV equation. The dependence of the rogue wave profile on the relevant physical parameters has been investigated. Furthermore, it is found that the NLSE that has been derived from the KdV equation cannot support the propagation of rogue waves.

El-Tantawy, S. A., E-mail: samireltantawy@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Moslem, W. M., E-mail: wmmoslem@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said 42521 (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Manhattan Project: A Note on Sources  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A NOTE ON SOURCES A NOTE ON SOURCES Resources > Note on Sources The text for this web site is a combination of original material and adaptations from previous publications of the Department of Energy (including contractors), its predecessor agencies (primarily the Atomic Energy Commission and the Manhattan Engineer District), and other government agencies. Adaptations run the gamut from summaries to close paraphrases to text being taken directly. This material was gathered and adapted for use by the DOE's Office of History and Heritage Resources. For detailed notes on what sources were used for any particular page, see the footnote at the bottom of the page or its entry in Sources and Notes. For a discussion of the best general sources on the Manhattan Project, see the Suggested Readings.

434

Ground Source Heat Pumps | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Source Heat Pumps Ground Source Heat Pumps Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ground Source Heat Pumps Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps GSHP Links Related documents and websites An Information Survival Kit for the Prospective Geothemral Heat Pump Owner List of Heat Pumps Incentives List of Ground Source Heat Pumps Incentives Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling Various ways to configure a geothermal heat pump system. (Source: The Geo-Heat Center's Survival Kit for the Prospective Geothemral Heat Pump

435

Ground Source Heat Pumps | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Source Heat Pumps Ground Source Heat Pumps (Redirected from Geothermal Heat Pumps) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Ground Source Heat Pumps Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps GSHP Links Related documents and websites An Information Survival Kit for the Prospective Geothemral Heat Pump Owner List of Heat Pumps Incentives List of Ground Source Heat Pumps Incentives Policy Makers' Guidebook for Geothermal Heating and Cooling Various ways to configure a geothermal heat pump system. (Source: The Geo-Heat Center's Survival Kit for the Prospective Geothemral Heat Pump

436

Spent Sealed Sources Management in Switzerland - 12011  

SciTech Connect

Information is provided about the international recommendations for the safe management of disused and spent sealed radioactive sources wherein the return to the supplier or manufacturer is encouraged for large radioactive sources. The legal situation in Switzerland is described mentioning the demand of minimization of radioactive waste as well as the situation with respect to the interim storage facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Based on this information and on the market situation with a shortage of some medical radionuclides the management of spent sealed sources is provided. The sources are sorted according to their activity in relation to the nuclide-specific A2-value and either recycled as in the case of high active sources or conditioned as in the case for sources with lower activity. The results are presented as comparison between recycled and conditioned activity for three selected nuclides, i.e. Cs-137, Co-60 and Am-241. (author)

Beer, H.F. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

HTGR Mechanistic Source Terms White Paper  

SciTech Connect

The primary purposes of this white paper are: (1) to describe the proposed approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms for HTGR design and licensing, (2) to describe the technology development programs required to validate the design methods used to predict these mechanistic source terms and (3) to obtain agreement from the NRC that, subject to appropriate validation through the technology development program, the approach for developing event specific mechanistic source terms is acceptable

Wayne Moe

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics on the advanced neutron source: quality assurance (QA) program; reactor core development; fuel element specification; corrosion loop tests and analyses; thermal-hydraulic loop tests; reactor control concepts; critical and subcritical experiments; material data, structural tests, and analysis; cold source development; beam tube, guide, and instrument development; hot source development; neutron transport and shielding; I C research and development; facility concepts; design; and safety.

McBee, M.R.; Chance, C.M. (eds.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The input power of distributed sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An alternative to the conventional method of calculation of net power radiated by flux integration is presented. This method allows power radiated by distributed sources to be calculated by an integral only over the source region. Furthermore the method is applicable to calculation of radiation from distributed sources in flow. Examples of power radiation for the geometry of the finite cylinder are given for both stationary and moving media. Analytic results are presented for the long wavelength approximation.

Marian Smith

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Glauber coherence of single-electron sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently demonstrated solid-state single-electron sources generate different quantum states depending on their operation condition. For adiabatic and nonadiabatic sources, we determine the Glauber correlation function in terms of the Floquet scattering matrix of the source. The correlation function provides full information on the shape of the state and on its time-dependent amplitude and phase. The coherence properties of single-electron states are therefore essential for the production of quantum multiparticle states.

G. Haack; M. Moskalets; M. Büttiker

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Protected Water Sources (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protected Water Sources (Iowa) Protected Water Sources (Iowa) Protected Water Sources (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations This chapter designates protected water sources, which are subject to additional special conditions regarding water use. Permit applications for

442

Sources Sought | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sources Sought | National Nuclear Security Administration Sources Sought | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Sources Sought Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Major Contract Solicitations > Environmental Program Services Contract > Sources Sought

443

BrightSource Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name: BrightSource Energy Place: Oakland, California Zip: 94612 Sector: Solar Product: California-based company that develops, builds, owns, and operates large...

444

Photon Statistics of Semiconductor Light Sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In recent years, semiconductor light sources have become more and more interesting in terms of applications due to their high efficiency and low cost. Advanced… (more)

Aßmann, Marc

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

An overview of LINAC ion sources  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses ion sources used in high-duty-factor proton and H{sup -} Linacs as well as in accelerators utilizing multi-charged heavy ions, mostly for nuclear physics applications. The included types are Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) sources as well as filament and rf driven multicusp sources. The paper does not strive to attain encyclopedic character but rather to highlight major lines of development, peak performance parameters and type-specific limitations and problems of these sources. The main technical aspects being discussed are particle feed, plasma generation and ion production by discharges, and plasma confinement.

Keller, Roderich [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Building the World's Most Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

View this time-lapse video showing construction of the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Construction is shown from 2009-2012.

None

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

447

Atmospheric Pressure Discharges: Traveling Wave Plasma Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave sustained, atmospheric pressure plasmas are finding an increasing number of applications ... interest in the developing and investigating of appropriate plasma sources [1, 2].

Z. Zakrzewski; M. Moisan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

X-ray sources in globular clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The twelve bright (Lx>10(36) erg/s) X-ray sources in the globular clusters have lower luminosities than the brightest sources in the bulge of our galaxy. The dim (Lx<10(35) erg/s) X-ray sources in globular clusters reach higher luminosities than the cataclysmic variables in the disk of our galaxy. The first difference is a statistical fluke, as comparison with M31 indicates. The second difference is explained because the brightest of the dim sources are not cataclysmic variables, but soft X-ray transients in quiescence. This article describes the BeppoSAX, ROSAT and first Chandra observations leading to these conclusions.

Frank Verbunt

2001-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

449

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",25548,15 "..Electric Utilities",16661,18 "..IPP & CHP",8887,13 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",103407706,15...

450

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",15404,29 "..Electric Utilities",12691,21 "..IPP & CHP",2713,33 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",54584295,28...

451

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",10,51 "Electric Utilities",, "IPP & CHP",10,51 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",71787,51 "Electric...

452

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",4491,43 "..Electric Utilities",19,49 "..IPP & CHP",4472,22 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",14428596,44...

453

Radiation Sources and Radioactive Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to persons who receive, transfer, possess, manufacture, use, store, handle, transport or dispose of radioactive materials and/or sources of ionizing radiation. Some...

454

5, 52235252, 2005 Size-resolved source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and included Chinese aerosol, soil dust, sea salt, biomass burning, coal combustion, oil heating furnace hand, anthropogenic sources such as coal combustion and biomass burning contributed about 60

Boyer, Edmond

455

Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diamondoid Monolayers as Monochromatic Electron Source Print Diamondoids are nanometer-sized molecules that feature diamond-crystal cage structures. Adamantane, the smallest member...

456

X-Ray Laser Sources for Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Progress and prospects in soft X-ray laser development at Princeton are presented. A comparison to plasma and synchrotron sources is made with a...

C. H. Skinner; D. E. Kim; A. Wouters; D. Voorhees; S. Suckewer

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

LANSCE | International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Admins nav background ICANS Related Sites: IPNS ICANS Proceedings International Collaboration on Advanced Neutron Sources dotline About ICANS meetings ICANS originated in...

458

Carbothermic reduction with parallel heat sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are apparatus and method of carbothermic direct reduction for producing an aluminum alloy from a raw material mix including aluminum oxide, silicon oxide, and carbon wherein parallel heat sources are provided by a combustion heat source and by an electrical heat source at essentially the same position in the reactor, e.g., such as at the same horizontal level in the path of a gravity-fed moving bed in a vertical reactor. The present invention includes providing at least 79% of the heat energy required in the process by the electrical heat source.

Troup, Robert L. (Murrysville, PA); Stevenson, David T. (Washington Township, Washington County, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

459

EA-164-A Constellation Power Source, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Source, Inc EA-164-A Constellation Power Source, Inc Order authorizing Constellation Power Source, Inc to export electric energy to Canada. EA-164-A...

460

EA-164 Constellation Power Source, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Constellation Power Source, Inc EA-164 Constellation Power Source, Inc Order authorizing Constellation Power Source, Inc to export electric energy to Canada. EA-164 Constellation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

462

SciTech Connect: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source Nuclear Physics: The Ultracold Neutron Source...

463

Property:EnergyAccessPowerSource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name EnergyAccessPowerSource Property Type String Description Power Source Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:EnergyAccessPowerSource&oldid421179...

464

Prompt GeV-TeV Emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts Due to High-Energy Protons, Muons and Electron-Positron Pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of the internal shock scenario, we model the broadband prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with emphasis on the GeV-TeV bands, utilizing Monte Carlo simulations that include various processes associated with electrons and protons accelerated to high energies. While inverse Compton emission from primary electrons is often dominant, different proton-induced mechanisms can also give rise to distinct high-energy components, such as synchrotron emission from protons, muons or secondary electrons/positrons injected via photomeson interactions. In some cases, they give rise to double spectral breaks that can serve as unique signatures of ultra-high-energy protons. We discuss the conditions favorable for such emission, and how they are related to the production of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos in internal shocks. Ongoing and upcoming observations by {\\it GLAST}, atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes and other facilities will test these expectations and provide important information on the physical conditions in GRB outflows.

Katsuaki Asano; Susumu Inoue

2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

465

Deformation effects and neutrinoless positron ?? decay of Ru96, Pd102, Cd106, Xe124, Ba130, and Dy156 isotopes within a mechanism involving Majorana neutrino mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The (?+?+)0? and (??+)0? modes of Ru96, Pd102, Cd106, Xe124, Ba130, and Dy156 isotopes are studied in the projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework for the 0+?0+ transition. The reliability of the intrinsic wave functions required to study these decay modes has been established in our earlier works by obtaining an overall agreement between the theoretically calculated spectroscopic properties, namely yrast spectra, reduced B(E2:0+?2+) transition probabilities, quadrupole moments Q(2+) and gyromagnetic factors g(2+), and the available experimental data in the parent and daughter even-even nuclei. In the present work, the required nuclear transition matrix elements are calculated in the Majorana neutrino mass mechanism using the same set of intrinsic wave functions as used to study the two neutrino positron double-? decay modes. Limits on effective light neutrino mass ?m?? and effective heavy neutrino mass ?MN? are extracted from the observed limits on half-lives T1/20?(0+?0+) of (?+?+)0? and (??+)0? modes. We also investigate the effect of quadrupolar correlations vis-a-vis deformation on nuclear transition matrix elements (NTMEs) required to study the (?+?+)0? and (??+)0? modes.

P. K. Rath, R. Chandra, K. Chaturvedi, P. K. Raina, and J. G. Hirsch

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

466

Calculation of the expectation values of the spin and the magnetic moment of the gamma photons created as a result of the electron-positron annihilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have calculated the expectation values of the spin and the intrinsic magnetic moment of the gamma photons created as a result of the electron-positron annihilation. We show that, depending on its helicity a gamma photon propagating in z direction with an angular frequency carries a magnetic moment of along the propagation direction. Here the (+) and (-) signs stand for the right hand and left circular helicity respectively. We also show that whatever the helicity is, the spin of each gamma photon is equal to zero (but not !). We argue that in a Stern-Gerlach experiment (SGE) the magnetic moment is an important property but not the spin of the particles. Because of these two symmetric values of the magnetic moment, we expect a splitting of the gamma photon beam into two symmetric subbeams in a (SGE). We believe that the present result will be helpful for understanding the recent attempts on the (SGE) with slow light and the behavior of the dark polaritons and also the atomic spinor polaritons.

Mesude Saglam; Ziya Saglam

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

467

Electron capture and positron decay of Fr206 and Fr208 and the energy levels of Rn206 and Rn208  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The isotopes Fr206 and Fr208 were produced by the reactions Ir(Ne20,xn)Fr206,208 and mass separated on-line. The electron-capture and positron decays to Rn206 and Rn208 were studied by collecting ? ray and internal conversion electron singles spectra as a function of decay time as well as ?-?, ?-e-, and ?-x ray coincidence spectra. The energies and many of the spins were determined for 18 excited, even parity states in Rn208 and for 10 excited, even parity states in Rn206. These nuclei appear to be excellent candidates for interpretation in terms of a weak coupling shell model. The energy levels were also compared to the predictions of the interacting boson approximation model.RADIOACTIVITY Fr206,208 from mass separated products of Irnat(Ne20,xn)Fr206,208. Measured E?, ICC, ?-?-t, e-?-t. Deduced levels E, J, ? in Rn206,208.

B. G. Ritchie; F. T. Avignone; III; H. K. Carter; R. L. Mlekodaj; E. H. Spejewski

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

An ideal sealed source life-cycle  

SciTech Connect

In the last 40 years, barriers to compliant and timely disposition of radioactive sealed sources have become apparent. The story starts with the explosive growth of nuclear gauging technologies in the 1960s. Dozens of companies in the US manufactured sources and many more created nuclear solutions to industrial gauging problems. Today they do not yet know how many Cat 1, 2, or 3 sources there are in the US. There are, at minimum, tens of thousands of sources, perhaps hundreds of thousands of sources. Affordable transportation solutions to consolidate all of these sources and disposition pathways for these sources do not exist. The root problem seems to be a lack of necessary regulatory framework that has allowed all of these problems to accumulate with no national plan for solving the problem. In the 1960s, Pu-238 displaced Pu-239 for most neutron and alpha source applications. In the 1970s, the availability of inexpensive Am-241 resulted in a proliferation of low energy gamma sources used in nuclear gauging, well logging, pacemakers, and X-ray fluorescence applications for example. In the 1980s, rapid expansion of worldwide petroleum exploration resulted in the expansion of Am-241 sources into international locations. Improvements of technology and regulation resulted in a change in isotopic distribution as Am-241 made Pu-239 and Pu-238 obsolete. Many early nuclear gauge technologies have been made obsolete as they were replaced by non-nuclear technoogies. With uncertainties in source end of life disposition and increased requirements for sealed source security, nuclear gauging technology is the last choice for modern process engineering gauging solutions. Over the same period, much was learned about licensing LLW disposition facilities as evident by the closure of early disposition facilities like Maxey Flats. The current difficulties in sealed source disposition start with adoption of the NLLW policy act of 1985, which created the state LLW compact system they we have today. This regulation created a new regulatory framework seen as promising at the time. However, now they recognize that, despite the good intentions, the NIJWP/85 has not solved any source disposition problems. The answer to these sealed source disposition problems is to adopt a philosophy to correct these regulatory issues, determine an interim solution, execute that solution until there is a minimal backlog of sources to deal with, and then let the mechanisms they have created solve this problem into the foreseeable future. The primary philosophical tenet of the ideal sealed source life cycle follows. You do not allow the creation (or importation) of any source whose use cannot be justified, which cannot be affordably shipped, or that does not have a well-delinated and affordable disposition pathway. The path forward dictates that we fix the problem by embracing the Ideal Source Life cycle. In figure 1, we can see some of the elements of the ideal source life cycle. The life cycle is broken down into four portions, manufacture, use, consolidation, and disposition. These four arbitrary elements allow them to focus on the ideal life cycle phases that every source should go through between manufacture and final disposition. As we examine the various phases of the sealed source life cycle, they pick specific examples and explore the adoption of the ideal life cycle model.

Tompkins, Joseph Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Compton Scattering Sources and Applications at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

We report the design and current status of a monoenergetic laser-based Compton scattering 0.5-2.5 MeV {gamma}-ray source. Previous nuclear resonance fluorescence results and future linac and laser developments for the source are presented.

Albert, Felicie; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Bayramian, A.; Betts, S. M.; Cross, R. R.; Ebbers, C. A.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M.; Shverdin, M. Y.; Wu, S. S.; Hartemann, F. V.; Scarpetti, R.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NIF and Photon Science, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

470

Carbon sources utilized by virulent Treponema pallidum.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the carbon and energy sources utilized...MATERIALS AND METHODS Bacteria. The...A solution metering pump was operated...assay medium. Verification of treponemes...Materials and Methods for details...and efficient methods for measuring...major carbon and energy sources will...

J C Nichols; J B Baseman

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Multi-Sourced Electricity for Electrolytic Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$/tonne (the DOE's centralized plant #12;Page 8 Electrolytic Hydrogen · Focus on low-cost electrolysis - 300 US Americas DOE Hydrogen Electrolysis-Utility Integration Workshop Boulder, Colorado 2004 September 22 & 23Multi-Sourced Electricity for Electrolytic Hydrogen Multi-Sourced Electricity for Electrolytic

472

Beam current controller for laser ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

Okamura, Masahiro

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

473

SHIELDING ANALYSIS FOR PORTABLE GAUGING COMBINATION SOURCES  

SciTech Connect

Radioisotopic decay has been used as a source of photons and neutrons for industrial gauging operations since the late 1950s. Early portable moisture/density gauging equipment used Americium (Am)-241/Beryllium (Be)/Cesium (Cs)-137 combination sources to supply the required nuclear energy for gauging. Combination sources typically contained 0.040 Ci of Am-241 and 0.010 Ci of CS-137 in the same source capsule. Most of these sources were manufactured approximately 30 years ago. Collection, transportation, and storage of these sources once removed from their original device represent a shielding problem with distinct gamma and neutron components. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project is planning to use a multi-function drum (MFD) for the collection, shipping, and storage of AmBe sources, as well as the eventual waste package for disposal. The MFD is an approved TRU waste container design for DOE TRU waste known as the 12 inch Pipe Component Overpack. As the name indicates, this drum is based on a 12 inch ID stainless steel weldment approximately 25 inch in internal length. The existing drum design allows for addition of shielding within the pipe component up to the 110 kg maximum pay load weight. The 12 inch pipe component is packaged inside a 55-gallon drum, with the balance of the interior space filled with fiberboard dunnage. This packaging geometry is similar to the design of a DOT 6M, Type B shipping container.

J. TOMPKINS; L. LEONARD; ET AL

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources.

475

Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100~MeV--300~GeV range. Based on the first four years of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the 2FGL catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4 sigma significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 232 sources are considered as identifie...

,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Audio Source Separation using Sparse Representations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Audio Source Separation using Sparse Representations Andrew Nesbit1 , Maria G. Jafari1 , Emmanuel ABSTRACT We address the problem of audio source separation, namely, the recovery of audio signals from related to the windowing methods used in the MPEG audio coding framework. In considering the anechoic

Plumbley, Mark

477

Adler's sum rule in source theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The neutrino-nucleon structure functions suggested by source theory are used to test Adler's sum rule; the numerical result argues for its correctness. An independent source-theoretic derivation is then produced, with the emphasis transferred from hadronic currents to the vector field of a partially U2-invariant unified theory of electromagnetic and weak interactions.

Julian Schwinger

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Stationary Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stationary Sources Stationary Sources NATCARB CO2 Stationary Sources CO2 Stationary Source Emission Estimation Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) employed carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions estimate methodologies that are based on the most readily available representative data for that particular industry type within the respective partnership area. Carbon dioxide emissions data provided by databases (for example, eGRID, IEA GHG, or NATCARB) were the first choice for all of the RCSPs, both for identifying major CO2 stationary sources and for providing reliable emission estimations. Databases are considered to contain reliable and accurate data obtained

479

Characterizing the source of radon indoors  

SciTech Connect

Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Nero, A.V.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Calculation of source terms for NUREG-1150  

SciTech Connect

The source terms estimated for NUREG-1150 are generally based on the Source Term Code Package (STCP), but the actual source term calculations used in computing risk are performed by much smaller codes which are specific to each plant. This was done because the method of estimating the uncertainty in risk for NUREG-1150 requires hundreds of source term calculations for each accident sequence. This is clearly impossible with a large, detailed code like the STCP. The small plant-specific codes are based on simple algorithms and utilize adjustable parameters. The values of the parameters appearing in these codes are derived from the available STCP results. To determine the uncertainty in the estimation of the source terms, these parameters were varied as specified by an expert review group. This method was used to account for the uncertainties in the STCP results and the uncertainties in phenomena not considered by the STCP.

Breeding, R.J.; Williams, D.C.; Murfin, W.B.; Amos, C.N.; Helton, J.C.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ilc positron source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.