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Sample records for ilc positron source

  1. Design of a Pulsed Flux Concentrator for the ILC Positron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gronberg, J; Abbott, R; Brown, C; Javedani, J; Piggott, W T; Clarke, J

    2010-05-17

    The Positron Source for the International Linear Collider requires an optical matching device after the target to increase the capture efficiency for positrons. Pulsed flux concentrators have been used by previous machines to improve the capture efficiency but the ILC has a 1 ms long pulse train which is too long for a standard flux concentrator. A pulsed flux concentrator with a 40 ms flat top was created for a hyperon experiment in 1965 which used liquid nitrogen cooling to reduce the resistance of the concentrating plates and extend the lifetime of the pulse. We report on a design for a 1 ms device based on this concept.

  2. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gronberg, J; Brooksby, C; Piggott, T; Abbott, R; Javedani, J; Cook, E

    2012-02-29

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  3. Prototyping of the ILC Baseline Positron Target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gronberg, Jeff; Piggott, Tom; Abbott, Ryan; Javedani, Jay; Cook, Ed

    2012-01-01

    The ILC positron system uses novel helical undulators to create a powerful photon beam from the main electron beam. This beam is passed through a titanium target to convert it into electron-positron pairs. The target is constructed as a 1 m diameter wheel spinning at 2000 RPM to smear the 1 ms ILC pulse train over 10 cm. A pulsed flux concentrating magnet is used to increase the positron capture efficiency. It is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures to maximize the flatness of the magnetic field over the 1 ms ILC pulse train. We report on prototyping effort on this system.

  4. The Polarized Electron Source for the International Collider (ILC) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brachmann, A.; Clendenin, J.E.; Garwin, E.L.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R.e.; Maruyama, T.; Prescott, C.Y.; Sheppard, J.; Turner, J.; Zhou, F.; /SLAC

    2006-12-01

    ILC project will be the next large high energy physics tool that will use polarized electrons (and positrons). For this machine spin physics will play an important role. The polarized electron source design is based on electron injectors built for the Stanford Linear Collider (polarized) and Tesla Test Facility (un-polarized). The ILC polarized electron source will provide a 5GeV spin polarized electron beam for injection into the ILC damping ring. Although most ILC machine parameters have been achieved by the SLC or TTF source, features of both must be integrated into one design. The bunch train structure presents unique challenges to the source laser drive system. A suitable laser system has not yet been demonstrated and is part of the ongoing R&D program for ILC at SLAC. Furthermore, ILC injector R&D incorporates photocathode development, increasing available polarization, and improving operational properties in gun vacuum systems. Another important area of research and development is advancing the design of DC and RF electron gun technology for polarized sources. This presentation presents the current status of the design and outlines aspects of the relevant R&D program carried out within the ILC community.

  5. ILC Polarized Electron Source Design and R&D Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brachmann, A.; Sheppard, J.; Zhou, F.; Poelker, M.; /SLAC

    2012-04-06

    The R and D program for the ILC electron focuses on three areas. These are the source drive laser system, the electron gun and photo cathodes necessary to produce a highly polarized electron beam. Currently, the laser system and photo cathode development take place at SLAC's 'ILC Injector Test facility', which is an integrated lab (laser and gun) that allows the production of the electron beam and is equipped with a set of diagnostics, necessary to characterize the source performance. Development of the ILC electron gun takes place at Jefferson Lab, where advanced concepts and technologies for HV DC electron guns for polarized beams are being developed. The goal is to combine both efforts at one facility to demonstrate an electron beam with ILC specifications, which are electron beam charge and polarization as well as the cathode's lifetime. The source parameters are summarized in Table 1. The current schematic design of the ILC central complex is depicted in Figure 1. The electron and positron sources are located and laid out approximately symmetric on either side of the damping rings.

  6. ILC Electron Source Gets Help from JLab | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electrode The cathode electrode is being put to the test in Jefferson Lab's electron gun test stand. This work is part of a research project on the ILC's electron source, which...

  7. Hypernovae as possible sources of Galactic positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephane Schanne; Michel Casse; Bertrand Cordier; Jacques Paul

    2004-07-15

    INTEGRAL/SPI has recently observed a strong and extended emission resulting from electron-positron annihilation located in the Galactic center region, consistent with the Galactic bulge geometry, without any counterpart at high gamma-ray energies, nor in the 1809 keV $^{26}$Al decay line. In order to explain the rate of positron injection in the Galactic bulge, estimated to more than 10$^{43}$ s$^{-1}$, the most commonly considered positron injection sources are type Ia supernovae. However, SN Ia rate estimations show that those sources fall short to explain the observed positron production rate, raising a challenging question about the nature of the Galactic positron source. In this context, a possible source of Galactic positrons could be supernova events of a new type, as the recently observed SN2003dh/GRB030329, an exploding Wolf-Rayet star (type Ic supernova) associated with a hypernova/gamma-ray burst; the question about the rate of this kind of events remains open, but could be problematically low. In this paper, we explore the possibility of positron production and escape by such an event in the framework of an asymmetric model, in which a huge amount of $^{56}$Ni is ejected in a cone with a very high velocity; the ejected material becomes quickly transparent to positrons, which spread out in the interstellar medium.

  8. Conceptual Design of ILC Damping Ring Wiggler Straight Vacuum System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, S.; Kennedy, K.; Plate, D.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zisman, M.

    2007-01-01

    rings for the International Linear Collider will containadopted for the International Linear Collider (ILC) positron

  9. FEASIBILITY AND CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF A C.W. POSITRON SOURCE AT CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serkan Golge

    2010-08-31

    A feasibility study of a CW positron source for the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) is provided. The proposed ? 100 nA Continuous Wave (CW) positron source at JLAB has several unique and challenging characteristics: high current incident electron beam at 126 MeV with a high beam power (up to a MW); CW e? beam and CW e+ production. The multiple scattering is a dominant process when creating e+ in a target, which results a large phase space area of the emitted positrons. An admittance study was done at CEBAF to find the maximum phase space area, which is tolerated in the machine. The measured geometrical transverse admittance (A) were Ax =10 and Ay = 5 mm?mrad at the injector. Energy spread measurement was also done at the ARC1. The fractional spread limit in the ARC1 was measured as ? = 3×10?3 at 653 MeV. By using the optimized results and the CEBAF parameters, three positron injector configurations are proposed; Combined Function Magnet, Two-Dipole and Microtron Dipole configurations. With the assumptions made, by using 126 MeV 10 mA e? beam impinging on a 2 mm W target with a 100 ?m spot size, we can get up to 3 ?A useful e+ current at the North Linac connection. One of the biggest challenges is the target design, which the deposited power is about 60 kW. ILC designs project power deposition up to 13 kW, which would allow the creation of a e+ beam of up to 650 nA otherwise. The results of analytic and monte carlo simulations of the positron production, capture and acceleration are presented. For the target design, a review is presented of solutions for the high power production target. Portions of this dissertation work have been published in two conference proceedings.

  10. Development of a Positron Source for JLab at the IAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Tony

    2013-10-12

    We report on the research performed towards the development of a positron sour for Jefferson Lab?s (JLab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, VA. The first year of work was used to benchmark the predictions of our current simulation with positron production efficiency measurements at the IAC. The second year used the benchmarked simulation to design a beam line configuration which optimized positron production efficiency while minimizing radioactive waste as well as design and construct a positron converter target. The final year quantified the performance of the positron source. This joint research and development project brought together the experiences of both electron accelerator facilities. Our intention is to use the project as a spring board towards developing a program of accelerator based research and education which will train students to meet the needs of both facilities as well as provide a pool of trained scientists.

  11. An Undulator Based Polarized Positron Source for CLIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wanming; /Argonne; Gai, Wei; /Argonne; Rinolfi, Louis; /CERN; Sheppard, John; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    A viable positron source scheme is proposed that uses circularly polarized gamma rays generated from the main 250 GeV electron beam. The beam passes through a helical superconducting undulator with a magnetic field of {approx} 1 Tesla and a period of 1.15 cm. The gamma-rays produced in the undulator in the energy range between {approx} 3 MeV - 100 MeV will be directed to a titanium target and produce polarized positrons. The positrons are then captured, accelerated and transported to a Pre-Damping Ring (PDR). Detailed parameter studies of this scheme including positron yield, and undulator parameter dependence are presented. Effects on the 250 GeV CLIC main beam, including emittance growth and energy loss from the beam passing through the undulator are also discussed.

  12. Report of the Snowmass T4 working group on particle sources: Positron sources, anti-proton sources and secondary beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Mokhov et al.

    2002-12-05

    This report documents the activities of the Snowmass 2001 T4 Particle Sources Working Group. T4 was charged with examining the most challenging aspects of positron sources for linear colliders and antiproton sources for proton-antiproton colliders, and the secondary beams of interest to the physics community that will be available from the next generation of high-energy particle accelerators. The leading issues, limiting technologies, and most important R and D efforts of positron production, antiproton production, and secondary beams are discussed in this paper. A listing of T4 Presentations is included.

  13. Physics at International Linear Collider (ILC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitoshi Yamamoto

    2007-09-06

    International Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with the initial center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV which is upgradable to about 1 TeV later on. Its goal is to study the physics at TeV scale with unprecedented high sensitivities. The main topics include precision measurements of the Higgs particle properties, studies of supersymmtric particles and the underlying theoretical structure if supersymmetry turns out to be realized in nature, probing alternative possibilities for the origin of mass, and the cosmological connections thereof. In many channels, Higgs and leptonic sector in particular, ILC is substantially more sensitive than LHC, and is complementary to LHC overall. In this short article, we will have a quick look at the capabilities of ILC.

  14. Positron Source from Betatron X-rays Emitted in a Plasma Wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.K.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; Krejcik, P.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2006-04-21

    In the E-167 plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), an ultra-short, 28.5 GeV electron beam field ionizes a neutral column of Lithium vapor. In the underdense regime, all plasma electrons are expelled creating an ion column. The beam electrons undergo multiple betatron oscillations leading to a large flux of broadband synchrotron radiation. With a plasma density of 3 x 10{sup 17}cm{sup -3}, the effective focusing gradient is near 9 MT/m with critical photon energies exceeding 50 MeV for on-axis radiation. A positron source is the initial application being explored for these X-rays, as photo-production of positrons eliminates many of the thermal stress and shock wave issues associated with traditional Bremsstrahlung sources. Photo-production of positrons has been well-studied; however, the brightness of plasma X-ray sources provides certain advantages. In this paper, we present results of the simulated radiation spectra for the E-167 experiments, and compute the expected positron yield.

  15. Discriminating the source of high-energy positrons with AMS-02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Pato; Massimiliano Lattanzi; Gianfranco Bertone

    2010-12-22

    We study the prospects for discriminating between the dark matter (DM) and pulsar origin of the PAMELA positron excess with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02. We simulate the response of AMS-02 to positrons (and electrons) originating from DM annihilations, and determine the pulsar parameters (spin-down luminosity, distance and characteristic age) that produce a satisfactory fit to the mock AMS-02 data. It turns out that it is always possible to mimic a DM signal with pulsars. Although the fit in some cases requires values of spin-down luminosity and characteristic age different from those of known pulsars in the ATNF and Fermi-LAT catalogues, these catalogues are known to be incomplete, and therefore the pulsar interpretation can hardly be ruled out. We also show that if the positron excess is due to a single pulsar, it is always possible to find a DM candidate that provides a good fit to the mock AMS-02 data. The discrimination between the two scenarios will thus require a better knowledge of the underlying sources, or complementary data.

  16. Discriminating the source of high-energy positrons with AMS-02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pato, Miguel; Bertone, Gianfranco [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zürich, Winterthurerst. 190, 8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Lattanzi, Massimiliano, E-mail: pato@iap.fr, E-mail: lattanzi@icra.it, E-mail: bertone@iap.fr [International Centre for Relativistic Astrophysics and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŕ di Roma ''La Sapienza'', Piazzale A. Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)

    2010-12-01

    We study the prospects for discriminating between the dark matter (DM) and pulsar origin of the PAMELA positron excess with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02. We simulate the response of AMS-02 to positrons (and electrons) originating from DM annihilations, and determine the pulsar parameters (spin-down luminosity, distance and characteristic age) that produce a satisfactory fit to the mock AMS-02 data. It turns out that it is always possible to mimic a DM signal with pulsars. Although the fit in some cases requires values of spin-down luminosity and characteristic age different from those of known pulsars in the ATNF and Fermi-LAT catalogues, these catalogues are known to be incomplete, and therefore the pulsar interpretation can hardly be ruled out. We also show that if the positron excess is due to a single pulsar, it is always possible to find a DM candidate that provides a good fit to the mock AMS-02 data. The discrimination between the two scenarios will thus require a better knowledge of the underlying sources, or complementary data.

  17. ILC Operating Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Barklow; J. Brau; K. Fujii; J. Gao; J. List; N. Walker; K. Yokoya

    2015-06-25

    The ILC Technical Design Report documents the design for the construction of a linear collider which can be operated at energies up to 500 GeV. This report summarizes the outcome of a study of possible running scenarios, including a realistic estimate of the real time accumulation of integrated luminosity based on ramp-up and upgrade processes. The evolution of the physics outcomes is emphasized, including running initially at 500 GeV, then at 350 GeV and 250 GeV. The running scenarios have been chosen to optimize the Higgs precision measurements and top physics while searching for evidence for signals beyond the standard model, including dark matter. In addition to the certain precision physics on the Higgs and top that is the main focus of this study, there are scientific motivations that indicate the possibility for discoveries of new particles in the upcoming operations of the LHC or the early operation of the ILC. Follow-up studies of such discoveries could alter the plan for the centre-of-mass collision energy of the ILC and expand the scientific impact of the ILC physics program. It is envisioned that a decision on a possible energy upgrade would be taken near the end of the twenty year period considered in this report.

  18. Electroweak Physics at the ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Weiglein

    2007-11-19

    Some aspects of electroweak physics at the International Linear Collider (ILC) are reviewed. The importance of precision measurements in the Higgs sector and in top-quark physics is emphasized, and the physics potential of the GigaZ option of the ILC is discussed. It is shown in particular that even in a scenario where the states of new physics are so heavy that they would be outside of the reach of the LHC and the first phase of the ILC, the GigaZ precision on the effective weak mixing angle may nevertheless allow the detection of quantum effects of new physics.

  19. Wake potentials of the ILC Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The vacuum chamber of the ILC Interaction Region (IR) is optimized for best detector performance. It has special shaping to minimize additional backgrounds due to the metal part of the chamber. Also, for the same reason this thin vacuum chamber does not have water cooling. Therefore, small amounts of power, which may be deposited in the chamber, can be enough to raise the chamber to a high temperature. One of the sources of 'heating' power is the electromagnetic field of the beam. This field diffracts by non-regularities of the beam pipe and excites free-propagating fields, which are then absorbed by the pipe wall. In addition we have a heating power of the image currents due to finite conductivity of the metallic wall. We will discuss these effects as updating the previous results. The conclusions of this report are: (1) The amount of the beam energy loss in IR is almost equal to the energy loss in one ILC (TESLA) accelerating cryo-module; (2) Addition energy spread at IR is very small; (3) Spectrum of the wake fields is limited 300 GHz; (4) Average power of the wake fields excited in IR is 30 W for nominal ILC parameters; and (5) Pulse power in this case is 6 kilowatts.

  20. A Central Positron Source to Perform the Timing Alignment of Detectors in a PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Chris

    . The time delay before the gamma ray is detected by the scanner's conventional gamma ray detectors An essential calibration procedure for a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is the compensation a precise time reference. Aligning the detectors in a PET scanner so that they can detect coincident gamma

  1. Discriminating the source of high-energy positrons with AMS-02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pato, Miguel; Bertone, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    We study the prospects for discriminating between the dark matter (DM) and pulsar origin of the PAMELA positron excess with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02. We simulate the response of AMS-02 to positrons (and electrons) originating from DM annihilations, and determine the pulsar parameters (spin-down luminosity, distance and characteristic age) that produce a satisfactory fit to the mock AMS-02 data. It turns out that it is always possible to mimic a DM signal with pulsars. Although the fit in some cases requires values of spin-down luminosity and characteristic age different from those of known pulsars in the ATNF and Fermi-LAT catalogues, these catalogues are known to be incomplete, and therefore the pulsar interpretation can hardly be ruled out. We also show that if the positron excess is due to a single pulsar, it is always possible to find a DM candidate that provides a good fit to the mock AMS-02 data. The discrimination between the two scenarios will thus require a better knowledge of the under...

  2. Polarimeters and Energy Spectrometers for the ILC Beam Delivery System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boogert, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Hildreth, M.; /Notre Dame U.; Kafer, D.; List, J.; Monig, K.; /DESY; Moffeit, K.C.; /SLAC; Moortgat-Pick, G.; /Durham U., IPPP; Riemann, S.; Schreiber, H.J.; Schuler, P.; /DESY; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U.; Woods, M.; /SLAC

    2009-02-24

    This article gives an overview of current plans and issues for polarimeters and energy spectrometers in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC. It is meant to serve as a useful reference for the Detector Letter of Intent documents currently being prepared. Concepts for high precision polarization and energy measurements exist. These concepts have resulted in detailed system layouts that are included in the RDR description for the Beam Delivery System. The RDR includes both upstream and downstream polarimeters and energy spectrometers for both beams. This provides needed complementarity and redundancy for achieving the precision required, with adequate control and demonstration of systematic errors. The BDS polarimeters and energy spectrometers need to be a joint effort of the ILC BDS team and the Detector collaborations, with collaboration members responsible for the performance and accuracy of the measurements. Details for this collaboration and assigning of responsibilities remain to be worked out. There is also a demonstrated need for Detector physicists to play an active role in the design and evaluation of accelerator components that impact beam polarization and beam energy capabilities, including the polarized source and spin rotator systems. A workshop was held in 2008 on ILC Polarization and Energy measurements, which resulted in a set of recommendations for the ILC design and operation. Additional input and action is needed on these from the Detector collaborations, the Research Director and the GDE. Work is continuing during the ILC engineering design phase to further optimize the polarimeter and energy spectrometer concepts and fully implement them in the ILC. This includes consideration for alternative methods, detailed design and cost estimates, and prototype and test beam activities.

  3. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  4. A POSITRON SOURCE USING AN AXIALLY ORIENTED CRYSTAL ASSOCIATED TO A GRANULAR AMORPHOUS CONVERTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and corresponding heating are analyzed and solutions for cooling are proposed. The configurations studied here]. For such device, called hybrid source, the amount of PEDD (Peak Energy Deposition Density) can be made lower than critical values (35 J/g, for W) avoiding the use ofa multi- target system; that was already proposed

  5. Pulsar Wind Nebulae as a source of the observed electron and positron excess at high energy: the case of Vela-X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Della Torre, S; Rancoita, P G; Rozza, D; Treves, A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, in terms of production from pulsars and their nebulae, the cosmic ray positron and electron fluxes above $\\sim10$ GeV, observed by the AMS-02 experiment up to 1 TeV. We concentrate on the Vela-X case. Starting from the gamma-ray photon spectrum of the source, generated via synchrotron and inverse Compton processes, we estimated the electron and positron injection spectra. Several features are fixed from observations of Vela-X and unknown parameters are borrowed from the Crab nebula. The particle spectra produced in the pulsar wind nebula are then propagated up to the Solar System, using a diffusion model. Differently from previous works, the omnidirectional intensity excess for electrons and positrons is obtained as a difference between the AMS-02 data and the corresponding local interstellar spectrum. An equal amount of electron and positron excess is observed and we interpreted this excess (above $\\sim$100 GeV in the AMS-02 data) as a supply coming from Vela-X. The particle contribution is c...

  6. Simulations of the Electron Cloud Builld Up and Instabilities for Various ILC Damping Ring Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivi, Mauro; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Wang, Lanfa; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Wolski, Andrzej; /Liverpool U. /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech.

    2007-03-12

    In the beam pipe of the positron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC), an electron cloud may be first produced by photoelectrons and ionization of residual gases and then increased by the secondary emission process. This paper reports the assessment of electron cloud effects in a number of configuration options for the ILC baseline configuration. Careful estimates were made of the secondary electron yield (sometimes in the literature also referred as secondary emission yield SEY or {delta}, with a peak value {delta}{sub max}) threshold for electron cloud build-up, and the related single- and coupled-bunch instabilities, as a function of beam current and surface properties for a variety of optics designs. When the configuration for the ILC damping rings was chosen at the end of 2005, the results from these studies were important considerations. On the basis of the joint theoretical and experimental work, the baseline configuration currently specifies a pair of 6 km damping rings for the positron beam, to mitigate the effects of the electron cloud that could present difficulties in a single 6 km ring. However, since mitigation techniques are now estimated to be sufficiently mature, a reduced single 6-km circumference is presently under consideration so as to reduce costs.

  7. Simplified SUSY at the ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikael Berggren

    2013-08-07

    At the ILC, one has the possibility to search for SUSY in an model-independent way: The corner-stone of SUSY is that sparticles couple as particles. This is independent of the mechanism responsible for SUSY breaking. Any model will have one Lightest SUSY Particle (LSP), and one Next to Lightest SUSY Particle (NLSP). In models with conserved R-parity, the NLSP must decay solely to the LSP and the SM partner of the NLSP. Therefore, studying NLSP production and decay can be regarded as a "simplified model without simplification": Any SUSY model will have such a process. The NLSP could be any sparticle: a slepton, an electroweak-ino, or even a squark. However, since there are only a finite number of sparticles, one can systematically search for signals of all possible NLSP:s. This way, the entire space of models that have a kinematicall y reachable NLSP can be covered. For any NLSP, the "worst case" can be determined, since the SUSY principle allows to calculate the cross-section once the NLSP nature and mass are given. The region in the LSP-NLSP mass-plane where the "worst case" could be discovered or excluded experimentally can be found by estimating background and efficiency at each point in the plane. From experience at LEP, it is expected that the lower signal-to background ratio will indeed be found for models with conserved R-parity. In this document, we show that at the ILC, such a program is possible, as it was at LEP. No loop-holes are left, even for difficult or non-standard cases: whatever the NLSP is it will be detectable.

  8. Longitudinal Single-Bunch Instability in the ILC Damping Rings: Estimate of Current Threshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, Marco

    2008-01-01

    in the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping rings (In order for the International Linear Collider (ILC) to meet

  9. Direct space-charge effects on the ILC damping rings: Task Force Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, Marco; Oide, Katsunobu

    2006-01-01

    components of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Workof the ILC (International Linear Collider) damping rings’s (

  10. Updated Results of a Solid-State Sensor Irradiation Study for ILC Extreme Forward Calorimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courcoubetis, George; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Kelley, Thomas; Martinez-McKinney, Forest; Schumm, Bruce A; Spencer, Edwin; Tang, Vivian; Wilder, Max

    2015-01-01

    Detectors proposed for the International Linear Collider (ILC) incorporate a tungsten sampling calorimeter (`BeamCal') intended to reconstruct showers of electrons, positrons and photons that emerge from the interaction point of the collider with angles between 5 and 50 milliradians. For the innermost radius of this calorimeter, radiation doses at shower-max are expected to reach 100 MRad per year, primarily due to minimum-ionizing electrons and positrons that arise in the induced electromagnetic showers of e+e- `beamstrahlung' pairs produced in the ILC beam-beam interaction. However, radiation damage to calorimeter sensors may be dominated by hadrons induced by nuclear interactions of shower photons, which are much more likely to contribute to the non-ionizing energy loss that has been observed to damage sensors exposed to hadronic radiation. We report here on the results of SLAC Experiment T-506, for which several different types of silicon diode and gallium-arsenide sensors were exposed to doses of radiati...

  11. Comparison of LHC and ILC Capabilities for Higgs Boson Coupling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LHC and ILC Capabilities for Higgs Boson Coupling Measurements Peskin, Michael E.; SLAC 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCURACY; BOSONS; COUPLING CONSTANTS; DECOUPLING; FERMIONS;...

  12. ILC Treatment of JLab Cavity Garners Exciting Result | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cavity Garners Exciting Result Accelerator cavitiy HG-6 was electropolished with a recipe developed by ILC research and custom-tailored here at Jefferson Lab. Accelerator...

  13. ILC Treatment of JLab Cavity Garners Exciting Result | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.jlab.orgnewsarticlesilc-treatment-jlab-cavity-garners-exciting-result ILC Treatment of JLab Cavity Garners Exciting Result Accelerator cavity HG-6 was...

  14. Methods and apparatus for producing and storing positrons and protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-07-06

    Apparatus for producing and storing positrons may include a trap that defines an interior chamber therein and that contains an electric field and a magnetic field. The trap may further include a source material that includes atoms that, when activated by photon bombardment, become positron emitters to produce positrons. The trap may also include a moderator positioned adjacent the source material. A photon source is positioned adjacent the trap so that photons produced by the photon source bombard the source material to produce the positron emitters. Positrons from the positron emitters and moderated positrons from the moderator are confined within the interior chamber of the trap by the electric and magnetic fields. Apparatus for producing and storing protons are also disclosed.

  15. Nondestructive examination using neutron activated positron annihilation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Denison, Arthur B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for performing nondestructive examination of a metal specimen using neutron activated positron annihilation wherein the positron emitter source is formed within the metal specimen. The method permits in situ nondestructive examination and has the advantage of being capable of performing bulk analysis to determine embrittlement, fatigue and dislocation within a metal specimen.

  16. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e-/e+ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  17. ILC Beam-Parameters and New Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikael Berggren

    2010-07-18

    A brief overview of the linear collider design is given, with emphasis on the elements of particular importance for the performance. The modifications of the RDR design suggested in the SB2009 proposal are presented, once again with emphasis on those item that have most impact on the performance. In particular, the effects on New Physics channels are studied, by two examples: the analysis of the properties of $\\stau$:s in the SUSY benchmark point SPS1a', and the model-independent Higgs recoil mass analysis. It is shown that for both these cases, the SB2009 design performs significantly worse than the RDR design: For the \\stau ~analysis, the uncertainties on both the mass and cross-section determination increases by 20 \\% (or 35 \\% if the travelling focus concept is not deployed). For the Higgs analysis, the corresponding increase in uncertainty is found to be 70 \\% both for cross-section and mass (or 100 \\% without travelling focus). For both channels, the deterioration is to a large part due to the move of the positron source to the end of the linac.

  18. The role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Moortgat-Pick; T. Abe; G. Alexander; B. Ananthanarayan; A. A. Babich; V. Bharadwaj; D. Barber; A. Bartl; A. Brachmann; S. Chen; J. Clarke; J. E. Clendenin; J. Dainton; K. Desch; M. Diehl; B. Dobos; T. Dorland; H. Eberl; J. Ellis; K. Flöttmann; H. Fraas; F. Franco-Sollova; F. Franke; A. Freitas; J. Goodson; J. Gray; A. Han; S. Heinemeyer; S. Hesselbach; T. Hirose; K. Hohenwarter-Sodek; J. Kalinowski; T. Kernreiter; O. Kittel; S. Kraml; W. Majerotto; A. Martinez; H. -U. Martyn; W. Menges; A. Mikhailichenko; K. Mönig; K. Moffeit; S. Moretti; O. Nachtmann; F. Nagel; T. Nakanishi; U. Nauenberg; T. Omori; P. Osland; A. A. Pankov; N. Paver; R. Pitthan; R. Pöschl; W. Porod; J. Proulx; P. Richardson; S. Riemann; S. D. Rindani; T. G. Rizzo; P. Schüler; C. Schwanenberger; D. Scott; J. Sheppard; R. K. Singh; H. Spiesberger; A. Stahl; H. Steiner; A. Wagner; G. Weiglein; G. W. Wilson; M. Woods; P. Zerwas; J. Zhang; F. Zomer

    2005-07-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  19. Recommendation for Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Instability in the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.; /SLAC; Demma, T.; Guiducci, S.; Suetsugu, Y.; Shibata, K.; Ohmi, K.; /Franscati /KEK, Tsukuba; Dugan, G.; Palmer, M.; Crittenden, J.A.; /Cornell U.; Harkay, K.; Boon, L.; Furman, M.A.; /Argonne /LBL, Berkeley; Vallgren, C.Yin; /CERN

    2011-12-13

    Electron cloud has been identified as one of the highest priority issues for the international Linear Collider (ILC) Damping Rings (DR). An electron cloud Working Group (WG) has evaluated the electron cloud effect and instability, and mitigation solutions for the electron cloud formation. Working group deliverables include recommendations for the baseline and alternate solutions to the electron cloud formation in various regions of the ILC Positron DR, which is presently assumed to be the 3.2 km design. Detailed studies of a range of mitigation options including coatings, clearing electrodes, grooves and novel concepts, were carried out over the previous several years by nearly 50 researchers, and the results of the studies form the basis for the recommendation. The recommendations are the result of the working group discussions held at numerous meetings and during a dedicated workshop. In addition, a number of items requiring further investigation were identified during the discussions at the Cornell meeting and studies will be carried out at CesrTA, a test accelerator dedicated to electron cloud studies, and other institutions.

  20. $Z'$ resonance and associated $Zh$ production at future Higgs boson factory: ILC and CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez-Rodriguez, A

    2015-01-01

    We study the prospects of the B-L model with an additional $Z'$ boson to be a Higgs boson factory at high-energy and high-luminosity linear electron positron colliders, such as the ILC and CLIC, through the Higgs-strahlung process $e^{+}e^{-}\\rightarrow (Z, Z') \\to Zh$, including both the resonant and non-resonant effects. We evaluate the total cross section of $Zh$ and we calculate the total number of events for integrated luminosities of 500-2000\\hspace{0.8mm}$fb^{-1}$ and center of mass energies between 500 and 3000\\hspace{0.8mm}$GeV$. We find that the total number of expected $Zh$ events can reach $10^6$, which is a very optimistic scenario and it would be possible to perform precision measurements for both the $Z'$ and Higgs boson in future high-energy $e^+e^-$ colliders experiments.

  1. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Sheppard, J. C. [SLAC, Standford University, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S. [Department of Applied Science, University of Alberta, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  2. ILC RF System R and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The Linac Group at SLAC is actively pursuing a broad range of R&D to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of the L-band (1.3 GHz) rf system proposed for the ILC linacs. Current activities include the long-term evaluation of a 120 kV Marx Modulator driving a 10 MW Multi-Beam Klystron, design of a second-generation Marx Modulator, testing of a sheet-beam gun and beam transport system for a klystron, construction of an rf distribution system with remotely-adjustable power tapoffs, and development of a system to combine the power from many klystrons in low-loss circular waveguide where it would be tapped-off periodically to power groups of cavities. This paper surveys progress during the past few years.

  3. ILC Marx Modulator Development Program Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, C.; Beukers, T.; Larsen, R.; Macken, K.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2009-03-04

    Development of a first generation prototype (P1) Marx-topology klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider is nearing completion at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. It is envisioned as a smaller, lower cost, and higher reliability alternative to the present, bouncer-topology, 'Baseline Conceptual Design'. The Marx presents several advantages over conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at ILC parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. The P1-Marx employs all solid state elements; IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the cells. A general overview of the modulator design and the program status are presented.

  4. Radiation calculations for the ILC cryomodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, N.; Mokhov, N.V.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The MARS15 radiation simulations were performed for the ILC cryomodule. The model assumes a uniform beam loss intensity of 1 W/m of 750-MeV and 250-GeV electron along the inner surface of the beam pipe and the cavity iris of the 12-m cryomodule. Two-dimensional distributions of radiation dose in the module were obtained. Absorbed dose rate and energy spectra of electrons, photons, neutrons and protons were also obtained at the three cryogenic thermometers locations by filling with silicon material in the appropriate locations, and radiation hardness of the thermometers was discussed. From the obtained results, maximum absorbed dose of thermometers at the cooling pipe is 0.85mGy/sec (85 mRad/sec), that is 0.31 MGy (31 MRad) for 20 years.

  5. A new target concept for production of slow positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Y.L; White, M.

    1995-01-01

    Slow positrons in the energy range up to a few keV are useful for material sciences and surface studies. The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator (linac) was designed to produce 8-mA of 450-MeV positrons. A 200-MeV, 1.7-Ampere electron beam impinges on a 7-mm-thick (2 radiation lengths) tungsten target, resulting in bremsstrahlung pair production of electrons and positrons. The existing target was optimized for high energy positron production, and most slow positrons produced by the electron-gamma shower remain trapped inside. The linac could also be used to produce slow positrons, and a modified target could increase the low energy positron yield. Use of a multilayer or segmented target reduces self-absorption by the target, and thus more fully utilizes the incident beam power for slow positron production. A slow positron yield of 10{sup 9}/sec is expected from the existing incident electron beam. Multilayer targets could probably be used by other accelerator-based slow positron sources to improve slow positron yield without increasing the incident beam power. Two variations of a multilayer target concept are presented and discussed in this paper.

  6. Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakes, Terry

    Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography with your host, Terry Oakes Positron Annihilation #1 neighboring atom Positron range: 1-10 mm Gamma-Ray range: 10 mm - 8 positron annihilation #2 #1 T.R.Oakes Univ. WI-Madison #12;Positron Emission Tomography detector #2 detector #1 #2 #1 detector ring T

  7. Introduction to Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakes, Terry

    range: 1-10 mm Gamma-Ray range: 10 mm - 8 positron annihilation #12;Positron Emission TomographyIntroduction to Positron Emission Tomography Positron Annihilation 180 o #1 #2 with your host detector #2 detector #1 #2 #1 detector ring #12;Positron Emission Tomography detector #2 detector #1 #2

  8. Apparatus for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-06-12

    Non-destructive testing apparatus according to one embodiment of the invention comprises a photon source. The photon source produces photons having predetermined energies and directs the photons toward a specimen being tested. The photons from the photon source result in the creation of positrons within the specimen being tested. A detector positioned adjacent the specimen being tested detects gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons with electrons. A data processing system operatively associated with the detector produces output data indicative of a lattice characteristic of the specimen being tested.

  9. Impedance and Single Bunch Instability Calculations for the ILC Damping Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    et al. , “International Linear Collider Reference DesignIn order for the International Linear Collider (ILC) to meet

  10. Development Status of the ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, M.; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2008-06-16

    The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-} 0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

  11. ILC MARX MODULATOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM STATUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, Craig; Benwell, Andrew; Beukers, Tony; Kemp, Mark; Larsen, Raymond; MacNair, David; Nguyen, Minh; Olsen, Jeff; Tang, Tao; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A Marx-topology klystron modulator is under development for the International Linear Collider (ILC) project. It is envisioned as a lower cost, smaller footprint, and higher reliability alternative to the present, bouncer-topology, baseline design. The application requires 120 kV (+/-0.5%), 140 A, 1.6 ms pulses at a rate of 5 Hz. The Marx constructs the high voltage pulse by combining, in series, a number of lower voltage cells. The Marx employs solid state elements; IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and disolation of the cells. Active compensation of the output is used to achieve the voltage regulation while minimizing the stored energy. The developmental testing of a first generation prototype, P1, has been completed. This modulator has been integrated into a test stand with a 10 MW L-band klystron, where each is undergoing life testing. Development of a second generation prototype, P2, is underway. The P2 is based on the P1 topology but incorporates an alternative cell configuration to increase redundancy and improve availability. Status updates for both prototypes are presented.

  12. P1-Marx Modulator for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.; Larsen, R.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    A first generation prototype, P1, Marx-topology klystron modulator has been developed at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC) project. It is envisioned as a lower cost, smaller footprint, and higher reliability alternative to the present, bouncer-topology, baseline design. The application requires 120 kV (+/-0.5%), 140 A, 1.6 ms pulses at a rate of 5 Hz. The Marx constructs the high voltage pulse by combining, in series, a number of lower voltage cells. The Marx employs solid state elements; IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the cells. Active compensation of the output is used to achieve the voltage regulation while minimizing the stored energy. The P1-Marx has been integrated into a test stand with a 10 MW L-band klystron, where each is undergoing life testing. A review of the P1-Marx design and its operational history in the L-band test stand are presented.

  13. Development Status of The ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, M; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Olsen, J.; Tang, T.; /SLAC; ,

    2010-06-07

    The ILC Marx Modulator is under development as a lower cost alternative to the 'Baseline Conceptual Design' (BCD) klystron modulator. Construction of a prototype Marx is complete and testing is underway at SLAC. The Marx employs solid state elements, IGBTs and diodes, to control the charge, discharge and isolation of the modules. The prototype is based on a stack of sixteen modules, each initially charged to {approx}11 kV, which are arranged in a Marx topology. Initially, eleven modules combine to produce the 120 kV output pulse. The remaining modules are switched in after appropriate delays to compensate for the voltage droop that results from the discharge of the energy storage capacitors. Additional elements will further regulate the output voltage to {+-}0.5%. The Marx presents several advantages over the conventional klystron modulator designs. It is physically smaller; there is no pulse transformer (quite massive at these parameters) and the energy storage capacitor bank is quite small, owing to the active droop compensation. It is oil-free; voltage hold-off is achieved using air insulation. It is air cooled; the secondary air-water heat exchanger is physically isolated from the electronic components. This paper outlines the current developmental status of the prototype Marx. It presents a detailed electrical and mechanical description of the modulator and operational test results. It will discuss electrical efficiency measurements, fault testing, and output voltage regulation.

  14. An Over-moded Fundamental Power Coupler for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Neilson, Sami Tantawi, Rand Pendleton

    2009-05-20

    The current design of fundamental power couplers for the ILC are expensive and require excessively long conditioning times. The goal of this develoment is design of a coupler that requires little rf processing and is significantly less expensive to build than the present ILC coupler.????? The goal of this program is development of a new technology for power couplers.This new technology is based on the cylindrical TE01 mode and other over-moded technologies developed for the X-band rf distribution system of the NCLTA. During the Phase I program, a TE10 to TE01 mode transducer suitable for use as a part of a power coupler in the ILC will be designed, built and tested. Following a succesful test, prototype designs of the TE01 to cavity coupler and thermal will be produced. A detailed study of the suitability of this overmoded waveguide technology for the ILC power coupler will be provided in the final report. Development of over-moded power couplers for superconducting cavities could find application im many world-wide accelerator projects, such as SNS, Jefferson Lab upgrade, RIA, TESLA in addition to the ILC.

  15. Dark Matter with (very) heavy SUSY scalars at ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Berggren; F. Richard; Z. Zhang

    2005-10-07

    In this paper, six SUSY scenarios with heavy sfermions, mainly based on theoretical arguments and on experimental indications for new physics, are defined. These scenarios, consistent with the amount of dark matter (DM) measured by WMAP, are then analysed in detail providing pertinent examples of the potential of ILC. It is shown that in most cases ILC, with its high precision based on the chargino analysis and in spite of an incomplete coverage of the gaugino and slepton mass spectrum, can predict the amount of DM in our universe with an accuracy which matches the WMAP results.

  16. Department: Modern and Classical Languages (ILCS) Course No: 258/W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Department: Modern and Classical Languages (ILCS) Course No: 258/W Credits: 3 Title: Cinematic and Humanities Diversity: CA4 Non-International WQ: Writing Catalog Copy: 258W. Cinematic Representations. Cinematic representations of Italian Americans in the works of major directors from the silent era

  17. Present Status of the ILC Project and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, M.; /Fermilab; Walker, N.; /DESY; Yamamoto, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-09-01

    The Technical Design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) Project will be finished in late 2012. The Technical Design Report (TDR) will include a description of the updated design, with a cost estimate and a project plan, and the results of research and development (R & D) done in support of the ILC. Results from directed ILC R & D are used to reduce the cost and risk associated with the ILC design. We present a summary of key challenges and show how the global R & D effort has addressed them. The most important activity has been in pursuit of very high gradient superconducting RF linac technology. There has been excellent progress toward the goal of practical industrial production of niobium sheet-metal cavities with gradient performance in excess of 35 MV/m. In addition, three purpose-built beam test facilities have been constructed and used to study and demonstrate high current linac performance, electron-cloud beam dynamics and precision beam control. The report also includes a summary of component design studies and conventional facilities cost optimization design studies.

  18. Design of the ILC RTML Extraction Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seletskiy, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Walz, D.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-10-17

    The ILC [1] Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) contains three extraction lines (EL). Each EL can be used both for an emergency abort dumping of the beam and tune-up continual train-by-train extraction. Two of the extraction lines are located downstream of the first and second stages of the RTML bunch compressor, and must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spreads of 2.5% and 0.15%, respectively. In this paper we report on an optics design that allowed minimizing the length of the extraction lines while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by the distance required for acceptable radiation levels in the service tunnel. The proposed extraction lines can accommodate beams with different energy spreads while at the same time providing the beam size acceptable for the aluminum dump window. The RTML incorporates three extraction lines, which can be used for either an emergency beam abort or for a train-by-train extraction. The first EL is located downstream of the Damping Ring extraction arc. The other two extraction lines are located downstream of each stage of the two-stage bunch compressor. The first extraction line (EL1) receives 5GeV beam with an 0.15% energy spread. The extraction line located downstream of the first stage of bunch compressor (ELBC1) receives both compressed and uncompressed beam, and therefore must accept beam with both 5 and 4.88GeV energy, and 0.15% and 2.5% energy spread, respectively. The extraction line located after the second stage of the bunch compressor (ELBC2) receives 15GeV beam with either 0.15 or 1.8% energy spread. Each of the three extraction lines is equipped with the 220kW aluminum ball dump, which corresponds to the power of the continuously dumped beam with 5GeV energy, i.e., the beam trains must be delivered to the ELBC2 dump at reduced repetition rate.

  19. Positron Propagation and Fluxes from Neutralino Annihilation in the Halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward A. Baltz; Joakim Edsjo

    1998-08-21

    Supersymmetric neutralinos are one of the most promising candidates for the dark matter in the Universe. If they exist, they should make up some fraction of the Milky Way halo. We investigate the fluxes of positrons expected at the Earth from neutralino annihilation in the halo. Positron propagation is treated in a diffusion model including energy loss. The positron source function includes contributions from both continuum and monochromatic positrons. We find that, for a "canonical" halo model and propagation parameters, the fluxes are generally too low to be visible. Given the large uncertainties in both propagation and halo structure, it is however possible to obtain observable fluxes. We also investigate the shapes of the positron spectra, including fits to a feature indicated by the results of the HEAT experiment.

  20. The ILC Marx Modulator Development Program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leyh, G.E.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The International Linear Collider [ILC] baseline design requires 576 L-band klystron stations, each supplying 10MW peak RF power to the accelerating structures. Each klystron requires a modulator capable of delivering 120kV, 140A 1.6ms pulses, at 5Hz. Solid-state Marx modulator topologies are rapidly becoming feasible with the advent of PC-board-level 4500V IGBTs, fast single junction HV diodes, high density capacitors, and sophisticated modeling software. Making full use of recent technology advances, the ILC Marx Modulator program at SLAC plans to pursue a 120kV solid-state Marx design, which appears to offer significantly higher efficiency, availability, and cost savings than existing modulator options.

  1. Spin Determination and Physics Beyond the Standard Model at the LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentala, Vikram

    2010-01-01

    32] H. Murayama, International Linear Collider Workshop (Proceedings of 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop (setting. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a

  2. Wakefield Effects in the Beam Delivery System of the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Seryi, A.; /SLAC

    2007-06-27

    The main linac of the International Linear Collider (ILC) accelerates short, high peak current bunches into the Beam Delivery System (BDS) on the way to the interaction point. In the BDS wakefields, excited by the resistance of the beam pipe walls and by beam pipe transitions, will tend to degrade the emittance of the beam bunches. In this report we calculate the effect on single bunch emittance of incoming jitter or drift, and of misalignments of the beam pipes with respect to the beam axis, both analytically and through multi-particle tracking. As we want to keep emittance growth due to this effect small, we consider also mitigation measures of changing the metallic surface material and/or the beam pipe aperture. The wake effects are studied in that part of the BDS which includes the collimation and final focus systems. Typical ILC beam parameters are given in Table 1. Initially a stainless steel (SS) beam pipe is considered. Note that the ILC collimator wakes, though very important, are not included in this study; their effects have been studied elsewhere [1]. Note also that similar methods are presented in recent reports Refs. [2],[3].

  3. DETECTORS, SAMPLING, SHIELDING, AND ELECTRONICS FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derenzo, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    SAMPLING, SHIELDING, AND ELECTRONICS FOR POSITRON EMISSIONSAMPLING, SHIELDING, AND ELECTRONICS FOR POSITRON EMISSIONSAMPLING, SHIELDING, AND ELECTRONICS FOR POSITRON EMISSION

  4. Stanford School of Medicine ILC LK005 Project Classroom Safety Training Information and Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    : ______________ (must be Stanford faculty or management staff) Reserving space in the ILC Project Classroom LK005Stanford School of Medicine ILC LK005 Project Classroom Safety Training Information on the Stanford SU-17 form. LK005 Project Classroom Safety Rules and Procedures 1. Food and Beverages or Cosmetic

  5. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  6. The Calibration of the PEPPo Polarimeter for Electrons and Positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyemi, Adeleke Hakeem [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Voutier, Eric J-.M. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie, Grenoble (France)

    2013-06-01

    The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) experiment at Jefferson Laboratory investigated the polarization transfer from longitudinally polarized electrons to longitudinally polarized positrons, with the aim of developing this technology for a low energy (~MeV) polarized positron source. Polarization of the positrons was measured by means of a Compton transmission polarimeter where incoming positrons transfer their polarization into circularly polarized photons that were subsequently analyzed by a thick polarized iron target. The measurement of the transmitted photon flux with respect to the orientation of the target polarization (+-) or the helicity (+-) of the incoming leptons provided the measurement of their polarization. Similar measurements with a known electron beam were also performed for calibration purposes. This presentation will describe the apparatus and calibrations performed at the injector at the Jefferson Laboratory to measure positron polarization in the momentum range 3.2-6.2 MeV/c, specifically to quantify the positron analyzing power from electron experimental data measured over a comparable momentum range.

  7. Report of the Fermilab ILC Citizens' Task Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory convened the ILC Citizens' Task Force to provide guidance and advice to the laboratory to ensure that community concerns and ideas are included in all public aspects of planning and design for a proposed future accelerator, the International Linear Collider. In this report, the members of the Task Force describe the process they used to gather and analyze information on all aspects of the proposed accelerator and its potential location at Fermilab in northern Illinois. They present the conclusions and recommendations they reached as a result of the learning process and their subsequent discussions and deliberations. While the Task Force was charged to provide guidance on the ILC, it became clear during the process that the high cost of the proposed accelerator made a near-term start for the project at Fermilab unlikely. Nevertheless, based on a year of extensive learning and dialogue, the Task Force developed a series of recommendations for Fermilab to consider as the laboratory develops all successor projects to the Tevatron. The Task Force recognizes that bringing a next-generation particle physics project to Fermilab will require both a large international effort and the support of the local community. While the Task Force developed its recommendations in response to the parameters of a future ILC, the principles they set forth apply directly to any large project that may be conceived at Fermilab, or at other laboratories, in the future. With this report, the Task Force fulfills its task of guiding Fermilab from the perspective of the local community on how to move forward with a large-scale project while building positive relationships with surrounding communities. The report summarizes the benefits, concerns and potential impacts of bringing a large-scale scientific project to northern Illinois.

  8. The Reference Design for the ILC, Costs, and What's Next

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barish, Barry

    2007-03-26

    A Reference Design for the International Linear Collider was recently released. The scale of the ILC is such that it must be built by an international collaboration and the design is the culmination of a unique global effort. Through ICFA, a decision was made to base the design on superconducting RF technology and then the Global Design Effort (GDE) was created to coordinate the actual accelerator design toward a construction proposal. The reference design establishes all the features of the machine, and defines both the R&D program and engineering design that will now follow over the next few years.

  9. Design of the Second-Generation ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, M.A.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; MacNair, D.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC; ,

    2010-09-14

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) has initiated a program to design and build a Marx-topology modulator to produce a relatively compact, low-cost, high availability klystron modulator for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Building upon the success of the P1 Marx, the SLAC P2 Marx is a second-generation modulator whose design further emphasizes the qualities of modularity and high-availability. This paper outlines highlights of this design and presents single-cell performance data obtained during the proof-of-concept phase of the project.

  10. ILC Comes to Snowmass (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article) | SciTechinducedcarbonatesConnect iILC

  11. Undulator-based production of polarized positrons$ G. Alexander j

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    as the International Linear Collider, ILC [1] and the Compact Linear Collider, CLIC [2]) will require the development

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-00

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  13. Coaxial Coupling Scheme for TESLA/ILC-type Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2010-05-01

    This paper reports about our efforts to develop a flangeable coaxial coupler for both HOM and fundamental coupling for 9-cell TESLA/ILC-type cavities. The cavities were designed in early 90‘s for pulsed operation with a low duty factor, less than 1 %. The proposed design of the coupler has been done in a way, that the magnetic flux B at the flange connection is minimized and only a field of <5 mT would be present at the accelerating field Eacc of ~ 36 MV/m (B =150 mT in the cavity). Even though we achieved reasonably high Q-values at low field, the cavity/coupler combination was limited in the cw mode to only ~ 7 MV/m, where a thermally initiated degradation occurred. We have improved the cooling conditions by initially drilling radial channels every 30 degrees, then every 15 degrees into the shorting plate. The modified prototype performed well up to 9 MV/m in cw mode. This paper reports about our experiences with the further modified coaxial coupler and about test results in cw and low duty cycle pulsed mode, similar to the TESLA/ILC operation conditions.

  14. Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    Portable Positron Measurement System (PPMS) is an automated, non-destructive inspection system based on positron annihilation, which characterizes a material's in situatomic-level properties during the manufacturing processes of formation, solidification, and heat treatment. Simultaneous manufacturing and quality monitoring now are possible. Learn more about the lab's project on our facebook site http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. High Efficiency Positron Accumulation for High-Precision Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoogerheide, S Fogwell; Novitski, E; Gabrielse, G

    2015-01-01

    Positrons are accumulated within a Penning trap designed to make more precise measurements of the positron and electron magnetic moments. The retractable radioactive source used is weak enough to require no license for handling radioactive material and the radiation dosage one meter from the source gives an exposure several times smaller than the average radiation dose on the earth's surface. The 100 mK trap is mechanically aligned with the 4.2 K superconducting solenoid that produces a 6 tesla magnetic trapping field with a direct mechanical coupling.

  16. A new look at the cosmic ray positron fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boudaud, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The positron fraction in cosmic rays was found to be steadily increasing in function of energy, above $\\sim$10 GeV. This behaviour contradicts standard astrophysical mechanisms, in which positrons are secondary particles, produced in the interactions of primary cosmic rays during the propagation in the interstellar medium. The observed anomaly in the positron fraction triggered a lot of excitement, as it could be interpreted as an indirect signature of the presence of dark matter species in the Galaxy. Alternatively, it could be produced by nearby astrophysical sources, such as pulsars. Both hypotheses are probed in this work in light of the latest AMS-02 positron fraction measurements. The transport of primary and secondary positrons in the Galaxy is described using a semi-analytic two-zone model. MicrOMEGAs is used to model the positron flux generated by dark matter species. We provide mass and annihilating cross section that best fit AMS-02 data for each single annihilating channel as well as for combinati...

  17. Bunching for shorter damping rings for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuffer, David; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A variant rearrangement of the bunch trains for the ILC that enables much shorter damping rings is presented. In a particular example the {approx}2280 bunches are regrouped into {approx}450 subtrains of five adjacent bunches. These subtrains are extracted from the damping rings at {approx}2.2 {micro}s intervals, obtaining the 1ms macrobunch length of the baseline TESLA collider scenario. If the baseline damping rf frequency is 325 MHz and the kicker rise and fall times are {approx}20 ns, a ring circumference of {approx}4.5km is required. Variations of the scheme could easily reduce the circumference to {approx}3km, and faster kickers could reduce it even further.

  18. Bunching for shorter damping rings for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    A variant rearrangement of the bunch trains for the ILC that enables much shorter damping rings is presented. In a particular example the {approx}2820 bunches are regrouped into {approx}550 subtrains of five adjacent bunches. These subtrains are extracted from the damping rings at {approx}1.8 {micro}s intervals, obtaining the 1ms macrobunch length of the baseline TESLA collider scenario. If the baseline damping rf frequency is 325 MHz and the kicker rise and fall times are {approx}20 ns, a ring circumference of {approx}5.8km is required. Variations of the scheme could easily reduce the circumference to {approx}4km, and faster kickers could reduce it even further.

  19. Improving Higgs coupling measurements through ZZ Fusion at the ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Tao; Qian, Zhuoni; Sayre, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the $e^- e^+ \\to e^- e^+ +h $ process through the $ZZ$ fusion channel at the International Linear Collider (ILC) operating at $500$ GeV and $1$ TeV center of mass energies. We perform realistic simulations on the signal process and background processes. With judicious kinematic cuts, we find that the inclusive cross section can be measured to $2.9\\%$ after combining the $500$ GeV at $500 ~\\text{fb}^{-1}$ and $1$ TeV at $1~ \\text{ab}^{-1}$ runs. A multivariate log-likelihood analysis further improves the precision of the cross section measurement to $2.3\\%$. We discuss the overall improvement to model-independent Higgs width and coupling determinations and demonstrate the use of different channels in distinguishing new physics effects in Higgs physics. Our study demonstrates the importance of the $ZZ$ fusion channel to Higgs precision physics, which has often been neglected in the literature.

  20. Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, M.

    2011-04-30

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  1. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  2. Microwave Signature of Relativistic Positrons in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleishman, Gregory; Meshalkina, Nataliia

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic antiparticles can be created in high-energy nuclear interactions; thus, detection of antiparticles in an astrophysical source can tell us something remarkable about the underlying high-energy processes and nuclear interactions. However, once created, the antiparticles remain a minor fraction of their conjugant normal particles, so the detection of the antiparticles represents a big science challenge. To address this challenge we employ imaging and polarimetry of microwave radiation produced as the positrons gyrate in the ambient magnetic field. The key property of the radiation used in this method is that the oppositely charged particles, electrons and positrons, produce radiation with opposite helicity, easily distinguishable by currently operating radio facilities. Analysis of available spatially resolved microwave data augmented by independent magnetic field measurements allows us to remotely detect the relativistic positron component in several solar flares.

  3. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of themore »beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.« less

  4. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  5. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Golge, Serkan [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Vlahovic, Branislav [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-06-21

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  6. Cryogenic infrastructure for Fermilab's ILC vertical cavity test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcagno, R.; Ginsburg, C.; Huang, Y.; Norris, B.; Ozelis, J.; Peterson, T.; Poloubotko, V.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Wong, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermilab is building a Vertical Cavity Test Facility (VCTF) to provide for R&D and pre-production testing of bare 9-cell, 1.3-GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities for the International Linear Collider (ILC) program. This facility is located in the existing Industrial Building 1 (IB1) where the Magnet Test Facility (MTF) also resides. Helium and nitrogen cryogenics are shared between the VCTF and MTF including the existing 1500-W at 4.5-K helium refrigerator with vacuum pumping for super-fluid operation (125-W capacity at 2-K). The VCTF is being constructed in multiple phases. The first phase is scheduled for completion in mid 2007, and includes modifications to the IB1 cryogenic infrastructure to allow helium cooling to be directed to either the VCTF or MTF as scheduling demands require. At this stage, the VCTF consists of one Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostat for the testing of one cavity in a 2-K helium bath. Planning is underway to provide a total of three Vertical Test Stands at VCTF, each capable of accommodating two cavities. Cryogenic infrastructure improvements necessary to support these additional VCTF test stands include a dedicated ambient temperature vacuum pump, a new helium purification skid, and the addition of helium gas storage. This paper describes the system design and initial cryogenic operation results for the first VCTF phase, and outlines future cryogenic infrastructure upgrade plans for expanding to three Vertical Test Stands.

  7. Klystron Cluster Scheme for ILC High Power RF Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2009-07-06

    We present a concept for powering the main linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) by delivering high power RF from the surface via overmoded, low-loss waveguides at widely spaced intervals. The baseline design employs a two-tunnel layout, with klystrons and modulators evenly distributed along a service tunnel running parallel to the accelerator tunnel. This new idea eliminates the need for the service tunnel. It also brings most of the warm heat load to the surface, dramatically reducing the tunnel water cooling and HVAC requirements. In the envisioned configuration, groups of 70 klystrons and modulators are clustered in surface buildings every 2.5 km. Their outputs are combined into two half-meter diameter circular TE{sub 01} mode evacuated waveguides. These are directed via special bends through a deep shaft and along the tunnel, one upstream and one downstream. Each feeds approximately 1.25 km of linac with power tapped off in 10 MW portions at 38 m intervals. The power is extracted through a novel coaxial tap-off (CTO), after which the local distribution is as it would be from a klystron. The tap-off design is also employed in reverse for the initial combining.

  8. Optimization of the Low Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekutowicz, J.S.; /DESY; Kneisel, P.; /Jefferson Lab; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Saito, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ge, L.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC main linacs. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and TJNAF (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping factors for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reducing the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced multipacting barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, multipacting activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss designs for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting.

  9. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); MacGregor, Robert R. (Sag Harbor, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY); Langstrom, Bengt (Upsala, SE)

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  10. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  11. Study of scattering in positron emission tomography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguiar, James

    1998-01-01

    The Texas A&M University positron emission tomograph (TAMU PET) is an experimental, medical-imaging instrument designed to detect gamma rays produced by positron-electron annihilation. Each annihilation yields two coincident gamma rays...

  12. LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 1 Level Set Method for Positron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 1 Level Set Method for Positron Emission for integrated Petroleum Research). #12;LEVEL SET REGULARIZATION IN POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY 2 Abstract In positron emission tomography (PET) a radioactive compound is injected into the body to promote a tissue

  13. Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy of High Performance Polymer Films under CO2 Pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Quarles; John R. Klaehn; Eric S. Peterson; Jagoda M. Urban-Klaehn

    2010-08-01

    Positron annihilation Lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements are reported for six polymer films as a function of carbon dioxide absolute pressure ranging from 0 to 45 psi. Since the polymer films were thin and did not absorb all positrons, corrections were made in the lifetime analysis for the absorption of positrons in the positron source and sample holder using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. Different polymers are found to behave differently. Some polymers studied form positronium and some, such as the polyimide structures, do not. For those samples that form positronium an interpretation in terms of free volume is possible; for those that don’t form positronium, further work is needed to determine how best to describe the behavior in terms of the bulk positron annihilation parameters. Some polymers exhibit changes in positron lifetime and intensity under CO2 pressure which may be described by the Henry or Langmuir sorption models, while the positron response of other polymers is rather insensitive to the CO2 pressure. The results demonstrate the usefulness of positron annihilation spectroscopy in investigating the sorption of CO2 into various polymers at pressures up to about 3 atm.

  14. Towards a PEBB-Based Design Approach for a Marx-Topology ILC Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macken, K

    2009-10-17

    Introduced by the U.S. Navy more than a decade ago, the concept of Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) has been successfully applied in various applications. It is well accepted within the power electronics arena that this concept offers the potential to achieve increased levels of modularity and compactness. This approach is thus ideally suited for applications where easy serviceability and high availability are key, such as the ILC. This paper presents a building block approach for designing a Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator.

  15. Analysis of DESY-Flash LLRF Measurements for the ILC Heavy Beam Loading Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cancelo, Gustavo; Chase, Brian; Davidsaver, Michael; /Fermilab; Carwardine, J.; /Argonne; Simrock, Stefan; Ayvazyan, Valeri; Grecki, Mariusz; /DESY; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2009-06-01

    In September 2008 the DESY-FLASH accelerator was run with up to 550, 3 nano-coulomb bunches at 5 Hz repetition rate. This test is part of a longer-term study aimed at validating ILC parameters by operation as close as possible to ILC beam currents and RF gradients. The present paper reports on the analysis that has been done in order to understand the RF control system performance during this test. Actual klystron power requirements and beam stability are evaluated with heavy beam loading conditions. Results include suggested improvements for upcoming tests in 2009.

  16. Radiation and spin separation of high energy positrons by bent crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bashmakov, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    The channeling of ultrahigh energy positrons both in bent and straight crystals can serve as an effective source of hard photons. The presence in the channel of the strong inhomogeneous electrical field gives rise to a number of interesting peculiarities of the motion of the channeling particles. The radiative separation of particles depending on spin orientation with respect to the plane of motion and radiative polarization can make it possible to obtain by means of bent crystals a positron beam with a degree of polarization about 10 to 20{percent}. Because of availability of the ultrahigh energy positron beams such experiments can be carried out nowadays. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Bremsstrahlung Energy Losses for Cosmic Ray Electrons and Positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widom, A; Srivastava, R

    2015-01-01

    Recently cosmic ray electrons and positrons, i.e. cosmic ray charged leptons, have been observed. To understand the distances from our solar system to the sources of such lepton cosmic rays, it is important to understand energy losses from cosmic electrodynamic fields. Energy losses for ultra-relativistic electrons and/or positrons due to classical electrodynamic bremsstrahlung are computed. The energy losses considered are (i) due to Thompson scattering from fluctuating electromagnetic fields in the background cosmic thermal black body radiation and (ii) due to the synchrotron radiation losses from quasi-static domains of cosmic magnetic fields. For distances to sources of galactic length proportions, the lepton cosmic ray energy must be lass than about a TeV.

  18. Bremsstrahlung Energy Losses for Cosmic Ray Electrons and Positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; R. Srivastava

    2015-09-24

    Recently cosmic ray electrons and positrons, i.e. cosmic ray charged leptons, have been observed. To understand the distances from our solar system to the sources of such lepton cosmic rays, it is important to understand energy losses from cosmic electrodynamic fields. Energy losses for ultra-relativistic electrons and/or positrons due to classical electrodynamic bremsstrahlung are computed. The energy losses considered are (i) due to Thompson scattering from fluctuating electromagnetic fields in the background cosmic thermal black body radiation and (ii) due to the synchrotron radiation losses from quasi-static domains of cosmic magnetic fields. For distances to sources of galactic length proportions, the lepton cosmic ray energy must be lass than about a TeV.

  19. Physics Case for the ILC Project: Perspective from Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Baer; Mikael Berggren; Jenny List; Mihoko M. Nojiri; Maxim Perelstein; Aaron Pierce; Werner Porod; Tomohiko Tanabe

    2013-07-19

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has recently proven its technical maturity with the publication of a Technical Design Report, and there is a strong interest in Japan to host such a machine. We summarize key aspects of the Beyond the Standard Model physics case for the ILC in this contribution to the US High Energy Physics strategy process. On top of the strong guaranteed physics case in the detailed exploration of the recently discovered Higgs boson, the top quark and electroweak precision measurements, the ILC will offer unique opportunities which are complementary to the LHC program of the next decade. Many of these opportunities have connections to the Cosmic and Intensity Frontiers, which we comment on in detail. We illustrate the general picture with examples of how our world could turn out to be and what the ILC would contribute in these cases, with an emphasis on value-added beyond the LHC. These comprise examples from Supersymmetry including light Higgsinos, a comprehensive bottom-up coverage of NLSP-LSP combinations for slepton, squark, chargino and neutralino NLSP, a stau-coannihilation dark matter scenario and bilinear R-parity violation as explanation for neutrino masses and mixing, as well as generic WIMP searches and Little Higgs models as non-SUSY examples.

  20. Non-Simplified SUSY: Stau-Coannihilation at LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Berggren; A. Cakir; D. Krücker; J. List; I. A. Melzer-Pellmann; B. Safarzadeh Samani; C. Seitz; S. Wayand

    2015-08-18

    If new phenomena beyond the Standard Model will be discovered at the LHC, the properties of the new particles could be determined with data from the High-Luminosity LHC and from a future linear collider like the ILC. We discuss the possible interplay between measurements at the two accelerators in a concrete example, namely a full SUSY model which features a small stau_1-LSP mass difference. Various channels have been studied using the Snowmass 2013 combined LHC detector implementation in the Delphes simulation package, as well as simulations of the ILD detector concept from the Technical Design Report. We investigate both the LHC and ILC capabilities for discovery, separation and identification of various parts of the spectrum. While some parts would be discovered at the LHC, there is substantial room for further discoveries at the ILC. We finally highlight examples where the precise knowledge about the lower part of the mass spectrum which could be acquired at the ILC would enable a more in-depth analysis of the LHC data with respect to the heavier states.

  1. Vacuum Polarization in High Energy Physics: (MZ) and at ILC scale 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röder, Beate

    Vacuum Polarization in High Energy Physics: (MZ) and at ILC scale 1. Introduction 2. (MZ. The running electric charge at high energies 179-1 #12;Physics of vacuum polarization ... 1. Introduction Non" (E) (charge screening by vacuum polarization) Of particular interest: (MZ) and aµ (g - 2)µ/2 (mµ

  2. ISIS2: Pixel Sensor with Local Charge Storage for ILC Vertex Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yiming Li; Chris Damerell; Rui Gao; Rhorry Gauld; Jaya John John; Peter Murray; Andrei Nomerotski; Konstantin Stefanov; Steve Thomas; Helena Wilding; Zhige Zhang

    2010-07-14

    ISIS (In-situ Storage Imaging Sensor) is a novel CMOS sensor with multiple charge storage capability developed for the ILC vertex detector by the Linear Collider Flavour Identification (LCFI) collaboration. This paper reports test results for ISIS2, the second generation of ISIS sensors implemented in a 0.18 micron CMOS process. The local charge storage and charge transfer were unambiguously demonstrated.

  3. International Linear Collider Reference Design Report Volume 2: PHYSICS AT THE ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelhak Djouadi; Joseph Lykken; Klaus Mönig; Yasuhiro Okada; Mark Oreglia; Satoru Yamashita

    2007-09-12

    This article reviews the physics case for the ILC. Baseline running at 500 GeV as well as possible upgrades and options are discussed. The opportunities on Standard Model physics, Higgs physics, Supersymmetry and alternative theories beyond the Standard Model are described.

  4. EUROTeV-Report-2005-026-1 Particle tracking in the ILC extraction lines with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be achieved by sending the outgoing beam off-center in the first large super-conducting defocusing quadrupole or the construction of compact super- conducting quadrupoles for the incoming beam lines, as well as with the passage of the 500 GeV International Linear Collider (ILC) and we perform particle tracking studies of heavily

  5. $WWZ/?$ production in large extra dimensions model at LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li Xiao-Zhou; Duan Peng-Fei; Ma Wen-Gan; Zhang Ren-You; Guo Lei

    2012-11-06

    We investigate the effect induced by the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton in the $W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$ production in the framework of the large extra dimensions (LED) model at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). The integrated cross sections and various kinematic distributions in the LED model are presented and compared with those in the standard model. The results show that the contributions from KK-graviton exchange remarkably affect the observables of the triple gauge boson ($W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$) production processes at both the ILC and the LHC, particularly either in the high transverse momentum region or in the central rapidity region. We also find that the relative LED discrepancy for the $W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$ production at the LHC is generally larger than that at the ILC due to the additional LED contribution via $gg$ fusion subprocess and the KK-graviton exchanging resonant effect induced by the continuous large colliding energy in $pp$ collision. We conclude that the $W^{+}W^{-}\\gamma$ and $W^{+}W^{-}Z$ productions at the LHC could have the distinct advantage over at the ILC from the aspect of effectively exploring the LED signal in measuring $W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$ production.

  6. Measuring the Magnetic Center Behavior of an ILC Superconducting Quadrupole Prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Cherrill M.; Adolphsen, Chris; Berndt, Martin; Jensen, David R.; Rogers, Ron; Sheppard, John C.; Lorant, Steve St; Weber, Thomas B.; Weisend, John, II; /SLAC; Brueck, Heinrich; /DESY; Toral, Fernando; /Madrid, CIEMAT

    2011-02-07

    The main linacs of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) consist of superconducting cavities operated at 2K. The accelerating cavities are contained in a contiguous series of cryogenic modules that also house the main linac quadrupoles, thus the quadrupoles also need to be superconducting. In an early ILC design, these magnets are about 0.6 m long, have cos (2{theta}) coils, and operate at constant field gradients up to 60 T/m. In order to preserve the small beam emittances in the ILC linacs, the e+ and e- beams need to traverse the quadrupoles near their magnetic centers. A quadrupole shunting technique is used to measure the quadrupole alignment with the beams; this process requires the magnetic centers move by no more than about 5 micrometers when their strength is changed. To determine if such tight stability is achievable in a superconducting quadrupole, we at SLAC measured the magnetic center motions in a prototype ILC quadrupole built at CIEMAT in Spain. A rotating coil technique was used with a better than 0.1 micrometer precision in the relative field center position, and less than a 2 micrometer systematic error over 30 minutes. This paper describes the warm-bore cryomodule that houses the quadrupole in its Helium vessel, the magnetic center measurement system, the measured center data and strength and harmonics magnetic data.

  7. A study of the measurement accuracy of the Higgs boson decaying into tau pairs at the ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawada, Shin-ichi; Suehara, Taikan; Takahashi, Tohru; Tanabe, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the measurement accuracy of the production cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs boson decaying into tau pairs at the International Linear Collider (ILC). We analyzed all possible production and decay processes for the Higgs boson into tau pairs. Further, we showed that the precision for the production cross section times the branching ratio can be a few percent with the nominal integrated luminosities assumed in the ILC Technical Design Report and a subpercent level with the running scenario including possible luminosity upgrades. The study provides the reference performance of the ILC for phenomenological analyses.

  8. A study of the measurement accuracy of the Higgs boson decaying into tau pairs at the ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin-ichi Kawada; Keisuke Fujii; Taikan Suehara; Tohru Takahashi; Tomohiko Tanabe

    2015-09-07

    We evaluated the measurement accuracy of the production cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs boson decaying into tau pairs at the International Linear Collider (ILC). We analyzed all possible production and decay processes for the Higgs boson into tau pairs. Further, we showed that the precision for the production cross section times the branching ratio can be a few percent with the nominal integrated luminosities assumed in the ILC Technical Design Report and a subpercent level with the running scenario including possible luminosity upgrades. The study provides the reference performance of the ILC for phenomenological analyses.

  9. Transport of positrons in the interstellar medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Gillard; P. Jean; A. Marcowith; K. Ferriere

    2007-02-06

    This work investigates some aspects of the transport of low-energy positrons in the interstellar medium (ISM). We consider resonance interactions with magnetohydrodynamic waves above the resonance threshold. Below the threshold, collisions take over and deflect positrons in their motion parallel to magnetic-field lines. Using Monte-Carlo simulations, we model the propagation and energy losses of positrons in the different phases of the ISM until they annihilate. We suggest that positrons produced in the disk by an old population of stars, with initial kinetic energies below 1 MeV, and propagating in the spiral magnetic field of the disk, can probably not penetrate the Galactic bulge.

  10. The study of the photon structure function at the ILC energy range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Krupa; T. Wojto?; L. Zawiejski

    2015-03-26

    At the future $e^{+}e^{-}$ linear collider ILC/CLIC it will be able to measure the photon structure functions in a wider range of kinematic variables x and $Q^{2}$ in comparison to the previous results of experiments at LEP. The classical way to measure the photon structure functions is the study of $e^{+}e^{-} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-} {\\gamma}{\\gamma} \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}$ X process, where X is the leptonic or hadronic final state. For the study of the QED and hadronic photon structure functions the simulations of two-photon processes were performed at the ILC center-of-mass energy equal to 500 GeV using the PYTHIA and the ILCSoft package. The analysis used information related to the forward detectors, tracking detectors and calorimeters which are parts of the ILD detector concept.

  11. The ILC P2 Marx and Application of the Marx Topology to Future Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, M.A.; Benwell, A.; Burkhart, C.; Hugyik, J.; Larsen, R.; Macken, K.; MacNair, D.; Nguyen, M.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    The SLAC P2 Marx is under development as the linac klystron modulator for the ILC. This modulator builds upon the success of the P1 Marx, which is currently undergoing lifetime evaluation. While the SLAC P2 Marx's (henceforth, 'P2 Marx') target application is the ILC, characteristics of the Marx topology make it equally well-suited for operation at different parameter ranges; for example, increased pulse repetition frequency, increased output current, longer pulse width, etc. Marx parameters such as the number of cells, cell capacitance, and component selection can be optimized for the application. This paper provides an overview of the P2 Marx development. In addition, the scalability of the Marx topology to other long-pulse parameter ranges is discussed.

  12. Probing top-Z dipole moments at the LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röntsch, Raoul

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the weak electric and magnetic dipole moments of top quark-Z boson interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Their vanishingly small magnitude in the Standard Model makes these couplings ideal for probing New Physics interactions and for exploring the role of top quarks in electroweak symmetry breaking. In our analysis, we consider the production of two top quarks in association with a Z boson at the LHC, and top quark pairs mediated by neutral gauge bosons at the ILC. These processes yield direct sensitivity to top quark-Z boson interactions and complement indirect constraints from electroweak precision data. Our computation is accurate to next-to-leading order in QCD, we include the full decay chain of top quarks and the Z boson, and account for theoretical uncertainties in our constraints. We find that LHC experiments will soon be able to probe weak dipole moments for the first time.

  13. HYDRODYNAMIC THERMAL MODELING OF 9-CELL ILC CAVITY ELECTROPOLISHING AND IMPLICATIONS FOR IMPROVING THE EP PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Reece; John Mammosser; Jun Ortega

    2008-02-12

    Multi-cell niobium cavities often obtain the highest performance levels after having been subjected to an electropolishing (EP) process. The horizontal EP process first developed at KEK/Nomura Plating for TRISTAN[1] cavities is being applied to TESLA-style cavities and other structures for the XFEL and ILC R&D. Jefferson Lab is presently carrying this activity in the US. Because the local electropolishing current density is highly temperature dependent, we have created using CFDesign™ a full-scale hydrodynamic model which simulates the various thermal conditions present during 9-cell cavity electropolishing. The results of these simulations are compared with exterior surface temperature data gathered during ILC cavity EP at JLab. Having benchmarked the simulation, we explore the affect of altered boundary conditions in order to evaluate potentially beneficial modifications to the current standard process.

  14. An RF Waveguide Distribution System for the ILC Test Accelerator at Fermilab's NML

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Bowden, Gordon; Swent, Richard; McKee, Bobby; /SLAC

    2007-06-27

    An ILC R&D facility is being constructed in the NML building at Fermilab which, in addition to an injector and beam dump with spectrometer, will contain up to three cryomodules of ILC-type superconducting 9-cell cavities. This linac will be powered by a single klystron. As part of SLAC's contribution to this project, we will provide a distribution network in WR650 waveguide to the various cavity couplers. In addition to commercial waveguide components and circulators and loads, this system will include adjustable tap-offs, and customized hybrids. In one configuration, the circulators will be removed to test pair-wise cancellation of cavity reflections through hybrids. The system will be pressurized with nitrogen to 3 bar absolute to avoid the need for SF{sub 6}. The full distribution system for the first cryomodule will be delivered and installed later this year. We describe the design of the system and completed RF testing.

  15. Direct space-charge effects on the ILC damping rings: Task ForceReport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venturini, Marco; Oide, Katsunobu

    2006-02-28

    In 2005 a global effort was initiated to conduct studies for a baseline recommendation for the various components of the International Linear Collider (ILC). Work for the damping rings was subdivided in a number of tasks. This Report contains the contribution to this effort by the Authors as Coordinators of the Task Force on space charge. (A slightly reduced version of this document can also be found as part of the ''Configuration Studies and Recommendations for the ILC Damping Rings'', Edts. A. Wolski, et al., LBNL-59449.) The studies documented in this Report were carried out for several of the reference lattices considered for the baseline recommendation. Space charge effects were found to be quite noticeable in the lattices with the longest circumference. Although it does not appear that they could prevent operation of any machine having such lattices they do favor a choice of a ring design with shorter ({approx}6km) circumference at 5 GeV.

  16. Towards a precise measurement of the top quark Yukawa coupling at the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juste, A.

    2005-12-01

    A precise measurement of the top quark Yukawa coupling is of great importance, since it may shed light on the mechanism of EWSB. We study the prospects of such measurement during the first phase of the ILC at {radical}s = 500 GeV, focusing in particular on recent theoretical developments as well as the potential benefits of beam polarization. It is shown that both yield improvements that could possibly lead to a measurement competitive with the LHC.

  17. Non-Simplified SUSY: stau-Coannihilation at LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Berggren; A. Cakir; D. Krücker; J. List; A. Lobanov; I. A. Melzer-Pellmann

    2013-09-30

    Simplified models have become a widely used and important tool to cover the more diverse phenomenology beyond constrained SUSY models. However, they come with a substantial number of caveats themselves, and great care needs to be taken when drawing conclusions from limits based on the simplified approach. To illustrate this issue with a concrete example, we examine the applicability of simplified model results to a series of full SUSY model points which all feature a small stau-LSP mass difference, and are compatible with electroweak and flavor precision observables as well as current LHC results. Various channels have been studied using the Snowmass Combined LHC detector implementation in the Delphes simulation package, as well as the Letter of Intent or Technical Design Report simulations of the ILD detector concept at the ILC. We investigated both the LHC and ILC capabilities for discovery, separation and identification of all parts of the spectrum. While parts of the spectrum would be discovered at the LHC, there is substantial room for further discoveries and property determination at the ILC.

  18. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY); Woody, Craig (Setauket, NY); Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang (Sound Beach, NY); Radeka, Veljko (Bellport, NY); Vaska, Paul (Sound Beach, NY); Pratte, Jean-Francois (Stony Brook, NY)

    2006-08-15

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  19. Positron Polarization at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Osland; N. Paver

    2005-07-15

    We review some recent arguments supporting the upgrade of the International Linear Collider by a polarized positron beam, in addition to the polarized electron beam. The examples presented here mainly focus on the impact of positron polarization on items relevant to new physics searches, such as the identification of novel interactions in fermion-pair production and the formulation of new CP-sensitive observables. In particular, in addition to the benefits from positron and electron longitudinal polarizations, the advantages in this field of having transverse polarization of both beams are emphasized.

  20. Demodulation of a positron beam in a bent crystal channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostyuk, A; Solov'yov, A V; Greiner, W

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of a modulated positron beam in a planar crystal channel is investigated within the diffusion approach. A detailed description of the formalism is given. A new parameter, the demodulation length, is introduced, representing the quantitative measure of the depth at which the channelling beam preserves its modulation in the crystal. It is demonstrated that there exist crystal channels with the demodulation length sufficiently large for using the crystalline undulator as a coherent source of hard X rays. This finding is a crucial milestone in developing a new type of lasers radiating in the hard X ray and gamma ray range.

  1. Study of electron-positron interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-09-15

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.

  2. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Joanna Fowler

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  3. Study of the Higgs Direct Reconstruction in ZH->qqH for ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroaki Ono

    2009-07-14

    Precise measurement of the Higgs boson properties is an important issue of the International Linear Collider (ILC) experiment. We studied the accuracy of the Higgs mass reconstruction in the ZH->qqH multi-jet process with the Higgs mass of MH = 120 GeV at sqrt(s) = 250 GeV with the ILD detector model. In this study, we obtained the reconstructed Higgs mass of M_H = 120.79 +- 0.089 GeV and 5.3% measurement accuracy of the cross-section for ZH->qqbb with the integrated luminosity of L=250 fb^{-1} data samples.

  4. Single-Bunch Instability Driven by the Electron Cloud Effect in the Positron Damping Ring of the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    RING OF THE INTERNATIONAL LINEAR COLLIDER* M. Pivi # , T.DR) of the International Linear Collider (ILC), an electron

  5. Electroweakino Searches: A Comparative Study for LHC and ILC (A Snowmass White Paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikael Berggren; Tao Han; Jenny List; Sanjay Padhi; Shufang Su; Tomohiko Tanabe

    2013-09-27

    We make a systematic and comparative study for the LHC and ILC for the electroweakino searches in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We adopt a general bottom-up approach and scan over the parameter regions for all the three cases of the lightest supersymmetric particle being Bino-, Wino-, and Higgsino-like. The electroweakino signal from pair production and subsequent decay to Wh (h to b\\bar b) final state may yield a sensitivity of 95% C.L. exclusion (5sigma discovery) to the mass scale M_2, mu ~ 250-400 GeV (200-250 GeV) at the 14 TeV LHC with an luminosity of 300 fb^{-1}. Combining with all the other decay channels, the 95% C.L. exclusion (5sigma discovery) may be extended to M_2, mu ~ 480-700 GeV (320-500 GeV). At the ILC, the electroweakinos could be readily discovered once the kinematical threshold is crossed, and their properties could be thoroughly studied.

  6. FINAL DESIGN OF ILC RTML EXTRACTION LINE FOR SINGLE STAGE BUNCH COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seletskiy, S.; Solyak, N.

    2011-03-28

    The use of single stage bunch compressor (BC) in the International Linear Collider (ILC) Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) requires new design for the extraction line (EL). The EL located downstream of the BC will be used for both an emergency abort dumping of the beam and the tune-up continuous train-by-train extraction. It must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spread of 3.54% and 0.15% respectively. In this paper we report the final design that allowed minimizing the length of such extraction line while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by 5m distance required for acceptable radiation level in the service tunnel. Proposed extraction line can accommodate beams with different energy spreads at the same time providing the beam size suitable for the aluminum ball dump window. We described the final design of the ILC RTML extraction line located downstream of the new single-stage bunch compressor. The extraction line is only 24m long and is capable of accepting and transmitting 220kW of beam power. The EL can be used for both fast intra-train and continual extraction, and is capable of accepting both 0.15% and 3.54% energy spread beams at 5MeV and 4.37MeV respectively.

  7. Probing top-Z dipole moments at the LHC and ILC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Röntsch, Raoul; Schulze, Markus

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the weak electric and magnetic dipole moments of top quark-Z boson interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Their vanishingly small magnitude in the Standard Model makes these couplings ideal for probing New Physics interactions and for exploring the role of top quarks in electroweak symmetry breaking. In our analysis, we consider the production of two top quarks in association with a Z boson at the LHC, and top quark pairs mediated by neutral gauge bosons at the ILC. These processes yield direct sensitivity to top quark-Z boson interactions and complement indirectmore »constraints from electroweak precision data. Our computation is accurate to next-to-leading order in QCD, we include the full decay chain of top quarks and the Z boson, and account for theoretical uncertainties in our constraints. Furthermore, we find that LHC experiments will soon be able to probe weak dipole moments for the first time.« less

  8. Compact Low-Voltage, High-Power, Multi-beam Klystron for ILC: Initial Test Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teryaev, V E; Kazakov, S Yu; Hirshfield, J L; Ives, R L; Marsden, D; Collins, G; Karimov, R; Jensen, R

    2015-01-01

    Initial test results of an L-band multi-beam klystron with parameters relevant for ILC are presented. The chief distinction of this tube from MBKs already developed for ILC is its low operating voltage of 60 kV, a virtue that implies considerable technological simplifications in the accelerator complex. To demonstrate the concept underlying the tubes design, a six-beamlet quadrant (a 54 inch high one-quarter portion of the full 1.3 GHz tube) was built and recently underwent initial tests, with main goals of demonstrating rated gun perveance, rated gain, and at least one-quarter of the full 10-MW rated power. Our initial three-day conditioning campaign without RF drive (140 microsec pulses @ 60 Hz) was stopped at 53% of full rated duty because of time-limits at the test-site; no signs appeared that would seem to prevent achieving full duty operation (i.e., 1.6 msec pulses @ 10 Hz). The subsequent tests with 10-15 microsec RF pulses confirmed the rated gain, produced output powers of up to 2.86 MW at 60 kV with...

  9. Latest Results of ILC High-Gradient R&D 9-cell Cavities at JLAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rongli Geng

    2008-02-11

    It has been over a year since JLAB started processing and testing ILC 9-cell cavities in the frame work of ILC high-gradient cavity R&D, aiming at the goal of a 35 MV/m gradient at a Q #4; of 1E10 with a yield of 90%. The necessary cavity processing steps include field flatness tuning, electropolishing (EP), hydrogen out-gassing under vacuum, high-pressure water rinsing, clean room assembly, and low temperature bake. These are followed by RF test at 2 Kelvin. Ultrasonic cleaning with Micro-90, an effective post-EP rinsing recipe discovered at JLAB, is routinely used. Seven industry manufactured 9-cell TESLAshape cavities are processed and tested repeatedly. So far, 33 EP cycles are accumulated, corresponding to more than 65 hours of active EP time. An emphasis put on RF testing is to discern cavity quench characteristics, including its nature and its location. Often times, the cavity performance is limited by thermal-magnetic quench instead of field emission. The quench field in some cavities is lower than 20 MV/m and remains unchanged despite repeated EP, implying material and/or fabrication defects. The quench field in some other cavities is high but changes unpredictably after repeated EP, suggesting processing induced defects. Based on our experience and results, several areas are identified where improvement is needed to improve cavity performance as well as yield.

  10. A Hierarchical Control Architecture for a PEBB-Based ILC Marx Modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macken, K.; Burkhart, C.; Larsen, R.; Nguyen, M.N.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2011-12-15

    The idea of building power conversion systems around Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) was initiated by the U.S. Office of Naval Research in the mid 1990s. A PEBB-based design approach is advantageous in terms of power density, modularity, reliability, and serviceability. It is obvious that this approach has much appeal for pulsed power conversion including the International Linear Collider (ILC) klystron modulator application. A hierarchical control architecture has the inherent capability to support the integration of PEBBs. This has already been successfully demonstrated in a number of industrial applications in the recent past. This paper outlines the underlying concepts of a hierarchical control architecture for a PEBB-based Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator. The control in PEBB-based power conversion systems can be functionally partitioned into (three) hierarchical layers; system layer, application layer, and PEBB layer. This has been adopted here. Based on such a hierarchical partition, the interfaces are clearly identified and defined and, consequently, are easily characterised. A conceptual design of the hardware manager, executing low-level hardware oriented tasks, is detailed. In addition, the idea of prognostics is briefly discussed.

  11. Design Considerations for a PEBB-Based Marx-Topology ILC Klystron Modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macken, K.; Beukers, T.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.A.; Nguyen, M.N.; Tang, T.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    The concept of Power Electronic Building Blocks (PEBBs) has its origin in the U.S. Navy during the last decade of the past century. As compared to a more conventional or classical design approach, a PEBB-oriented design approach combines various potential advantages such as increased modularity, high availability and simplified serviceability. This relatively new design paradigm for power conversion has progressively matured since then and its underlying philosophy has been clearly and successfully demonstrated in a number of real-world applications. Therefore, this approach has been adopted here to design a Marx-topology modulator for an International Linear Collider (ILC) environment where easy serviceability and high availability are crucial. This paper describes various aspects relating to the design of a 32-cell Marx-topology ILC klystron modulator. The concept of nested droop correction is introduced and illustrated. Several design considerations including cosmic ray withstand, power cycling capability, fault tolerance, etc., are discussed. Details of the design of a Marx cell PEBB are included.

  12. Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crittenden, J.?A.

    2014-01-01

    cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positroninstability in the International Linear Collider positronin the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) [3].

  13. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voutier, Eric J.-M. [UNIV. JOSEPH FOURNIER, GRENOBLE, France

    2014-06-01

    Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography Physics, Instrumentation, Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Thomas T.

    1 Positron Emission Tomography Physics, Instrumentation, Data Analysis Carl K. Hoh, MD Department PET Scanner Design · Smaller individual crystal size = better spatial resolution · Physical limit HR scanner = 24 elements in axial FOV.Axial FOV = 15 cm 2D and 3D Detector Configurations · 2D mode

  15. Multi-Bunch Simulations of the ILC for Luminosity Performance Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, G.; /SLAC /Queen Mary, U. of London; Walker, N.; /DESY; Schulte, D.; /CERN

    2005-07-11

    To study the luminosity performance of the International Linear Collider (ILC) with different design parameters, a simulation was constructed that tracks a multi-bunch representation of the beam from the Damping Ring extraction through to the Interaction Point. The simulation code PLACET is used to simulate the LINAC, MatMerlin is used to track through the Beam Delivery System and GUINEA-PIG for the beam-beam interaction. Included in the simulation are ground motion and wakefield effects, intra-train fast feedback and luminosity-based feedback systems. To efficiently study multiple parameters/multiple seeds, the simulation is deployed on the Queen Mary High-Throughput computing cluster at Queen Mary, University of London, where 100 simultaneous simulation seeds can be run.

  16. Development of a 10 MW Sheet Beam Klystron for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprehn, D.; Jongewaard, E.; Haase, A.; Jensen, A.; Martin, D.; /SLAC; Burke, A.; /SAIC, Sunnyvale

    2009-05-07

    SLAC is developing a 10 MW, 5 Hz, 1.6 ms, L-band (1.3 GHz) Sheet-Beam Klystron as a less expensive and more compact alternative to the ILC baseline Multiple-Beam Klystron. The Klystron is intended as a plug-compatible device of the same beam current and operating voltage as existing Multiple-Beam Klystrons. At this time, a beam tester has been constructed and currently is in test. The beam tester includes an intercepting cup for making beam quality measurements of the 130 A, 40-to-1 aspect ratio beam. Measurements will be made of the electrostatic beam and of the beam after transporting through a drift tube and magnetic focusing system. General theory of operation, design trade-offs, and manufacturing considerations of both the beam tester and klystron will be discussed.

  17. Beam Ion Instability in ILC Damping Ring with Multi-Gas Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lanfa; Pivi, Mauro; /SLAC

    2012-05-30

    Ion induced beam instability is one critical issue for the electron damping ring of the International Linear Collider (ILC) due to its ultra small emittance of 2 pm. The beam ion instability with various beam filling patterns for the latest lattice DTC02 is studied using PIC code. The code has been benchmarked with SPEAR3 experimental data and there is a good agreement between the simulation and observations. It uses the optics from MAD and can handle arbitrary beam filling pattern and vacuum. Different from previous studies, multi-gas species and exact beam filling patterns have been modeled simultaneously in the study. This feature makes the study more realistic. Analyses have been done to compare with the simulations.

  18. Overview of high gradient SRF R&D for ILC cavities at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, Rongli [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    We report the progress on high gradient R&D of ILC cavities at Jefferson Lab (JLab) since the Beijing workshop. Routine 9-cell cavity electropolishing (EP) processing and RF testing has been enhanced with added surface mapping and T-mapping instrumentations. 12 new 9-cell cavities (10 of them are baseline fine-grain TESLA-shape cavities: 5 built by ACCEL/Research Instruments, 4 by AES and 1 by JLab; 2 of them are alternative cavities: 1 fine-grain ICHIRO-shape cavity built by KEK/Japan industry and 1 large-grain TESLA-shape cavity built by JLab) are EP processed and tested. 76 EP cycles are accumulated, corresponding to more than 200 hours of active EP time. Field emission (FE) and quench behaviors of electropolished 9-cell cavities are studied. EP process continues to be optimized, resulting in advanced procedures and hence improved cavity performance. Several 9-cell cavities reached 35 MV/m after the first light EP processing. FE-free performance has been demonstrated in 9-cell cavities in 35-40 MV/m range. 1-cell cavity studies explore new techniques for defect removal as well as advanced integrated cavity processing. Surface studies of niobium samples electropolished together with real cavities provide new insight into the nature of field emitters. Close cooperation with the US cavity fabrication industry has been undertaking with the successful achievement of 41 MV/m for the first time in a 9-cell ILC cavity built by AES. As the size of the data set grows, it is now possible to construct gradient yield curves, from which one can see that significant progress has been made in raising the high gradient yield.

  19. Design and evaluation of a low-level RF control system analog/digital receiver for the ILC main Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavric, Uros; Vidmar, Matjaz; Chase, Brian; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The proposed RF distribution scheme for the two 15 km long ILC LINACs, uses one klystron to feed 26 superconducting RF cavities operating at 1.3 GHz. For a precise control of the vector sum of the signals coming from the SC cavities, the control system needs a high performance, low cost, reliable and modular multichannel receiver. At Fermilab we developed a 96 channel, 1.3 GHz analog/digital receiver for the ILC LINAC LLRF control system. In the paper we present a balanced design approach to the specifications of each receiver section, the design choices made to fulfill the goals and a description of the prototyped system. The design is tested by measuring standard performance parameters, such as noise figure, linearity and temperature sensitivity. Measurements show that the design meets the specifications and it is comparable to other similar systems developed at other laboratories, in terms of performance.

  20. Cold Positrons from Decaying Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Dodelson, Scott; Vives, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here we explore the possibilities that arise if one of the products in a (Heavy Particle) $\\rightarrow$ (Dark Matter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  1. The positron excess and supersymmetric dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward A. Baltz; Joakim Edsjo; Katherine Freese; Paolo Gondolo

    2002-11-12

    Using a new instrument, the HEAT collaboration has confirmed the excess of cosmic ray positrons that they first detected in 1994. We explore the possibility that this excess is due to the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the galactic halo. We confirm that neutralino annihilation can produce enough positrons to make up the measured excess only if there is an additional enhancement to the signal. We quantify the `boost factor' that is required in the signal for various models in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model parameter space, and find that a boost factor >30 provides good fits to the HEAT data. Such an enhancement in the signal could arise if we live in a clumpy halo.

  2. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jian; Fisch, Nathaniel J; Teng, Qian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1\\%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.

  3. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Teng, Qian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-06-19

    In this study, massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.

  4. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Teng, Qian; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-06-01

    Massive runaway positrons are generated by runaway electrons in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak geometry, loop voltage, radiation and collisional effects. It is found numerically that runaway positrons will drift out of the plasma to annihilate on the first wall, with an in-plasma annihilation possibility less than 0.1%. The dynamics of runaway positrons provides signatures that can be observed as diagnostic tools.

  5. Multi-gigaelectronvolt, low-energy spread acceleration of positrons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Multi-gigaelectronvolt, low-energy spread acceleration of positrons in a self-loaded plasma wakefield Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  6. Remarks on calculation of positron flux from galactic dark matter...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    involves solving transport equations, which account for interaction of positrons with matter and galactic magnetic fields. Existing calculations solve the equations inside the...

  7. International Linear Collider Reference Design Report Volume 2: Physics at the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aarons, Gerald; Abe, Toshinori; Abernathy, Jason; Ablikim, Medina; Abramowicz, Halina; Adey, David; Adloff, Catherine; Adolphsen, Chris; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Agapov, Ilya; Ahn, Jung-Keun; Aihara, Hiroaki; Akemoto, Mitsuo; del Carmen Alabau, Maria; Albert, Justin; Albrecht, Hartwig; Albrecht, Michael; Alesini, David; Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Jim; Allison, Wade; /SLAC /Tokyo U. /Victoria U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Tel Aviv U. /Birmingham U. /Annecy, LAPP /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /DESY /Royal Holloway, U. of London /CERN /Pusan Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Notre Dame U. /Frascati /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Oxford U. /Hefei, CUST /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /Fermilab

    2011-11-14

    The triumph of 20th century particle physics was the development of the Standard Model and the confirmation of many of its aspects. Experiments determined the particle constituents of ordinary matter, and identified four forces that hold matter together and transform it from one form to another. Particle interactions were found to obey precise laws of relativity and quantum theory. Remarkable features of quantum physics were observed, including the real effects of 'virtual' particles on the visible world. Building on this success, particle physicists are now able to address questions that are even more fundamental, and explore some of the deepest mysteries in science. The scope of these questions is illustrated by this summary from the report Quantum Universe: (1) Are there undiscovered principles of nature; (2) How can we solve the mystery of dark energy; (3) Are there extra dimensions of space; (4) Do all the forces become one; (5) Why are there so many particles; (6) What is dark matter? How can we make it in the laboratory; (7) What are neutrinos telling us; (8) How did the universe begin; and (9) What happened to the antimatter? A worldwide program of particle physics investigations, using multiple approaches, is already underway to explore this compelling scientific landscape. As emphasized in many scientific studies, the International Linear Collider is expected to play a central role in what is likely to be an era of revolutionary advances. Discoveries from the ILC could have breakthrough impact on many of these fundamental questions. Many of the scientific opportunities for the ILC involve the Higgs particle and related new phenomena at Terascale energies. The Standard Model boldly hypothesizes a new form of Terascale energy, called the Higgs field, that permeates the entire universe. Elementary particles acquire mass by interacting with this field. The Higgs field also breaks a fundamental electroweak force into two forces, the electromagnetic and weak forces, which are observed by experiments in very different forms. So far, there is no direct experimental evidence for a Higgs field or the Higgs particle that should accompany it. Furthermore, quantum effects of the type already observed in experiments should destabilize the Higgs boson of the Standard Model, preventing its operation at Terascale energies. The proposed antidotes for this quantum instability mostly involve dramatic phenomena at the Terascale: new forces, a new principle of nature called supersymmetry, or even extra dimensions of space. Thus for particle physicists the Higgs boson is at the center of a much broader program of discovery, taking off from a long list of questions. Is there really a Higgs boson? If not, what are the mechanisms that give mass to particles and break the electroweak force? If there is a Higgs boson, does it differ from the hypothetical Higgs of the Standard Model? Is there more than one Higgs particle? What are the new phenomena that stabilize the Higgs boson at the Terascale? What properties of Higgs boson inform us about these new phenomena? Another major opportunity for the ILC is to shed light on the dark side of the universe. Astrophysical data shows that dark matter dominates over visible matter, and that almost all of this dark matter cannot be composed of known particles. This data, combined with the concordance model of Big Bang cosmology, suggests that dark matter is comprised of new particles that interact weakly with ordinary matter and have Terascale masses. It is truely remarkable that astrophysics and cosmology, completely independently of the particle physics considerations reviewed above, point to new phenomena at the Terascale. If Terascale dark matter exists, experiments at the ILC should be able to produce such particles in the laboratory and study their properties. Another list of questions will then beckon. Do these new particles really have the correct properties to be the dark matter? Do they account for all of the dark matter, or only part of it? What do their properties tell us about the evolut

  8. Optimization of the Low-Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Li; L. Ge; K. Ko; L. Lee; C.-K. Ng; G. L. Schussman; L. Xiao; T. Higo; Y. Morozumi; K. Saito; P. Kneisel; J. S. Sekutowicz

    2007-08-01

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and JLab (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting (MP) still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reduces the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced MP barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, MP activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss shape for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting. Comparisons of simulation results with measurements will also be presented.

  9. Progress, Challenges and Perspectives in Positron Physics: Report on the XIIth International Positron Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gribakin, Gleb

    was the first production in the laboratory of low-energy antihydrogen atoms, which represents a crucial, first, Denmark 3 Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Received January International Workshop on Positron and Positronium Physics (Sandbjerg, Denmark, 19­21 July 2003). This workshop

  10. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Detector design for a Future Electron-Positron Collider (4/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    In this lecture I will discuss the issues related to the overall design and optimization of a detector for ILC and CLIC energies. I will concentrate on the two main detector concepts which are being developed in the context of the ILC. Here there has been much recent progress in developing realistic detector models and in understanding the physics performance of the overall detector concept. In addition, I will discuss the how the differences in the detector requirements for the ILC and CLIC impact the overall detector design.

  11. Positron-molecule interactions: Resonant attachment, annihilation, and bound states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gribakin, Gleb

    , Northern Ireland, United Kingdom J. A. Young Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology with the number of vibrational degrees of freedom, approximately as the fourth power of the number of atoms. Positron-molecule wave function 2563 D. Direct annihilation: Virtual and weakly bound positron states 2564

  12. Prospects for the study of the \\stau-system in SPS1a' at the ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Bechtle; Mikael Berggren; Jenny List; Peter Schade; Olga Stempel

    2010-07-22

    The prospects for the analysis of tau channels at the SUSY benchmark point SPS1a', especially from e+e- -> stau_1 stau_1 and e+e- -> stau_2 stau_2, have been studied in full simulation of the ILD detector concept forseen for the International Linear Collider. All accessible SUSY channels as well as all Standard Model backgrounds were generated at a centre-of-mass energy E_CMS=500 GeV, including the beam energy spectrum and beam backgrounds expected for nominal ILC beam parameters. With an integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 delivered to the experiment, the masses of the stau_1 and stau_2 can be measured to 107.69^{+0.03}_{-0.06} GeV +- 1.1 \\delta M_LSP and 183 ^{+11}_{-5} GeV +- 18 \\delta M_LSP, respectively, while the true values in SPS1a' are 107.9 GeV and 194.9 GeV, respectively. The cross sections for stau_1 and stau_2 pair production could be obtained with a precision of 3.1% and 4.2%, respectively. Combining the mass and cross section measurement in the stau_2 channel allows to determine the LSP mass with a relative error of 1.7%, assuming a known mixing angle. In stau_1 -> tau LSP decays, the tau polarisation is measured to be 91 +- 9% and 87.0 +- 3.4% in the pi and rho decay channels of the tau, respectively. The true value in the simulated SPS1a' sample is 89.6%.

  13. Roles of superthermal electrons and positrons on positron-acoustic solitary waves and double layers in electron–positron–ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, M. S.; Uddin, M. J.; Mamun, A. A.; Masud, M. M.

    2014-09-01

    Positron-acoustic (PA) solitary waves (SWs) and double layers (DLs) in four-component plasmas consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated both numerically and analytically by deriving Korteweg–de Vries (K-dV), modified K-dV (mK-dV), and Gardner equations along with their DLs solutions using the reductive perturbation method. It is examined that depending on the plasma parameters, the K-dV SWs, Gardner SWs, and DLs support either compressive or rarefactive structures, whereas mK-dV SWs support only compressive structure. It is also found that the presence of superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and hot electrons significantly modify the basic features of PA SWs as well as PA DLs. Besides, the critical number density ratio of hot positrons and cold positrons play an important role in the polarity of PA SWs and DLs. The implications of our results in different space as well as laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  14. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schyler, David J. (Bellport, NY); O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY); Woody, Craig (Setauket, NY); Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang (Sound Beach, NY); Radeka, Veljko (Bellport, NY); Vaska, Paul (Sound Beach, NY); Pratte, Jean-Francois (Stony Brook, NY); Volkow, Nora (Chevy Chase, MD)

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  15. Progress towards a practical multicell positron trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danielson, J. R. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States); Hurst, N. C.; Surko, C. M. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States)

    2013-03-19

    Described here is progress in an experimental program to develop a 21 cell multicell trap for the accumulation and storage of {approx} 10{sup 12} positrons. The basic architecture is an arrangement of multiple Penning-Malmberg (PM) trapped plasmas (i.e., cells) arranged in parallel in a common vacuum system and magnetic field. Experiments are described that are intended to address several key issues, including the effects of large space charge potentials and high plasma densities on: plasma heating, deterioration of confinement, and decreased efficiency of rotating electric fields in producing plasma compression. The confinement of PM plasmas displaced both radially and toward the ends of the uniform magnetic field region will also be investigated.

  16. Applications and advances of positron beam spectroscopy: appendix a

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, R. H., LLNL

    1997-11-05

    Over 50 scientists from DOE-DP, DOE-ER, the national laboratories, academia and industry attended a workshop held on November 5-7, 1997 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory jointly sponsored by the DOE-Division of Materials Science, The Materials Research Institute at LLNL and the University of California Presidents Office. Workshop participants were charged to address two questions: Is there a need for a national center for materials analysis using positron techniques and can the capabilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serve this need. To demonstrate the need for a national center the workshop participants discussed the technical advantages enabled by high positron currents and advanced measurement techniques, the role that these techniques will play in materials analysis and the demand for the data. There were general discussions lead by review talks on positron analysis techniques, and their applications to problems in semiconductors, polymers and composites, metals and engineering materials, surface analysis and advanced techniques. These were followed by focus sessions on positron analysis opportunities in these same areas. Livermore now leads the world in materials analysis capabilities by positrons due to developments in response to demands of science based stockpile stewardship. There was a detailed discussion of the LLNL capabilities and a tour of the facilities. The Livermore facilities now include the worlds highest current beam of keV positrons, a scanning pulsed positron microprobe under development capable of three dimensional maps of defect size and concentration, an MeV positron beam for defect analysis of large samples, and electron momentum spectroscopy by positrons. This document is a supplement to the written summary report. It contains a complete schedule, list of attendees and the vuegraphs for the presentations in the review and focus sessions.

  17. Two-photon exchange measurements with positrons and electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Arrington

    2009-05-05

    Two-photon exchange contributions have potentially broad ranging impact on several charged lepton scattering measurements. Previously believed to be extremely small, based in part on comparisons of positron scattering and electron scattering in the 1950s and 1960s, recent data suggest that the corrections may be larger than expected, in particular in kinematic regions that were inaccessible in these early positron scattering measurements. Additional measurements using positron beams at Jefferson Lab would allow for a detailed investigation of these contributions in a range of reactions and observables.

  18. Q0 Improvement of Large-Grain Multi-Cell Cavities by Using JLab's Standard ILC EP Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, R. L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Eremeev, G. V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Kneisel, P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Liu, K. X. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China); Lu, X. Y. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhao, K. [IHIP, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01

    As reported previously at the Berlin workshop, applying the JLab standard ILC electropolishing (EP) recipe on previously buffered chemical polishing (BCP) etched fine-grain multi-cell cavities results in improvement both in gradient and Q{sub 0}. We recently had the opportunity to experiment with two 1300 MHz 9-cell large-gain niobium cavities manufactured by JLab and Peking University. Both cavities were initially BCP etched and further processed by using JLab's standard ILC EP recipe. Due to fabrication defects, these two cavities only reached a gradient in the range of 20-30 MV/m. Interestingly both cavities demonstrated significant Q{sub 0} improvement in the gradient range of 15-20 MV/m. At 2K, a Q{sub 0} value of 2E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. At a reduced temperature of 1.8K, a Q{sub 0} value of 3E10 is achieved at 20 MV/m. These results suggest that a possible path for obtaining higher Q{sub 0} in the medium gradient range is to use the large-grain material for cavity fabrication and EP and low temperature bake for cavity processing.

  19. Neutral Higgs Boson Pair-Production and Trilinear Self-Couplings in the MSSM at ILC and CLIC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gutierrez-Rodriguez; M. A. Hernandez-Ruiz; O. A. Sampayo

    2009-03-09

    We study pair-production as well as the triple self-couplings of the neutral Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) at the Future International Linear $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The analysis is based on the reactions $e^{+}e^{-}\\to b \\bar b h_ih_i, t \\bar t h_ih_i$ with $h_i=h, H, A$. We evaluate the total cross-section for both $b\\bar bh_ih_i$, $t\\bar th_ih_i$ and calculate the total number of events considering the complete set of Feynman diagrams at tree-level. We vary the triple couplings $\\kappa\\lambda_{hhh}$, $\\kappa\\lambda_{Hhh}$, $\\kappa\\lambda_{hAA}$, $\\kappa\\lambda_{HAA}$, $\\kappa\\lambda_{hHH}$ and $\\kappa\\lambda_{HHH}$ within the range $\\kappa=-1$ and +2. The numerical computation is done for the energies expected at the ILC with a center-of-mass energy 500, 1000, 1600 $GeV$ and a luminosity 1000 $fb^{-1}$. The channels $e^{+}e^{-}\\to b \\bar b h_ih_i$ and $e^{+}e^{-}\\to t \\bar t h_ih_i$ are also discussed to a center-of-mass energy of 3 $TeV$ and luminosities of 1000 $fb^{-1}$ and 5000 $fb^{-1}$.

  20. Separation of accelerated electrons and positrons in the relativistic reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marian Karlicky

    2007-09-05

    We study an acceleration of electrons and positrons in the relativistic magnetic field reconnection using a 2.5-D particle-in-cell electromagnetic relativistic code. We consider the model with two current sheets and periodic boundary conditions. The electrons and positrons are very effectively accelerated during the tearing and coalescence processes of the reconnection. We found that near the X-points of the reconnection the positions of electrons and positrons differ. This separation process is in agreement with those studied in the previous papers analytically or by test particle simulations. We expect that in dependence on the magnetic field connectivity this local separation can lead to global spatial separation of the accelerated electrons and positrons. A similar simulation in the electron-proton plasma with the proton-electron mass ratio m_i/m_e = 16 is made.

  1. Functional lung imaging in humans using Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layfield, Dominick, 1971-

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with a method of functional lung imaging using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). In this technique, a radioactive tracer, nitrogen-13, is dissolved in saline solution, and injected into a peripheral ...

  2. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conti, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Perez-Mendez, V. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  3. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at ?s = 1 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; Tanabe, T.

    2015-07-04

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of tt-barH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on yt of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization P(e-,e+), (-80 %,+20 %) and (+80 %,-20 %). This estimate improvesmore »to 4 % if the 1 ab-1 sample is assumed to be fully in the P(e-,e+)=(-80 %,+20 %) configuration.« less

  4. Next Generation Fast RF Interlock Module and ATCA Adapter for ILC High Availability RF Test Station Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, R

    2009-10-17

    High availability interlocks and controls are required for the ILC (International Linear Collider) L-Band high power RF stations. A new F3 (Fast Fault Finder) VME module has been developed to process both fast and slow interlocks using FPGA logic to detect the interlock trip excursions. This combination eliminates the need for separate PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control of slow interlocks. Modules are chained together to accommodate as many inputs as needed. In the next phase of development the F3's will be ported to the new industry standard ATCA (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture) crate (shelf) via a specially designed VME adapter module with IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface). The goal is to demonstrate auto-failover and hot-swap for future partially redundant systems.

  5. Cosmic ray electrons, positrons and the synchrotron emission of the Galaxy: consistent analysis and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernardo, Giuseppe Di [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, SE 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Evoli, Carmelo [II. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Gaggero, Daniele [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Grasso, Dario [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitŕ di Siena, Via Roma 56, I-56100 Siena (Italy); Maccione, Luca, E-mail: giuseppe.dibernardo@physics.gu.se, E-mail: carmelo.evoli@desy.de, E-mail: dgaggero@sissa.it, E-mail: dario.grasso@pi.infn.it, E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    A multichannel analysis of cosmic ray electron and positron spectra and of the diffuse synchrotron emission of the Galaxy is performed by using the DRAGON code. This study is aimed at probing the interstellar electron source spectrum down to E ?< 1GeV and at constraining several propagation parameters. We find that above 4GeV the e{sup ?} source spectrum is compatible with a power-law of index ? 2.5. Below 4GeV instead it must be significantly suppressed and the total lepton spectrum is dominated by secondary particles. The positron spectrum and fraction measured below a few GeV are consistently reproduced only within low reacceleration models. We also constrain the scale-height z{sub t} of the cosmic-ray distribution using three independent (and, in two cases, original) arguments, showing that values of z{sub t} ?< 2kpc are excluded. This result may have strong implications for particle dark matter searches.

  6. Plenary: Photon-Photon and Electron-Photon Colliders Mayda M. Velasco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electron-positron colliders like the Interna- tional Linear Collider (ILC) and/or Compact LInear Collider

  7. Compact Beta Particle/Positron Imager for Plant Biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Xi, Wenze; Zorn, Carl; Stolin, Alexander; Majewski, Stan; Majewski, Stanislaw; Howell, Calvin; Crowell, Alec

    2011-06-01

    The 11CO2 tracer is used to facilitate plant biology research towards optimization of plant productivity, biofuel development and carbon sequestration in biomass. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been used to study carbon transport in live plants using 11CO2. Plants typically have very thin leaves resulting in little medium for the emitted positrons to undergo an annihilation event. For the emitted positron from 11C decay approximately 1mm of water equivalent material is needed for positron annihilation. Thus most of the positrons do not annihilate inside the leaf, resulting in limited sensitivity for PET imaging. To address this problem we have developed a compact beta-positive beta-minus particle (BPBM) imager for 11CO2 leaf imaging. The detector is based on a Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tube optically coupled via optical grease and a 3mm thick glass plate to a 0.5mm thick Eljin EJ-212 plastic scintillator. The detector is equipped with a flexible arm to allow its placement and orientation on the leaf of the plant of interest while maintaining the leaf's original orientation. We are planning to utilize the imaging device at the Duke University Phytotron to investigate dynamic carbon transport differences between invasive and native species.

  8. Dark matter vs. astrophysics in the interpretation of AMS-02 electron and positron data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Mauro, Mattia; Fornengo, Nicolao; Vittino, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed quantitative analysis of the recent AMS-02 electron and positron data. We investigate the interplay between the emission from primary astrophysical sources, namely Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, and the contribution from a dark matter annihilation or decay signal. Our aim is to assess the information that can be derived on dark matter properties when both dark matter and primary astrophysical sources are assumed to jointly contribute to the leptonic observables measured by the AMS-02 experiment. We investigate both the possibility to set robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation/decay rate and the possibility to look for dark matter signals within realistic models that take into account the full complexity of the astrophysical background. Our results show that AMS-02 data enable to probe efficiently vast regions of the dark matter parameter space and, in some cases, to set constraints on the dark matter annihilation/decay rate that are comparable or even stronger wi...

  9. AMS-02 electrons and positrons: astrophysical interpretation and Dark Matter constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattia Di Mauro; Andrea Vittino

    2015-07-30

    We present here a quantitative analysis of the recent AMS-02 data with the purpose of investigating the interplay between astrophysical sources and Dark Matter in their interpretation. First, we show that AMS-02 leptonic measurements are in a remarkably good agreement with the hypothesis that all electrons and positrons are the outcome of primary or secondary astrophysical processes. Then, we add Dark Matter to the picture, in order to establish which are the informations on its annihilation cross section (or lifetime) that can be inferred by fitting AMS-02 data within a scenario in which Dark Matter and astrophysical sources jointly contribute to the different leptonic observables. In particular, by performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the parameters space of the theory, we attempt at characterizing the significance of a possible Dark Matter contribution to the observed data and we derive robust upper limits on the Dark Matter annihilation/decay rate.

  10. AMS-02 electrons and positrons: astrophysical interpretation and Dark Matter constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Mauro, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    We present here a quantitative analysis of the recent AMS-02 data with the purpose of investigating the interplay between astrophysical sources and Dark Matter in their interpretation. First, we show that AMS-02 leptonic measurements are in a remarkably good agreement with the hypothesis that all electrons and positrons are the outcome of primary or secondary astrophysical processes. Then, we add Dark Matter to the picture, in order to establish which are the informations on its annihilation cross section (or lifetime) that can be inferred by fitting AMS-02 data within a scenario in which Dark Matter and astrophysical sources jointly contribute to the different leptonic observables. In particular, by performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the parameters space of the theory, we attempt at characterizing the significance of a possible Dark Matter contribution to the observed data and we derive robust upper limits on the Dark Matter annihilation/decay rate.

  11. Dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Asit E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com; Pal, Nikhil; Chatterjee, Prasanta E-mail: prasantachatterjee1@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-15

    The dynamic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons has been investigated in the framework of perturbed and non-perturbed Kadomtsev-Petviashili (KP) equations. Applying the reductive perturbation technique, we have derived the KP equation in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma with kappa distributed electrons and positrons. Bifurcations of ion acoustic traveling waves of the KP equation are presented. Using the bifurcation theory of planar dynamical systems, the existence of the solitary wave solutions and the periodic traveling wave solutions has been established. Two exact solutions of these waves have been derived depending on the system parameters. Then, using the Hirota's direct method, we have obtained two-soliton and three-soliton solutions of the KP equation. The effect of the spectral index ? on propagations of the two-soliton and the three-soliton has been shown. Considering an external periodic perturbation, we have presented the quasi periodic behavior of ion acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas.

  12. The cosmic ray positron excess and neutralino dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward A. Baltz; Joakim Edsjo; Katherine Freese; Paolo Gondolo

    2001-12-14

    Using a new instrument, the HEAT collaboration has confirmed the excess of cosmic ray positrons that they first detected in 1994. We explore the possibility that this excess is due to the annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the galactic halo. We confirm that neutralino annihilation can produce enough positrons to make up the measured excess only if there is an additional enhancement to the signal. We quantify the `boost factor' that is required in the signal for various models in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model parameter space, and study the dependence on various parameters. We find models with a boost factor greater than 30. Such an enhancement in the signal could arise if we live in a clumpy halo. We discuss what part of supersymmetric parameter space is favored (in that it gives the largest positron signal), and the consequences for other direct and indirect searches of supersymmetric dark matter.

  13. Relativistic tunneling picture of electron-positron pair creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Wöllert; Michael Klaiber; Heiko Bauke; Christoph H. Keitel

    2015-03-19

    The common tunneling picture of electron-positron pair creation in a strong electric field is generalized to pair creation in combined crossed electric and magnetic fields. This enhanced picture, being symmetric for electrons and positrons, is formulated in a gauge-invariant and Lorentz-invariant manner for quasistatic fields. It may be used to infer qualitative features of the pair creation process. In particular, it allows for an intuitive interpretation of how the presence of a magnetic field modifies and, in particular cases, even enhances pair creation. The creation of electrons and positrons from the vacuum may be assisted by an energetic photon, which can also be incorporated into this picture of pair creation.

  14. Recent progress in tailoring trap-based positron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natisin, M. R.; Hurst, N. C.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States)

    2013-03-19

    Recent progress is described to implement two approaches to specially tailor trap-based positron beams. Experiments and simulations are presented to understand the limits on the energy spread and pulse duration of positron beams extracted from a Penning-Malmberg (PM) trap after the particles have been buffer-gas cooled (or heated) in the range of temperatures 1000 {>=} T {>=} 300 K. These simulations are also used to predict beam performance for cryogenically cooled positrons. Experiments and simulations are also presented to understand the properties of beams formed when plasmas are tailored in a PM trap in a 5 tesla magnetic field, then non-adiabatically extracted from the field using a specially designed high-permeability grid to create a new class of electrostatically guided beams.

  15. Electromagnetic production of positron and electron in collisions of heavy nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Khriplovich

    2015-08-10

    We consider the electromagnetic production of positron and electron in collisions of slow heavy nuclei. This process is dominated by emission of positron, with the electron captured by nucleus.

  16. Positron plasma control techniques for the production of cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funakoshi, R.; Hayano, R. S. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Bonomi, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Brescia, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Universita di Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Cesar, C. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Brasil, Cx Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.; Werf, D. P. van der [Department of Physics, University of Wales Swansea, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Doser, M. [PH Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2007-07-15

    An observation of a clear dependence of antihydrogen production on positron plasma shapes is reported. For this purpose a plasma control method has been developed combining the plasma rotating-wall technique with a mode diagnostic system. With the help of real-time and nondestructive observations, the rotating-wall parameters have been optimized. The positron plasma can be manipulated into a wide range of shapes (aspect ratio 6.5{<=}{alpha} < or approx. 80) and densities (1.5x10{sup 8}{<=}n < or approx. 7x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) within a short duration (25 s) compatible with the ATHENA antihydrogen production cycle.

  17. Nambu--Goldstone Dark Matter and Cosmic Ray Electron and Positron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BOSONS; ELECTRONS; LEPTONS; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; POSITRONS; RESONANCE; SUPERSYMMETRY...

  18. Acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam in the presence of quantum effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R.; Aki, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2013-09-15

    Using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and obtaining the dispersion relation of the Cherenkov and cyclotron waves, the acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam is investigated. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of positrons are compared together. It is shown that growth rate and, therefore, the acceleration of positrons can be increased in the presence of quantum effects.

  19. Galactic propagation of positrons from particle dark-matter annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Moskalenko; A. W. Strong

    1999-06-14

    We have made a calculation of the propagation of positrons from dark-matter particle annihilation in the Galactic halo for different models of the dark matter halo distribution using our 3D code. We show that the Green's functions are not very sensitive to the dark matter distribution for the same local dark matter energy density. We compare our predictions with computed cosmic ray positron spectra ("background") for the "conventional" cosmic-ray nucleon spectrum which matches the local measurements, and a modified spectrum which respects the limits imposed by measurements of diffuse Galactic gamma-rays, antiprotons, and positrons. We conclude that significant detection of a dark matter signal requires favourable conditions and precise measurements unless the dark matter is clumpy which would produce a stronger signal. Although our conclusion qualitatively agrees with that of previous authors, it is based on a more realistic model of particle propagation and thus reduces the scope for future speculations. Reliable background evaluation requires new accurate positron measurements and further developments in modelling production and propagation of cosmic ray species in the Galaxy.

  20. FPGA-Based Pulse Parameter Discovery for Positron Emission Tomography.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauck, Scott

    technology for a data acquisition system for a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. The University Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are capable of performing complex digital signal processing algorithms of Washington is producing a series of high-resolution, small-animal PET scanners that utilize FPGAs as the core

  1. Test and Development of a 10 MW 1.3 GHz Sheet Beam Klystron for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprehn, Daryl; /SLAC; Haase, Andrew; /SLAC; Jensen, Aaron; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Martin, David; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Klystron Department is developing a 10 MW, 5 Hz, 1.6 ms, 1.3 GHz plug-compatible Sheet-Beam Klystron as a less expensive and more compact alternative to the ILC baseline Multiple-Beam Klystron. Earlier this year a beam tester was constructed and began test. Device fabrication issues have complicated the analysis of the data collected from an intercepting cup for making beam quality measurements of the 130 A, 40-to-1 aspect ratio beam. Since the goal of the beam tester is to confirm 3d beam simulations it was necessary to rebuild the device in order to mitigate unwanted effects due to imperfect focusing construction. Measurements are underway to verify the results of this latest incarnation. Measurement will then be made of the beam after transporting through a drift tube and magnetic focusing system. In the klystron design, a TE oscillation was discovered during long simulation runs of the entire device which has since prompted two design changes to eliminate the beam disruption. The general theory of operation, the design choices made, and results of testing of these various devices will be discussed.

  2. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    General relativity (GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton's theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This is the first confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without additional assumption...

  3. Electromagnetic Solitons in Degenerate Relativistic Electron-Positron Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berezhiani, V I; Tsintsadze, N L

    2014-01-01

    The existence of soliton-like electromagnetic (EM) distributions in a fully degenerate electron-positron plasma is studied applying relativistic hydrodynamic and Maxwell equations. For circularly polarized wave it is found that the soliton solutions exist both in relativistic as well as nonrelativistic degenerate plasmas. Plasma density in the region of soliton pulse localization is reduced considerably. The possibility of plasma cavitation is also shown.

  4. Characterization of densified fully stabilized nanometric zirconia by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garay, J E; Glade, S C; Asoka-Kumar, P; Anselmi-Tamburini, U; Munir, Zuhair A

    2006-01-01

    stabilized nanometric zirconia by positron annihilationstabilized nanometric zirconia samples with varying degreesmeasured single-crystal zirconia sample. Data for pure Zr

  5. Progress on a cryogenically cooled RF gun polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller, R.P., III; Edwards, H.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    RF guns have proven useful in multiple accelerator applications. An RF gun capable of producing polarized electrons is an attractive electron source for the ILC or an electron-ion collider. Producing such a gun has proven elusive. The NEA GaAs photocathode needed for polarized electron production is damaged by the vacuum environment in an RF gun. Electron and ion back bombardment can also damage the cathode. These problems must be mitigated before producing an RF gun polarized electron source. In this paper we report continuing efforts to improve the vacuum environment in a normal conducting RF gun by cooling it with liquid nitrogen after a high temperature vacuum bake out. We also report on a design of a cathode preparation chamber to produce bulk GaAs photocathodes for testing in such a gun. Future directions are also discussed.

  6. Photoproduction of electron-positron pairs in bent single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesnokov, Yu A; Bolognini, D; Hasan, S; Prest, M; Vallazza, E

    2010-01-01

    The process of photoproduction of electron-positron pairs in bent single crystals is considered in this paper. In particular, it is shown that the probability of the process for gamma-quanta with energies from 100 GeV on is significantly higher than the one in an amorphous medium. A possible scenario for the experimental validation of the process is discussed and the positive features of the photoproduction in bent crystals compared to straight ones are underlined from the point of view of possible applications.

  7. Positron scattering from hydrogen atom with screened Coulomb potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoshal, Arijit [Department of Mathematics, Burdwan University, Golapbag, Burdwan 713 104, West Bengal, India and Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Nayek, Sujay [Department of Mathematics, Burdwan University, Golapbag, Burdwan 713 104, West Bengal (India); Kamali, M. Z. M. [Centre for Foundation Studies in Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ratnavelu, K. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05

    Elastic positron-hydrogen collisions with screened Coulomb potentials have been investigated using a second-order distorted wave Born approximation in the momentum space. Two types of potentials have been considered, namely, static screened Coulomb potential and exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potential. Using a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in a closed form. A detailed study has been made on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300 eV.

  8. Beam Dump Experiment at Future Electron-Positron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanemura, Shinya; Tanabe, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new beam dump experiment at future colliders with electron ($e^-$) and positron ($e^+$) beams, BDee, which will provide a new possibility to search for hidden particles, like hidden photon. If a particle detector is installed behind the beam dump, it can detect the signal of in-flight decay of the hidden particles produced by the scatterings of $e^\\pm$ beams off materials for dumping. We show that, compared to past experiments, BDee (in particular BDee at $e^+e^-$ linear collider) significantly enlarges the parameter region where the signal of the hidden particle can be discovered.

  9. Beam Dump Experiment at Future Electron-Positron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Kanemura; Takeo Moroi; Tomohiko Tanabe

    2015-07-10

    We propose a new beam dump experiment at future colliders with electron ($e^-$) and positron ($e^+$) beams, BDee, which will provide a new possibility to search for hidden particles, like hidden photon. If a particle detector is installed behind the beam dump, it can detect the signal of in-flight decay of the hidden particles produced by the scatterings of $e^\\pm$ beams off materials for dumping. We show that, compared to past experiments, BDee (in particular BDee at $e^+e^-$ linear collider) significantly enlarges the parameter region where the signal of the hidden particle can be discovered.

  10. Positron PWFA Simulations for FACET (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeeding accessusers' guide.representationComplexsamearrays usingPositron PWFA

  11. Prospects for the study of the {tau}-tilde system in SPS1a' at the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtle, Philip; Berggren, Mikael; List, Jenny; Schade, Peter; Stempel, Olga

    2010-09-01

    The prospects for the analysis of {tau} channels at the supersymmetry (SUSY) benchmark point SPS1a', especially from e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{tau}}-tilde{sub 1}{sup +{tau}}-tilde{sub 1}{sup -} and e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{tau}}-tilde{sub 2}{sup +{tau}}-tilde{sub 2}{sup -}, have been studied in full simulation of the ILD detector concept foreseen for the International Linear Collider. All accessible SUSY channels as well as all standard model backgrounds were generated at a center-of-mass energy E{sub CMS}=500 GeV, including the beam energy spectrum and beam backgrounds expected for nominal ILC beam parameters. With an integrated luminosity of 500 fb{sup -1} delivered to the experiment, the masses of the {tau}-tilde{sub 1} and {tau}-tilde{sub 2} can be measured to 107.73{sub -0.05}{sup +0.03} GeV{+-}1.1{center_dot}{delta}M{sub {chi}-}tilde{sub 1}{sup 0} and 183{sub -5}{sup +11} GeV{+-}18{center_dot}{delta}M{sub {chi}-}tilde{sub 1}{sup 0}, respectively, while the true values in SPS1a' are 107.9 GeV and 194.9 GeV, respectively. This corresponds to {delta}M{sub {tau}-}tilde{sub 1}/M{sub {tau}-}tilde{sub 1{approx}}0.1% and {delta}M{sub {tau}-}tilde{sub 2}/M{sub {tau}-}tilde{sub 2{approx}}3% with reasonable assumptions on {delta}M{sub {chi}-}tilde{sub 1}{sup 0}. The cross sections for {tau}-tilde{sub 1} and {tau}-tilde{sub 2} pair production could be obtained with a precision of 3.1% and 4.2%, respectively. Combining the mass and cross section measurement in the {tau}-tilde{sub 2} channel allows to determine the LSP mass with a relative error of 1.7%, assuming a known {tau}-tilde mixing angle. In {tau}-tilde{sub 1{yields}{tau}{chi}}-tilde{sub 1}{sup 0} decays, the {tau} polarization is measured to be 91{+-}9% and 86{+-}5% in the {pi} and {rho} decay channels of the {tau}, respectively. The true value in the simulated SPS1a' sample is 89.6%.

  12. Dark matter vs. astrophysics in the interpretation of AMS-02 electron and positron data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattia Di Mauro; Fiorenza Donato; Nicolao Fornengo; Andrea Vittino

    2015-07-24

    We perform a detailed quantitative analysis of the recent AMS-02 electron and positron data. We investigate the interplay between the emission from primary astrophysical sources, namely Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, and the contribution from a dark matter annihilation or decay signal. Our aim is to assess the information that can be derived on dark matter properties when both dark matter and primary astrophysical sources are assumed to jointly contribute to the leptonic observables measured by the AMS-02 experiment. We investigate both the possibility to set robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation/decay rate and the possibility to look for dark matter signals within realistic models that take into account the full complexity of the astrophysical background. Our results show that AMS-02 data enable to probe efficiently vast regions of the dark matter parameter space and, in some cases, to set constraints on the dark matter annihilation/decay rate that are comparable or even stronger with respect to the ones that can be derived from other indirect detection channels. For dark matter annihilation into muons, the bounds leave room for a possible joint DM+astro interpretation of the data, with a dark matter mass in the 50-80 GeV range (depending on the pulsars modeling) and an annihilation cross section in the range (0.7 {\\div} 3) times the thermal cross section.

  13. What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks? Hong Qin,1,2,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What is the fate of runaway positrons in tokamaks? Jian Liu,1 Hong Qin,1,2,a) Nathaniel J. Fisch,2 in tokamaks. The fate of these positrons encodes valuable information about the runaway dynamics. The phase space dynamics of a runaway position is investigated using a Lagrangian that incorporates the tokamak

  14. Z .Applied Surface Science 149 1999 97102 Unfolding positron lifetime spectra with neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    Z .Applied Surface Science 149 1999 97­102 Unfolding positron lifetime spectra with neural networks is based on the use of artificial neural networks ANNs . By using data from simulated positron spectra: Artificial neural networks ANNs ; Amplitudes; Simulation model 1. Introduction Determination of mean

  15. Operating instructions for ORELA (Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator) positron beam line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donohue, D.L.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.

    1990-11-01

    This report will contain details of the construction and operation of the positron beam line. Special procedures which are performed on a less frequent basis will also be described. Appendices will contain operating instructions for experiments which make use of the positron beam and are connected to the beam line. Finally, a review of safety-related considerations will be presented.

  16. Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping; published 17 March 2014) We report modeling results for electron cloud buildup and instability in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring. Updated optics, wiggler magnets, and vacuum chamber designs

  17. Classical Mechanics of Collinear Positron-Hydrogen Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Min-Ho; Moon, Jin-Sung; Choi, Nark Nyul; Kim, Dae-Soung

    2015-01-01

    We study the classical dynamics of the collinear positron-hydrogen scattering system below the three-body breakup threshold. Observing the chaotic behavior of scattering time signals, we in- troduce a code system appropriate to a coarse grained description of the dynamics. And, for the purpose of systematic analysis of the phase space structure, a surface of section is introduced being chosen to match the code system. Partition of the surface of section leads us to a surprising conjec- ture that the topological structure of the phase space of the system is invariant under exchange of the dynamical variables of proton with those of positron. It is also found that there is a finite set of forbidden patterns of symbol sequences. And the shortest periodic orbit is found to be stable, around which invariant tori form an island of stability in the chaotic sea. Finally we discuss a possible quantum manifestation of the classical phase space structure relevant to resonances in scattering cross sections.

  18. Ion acoustic solitons in dense magnetized plasmas with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadiq, Safeer; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Zulfiqar

    2014-09-20

    The propagation of electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is investigated. The linear dispersion relation is obtained for slow and fast electrostatic waves in the EPI plasma. The limiting cases for ion acoustic wave (slow) and ion cyclotron wave (fast) are also discussed. Using the reductive perturbation method, two-dimensional propagation of ion acoustic solitons is found for both the nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons. The effects of positron concentration, magnetic field, and mass of ions on ion acoustic solitons are shown in numerical plots. The proper form of Fermi temperature for nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is employed, which has not been used in earlier published work. The present investigation is useful for the understanding of linear and nonlinear electrostatic wave propagation in the dense magnetized EPI plasma of compact stars. For illustration purposes, we have applied our results to a pulsar magnetosphere.

  19. ILC Citizens' Task Force

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    workers for 20 to 30 years of operation, diversifying the local community with an infusion of skilled, well-paid workers and their families. "In the United States, since we...

  20. Solitary and shock waves in magnetized electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Abdukerim, Nuriman; Xie, Bai-Song

    2014-02-15

    An Ohm's law for electron-positron (EP) plasma is obtained. In the framework of EP magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate nonrelativistic nonlinear waves' solutions in a magnetized EP plasma. In the collisionless limit, quasistationary propagating solitary wave structures for the magnetic field and the plasma density are obtained. It is found that the wave amplitude increases with the Mach number and the Alfvén speed. However, the dependence on the plasma temperature is just the opposite. Moreover, for a cold EP plasma, the existence range of the solitary waves depends only on the Alfvén speed. For a hot EP plasma, the existence range depends on the Alfvén speed as well as the plasma temperature. In the presence of collision, the electromagnetic fields and the plasma density can appear as oscillatory shock structures because of the dissipation caused by the collisions. As the collision frequency increases, the oscillatory shock structure becomes more and more monotonic.

  1. Scattering of low-energy electrons and positrons by atomic beryllium: Ramsauer-Townsend effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, David D

    2014-01-01

    Total cross sections for the scattering of low-energy electrons and positrons by atomic beryllium in the energy range below the first inelastic thresholds are calculated. A Ramsauer-Townsend minimum is seen in the electron scattering cross sections, while no such effect is found in the case of positron scattering. A minimum total cross section of 0.016 a.u. at 0.0029 eV is observed for the electron case. In the limit of zero energy, the cross sections yield a scattering length of -0.61 a.u. for electron and +13.8 a.u. for positron scattering.

  2. A statistical procedure for the identification of positrons in the PAMELA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adriani, O; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Borisov, S; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Consiglio, L; De Pascale, M P; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Gillard, W; Grishantseva, L; Hofverberg, P; Jerse, G; Koldashov, S V; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malvezzi, V; Marcelli, L; Menn, W; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Nikonov, N; Osteria, G; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Rossetto, L; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Wu, J; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G; Marinucci, D

    2010-01-01

    The PAMELA satellite experiment has measured the cosmic-ray positron fraction between 1.5 GeV and 100 GeV. The need to reliably discriminate between the positron signal and proton background has required the development of an ad hoc analysis procedure. In this paper, a method for positron identification is described and its stability and capability to yield a correct background estimate is shown. The analysis includes new experimental data, the application of three different fitting techniques for the background sample and an estimate of systematic uncertainties due to possible inaccuracies in the background selection. The new experimental results confirm both solar modulation effects on cosmic-rays with low rigidities and an anomalous positron abundance above 10 GeV.

  3. Brain Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: Quantification and Biomedical Applications in Alzheimer's Disease and Brain Tumors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wardak, Mirwais

    2013-01-01

    AB, Elson LM. The human brain coloring book. 1st ed. New21. Toga AW, Mazziotta JC. Brain mapping : the systems. SanSR, Phelps ME. Imaging Brain Function with Positron Emission

  4. Particle Acceleration and Magnetic Field Generation in Electron-Positron Relativistic Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishikawa, K I; Richardson, G; Preece, R; Sol, H; Fishman, G J

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel and other two-stream instabilities) created in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet front propagating into an ambient electron-positron plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates jet and ambient particles both perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The non-linear fluctuation amplitudes of densities, currents, electric, and magnetic fields in the electron-positron shock are larger than those found in the electron-ion shock studied in a previous paper at the comparable simulation time. This comes from the fact that both electrons and ...

  5. FOUR-QUADRANT POWER SUPPLIES FOR STEERING ELECTROMAGNETS FOR ELECTRON-POSITRON COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    ). The power supplies are manufactured under the Switch Mode Technology in the "Euromechanics" standardFOUR-QUADRANT POWER SUPPLIES FOR STEERING ELECTROMAGNETS FOR ELECTRON-POSITRON COLLIDERS O. Belikov, V. Kozak, A. Medvedko, BINP, Novosibirsk, Russia. Abstract Specialized power supplies

  6. Sub-GeV Electron and Positron Channeling in Straight, Bent and Periodically Bent Silicon Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sushko, G B; Greiner, Walter; Solov'yov, A V

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary results of numerical simulations of electron and positron channeling and emission spectra are reported for straight, uniformly bent and periodically bent silicon crystal. The projectile trajectories are computed using the newly developed module [1] of the MBN Explorer package [2,3]. The electron and positron channeling along Si(110) and Si(111) crystallographic planes are studied for the projectile energies 195--855 MeV.

  7. Determination of interfacial states in solid heterostructures using a variable-energy positron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Asokakumar, P.P.V.; Lynn, K.G.

    1993-04-06

    A method and means is provided for characterizing interfacial electron states in solid heterostructures using a variable energy positron beam to probe the solid heterostructure. The method includes the steps of directing a positron beam having a selected energy level at a point on the solid heterostructure so that the positron beam penetrates into the solid heterostructure and causes positrons to collide with the electrons at an interface of the solid heterostructure. The number and energy of gamma rays emitted from the solid heterostructure as a result of the annihilation of positrons with electrons at the interface are detected. The data is quantified as a function of the Doppler broadening of the photopeak about the 511 keV line created by the annihilation of the positrons and electrons at the interface, preferably, as an S-parameter function; and a normalized S-parameter function of the data is obtained. The function of data obtained is compared with a corresponding function of the Doppler broadening of the annihilation photopeak about 511 keV for a positron beam having a second energy level directed at the same material making up a portion of the solid heterostructure. The comparison of these functions facilitates characterization of the interfacial states of electrons in the solid heterostructure at points corresponding to the penetration of positrons having the particular energy levels into the interface of the solid heterostructure. Accordingly, the invention provides a variable-energy non-destructive probe of solid heterostructures, such as SiO[sub 2]/Si, MOS or other semiconductor devices.

  8. RADIOACTIVE POSITRON EMITTER PRODUCTION BY ENERGETIC ALPHA PARTICLES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, R. J. [Code 7650, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kozlovsky, B. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Share, G. H., E-mail: murphy@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: benz@wise.tau.ac.il, E-mail: share@astro.umd.edu [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the 0.511 MeV positron-annihilation line from solar flares are used to explore the flare process in general and ion acceleration in particular. In flares, positrons are produced primarily by the decay of radioactive positron-emitting isotopes resulting from nuclear interactions of flare-accelerated ions with ambient solar material. Kozlovsky et al. provided ion-energy-dependent production cross sections for 67 positron emitters evaluated from their threshold energies (some <1 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) to a GeV nucleon{sup –1}, incorporating them into a computer code for calculating positron-emitter production. Adequate cross-section measurements were available for proton reactions, but not for ?-particle reactions where only crude estimates were possible. Here we re-evaluate the ?-particle cross sections using new measurements and nuclear reaction codes. In typical large gamma-ray line flares, proton reactions dominate positron production, but ?-particle reactions will dominate for steeper accelerated-ion spectra because of their relatively low threshold energies. With the accelerated-{sup 3}He reactions added previously, the code is now reliable for calculating positron production from any distribution of accelerated-ion energies, not just those of typical flares. We have made the code available in the online version of the Journal. We investigate which reactions, projectiles, and ion energies contribute to positron production. We calculate ratios of the annihilation-line fluence to fluences of other gamma-ray lines. Such ratios can be used in interpreting flare data and in determining which nuclear radiation is most sensitive for revealing acceleration of low-energy ions at the Sun.

  9. Determination of interfacial states in solid heterostructures using a variable-energy positron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Asoka kumar, Palakkal P. V. (Coram, NY); Lynn, Kelvin G. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1993-01-01

    A method and means is provided for characterizing interfacial electron states in solid heterostructures using a variable energy positron beam to probe the solid heterostructure. The method includes the steps of directing a positron beam having a selected energy level at a point on the solid heterostructure so that the positron beam penetrates into the solid heterostructure and causes positrons to collide with the electrons at an interface of the solid heterostructure. The number and energy of gamma rays emitted from the solid heterostructure as a result of the annihilation of positrons with electrons at the interface are detected. The data is quantified as a function of the Doppler broadening of the photopeak about the 511 keV line created by the annihilation of the positrons and electrons at the interface, preferably, as an S-parameter function; and a normalized S-parameter function of the data is obtained. The function of data obtained is compared with a corresponding function of the Doppler broadening of the annihilation photopeak about 511 keV for a positron beam having a second energy level directed at the same material making up a portion of the solid heterostructure. The comparison of these functions facilitates characterization of the interfacial states of electrons in the solid heterostructure at points corresponding to the penetration of positrons having the particular energy levels into the interface of the solid heterostructure. Accordingly, the invention provides a variable-energy non-destructive probe of solid heterostructures, such as SiO.sub.2 /Si, MOS or other semiconductor devices.

  10. The positron excess as a smoking gun for dynamical dark matter?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Kumar, Jason; Thomas, Brooks

    2014-06-24

    One of the most puzzling aspects of recent data from the AMS-02 experiment is an apparent rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction as a function of energy. This feature is observed out to energies of approximately 350 GeV. One explanation of these results interprets the extra positrons as arising from the decays of dark-matter particles. This in turn typically requires that such particles have rather heavy TeV-scale masses and not undergo simple two-body decays to leptons. In this talk, by contrast, we show that Dynamical Dark Matter (DDM) can not only match existing AMS-02 data on the positron excess, but also accomplish this feat with significantly lighter dark-matter constituents undergoing simple two-body decays to leptons. We also demonstrate that the Dynamical Dark Matter framework makes a fairly robust prediction that the positron fraction should level off and then remain roughly constant out to approximately 1 TeV, without experiencing any sharp downturns. Thus, if we interpret the positron excess in terms of decaying dark matter, the existence of a plateau in the positron fraction at energies less than 1 TeV may be taken as a “smoking gun” of Dynamical Dark Matter.

  11. Electromagnetic cascade in high energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Bulanov; C. B. Schroeder; E. Esarey; W. P. Leemans

    2013-06-05

    The interaction of high energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when 3D effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high energy e-beam interacting with a counter-streaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  12. The VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider: First experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkaev, D. E., E-mail: D.E.Berkaev@inp.nsk.su; Shwartz, D. B.; Shatunov, P. Yu.; Rogovskii, Yu. A.; Romanov, A. L.; Koop, I. A.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Zemlyanskii, I. M.; Lysenko, A. P.; Perevedentsev, E. A.; Stankevich, A. S.; Senchenko, A. I.; Khazin, B. I.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Epshtein, L. B.; Serednyakov, S. I. [Russian Academy of Science, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation); and others

    2011-08-15

    In 2007, at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk), the construction of the VEPP-2000 electron-positron collider was completed. The first electron beam was injected into the accelerator structure with turned-off solenoids of the final focus. This mode was used to tune all subsystems of the facility and to train the vacuum chamber using synchrotron radiation at electron currents of up to 150 mA. The VEPP-2000 structure with small beta functions and partially turned-on solenoids was used for the first testing of the 'round beams' scheme at an energy of 508 MeV. Beam-beam effects were studied in strong-weak and strong-strong modes. Measurements of the beam sizes in both cases showed a dependence corresponding to model predictions for round colliding beams. Using a modernized SND (spherical neutral detector), the first energy calibration of the VEPP-2000 collider was performed by measuring the excitation curve of the phimeson resonance; the phi-meson mass is known with high accuracy from previous experiments at VEEP-2M. In October 2009, a KMD-3 (cryogenic magnetic detector) was installed at the VEPP-2000 facility, and the physics program with both the SND and LMD-3 particle detectors was started in the energy range of 1-1.9 GeV. This first experimental season was completed in summer 2010 with precision energy calibration by resonant depolarization.

  13. Mathematical modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data to assess radiofluoride transport in living plants following petiolar administration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Converse, Alexander K.; Ahlers, Elizabeth O.; Bryan, Tom W.; Hetue, Jackson D.; Lake, Katherine A.; Ellison, Paul A.; Engle, Jonathan W.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Williams, Paul H.; et al

    2015-03-15

    Background: Ion transport is a fundamental physiological process that can be studied non-invasively in living plants with radiotracer imaging methods. Fluoride is a known phytotoxic pollutant and understanding its transport in plants after leaf absorption is of interest to those in agricultural areas near industrial sources of airborne fluoride. Here we report the novel use of a commercial, high-resolution, animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to trace a bolus of [ą?F]fluoride administered via bisected petioles of Brassica oleracea, an established model species, to simulate whole plant uptake of atmospheric fluoride. This methodology allows for the first time mathematical compartmental modelingmore »of fluoride transport in the living plant. Radiotracer kinetics in the stem were described with a single-parameter free- and trapped-compartment model and mean arrival times at different stem positions were calculated from the free-compartment time-activity curves. Results: After initiation of administration at the bisected leaf stalk, [ą?F] radioactivity climbed for approximately 10 minutes followed by rapid washout from the stem and equilibration within leaves. Kinetic modeling of transport in the stem yielded a trapping rate of 1.5 +/- 0.3%/min (mean +/- s.d., n = 3), velocity of 2.2 +/- 1.1 cm/min, and trapping fraction of 0.8 +/- 0.5%/cm. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of physiologically meaningful transport parameters of fluoride in living plants is possible using standard positron emission tomography in combination with petiolar radiotracer administration. Movement of free fluoride was observed to be consistent with bulk flow in xylem, namely a rapid and linear change in position with respect to time. Trapping, likely in the apoplast, was observed. Future applications of the methods described here include studies of transport of other ions and molecules of interest in plant physiology.« less

  14. Mathematical modeling of positron emission tomography (PET) data to assess radiofluoride transport in living plants following petiolar administration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Converse, Alexander K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahlers, Elizabeth O. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Bryan, Tom W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Hetue, Jackson D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Lake, Katherine A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ellison, Paul A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Engle, Jonathan W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Barnhart, Todd E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Nickles, Robert J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Williams, Paul H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); DeJesus, Onofre T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ion transport is a fundamental physiological process that can be studied non-invasively in living plants with radiotracer imaging methods. Fluoride is a known phytotoxic pollutant and understanding its transport in plants after leaf absorption is of interest to those in agricultural areas near industrial sources of airborne fluoride. Here we report the novel use of a commercial, high-resolution, animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner to trace a bolus of [ą?F]fluoride administered via bisected petioles of Brassica oleracea, an established model species, to simulate whole plant uptake of atmospheric fluoride. This methodology allows for the first time mathematical compartmental modeling of fluoride transport in the living plant. Radiotracer kinetics in the stem were described with a single-parameter free- and trapped-compartment model and mean arrival times at different stem positions were calculated from the free-compartment time-activity curves. Results: After initiation of administration at the bisected leaf stalk, [ą?F] radioactivity climbed for approximately 10 minutes followed by rapid washout from the stem and equilibration within leaves. Kinetic modeling of transport in the stem yielded a trapping rate of 1.5 +/- 0.3%/min (mean +/- s.d., n = 3), velocity of 2.2 +/- 1.1 cm/min, and trapping fraction of 0.8 +/- 0.5%/cm. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of physiologically meaningful transport parameters of fluoride in living plants is possible using standard positron emission tomography in combination with petiolar radiotracer administration. Movement of free fluoride was observed to be consistent with bulk flow in xylem, namely a rapid and linear change in position with respect to time. Trapping, likely in the apoplast, was observed. Future applications of the methods described here include studies of transport of other ions and molecules of interest in plant physiology.

  15. A Gamma-Ray Burst/Pulsar for Cosmic-Ray Positrons with a Dark Matter-like Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunihito Ioka

    2010-06-15

    We propose that a nearby gamma-ray burst (GRB) or GRB-like (old, single and short-lived) pulsar/supernova remnant/microquasar about 10^{5-6} years ago may be responsible for the excesses of cosmic-ray positrons and electrons recently observed by the PAMELA, ATIC/PPB-BETS, Fermi and HESS experiments. We can reproduce the smooth Fermi/HESS spectra as well as the spiky ATIC/PPB-BETS spectra. The spectra have a sharp cutoff that is similar to the dark matter predictions, sometimes together with a line (not similar), since higher energy cosmic-rays cool faster where the cutoff/line energy marks the source age. A GRB-like astrophysical source is expected to have a small but finite spread in the cutoff/line as well as anisotropy in the cosmic-ray and diffuse gamma-ray flux, providing a method for the Fermi and future CALET experiments to discriminate between dark matter and astrophysical origins.

  16. Creation of transversely polarized high-energy electrons and positrons in crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baryshevskii, V.B.; Tikhomirov, V.V.

    1983-07-01

    It is shown that when high-energy ..gamma.. quanta pass through a crystal at small angles to the crystallographic planes (axes) a new phenomenon arises: creation of transversely polarized electrons and positrons by unpolarized ..gamma.. quanta. Estimates based on the theory developed in this paper for this phenomenon show that it can be used to obtain transversely polarized electrons and positrons with degree of polarization 50--90% and with energies of hundreds and thousands GeV in the case of incidence of the ..gamma.. quanta on atomic planes, and starting with an energy of several tens of GeV in the case of incidence on atomic axes. Concrete calculations are made of the polarization, number, and angular distributions of positrons produced by 350-GeV ..gamma.. quanta incident on the (110) family of planes of a tungsten plate of thickness 3 x 10 cm. The features of the manifestation of the described phenomenon in bent crystals are analyzed.

  17. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virador, Patrick R.G.

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data and (c) mash the in plane projections, i.e. 2D data, with the projection data from the first oblique angles, which are then used to reconstruct the preliminary image in the 3D Reprojection Projection algorithm. The author presents reconstructed images of point sources and extended sources in both 2D and 3D. The images show that the camera is anticipated to eliminate radial elongation and produce artifact free and essentially spatially isotropic images throughout the entire FOV. It has a resolution of 1.50 {+-} 0.75 mm FWHM near the center, 2.25 {+-}0.75 mm FWHM in the bulk of the FOV, and 3.00 {+-} 0.75 mm FWHM near the edge and corners of the FOV.

  18. Particle Acceleration and Magnetic Field Generation in Electron-Positron Relativistic Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -I. Nishikawa; P. Hardee; G. Richardson; R. Preece; H. Sol; G. J. Fishman

    2004-12-10

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel and other two-stream instabilities) created in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet front propagating into an ambient electron-positron plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find small differences in the results for no ambient and modest ambient magnetic fields. New simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates jet and ambient particles both perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. Furthermore, the non-linear fluctuation amplitudes of densities, currents, electric, and magnetic fields in the electron-positron shock are larger than those found in the electron-ion shock studied in a previous paper at the comparable simulation time. This comes from the fact that both electrons and positrons contribute to generation of the Weibel instability. Additionally, we have performed simulations with different electron skin depths. We find that growth times scale inversely with the plasma frequency, and the sizes of structures created by the Weibel instability scale proportional to the electron skin depth. This is the expected result and indicates that the simulations have sufficient grid resolution. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields which contribute to the electron's (positron's) transverse deflection behind the jet head.

  19. Scattering of low-to intermediate-energy positrons from molecular hydrogen David D. Reid and William B. Klann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadehra, Jogindra M.

    Scattering of low- to intermediate-energy positrons from molecular hydrogen David D. Reid for positrons scattered from molecular hydrogen. The widely avail- able software package GAUSSIAN is used to generate the radial electronic charge density of the molecule which is used to produce the interaction

  20. Electron dynamics, gamma and electron-positron production by colliding laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirka, M; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Gelfer, E; Bulanov, S S; Weber, S; Korn, G

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of an electron bunch irradiated by two focused colliding super-intense laser pulses and the resulting gamma and electron-positron production are studied. Due to attractors of electron dynamics in a standing wave created by colliding pulses the photon emission and pair production, in general, are more efficient with linearly polarized pulses than with circularly polarized ones. The dependence of the key parameters on the laser intensity and wavelength allows to identify the conditions for the cascade development and gamma-electron-positron plasma creation.

  1. Vacancy defects in as-grown and neutron irradiated GaP studied by positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dlubek, G.; Bruemmer, O.; Polity, A.

    1986-08-18

    Positron lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements have been used to study vacancy defects in n-italic-type GaP. Vacancies in the P sublattice with a concentration of some 10/sup 17/ cm/sup -3/ were observed in as-grwon GaP. The vacancies disappear during annealing at 500--800 /sup 0/C. In neutron-irradiated GaP positrons are trapped by Ga vacancies which anneal out in two stages situated at 300--550 /sup 0/C and 550--700 /sup 0/C.

  2. Size of nanoobjects in oil and gas species and materials with positron annihilation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grafutin, V I; Elnikova, L V

    2012-01-01

    The analytical method to determine geometry and size of nano-scale defects in oil and gas species and materials is proposed. The modeling is carried out with the parameters of the positron spectra in the angular distribution method of positron annihilation spectroscopy, and is based on the 'free electron' approximation. From the annihilation decay kinetics, it is possible to express the trapping velocity of parapositronium in pores via intensities of the positronium components and to define the concentration and radii of pores in a porous layer. As the result, size and the concentration of micro-porous cylindrical nano-objects in the silicon samples are estimated.

  3. Electron and positron scattering on rubidium at 200 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, J. H.; Ratnavelu, K. [Institute of Mathematical Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zhou, Y. [Natural Science Research Center, The Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150080 (China)

    2014-03-05

    The recent implementation of the coupled-channels-optical method (CCOM) [1,2], in the study of the electron and positron-Rubidium(Rb) scattering at intermediate energies [3,4], shows that the continuum effect remains important as the energy increases, even to 100 eV. Here, we study the effect of the continuum in electron and positron scattering on Rb at an even higher energy namely 200 eV. The total, elastic and inelastic integral and differential cross sections are therefore calculated and compared to the available experimental [5] and theoretical data [6,7].

  4. Jet algorithms in electron-positron annihilation: Perturbative higher order predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Weinzierl

    2011-06-30

    This article gives results on several jet algorithms in electron-positron annihilation: Considered are the exclusive sequential recombination algorithms Durham, Geneva, Jade-E0 and Cambridge, which are typically used in electron-positron annihilation. In addition also inclusive jet algorithms are studied. Results are provided for the inclusive sequential recombination algorithms Durham, Aachen and anti-kt, as well as the infrared-safe cone algorithm SISCone. The results are obtained in perturbative QCD and are NNNLO for the two-jet rates, NNLO for the three-jet rates, NLO for the four-jet rates and LO for the five-jet rates.

  5. Leptophilic Dark Matter and AMS-02 Cosmic-ray Positron Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing-Hong Cao; Chuan-Ren Chen; Ti Gong

    2014-09-25

    With the measurement of positron flux published recently by AMS-02 collaboration, we show how the leptophilic dark matter fits the observation. We obtain the percentages of different products of dark matter annihilation that can best describe the flux of high energy positrons observed by AMS. We show that dark matter annihilates predominantly into $\\tau\\tau$ pair, while both $ee$ and $\\mu\\mu$ final states should be less than $20\\%$. When gauge boson final states are included, the best branching ratio of needed $\\tau\\tau$ mode reduces.

  6. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mańá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türko?lu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ?30??GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  7. Solitons and shocks in dense astrophysical magnetoplasmas with relativistic degenerate electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, S.; Ata-ur-Rahman; Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000

    2014-04-15

    The linear and nonlinear properties of the ion-acoustic (IA) waves are investigated in a relativistically degenerate magnetoplasma, whose constituents are the electrons, positrons, and ions. The electrons and positrons are assumed to obey the Fermi-Dirac statistics, whereas the cold ions are taken to be inertial and magnetized. In linear analysis, various limiting cases are discussed both analytically and numerically. However, for nonlinear studies, the well-known reductive perturbation technique is employed to derive the Zakharov-Kuznetsov and Zakharov-Kuznetsov Burgers equations in the presence of relativistically degenerate electrons and positrons. Furthermore, with the use of hyperbolic tangent method, the equations are simplified to admit the soliton and shock wave solutions. Numerically, it is shown that the amplitude, width, and phase speed associated with the localized IA solitons and shocks are significantly influenced by the various intrinsic plasma parameters relevant to our model. The present analysis can be useful for understanding the collective processes in dense astrophysical environments like neutron stars, where the electrons and positrons are expected to be relativistic and degenerate.

  8. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaladze, T.; I.Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics, Tbilisi State University, 0186 Georgia ; Mahmood, S.

    2014-03-15

    Electrostatic ion-acoustic periodic (cnoidal) waves and solitons in unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasmas with warm ions and kappa distributed electrons and positrons are investigated. Using the reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived with appropriate boundary conditions for periodic waves. The corresponding analytical and various numerical solutions are presented with Sagdeev potential approach. Differences between the results caused by the kappa and Maxwell distributions are emphasized. It is revealed that only hump (compressive) structures of the cnoidal waves and solitons are formed. It is shown that amplitudes of the cnoidal waves and solitons are reduced in an EPI plasma case in comparison with the ordinary electron-ion plasmas. The effects caused by the temperature variations of the warm ions are also discussed. It is obtained that the amplitude of the cnoidal waves and solitons decreases for a kappa distributed (nonthermal) electrons and positrons plasma case in comparison with the Maxwellian distributed (thermal) electrons and positrons EPI plasmas. The existence of kappa distributed particles leads to decreasing of ion-acoustic frequency up to thermal ions frequency.

  9. AMS02 positron excess from decaying fermion DM with local dark gauge symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ko; Yong Tang

    2015-01-11

    Positron excess observed by PAMELA, Fermi and AMS02 may be due to dark matter (DM) pair annihilation or decay dominantly into muons. In this paper, we consider a scenario with thermal fermionic DM ($\\chi$) with mass $\\sim O(1-2)$ TeV decaying into a dark Higgs ($\\phi$) and an active neutrino ($\

  10. Plastic scintillators for positron emission tomography obtained by the bulk polymerization method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kap?on, ?ukasz; Molenda, Marcin; Moskal, Pawe?; Wieczorek, Anna; Bednarski, Tomasz; Bia?as, Piotr; Czerwi?ski, Eryk; Korcyl, Grzegorz; Kowal, Jakub; Kowalski, Pawe?; Kozik, Tomasz; Krzemie?, Wojciech; Nied?wiecki, Szymon; Pa?ka, Marek; Pawlik, Monika; Raczy?ski, Lech; Rudy, Zbigniew; Salabura, Piotr; Gupta-Sharma, Neha; Silarski, Micha?; S?omski, Artur; Smyrski, Jerzy; Strzelecki, Adam; Wi?licki, Wojciech; Zieli?ski, Marcin; Zo?, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes three methods regarding the production of plastic scintillators. One method appears to be suitable for the manufacturing of plastic scintillator, revealing properties which fulfill the requirements of novel positron emission tomography scanners based on plastic scintillators. The key parameters of the manufacturing process are determined and discussed.

  11. REVIEWS OF MODERN PHYSICS, VOLUME 82, 25572607 (2010) Positron-molecule interactions: resonant attachment, annihilation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gribakin, Gleb

    2010-01-01

    Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland, UK J. A. Young Jet Propulsion rapidly with the num- ber of vibrational degrees of freedom, approximately as the fourth power-molecule wave function 7 D. Direct annihilation: virtual and weakly bound positron states 8 E. Resonant

  12. Experimentation and Physics at a Future Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Pohl

    2000-07-20

    I summarise the physics opportunities and experimental challenges at future Linear Colliders, using material from the recent ECFA/DESY workshop on the subject as well as contributions to the series of worldwide studies. For reasons of economy, the discussion is restricted to the European Tesla project and to its electron-positron mode only.

  13. Measurements of the Cosmic-Ray Positron Fraction From 1 to 50 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HEAT Collaboration; S. W. Barwick; E. Schneider; J. J. Beatty; G. A. de Nolfo; A. Bhattacharyya; C. R. Bower; J. A. Musser; C. J. Chaput; S. Coutu; S. McKee; G. Tarle; A. D. Tomasch; J. Knapp; D. M. Lowder; D. Muller; S. P. Swordy; E. Torbet; S. L. Nutter

    1997-03-28

    Two measurements of the cosmic-ray positron fraction as a function of energy have been made using the High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) balloon-borne instrument. The first flight took place from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico in 1994, and yielded results above the geomagnetic cutoff energy of 4.5 GeV. The second flight from Lynn Lake, Manitoba in 1995 permitted measurements over a larger energy interval, from 1 GeV to 50 GeV. In this letter we present results on the positron fraction based on data from the Lynn Lake flight, and compare these with the previously published results from the Ft. Sumner flight. The results confirm that the positron fraction does not increase with energy above ~10 GeV, although a small excess above purely secondary production cannot be ruled out. At low energies the positron fraction is slightly larger than that reported from measurements made in the 1960's. This effect could possibly be a consequence of charge dependence in the level of solar modulation.

  14. New Positron Spectral Features from Supersymmetric Dark Matter - a Way to Explain the PAMELA Data?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bergstrom; Torsten Bringmann; Joakim Edsjo

    2008-11-13

    The space-borne antimatter experiment PAMELA has recently reported a surprising rise in the positron to electron ratio at high energies. It has also recently been found that electromagnetic radiative corrections in some cases may boost the gamma-ray yield from supersymmetric dark matter annihilations in the galactic halo by up to three or four orders of magnitude, providing distinct spectral signatures for indirect dark matter searches to look for. Here, we investigate whether the same type of corrections can also lead to sizeable enhancements in the positron yield. We find that this is indeed the case, albeit for a smaller region of parameter space than for gamma rays; selecting models with a small mass difference between the neutralino and sleptons, like in the stau coannihilation region in mSUGRA, the effect becomes more pronounced. The resulting, rather hard positron spectrum with a relatively sharp cutoff may potentially fit the rising positron ratio measured by the PAMELA satellite. To do so, however, very large "boost factors" have to be invoked that are not expected in current models of halo structure. If the predicted cutoff would also be confirmed by later PAMELA data or upcoming experiments, one could either assume non-thermal production in the early universe or non-standard halo formation to explain such a spectral feature as an effect of dark matter annihilation. At the end of the paper, we briefly comment on the impact of radiative corrections on other annihilation channels, in particular antiprotons and neutrinos.

  15. New positron spectral features from supersymmetric dark matter: A way to explain the PAMELA data?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstroem, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2008-11-15

    The space-borne antimatter experiment PAMELA has recently reported a surprising rise in the positron to electron ratio at high energies. It has also recently been found that electromagnetic radiative corrections in some cases may boost the gamma-ray yield from supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations in the galactic halo by up to 3 or 4 orders of magnitude, providing distinct spectral signatures for indirect dark matter searches to look for. Here, we investigate whether the same type of corrections can also lead to sizeable enhancements in the positron yield. We find that this is indeed the case, albeit for a smaller region of parameter space than for gamma rays; selecting models with a small mass difference between the neutralino and sleptons, like in the stau-coannihilation region in mSUGRA, the effect becomes more pronounced. The resulting, rather hard positron spectrum with a relatively sharp cutoff may potentially fit the rising positron ratio measured by the PAMELA satellite. To do so, however, very large 'boost factors' have to be invoked that are not expected in current models of halo structure. If the predicted cutoff would also be confirmed by later PAMELA data or upcoming experiments, one could either assume nonthermal production in the early universe or nonstandard halo formation to explain such a spectral feature as an effect of dark-matter annihilation. At the end of the paper, we briefly comment on the impact of radiative corrections on other annihilation channels, in particular, antiprotons and neutrinos.

  16. NEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    annealing the samples at 280' C. INTRODUCTION Reactor pressure-vessel steel embrittlement is one ofthe mostNEUTRON DAMAGE IN REACTOR PRESSURE-VESSEL STEEL EXAMINED WITH POSITRON ANNIHILATION LIFETIME spectroscopy to study the development of damage and annealing behavior ofneutron-irradiated reactor pressure

  17. FPGA-Based Front-End Electronics for Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauck, Scott

    technology for a data acquisition system for positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. Our laboratory, Design, Verification Keywords PET, FPGA, Digital Signal Processing, Pulse Timing, Event Localization 1 to process the incoming data without the complexity of an application-specific circuit. Technology advances

  18. Use of Physical Models to Facilitate Transfer of Physics Learning to Understand Positron Emission Tomography*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    in order to understand the image construction process in PET. For this purpose we conduct teaching of learning from the models of the activities to the PET image construction process. #12;METHODOLOGY Sixteen of the physical models in transferring physics ideas to understanding positron emission tomography technology

  19. SYNTHESIS OF DIVERSE TRACERS ON EWOD MICRODEVICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY (PET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , spatial, and temporal measurement of biochemical processes. Applications of PET include studying disease-labeled PET tracers with electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) technology [3],[4], the digital microfluidicSYNTHESIS OF DIVERSE TRACERS ON EWOD MICRODEVICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY (PET) S. Chen1

  20. FPGA-Based Data Acquisition System for a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauck, Scott

    FPGA-Based Data Acquisition System for a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scanner Michael of performing complex discrete signal processing algorithms with clock rates of above 100MHz. This combined with FPGAs low expense, ease of use, and selected dedicated hardware make them an ideal technology for a data

  1. PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLASMA FOCUSING OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY ELECTRON AND POSITRON BEAMS \\Lambda J.S.T. Ng, P. Chen, W present results from the SLAC E­150 experiment on plasma focusing of high energy density electron and experiments to test this con­ cept were carried out with low energy density electron beams [2]. The goals

  2. Ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  3. PROSPECTS FOR DETECTION OF SYNCHROTRON EMISSION FROM SECONDARY ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS IN STARLESS CORES: APPLICATION TO G0.216+0.016

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D. I.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the diffusion of cosmic rays into molecular cloud complexes. Using the cosmic-ray diffusion formalism of Protheroe et al., we examine how cosmic rays diffuse into clouds exhibiting different density structures, including a smoothed step-function, as well as Gaussian and inverse-r density distributions, which are well known to trace the structure of star-forming regions. These density distributions were modeled as an approximation to the Galactic center cloud G0.216+0.016, a recently discovered massive dust clump that exhibits limited signs of massive star formation and thus may be the best region in the Galaxy to observe synchrotron emission from secondary electrons and positrons. Examination of the resulting synchrotron emission, produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray protons interacting with ambient molecular matter producing secondary electrons and positrons reveals that, due to projection effects, limb-brightened morphology results in all cases. However, we find that the Gaussian and inverse-r density distributions show much broader flux density distributions than step-function distributions. Significantly, some of the compact (compared to the 2.''2 resolution, 5.3 GHz Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) observations) sources show non-thermal emission, which may potentially be explained by the density structure and the lack of diffusion of cosmic rays into the cloud. We find that we can match the 5.3 and 20 GHz flux densities of the non-thermal source JVLA 1 and 6 from Rodríguez and Zapata with a local cosmic-ray flux density, a diffusion coefficient suppression factor of ? = 0.1-0.01 for a coefficient of 3 × 10{sup 27} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}, and a magnetic field strength of 470 ?G.

  4. Positron emission imaging device and method of using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Philip R.; Mullens, James Allen

    2013-01-15

    An imaging system and method of imaging are disclosed. The imaging system can include an external radiation source producing pairs of substantially simultaneous radiation emissions of a picturization emission and a verification emissions at an emission angle. The imaging system can also include a plurality of picturization sensors and at least one verification sensor for detecting the picturization and verification emissions, respectively. The imaging system also includes an object stage is arranged such that a picturization emission can pass through an object supported on said object stage before being detected by one of said plurality of picturization sensors. A coincidence system and a reconstruction system can also be included. The coincidence can receive information from the picturization and verification sensors and determine whether a detected picturization emission is direct radiation or scattered radiation. The reconstruction system can produce a multi-dimensional representation of an object imaged with the imaging system.

  5. Comment on AMS02 results support the secondary origin of cosmic ray positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dado, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Recently Blum, Katz and Waxman have claimed that the flux of high energy cosmic ray (CR) positrons near Earth that has been measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) aboard the International Space Station can be produced in the collisions of Galactic CR protons and nuclei with the ambient matter in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM). Their claim was based on an alleged "robust upper limit to the positron flux" which neglected the energy loss of e+'s in the ISM. Inclusion of this energy loss, however, yields a much smaller upper limit, which excludes secondary production in the ISM by the Galactic cosmic rays as the main origin of the CR e^+ flux above 10 GeV.

  6. Photon emission by ultra-relativistic positrons in crystalline undulators: the high-energy regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, W; Solov'yov, A V; Greiner, W

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the undulator radiation emitted by high-energy positrons during planar channeling in periodically bent crystals. We demonstrate that the construction of the undulator for positrons with energies of 10 GeV and above is only possible if one takes into account the radiative energy losses. The frequency of the undulator radiation depends on the energy of the particle. Thus the decrease of the particle's energy during the passage of the crystal should result in the destruction of the undulator radiation regime. However, we demonstrate that it is possible to avoid the destructive influence of the radiative losses on the frequency of the undulator radiation by the appropriate variation of the shape of the crystal channels. We also discuss a method by which, to our mind, it would be possible to prepare the crystal with the desired properties of its channels.

  7. Low energy cosmic ray positron fraction explained by charge-sign dependent solar modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Maccione

    2013-01-24

    We compute cosmic ray (CR) nuclei, proton, antiproton, electron and positron spectra below 1 TeV at Earth by means of a detailed transport description in the galaxy and in the solar system. CR spectra below 10 GeV are strongly modified by charge-sign dependent propagation effects. These depend on the polarity of the solar magnetic field and therefore vary with the solar cycle. The puzzling discrepancy between the low-energy positron fraction measured by PAMELA and AMS-01 is then easily explained by their different data-taking epochs. We reproduce the observed spectra of CR light nuclei within the same galactic and solar-system propagation model.

  8. Nonlinear interaction of intense electromagnetic waves with a magnetoactive electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Rastbood, E.; Zeinaddini Meymand, H.; Niknam, A. R.

    2013-08-15

    The nonlinear coupling between circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) waves and acoustic-like waves in a magnetoactive electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma is studied, taking into account the relativistic motion of electrons and positrons. The possibility of modulational instability and its growth rate as well as the envelope soliton formation and its characteristics in such plasmas are investigated. It is found that the growth rate of modulation instability increases in the case that ?{sub c}/?<1 (?{sub c} and ? are the electron gyrofrequency and the CPEM wave frequency, respectively) and decreases in the case that ?{sub c}/?>1. It is also shown that in a magnetoactive e-p-i plasma, the width of bright soliton increases/decreases in case of (?{sub c}/?)<1/(?{sub c}/?)>1 by increasing the magnetic field strength.

  9. Calculation of positron binding energies using the generalized any particle propagator theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, Jonathan; Charry, Jorge A.; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Varella, Márcio T. do N.; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-09-21

    We recently extended the electron propagator theory to any type of quantum species based in the framework of the Any-Particle Molecular Orbital (APMO) approach [J. Romero, E. Posada, R. Flores-Moreno, and A. Reyes, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 074105 (2012)]. The generalized any particle molecular orbital propagator theory (APMO/PT) was implemented in its quasiparticle second order version in the LOWDIN code and was applied to calculate nuclear quantum effects in electron binding energies and proton binding energies in molecular systems [M. Díaz-Tinoco, J. Romero, J. V. Ortiz, A. Reyes, and R. Flores-Moreno, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 194108 (2013)]. In this work, we present the derivation of third order quasiparticle APMO/PT methods and we apply them to calculate positron binding energies (PBEs) of atoms and molecules. We calculated the PBEs of anions and some diatomic molecules using the second order, third order, and renormalized third order quasiparticle APMO/PT approaches and compared our results with those previously calculated employing configuration interaction (CI), explicitly correlated and quantum Montecarlo methodologies. We found that renormalized APMO/PT methods can achieve accuracies of ?0.35 eV for anionic systems, compared to Full-CI results, and provide a quantitative description of positron binding to anionic and highly polar species. Third order APMO/PT approaches display considerable potential to study positron binding to large molecules because of the fifth power scaling with respect to the number of basis sets. In this regard, we present additional PBE calculations of some small polar organic molecules, amino acids and DNA nucleobases. We complement our numerical assessment with formal and numerical analyses of the treatment of electron-positron correlation within the quasiparticle propagator approach.

  10. Self-consistent quasiparticle model results for ultrarelativistic electron-positron thermodynamic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannur, Vishnu M. [Department of Physics, University of Calicut, Kerala-673 635 (India)

    2006-06-15

    Relativistic plasma with two charge species and radiation at thermodynamic equilibrium is a general system of interest in astrophysics and high-energy physics. We develop a self-consistent quasiparticle model for such a system to take account of the collective behavior of plasma, and thermodynamic properties are derived. It is applied to the ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma and compared with previous results.

  11. State-Selective High-Energy Excitation of Nuclei by Resonant Positron Annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Belov; Z. Harman

    2014-10-23

    In the annihilation of a positron with a bound atomic electron, the virtual gamma photon created may excite the atomic nucleus. We put forward this effect as a spectroscopic tool for an energy-selective excitation of nuclear transitions. This scheme can efficiently populate nuclear levels of arbitrary multipolarities in the MeV regime, including monopole transitions and giant resonances. In certain cases, it may have a higher cross sections than the conventionally used Coulomb excitation.

  12. Indirect search for dark matter with AMS in positrons, gamma and antiprotons channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diego Casadei

    2006-09-04

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), to be installed on the International Space Station, will provide data on cosmic radiations in a large energy range. The main physics goals in the astroparticle domain are the antimatter and the dark matter searches. Dark matter should be composed of non baryonic weakly interacting massive particles, a good candidate being the lightest SUSY particle in R-parity conserving models. As a prototype for the AMS-02 experiment, the AMS-01 particle spectrometer was flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery in near earth orbit for a ten day mission in June 1998. The direct identification of positrons in AMS-01 was limited to energies below 3 GeV due to the vast proton background and the characteristics of the subdetectors, but the sensitivity towards higher energies (up to 40 GeV) was extended by identifying positrons through the conversion of bremsstrahlung photons. AMS-02 will greatly improve the accuracy on the positron spectrum, which will be measured up to 300 GeV, together with the antiproton and $\\gamma$-ray flux, thus providing a unique chance to measure all relevant neutralino decay channels with the same experiment.

  13. Indirect search for dark matter with AMS in positrons, gamma and antiprotons channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casadei, D

    2007-01-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), to be installed on the International Space Station, will provide data on cosmic radiations in a large energy range. The main physics goals in the astroparticle domain are the antimatter and the dark matter searches. Dark matter should be composed of non baryonic weakly interacting massive particles, a good candidate being the lightest SUSY particle in R-parity conserving models. As a prototype for the AMS-02 experiment, the AMS-01 particle spectrometer was flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery in near earth orbit for a ten day mission in June 1998. The direct identification of positrons in AMS-01 was limited to energies below 3 GeV due to the vast proton background and the characteristics of the subdetectors, but the sensitivity towards higher energies (up to 40 GeV) was extended by identifying positrons through the conversion of bremsstrahlung photons. AMS-02 will greatly improve the accuracy on the positron spectrum, which will be measured up to 300 GeV, together with t...

  14. Measurement of the hadronic cross section in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-11-01

    This thesis describes the most precise measurement to date of the ratio R, the hadronic cross section in lowest order electron-positron annihilation to the cross section for muon pair production in lowest order electron-positron annihilation. This experiment is of interest because R is a fundamental parameter that tests in a model independent way the basic assumptions of strong interaction theories. According to the assumptions of one of these theories the value of R is determined simply from the electric charges, spin, and color assignments of the produced quark-pairs. The experiment was carried out with the MAgnetic Calorimeter using collisions of 14.5 GeV electrons and positrons at the 2200m circumference PEP storage ring at SLAC. The MAC detector is one of the best-suited collider detectors for measuring R due to its nearly complete coverage of the full angular range. The data for this experiment were accumulated between February 1982 and April 1983 corresponding to a total event sample of about 40,000 hadronic events. About 5% of the data were taken with 14 GeV beams and the rest of the data were taken with 14.5 GeV beams. A description of particle interactions and experimental considerations is given.

  15. Total cross sections for positron scattering from benzene, cyclohexane, and aniline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zecca, Antonio; Moser, Norberto; Perazzolli, Chiara; Salemi, Alessandro; Brunger, Michael J.

    2007-08-15

    We use a linear transmission technique to measure total cross sections for positron scattering from benzene, cyclohexane, and aniline. In the case of cyclohexane, the energy range of the present study is 0.1-20 eV, while for benzene and aniline it is 0.2-20 eV. With respect to benzene and cyclohexane, comparison is made to the only other existing results we know of [Makochekanwa and co-workers, Phys. Rev. A 68, 032707 (2003); 72, 042705 (2005)]. Agreement with those data is only marginal, being particularly poor at the overlap lower energies. Unlike Kimura et al. [J. Phys. B 37, 1461 (2004)], we find the low-energy dependence of the positron-benzene total cross sections to be qualitatively similar to those found in the electron channel [Gulley et al., J. Phys. B 31, 2735 (1998)]. We believe that the present positron-aniline total cross sections represent the first time such data have been measured. These cross sections are almost identical to those we found for benzene, suggesting that substitution of hydrogen by the amine group on the aromatic ring is largely irrelevant to the scattering process in the energy regimes considered.

  16. Positron impact excitations of hydrogen atom embedded in weakly coupled plasmas: Formation of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rej, Pramit; Ghoshal, Arijit

    2014-09-15

    Formation of Rydberg atoms due to 1s?nlm excitations of hydrogen, for arbitrary n, l, m, by positron impact in weakly coupled plasma has been investigated using a distorted-wave theory in the momentum space. The interactions among the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Huckel potentials. Making use of a simple variationally determined wave function for the hydrogen atom, it has been possible to obtain the distorted-wave scattering amplitude in a closed analytical form. A detailed study has been made on the effects of plasma screening on the differential and total cross sections in the energy range 20–300?eV of incident positron. For the unscreened case, our results agree nicely with some of the most accurate results available in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, such a study on the differential and total cross sections for 1s?nlm inelastic positron-hydrogen collisions for arbitrary n, l, m in weakly coupled plasmas is the first reported in the literature.

  17. Extragalactic Inverse Compton Light from Dark Matter annihilation and the Pamela positron excess

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Jeltema, Tesla E., E-mail: profumo@scipp.ucsc.edu, E-mail: tesla@ucolick.org [UCO/Lick Observatories, 1156 High St, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2009-07-01

    We calculate the extragalactic diffuse emission originating from the up-scattering of cosmic microwave photons by energetic electrons and positrons produced in particle dark matter annihilation events at all redshifts and in all halos. We outline the observational constraints on this emission and we study its dependence on both the particle dark matter model (including the particle mass and its dominant annihilation final state) and on assumptions on structure formation and on the density profile of halos. We find that for low-mass dark matter models, data in the X-ray band provide the most stringent constraints, while the gamma-ray energy range probes models featuring large masses and pair-annihilation rates, and a hard spectrum for the injected electrons and positrons. Specifically, we point out that the all-redshift, all-halo inverse Compton emission from many dark matter models that might provide an explanation to the anomalous positron fraction measured by the Pamela payload severely overproduces the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background.

  18. Department: ILCS Course No: 160

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Italian literary and cinematic culture justified, survived, and fought the terrors of the Fascist and cinematic works that exemplify the varied responses of Italian culture to Fascism. Hence, students critical, responsible, and serious assessment of the way literary and cinematic culture responds

  19. Structural transition in rare earth doped zirconium oxide: A positron annihilation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Keka; Bisoi, Abhijit

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: New microstructural analysis and phase transition of rare earth doped mixed oxide compounds such as: Sm{sub 2?x}Dy{sub x}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (where x = 0.0 ? x ? 2.0) that are potentially useful as solid oxide fuels, ionic conductors, optoelectronic materials and most importantly as radiation resistant host for high level rad-waste disposal, structural transition in the system is reported through positron annihilation spectroscopy as there is an indication in the X-ray diffraction analysis. Highlights: ? Zirconium oxide material doped with rare earth ions. ? The method of positron annihilation spectroscopy suggests a phase transition in the system. ? The crystal structure transformation from pure pyrochlore to defect fluorite type of structure is shown by X-ray diffraction results. -- Abstract: A series of compounds with the general composition Sm{sub 2?x}Dy{sub x}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (where 0 ? x ? 2.0) were synthesized by chemical route and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The rare earth ion namely Sm{sup +3} in the compound was gradually replaced with another smaller and heavier ion, Dy{sup +3} of the 4f series, there by resulting in order–disorder structural transition, which has been studied by positron annihilation lifetime and Doppler broadening spectroscopy. This study reveals the subtle electronic micro environmental changes in the pyrochlore lattice (prevalent due to the oxygen vacancy in anti-site defect structure of the compound) toward its transformation to defect fluorite structure as found in Dy{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. A comparison of the changes perceived with PAS as compared to XRD analysis is critically assayed.

  20. Photo-degradation of Lexan polycarbonate studied using positron lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hareesh, K.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Pandey, A. K.; Meghala, D.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2013-02-05

    The free volume properties of pristine and UV irradiated Lexan polycarbonate have been investigated using Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (PLS). The decrease in o-Ps life time and free volume size of irradiated sample is attributed to free volume modification and formation of more stable free radicals. These free radicals are formed due to the breakage of C-O bonds in Lexan polycarbonate after irradiation. This is also supported by the decrease in the intensity of C-O bond after exposure to UV-radiation as studied from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and it also shows that benzene ring does not undergo any changes after irradiation.

  1. Positrons in Cosmic Rays from Dark Matter Annihilations for Uplifted Higgs Regions in MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Kadota; Katherine Freese; Paolo Gondolo

    2010-03-23

    We point out that there are regions in the MSSM parameter space which successfully provide a dark matter (DM) annihilation explanation for observed positron excess (e.g. PAMELA), while still remaining in agreement with all other data sets. Such regions (e.g. the uplifted Higgs region) can realize an enhanced neutralino DM annihilation dominantly into leptons via a Breit-Wigner resonance through the CP-odd Higgs channel. Such regions can give the proper thermal relic DM abundance, and the DM annihilation products are compatible with current antiproton and gamma ray observations. This scenario can succeed without introducing any additional degrees of freedom beyond those already in the MSSM.

  2. Phase-mixing of electrostatic modes in a cold magnetized electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2013-08-15

    In a fluid description, we study space-time evolution of electrostatic oscillations in a cold magnetized electron-positron plasma. Nonlinear results up to third order, obtained by employing a simple perturbation technique, indicate phase-mixing and thus breaking of excited oscillations, and provide an expression for the phase-mixing time. It is shown that an increase in the strength of ambient magnetic field results in an increase in the phase-mixing time. The results of our investigation will be of relevance to astrophysical environments as well as laboratory experiments.

  3. Contact interaction probes at the Linear Collider with polarized electron and positron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Babich; P. Osland; A. A. Pankov; N. Paver

    2000-03-26

    For contact-interaction searches at the Linear Collider, we discuss the advantages of polarizing both the electron and the positron beams as compared with polarizing only the electron beam. In particular, for the processes e^+e^-\\to \\mu^+\\mu^-, \\tau^+\\tau^-, b\\bar{b} and c\\bar{c} at a future e^+e^- collider with \\sqrt{s}=0.5 TeV we derive model-independent bounds on the four-fermion contact interaction parameters from studies of the helicity cross sections.

  4. An All-Solid State Central Tracker for the Proposed DESY Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce J. King

    1999-07-17

    This report describes an all-solid state central tracker which is intended for use in a detector at the proposed DESY 500 GeV electron-positron linear collider or a similar accelerator. The precise position measurements from position-sensitive silicon detectors give the tracker an outstanding momentum resolution for high momentum tracks: sigma_p/p^2 = 3.6 x 10^{-5} (GeV/c)^{-1} for tracks perpendicular to the beam-line. The report concludes with an example layout for a detector which uses this central tracker.

  5. Elecron-positron momentum distribution measurements of high-t/sub c/ superconductors and related systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachs, A.L.; Turchi, P.E.A.; Howell, R.H.; Jean, Y.C.; Fluss, M.J.; West, R.N.; Kaiser, J.H.; Rayner, S.; Hahgighi, H.; Merkle, K.L.; Revcolevschi, A.

    1989-06-01

    We discuss our measurements of the 2D-angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR) in La/sub 2/CuO/sub 4/, YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/ (YBCO), and NiO. The measurements for NiO are the first such 2D-ACAR measurements; the YBCO results are of a higher statistical quality than previously reported in the literature. The data are compared with complementary theoretical calculations and with each other. We discuss the implication of our analysis for ACAR studies of similar and related systems. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Electron-positron momentum distribution measurements of high-T superconductors and related systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachs, A.L.; Turchi, P.E.A.; Howell, R.J.; Jean, Y.C.; Fluss, M.J.; West, R.N.; Kaiser, J.H.; Rayner, S.; Hahgighi, H.; Merkle, K.L.; Revcolevschi, A.; Wang, Z.Z.

    1989-08-01

    We discuss our measurements of the 2D-angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR) in La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO), and NiO. The measurements for NiO are the first such 2D-ACAR measurements; the YBCO results are of a higher statistical quality than previously reported in the literature. The data are compared with complementary theoretical calculations and with each other. We discuss the implication of our analysis for ACAR studies of similar and related systems. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  7. RELATIVISTIC POSITRON-ELECTRON-ION SHEAR FLOWS AND APPLICATION TO GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Edison; Fu, Wen; Smith, Ian; Roustazadeh, Parisa [Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Boettcher, Markus, E-mail: liang@rice.edu [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)

    2013-12-20

    We present particle-in-cell simulation results of relativistic shear flows for hybrid positron-electron-ion plasmas and compare to those for pure e {sup +} e {sup –} and pure e {sup –} ion plasmas. Among the three types of relativistic shear flows, we find that only hybrid shear flow is able to energize the electrons to form a high-energy spectral peak plus a hard power law tail. Such electron spectra are needed to model the observational properties of gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Static Electron-Positron Pair Creation in Strong Fields for a Nonlinear Dirac model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Sabin

    2011-12-12

    We consider the Hartree-Fock approximation of Quantum Electrodynamics, with the exchange term neglected. We prove that the probability of static electron-positron pair creation for the Dirac vacuum polarized by an external field of strength $Z$ behaves as $1-\\exp(-\\kappa Z^{2/3})$ for $Z$ large enough. Our method involves two steps. First we estimate the vacuum expectation of general quasi-free states in terms of their total number of particles, which can be of general interest. Then we study the asymptotics of the Hartree-Fock energy when $Z\\to+\\infty$ which gives the expected bounds.

  9. Positron scattering and annihilation from the hydrogen molecule at zero energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J -Y; Varga, K

    2009-01-01

    The confined variational method is used to generate a basis of correlated gaussians to describe the interaction region wave function for positron scattering from the H$_2$ molecule. The scattering length was $\\approx -2.7$ $a_0$ while the zero energy $Z_{\\rm eff}$ of 15.7 is compatible with experimental values. The variation of the scattering length and $Z_{\\rm eff}$ with inter-nuclear distance was surprisingly rapid due to virtual state formation at $R \\approx 3.4$ $a_0$.

  10. MAGNETIC FIELD GENERATION AND PARTICLE ENERGIZATION AT RELATIVISTIC SHEAR BOUNDARIES IN COLLISIONLESS ELECTRON-POSITRON PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Edison; Smith, Ian [Rice University, MS 108, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Boettcher, Markus, E-mail: liang@rice.edu, E-mail: iansmith@rice.edu, E-mail: boettchm@ohio.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Using particle-in-cell simulations, we study the kinetic physics of relativistic shear flow in collisionless electron-positron (e+e-) plasmas. We find efficient magnetic field generation and particle energization at the shear boundary, driven by streaming instabilities across the shear interface and sustained by the shear flow. Nonthermal, anisotropic high-energy particles are accelerated across field lines to produce a power-law tail turning over just below the shear Lorentz factor. These results have important implications for the dissipation and radiation of jets in blazars and gamma-ray bursts.

  11. Computer simulation of longitudinal single-bunch effects in electron-positron storage rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, P.B.; Bane, K.L.F.; Satoh, K.

    1981-02-01

    The computer code TRACK simulates longitudinal single-bunch effects in an electron-positron storage ring. The program tracks the turn-by-turn energy and phase deviations of N superparticles, where N is 100-1000. In addition to the usual RF and lattice parameters, an input to the program is the wake potential function for the ring vacuum chamber. The program has been applied to compute bunch lengthening in SPEAR as a function of charge per bunch. Although the computed results are in qualitative agreement with measurements, there are discrepancies in some details. Possible reasons for these discrepancies are discussed.

  12. Spin polarized electron-positron pair production via elliptical polarized laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wöllert, Anton; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-01-01

    We study nonperturbative multiphoton electron-positron pair creation in ultra-strong electromagnetic fields formed by two counterpropagating pulses with elliptic polarization. Our numerical approach allows us to take into account the temporal as well as the spatial variation of the standing electromagnetic field. The spin and momentum resolved pair creation probabilities feature characteristic Rabi oscillations and resonance spectra. Therefore, each laser frequency features a specific momentum distribution of the created particles. We find that depending on the relative polarization of both pulses the created electrons may be spin polarized along the direction of field propagation.

  13. Towards a resolution of the proton form factor problem: new electron and positron scattering data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Adikaram; D. Rimal; L. B. Weinstein; B. Raue; P. Khetarpal; R. P. Bennett; J. Arrington; W. K. Brooks; K. P. Adhikari; A. V. Afanasev; M. J. Amaryan; M. D. Anderson; J. Ball; M. Battaglieri; I. Bedlinskiy; A. S. Biselli; J. Bono; S. Boiarinov; W. J. Briscoe; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; G. Charles; L. Colaneri; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; G. E. Dodge; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; A. Filippi; J. A. Fleming; A. Fradi; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; W. Gohn; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; N. Harrison; M. Hattawy; K. Hicks; M. Holtrop; S. M. Hughes; C. E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; D. Jenkins; H. Jiang; K. Joo; S. Joosten; M. Khandaker; W. Kim; A. Klein; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; V. Kubarovsky; S. E. Kuhn; H. Y. Lu; I . J . D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; M. D. Mestayer; C. A. Meyer; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; C. I. Moody; H. Moutarde; A Movsisyan; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; K. Park; E. Pasyuk; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Procureur; Y. Prok; D. Protopopescu; A. J. R. Puckett; M. Ripani; A. Rizzo; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatié; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; Y. G. Sharabian; A. Simonyan; I. Skorodumina; E. S. Smith; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; N. Sparveris; S. Stepanyan; S. Strauch; V. Sytnik; M. Taiuti; Ye Tian; A. Trivedi; M. Ungaro; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; D. P. Watts; X. Wei; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; L. Zana; J. Zhang; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta; The CLAS Collaboration

    2014-11-25

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, $G_E^p$, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of $G_E^p$ from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization ($\\varepsilon$) and momentum transfer ($Q^2$) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing $\\varepsilon$ at $Q^2 = 1.45 \\text{ GeV}^2$. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at $Q^2\\approx 1.75$ GeV$^2$ and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and $\\Delta$ intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to $2-3$ GeV$^2$.

  14. Electroweak Measurements in Electron-Positron Collisions at W-Boson-Pair Energies at LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schael, S; Bruneliere, R; Buskulic, D; De Bonis, I; Decamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jezequel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Trocme, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Fernandez, E; Fernandez-Bosman, M; Garrido, Ll; Grauges, E; Juste, A; Martinez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, Ll. M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Perlas, J; Riu, I; Ruiz, H; Sanchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Bazarko, A; Becker, U; Boix, G; Bird, F; Blucher, E; Bonvicini, B; Bright-Thomas, P; Barklow, T; Buchmuller, O; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Greening, T C; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Gianotti, F; Girone, M; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Kado, M; Lehraus, I; Lazeyras, P; Maley, P; Mato, P; May, J; Moutoussi, A; Pepe-Altarelli, M; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, L; Schlatter, D; Schmitt, B; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Veenhof, R; Valassi, A; Wiedenmann, W; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Z; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Bertelsen, H; Fernley, T; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Lindahl, A; Mollerud, R; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Waananen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Siotis, I; Vayaki, A; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G; Brient, J C; Machefert, F; Rouge, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Verderi, M; Videau, H; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Picchi, P; Colrain, P; Have, I. ten; Hughes, I S; Kennedy, J; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Turnbull, R M; Wasserbaech, S; Buchmuller, O; Cavanaugh, R; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, W; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, D M; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Goodsir, S; Marinelli, N; Martin, E B; Nash, J; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R.W L; Keemer, N R; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Sloan, T; Smizanska, M; Snow, S W; Williams, M I; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaitre, V; Bauerdick, L.A T; Blumenschein, U; van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Holldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kasemann, M; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Muller, A S; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, J J; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Etienne, F; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Tilquin, A; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Buscher, V; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Huttmann, K; Lutjens, G; Mannert, C; Manner, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Seywerd, H; Stenzel, H; Villegas, M; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Azzurri, P; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, Ph; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F; Lefrancois, J; Mutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foa, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciaba, A; Sguazzoni, G; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, J; Tenchini, R; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; Garcia-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Botterill, D R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Edwards, M; Haywood, S J; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D; Colas, P; Emery, S; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, W; Lancon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Perez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S

    2013-01-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3~fb$^{-1}$ collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from $130~GeV$ to $209~GeV$. Combining the published results of the four LEP experiments, the measurements include total and differential cross-sections in photon-pair, fermion-pair and four-fermion production, the latter resulting from both double-resonant WW and ZZ production as well as singly resonant production. Total and differential cross-sections are measured precisely, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model at centre-of-mass energies never explored before in electron-positron collisions. Final-state interaction effects in four-fermion production, such as those arising from colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein correlations between the two W decay systems arising ...

  15. Quantification of stress history in type 304L stainless steel using positron annihilation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, Thomas W.; Walters, Leon C.; Schoen, Marco P.; Naidu, D. Subbaram; Dickerson, Charles; Perrenoud, Ben C.

    2011-04-15

    Five Type 304L stainless steel specimens were subjected to incrementally increasing values of plastic strain. At each value of strain, the associated static stress was recorded and the specimen was subjected to positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) using the Doppler Broadening method. A calibration curve for the 'S' parameter as a function of stress was developed based on the five specimens. Seven different specimens (blind specimens labeled B1-B7) of 304L stainless steel were subjected to values of stress inducing plastic deformation. The values of stress ranged from 310 to 517 MPa. The seven specimens were subjected to PAS post-loading using the Doppler Broadening method, and the results were compared against the developed curve from the previous five specimens. It was found that a strong correlation exists between the 'S' parameter, stress, and strain up to a strain value of 15%, corresponding to a stress value of 500 MPa, beyond which saturation of the 'S' parameter occurs. Research Highlights: {yields} Specimens were initially in an annealed/recrystallized condition. {yields} Calibration results indicate positron annihilation measurements yield correlation. {yields} Deformation produced by cold work was likely larger than the maximum strain.

  16. Standing electromagnetic solitons in hot ultra-relativistic electron-positron plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heidari, E.; Aslaninejad, M.; Eshraghi, H.; Rajaee, L.

    2014-03-15

    Using a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model, we investigate standing relativistic bright solitons in hot electron-positron plasmas. The positron dynamics is taken into account. A set of nonlinear coupled differential equations describing the evolution of electromagnetic waves in fully relativistic two-fluid plasma is derived analytically and solved numerically. As a necessary condition for the existence of standing solitons the system should be relativistic. For the case of ultra-relativistic plasma, we investigate non-drifting bright solitary waves. Detailed discussions of the acceptable solutions are presented. New single hump non-trivial symmetric solutions for the scalar potential were found, and single and multi-nodal symmetric and anti-symmetric solutions for the vector potential are presented. It is shown that for a fixed value of the fluid velocity excited modes with more zeros in the profile of the vector potential show a higher magnitude for the scalar potential. An increase in the plasma fluid velocity also increases the magnitude of the scalar potential. Furthermore, the Hamiltonian and the first integral of the system are given.

  17. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; et al

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentummore »transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ? at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2?1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.« less

  18. Thermonuclear supernovae: probing magnetic fields by positrons and late-time IR line profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P., E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com, E-mail: rpenney@g.clemson.edu [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32305 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of ? and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 ?m, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M {sub Ch}) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 10{sup 9} G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a ?-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 ?m can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M {sub Ch} mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central {sup 56}Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M {sub Ch}. Good time coverage is required to separate the effects of optical depth, the size and morphology of B, and the aspect angle of the observer. The spectra require a resolution of about 500 km s{sup –1} and a signal-to-noise ratio of about 20%. Two other strong near-IR spectral features at about 1.5 and 1.8 ?m are used to demonstrate the importance of line blending, which may invalidate a kinematic interpretation of emission lines. Flat-topped line profiles between 300 and 400 days have been observed and reported in the literature. They lend support for M {sub Ch} mass explosions in at least some cases and require magnetic fields equal to or in excess of 10{sup 6} G. We briefly discuss the effects of the size and morphology of B on light curves, as well as limitations. We argue that line profiles are a more direct measurement of B than light curves because they measure both the distribution of {sup 56}Ni and the redistribution of the energy input by positrons rather than the total energy input. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms for the formation of high B-fields and the limitations of our analysis.

  19. Radiation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

  20. Contaminant Sources are Known

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources are Known Historical contaminant sources from liquid discharges and solid waste management units are known. August 1, 2013 Contaminant source map LANL contaminant...

  1. Positron and gamma-photon production and nuclear reactions in cascade processes initiated by a sub-terawatt femtosecond laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Alexander

    Positron and gamma-photon production and nuclear reactions in cascade processes initiated by a sub, through specially arranged cascade processes in optimal targets, substantial amounts of nuclear radiation-6951 97 02350-4 Numerous proposals to induce nuclear transformations by intense lasers see, e.g., Ref. 1

  2. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R. [Research Institute of Instrumentation Frontier, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yamamoto, N. [Nagoya University Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M. [UVSOR, Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Myodaiji-cho, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  3. Investigation into electron cloud effects in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.; Crittenden, J.A.; Conway, J.; Dugan, G.F.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L.; Shanks, J.; Sonnad, K.G.; Boon, L.; Harkay, K.; Ishibashi, T.; Furman, M.A.; Guiducci, S.; Pivi, M.T.F.; Wang, L.

    2014-02-28

    We report modeling results for electron cloud buildup and instability in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring. Updated optics, wiggler magnets, and vacuum chamber designs have recently been developed for the 5 GeV, 3.2-km racetrack layout. An analysis of the synchrotron radiation profile around the ring has been performed, including the effects of diffuse and specular photon scattering on the interior surfaces of the vacuum chamber. The results provide input to the cloud buildup simulations for the various magnetic field regions of the ring. The modeled cloud densities thus obtained are used in the instability threshold calculations. We conclude that the mitigation techniques employed in this model will suffice to allow operation of the damping ring at the design operational specifications

  4. Radiation from multi-GeV electrons and positrons in periodically bent silicon crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezchastnov, Victor G; Solovyov, Andrey V

    2015-01-01

    A periodically bent Si crystal is shown to efficiently serve for producing highly monochromatic radiation in a gamma-ray energy spectral range. A short-period small-amplitude bending yields narrow undulator-type spectral peaks in radiation from multi-GeV electrons and positrons channeling through the crystal. Benchmark theoretical results on the undulator are obtained by simulations of the channeling with a full atomistic approach to the projectile-crystal interactions over the macroscopic propagation distances. The simulations are facilitated by employing the MBN Explorer package for molecular dynamics calculations on the meso- bio- and nano-scales. The radiation from the ultra-relativistic channeling projectiles is computed within the quasi-classical formalism. The effects due to the quantum recoil are shown to be significantly prominent in the gamma-ray undulator radiation.

  5. Phase-mixing of Langmuir oscillations in cold electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maity, Chandan

    2014-07-15

    Space-time evolution of Langmuir oscillations in a cold homogeneous electron-positron-ion plasma has been analyzed by employing a straightforward perturbation expansion method, showing phase-mixing and, thus, wave-breaking of excited oscillations at arbitrary amplitudes. Within an assumption of infinitely massive ions, an approximate phase-mixing time is found to scale as ?{sub pe}t{sub mix}?[(6/?{sup 2})((2??){sup 5/2}/(1??))]{sup 1/3}, where “?” and “?” (= n{sub 0i}/n{sub 0e}) are the amplitude of perturbation and the ratio of equilibrium ion density to equilibrium electron density, respectively, and ?{sub pe}??(4?n{sub 0e}e{sup 2}/m) is the electron plasma frequency. The results presented on phase-mixing of Langmuir modes in multispecies plasmas are expected to be relevant to laboratory and astrophysical environments.

  6. Semiclassical description of nonlinear electron-positron photoproduction in strong laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Meuren; Christoph H. Keitel; Antonino Di Piazza

    2015-03-11

    The nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process is studied in the presence of strong and short laser pulses. We show that for a relativistically intense plane-wave laser field many aspects of the momentum distribution for the produced electron-positron pair like its extend, region of highest probability and carrier-envelope phase effects can be explained from the classical evolution of the created particles in the background field. To this end we verify that the local constant-crossed field approximation is also appropriate for the calculation of the spectrum if applied on the probability-amplitude level. To compare the exact expressions with the semiclassical approach, we introduce a very fast numerical scheme, which makes it feasible to completely resolve the interference structure of the spectrum over the available multidimensional phase space.

  7. Comptonization of cosmic microwave background by cold ultra-relativistic electron-positron pulsar wind and origin of ~100 GeV lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iakubovskyi, Dmytro

    2015-01-01

    Previously, [1207.0458] proposed an astrophysical explanation of narrow gamma-ray line-like feature(s) at ~100 GeV from Galactic Center region observed by Fermi/LAT [1205.4700]. The model of [1207.0458] is based on the inverse Compton scattering of external ultra-violet/X-ray radiation by a cold ultra-relativistic electron-positron pulsar wind. We show that the extra broad ~30 MeV component should arise from Comptonization of cosmic microwave background radiation. We estimate the main parameters of this component and show that it can be detectable with MeV telescopes such as CGRO/COMPTEL. The location of CGRO/COMPTEL unidentified source GRO J1823-12 close to excess of 105-120 GeV emission (Reg.1 of [1205.4700]) can be interpreted as an argument in favour of astrophysical model of the narrow feature(s) at ~100 GeV.

  8. INTEGRAL high energy sky: The keV to MeV cosmic sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ubertini; A. De Rosa; A. Bazzano; L. Bassani; V. Sguera

    2008-02-03

    After almost 5 years of operation, ESA's International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Space Observatory has unveiled a new soft Gamma ray sky and produced a remarkable harvest of results, ranging from identification of new high energy sources, to the discovery of dozens of variable sources to the mapping of the Aluminum emission from the Galaxy Plane to the presence of electrons and positrons generating the annihilation line in the Galaxy central radian. INTEGRAL is continuing the deep observations of the Galactic Plane and of the whole sky in the soft Gamma ray range. The new IBIS gamma ray catalogue contains more than 420 sources detected above 20 keV. We present a view of the INTEGRAL high energy sky with particular regard to sources emitting at high energy, including Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), HESS/MAGIC counterparts and new view of the cosmic gamma ray diffuse background.

  9. Evaluating the purity of a {sup 57}Co flood source by PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiFilippo, Frank P., E-mail: difilif@ccf.org [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Flood sources of {sup 57}Co are commonly used for quality control of gamma cameras. Flood uniformity may be affected by the contaminants {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co, which emit higher energy photons. Although vendors specify a maximum combined {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co activity, a convenient test for flood source purity that is feasible in a clinical environment would be desirable. Methods: Both {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co emit positrons with branching 19.6% and 14.9%, respectively. As is known from {sup 90}Y imaging, a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is capable of quantitatively imaging very weak positron emission in a high single-photon background. To evaluate this approach, two {sup 57}Co flood sources were scanned with a clinical PET/CT multiple times over a period of months. The {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co activity was clearly visible in the reconstructed PET images. Total impurity activity was quantified from the PET images after background subtraction of prompt gamma coincidences. Results: Time-of-flight PET reconstruction was highly beneficial for accurate image quantification. Repeated measurements of the positron-emitting impurities showed excellent agreement with an exponential decay model. For both flood sources studied, the fit parameters indicated a zero intercept and a decay half-life consistent with a mixture of {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co. The total impurity activity at the reference date was estimated to be 0.06% and 0.07% for the two sources, which was consistent with the vendor’s specification of <0.12%. Conclusions: The robustness of the repeated measurements and a thorough analysis of the detector corrections and physics suggest that the accuracy is acceptable and that the technique is feasible. Further work is needed to validate the accuracy of this technique with a calibrated high resolution gamma spectrometer as a gold standard, which was not available for this study, and for other PET detector models.

  10. Electron-positron pair production near the Galactic Centre and the 511 keV emission line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Man Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that a high production rate of positrons (strong 511 keV line) and a significant amount of excess GeV gamma-ray exist in our Galactic bulge. The latter issue can be explained by $\\sim 40$ GeV dark matter annihilation through $b \\bar{b}$ channel while the former one remains a mystery. On the other hand, recent studies reveal that a large amount of high density gas might exist near the Galactic Centre million years ago to account for the young, massive stars extending from 0.04 pc - 7 pc. In this article, I propose a new scenario and show that the 40 GeV dark matter annihilation model can also explain the required positron production rate (511 keV line) in the bulge due to the existence of the high density gas cloud near the supermassive black hole long time ago.

  11. Lithium ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Prabir K.

    2014-01-01

    HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. Roya source of ?100 mA lithium ion current for the Neutralized

  12. EPAC08-TUPP024, LBNL-704E ELECTRON CYCLOTRON RESONANCES IN ELECTRON CLOUD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    in the International Linear Collider positron damping ring wiggler. An electron equilibrium density enhancement of up for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We have simulated the buildup of the electron cloud in this damping ring

  13. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-01-03

    Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

  14. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

  15. The effect of drift on the evolution of the electron/positron spectra in an axisymmetric pulsar wind nebula

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorster, Michael J.; Moraal, Harm

    2014-06-20

    Charged particles propagating through a structured magnetic field are subject to drift motion. The primary aim of the present paper is therefore to investigate the effects of gradient, curvature, and neutral sheet drift on the evolution of the electron and positron spectra in a pulsar wind nebula, where the drift motion is a direct result of the magnetic field having an Archimedean spiral structure. In order to investigate the evolution of the spectra, the steady-state, axisymmetric Fokker-Planck transport equation is solved numerically using a finite-difference scheme. Apart from drift motion, the transport processes of convection and diffusion, along with the energy loss processes of adiabatic cooling and synchrotron radiation, are also included in the model. It is found that drift, particularly neutral sheet drift, can lead to a quantitative difference in the evolution of the electron and positron spectra. This difference may be of importance when interpreting the positron excess observed by PAMELA and AMS-02 near Earth.

  16. Fast magnetic reconnection in low-density electron-positron plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessho, Naoki; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2010-10-15

    Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been performed to study magnetic reconnection in low-density electron-positron plasmas without a guide magnetic field. Impulsive reconnection rates become of the order of unity when the background density is much smaller than 10% of the density in the initial current layer. It is demonstrated that the outflow speed is less than the upstream Alfven speed, and that the time derivative of the density must be taken into account in the definition of the reconnection rate. The reconnection electric fields in the low-density regime become much larger than the ones in the high-density regime, and it is possible to accelerate the particles to high energies more efficiently. The inertial term in the generalized Ohm's law is the most dominant term that supports a large reconnection electric field. An effective collisionless resistivity is produced and tracks the extension of the diffusion region in the late stage of the reconnection dynamics, and significant broadening of the diffusion region is observed. Because of the broadening of the diffusion region, no secondary islands, which have been considered to play a role to limit the diffusion region, are generated during the extension of the diffusion region in the outflow direction.

  17. Observation of Exclusive Electron-Positron Production in Hadron-Hadron Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.

    2006-11-01

    We present the first observation of exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} production in hadron-hadron collisions, using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 532 pb{sup -1}. We require the absence of any particle signatures in the detector except for an electron and a positron candidate, each with transverse energy E{sub T} > 5 GeV and pseudorapidity |{eta}| < 2. With these criteria, 16 events are observed compared to a background expectation of 1.9 {+-} 0.3 events. These events are consistent in cross section and properties with the QED process p{bar p} {yields} p + e{sup +}e{sup -} + {bar p} through two-photon exchange. The measured cross section is 1.6{sub -0.3}{sup +0.5}(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst) pb. This agrees with the theoretical prediction of 1.71 {+-} 0.01 pb.

  18. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)] [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because {sup 134}Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as {sup 40}K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from {sup 134}Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  19. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Krishnendu; Straus, Kenneth J.; Glick, Stephen J.; Chen, Yu.

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  20. Studies of unicellular micro-organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae by means of Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kubicz, E; Zgardzi?ska, B; Bednarski, T; Bia?as, P; Czerwi?ski, E; Gajos, A; Gorgol, M; Kami?ska, D; Kap?on, ?; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemie?, W; Nied?wiecki, S; Pa?ka, M; Raczy?ski, L; Rajfur, Z; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; S?omski, A; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wi?licki, W; Zieli?ski, M; Moskal, P

    2015-01-01

    Results of Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and microscopic studies on simple microorganisms: brewing yeasts are presented. Lifetime of ortho - positronium (o-Ps) were found to change from 2.4 to 2.9 ns (longer lived component) for lyophilised and aqueous yeasts, respectively. Also hygroscopicity of yeasts in time was examined, allowing to check how water - the main component of the cell - affects PALS parameters, thus lifetime of o-Ps were found to change from 1.2 to 1.4 ns (shorter lived component) for the dried yeasts. The time sufficient to hydrate the cells was found below 10 hours. In the presence of liquid water an indication of reorganization of yeast in the molecular scale was observed. Microscopic images of the lyophilised, dried and wet yeasts with best possible resolution were obtained using Inverted Microscopy (IM) and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) methods. As a result visible changes to the surface of the cell membrane were observed in ESEM images.

  1. Hidden-Sector Higgs Bosons at High-Energy Electron-Positron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack H. Collins; James D. Wells

    2012-09-30

    The possibility of a scalar messenger that can couple the Standard Model (SM) to a hidden sector has been discussed in a variety of contexts in the literature in recent years. We consider the case that a new scalar singlet charged under an exotic spontaneously broken Abelian gauge symmetry mixes weakly with the SM Higgs resulting in two scalar mass states, one of which has heavily suppressed couplings to the SM particles. Previous phenomenological studies have focussed on potential signatures for such a model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, there are interesting regions of the parameter space in which the heavier Higgs state would be out of reach for LHC searches if its mass is greater than 1 TeV. We therefore investigate the discovery potential for such a particle at a 3 TeV electron-positron collider, which is motivated by the recent developments of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). We find that such an experiment could substantially extend our discovery reach for a heavy, weakly coupled Higgs boson, and we discuss three possible search channels.

  2. High Statistics Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5–500 GeV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardo, L; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Carosi, G; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Cindolo, F; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Henning, R; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mańá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Massera, F; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Monreal, B; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilastrini, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rossi, L; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Rybka, G; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türko?lu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Volpini, G; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, K Y; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhou, F; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 500 GeV based on 10.9 million positron and electron events is presented. This measurement extends the energy range of our previous observation and increases its precision. The new results show, for the first time, that above ?200??GeV the positron fraction no longer exhibits an increase with energy.

  3. The source-sample stage of the new two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation spectrometer at Technische Universitaet Muenchen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreas; Boeni, Peter [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl E21, James-Franck Strasse, 85747 Garching (Germany); Leitner, Michael [FRM II, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Hugenschmidt, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl E21, James-Franck Strasse, 85747 Garching (Germany); FRM II, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR) is a well established technique for the investigation of the electronic structure. A major limitation of ACAR studies is the available positron flux at a small spot on the sample. For this reason, the focus of this work is put on the discussion of a newly developed source-sample stage of the new 2D-ACAR spectrometer at Technische Universitaet Muenchen which uses an optimized static magnetic field configuration to guide the positrons onto the sample. The achieved spot diameter is d{sub FWHM}= 5.4 mm, with a high efficiency over the whole energy spectrum of the {sup 22}Na positron source. The implications of the performance of the source-sample stage are discussed with regard to 2D-ACAR measurements of single crystalline {alpha}-quartz, which serves as a model system for the determination of the total resolution. A value of (1.53 Multiplication-Sign 1.64) mrad{sup 2} FWHM was achieved at room temperature.

  4. Fine-grid calculations for stellar electron and positron capture rates on Fe isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Tawfik, Abdel Nasser

    2013-03-15

    The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y{sub e}) of the corematerial. It is suggested that the temporal variation of Y{sub e} within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly {sup 54-56}Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling Y{sub e} ratio via electron capture on these nuclides. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak-interaction-mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the Y{sub e} ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on {sup 54-56}Fe. The sensitivity of the pn-QRPA calculated capture rates to the deformation parameter is also studied in this work. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

  5. Relationship of computed tomography perfusion and positron emission tomography to tumour progression in malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeung, Timothy P C; Yartsev, Slav; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene; He, Wenqing; Fisher, Barbara; VanderSpek, Lauren L; Macdonald, David; Bauman, Glenn

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This study aimed to explore the potential for computed tomography (CT) perfusion and 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in predicting sites of future progressive tumour on a voxel-by-voxel basis after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: Ten patients underwent pre-radiotherapy magnetic resonance (MR), FDG-PET and CT perfusion near the end of radiotherapy and repeated post-radiotherapy follow-up MR scans. The relationships between these images and tumour progression were assessed using logistic regression. Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the value of these images in predicting sites of tumour progression. Results: Pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour; near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion; CT perfusion blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and permeability-surface area (PS) product; FDG-PET standard uptake value (SUV); and SUV:BF showed significant associations with tumour progression on follow-up MR imaging (P < 0.0001). The mean sensitivity (±standard deviation), specificity and area under the ROC curve (AUC) of PS were 0.64 ± 0.15, 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.72 ± 0.12 respectively. This mean AUC was higher than that of the pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour and near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion (both AUCs = 0.6 ± 0.1, P ? 0.03). The multivariate model using BF, BV, PS and SUV had a mean AUC of 0.8 ± 0.1, but this was not significantly higher than the PS only model. Conclusion: PS is the single best predictor of tumour progression when compared to other parameters, but voxel-based prediction based on logistic regression had modest sensitivity and specificity.

  6. Characterization of Vacancy Defects in Electroplated Cu Films by Positron Annihilation and its Impact on Stress Migration Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, T.; Nakamura, T.; Mizushima, Y. [Fujitsu Laboratories LTD. Akiruno Technology Center 50 Fuchigami, Akiruno, Tokyo, 197-0833 (Japan); Kouno, T. [Fujitsu LTD. Akiruno Technology Center 50 Fuchigami, Akiruno, Tokyo, 197-0833 (Japan); Uedono, A. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Tsuchikawa, H. [Fujitsu Laboratories LTD. Akiruno Technology Center 50 Fuchigami, Akiruno, Tokyo, 197-0833 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2006-02-07

    Positron annihilation was used to evaluate vacancy concentrations in electroplated Cu films with different kinds of electrolytes. The influence of various electrolytes on the impurities, grain boundaries, and micro-voids were also investigated. We found a higher impurity concentration and larger micro-voids were observed in copper films with higher vacancy concentrations. We reduced the failure rate in our stress migration results using a copper film with a higher concentration of vacancy and impurity. The stress migration performance improved because impurity nucleated vacancy clusters act as effective traps for diffusing vacancies.

  7. DC source assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  8. First Result from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station: Precision Measurement of the Positron Fraction in Primary Cosmic Rays of 0.5–350 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basil, A.

    A precision measurement by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the positron fraction in primary cosmic rays in the energy range from 0.5 to 350 GeV based on 6.8×10[superscript 6] positron ...

  9. (/sup 11/C)clorgyline and (/sup 11/C)-L-deprenyl and their use in measuring functional monoamine oxidase activity in the brain using positron emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1986-04-17

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase in the living body by using /sup 11/C-labeled enzyme inhibitors which bind irreversibly to an enzyme as a result of catalysis. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  10. Defects introduced into electroplated Cu films during room-temperature recrystallization probed by a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uedono, A.; Suzuki, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ohdaira, T.; Suzuki, R. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Semiconductor Technology Academic Research Center, 17-2, Shin Yokohama 3-chome, Kohoku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 222-0033 (Japan); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Positron annihilation was used to probe vacancy-type defects in electroplated Cu films deposited on Ta/SiO{sub 2}/Si. Doppler broadening spectra of the annihilation radiation were measured for the Cu films during grain growth at room temperature (i.e., self-annealing). The line-shape parameter S increased during self-annealing, and the observed time dependence of S was well described by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov kinetics. After self-annealing, the values of S were found to be larger than the S value for annealed pure Cu, suggesting that the positrons annihilated from the trapped state by vacancy-type defects in grains. From a comparison with the results of previous isochronal annealing experiments, the major species of defects introduced during self-annealing was found to be vacancy clusters. The size of these defects increased, but their concentration decreased, with increasing film thickness. In thicker Cu films, an enhanced flow of atoms and subsequent rapid grain growth cause such defect behavior.

  11. Microwave ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  12. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  13. Improved ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-05-04

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species,

  14. Experimental and numerical characterization of the neutron field produced in the n@BTF Frascati photo-neutron source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedogni, R.; Buonomo, B.; Esposito, A.; Mazzitelli, G.; Foggetta, L.; Gomez Ros. J.M.; 10.1016/j.nima.2011.08.032

    2011-01-01

    A photo-neutron irradiation facility is going to be established at the Frascati National Laboratories of INFN on the base of the successful results of the n@BTF experiment. The photoneutron source is obtained by an electron or positron pulsed beam, tunable in energy, current and in time structure, impinging on an optimized tungsten target located in a polyethylene-lead shielding assembly. The resulting neutron field, through selectable collimated apertures at different angles, is released into a 100 m2 irradiation room. The neutron beam, characterized by an evaporation spectrum peaked at about 1 MeV, can be used in nuclear physics, calibration of neutron detectors, material

  15. The potential of positron emission tomography for intratreatment dynamic lung tumor tracking: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jaewon [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yamamoto, Tokihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Mazin, Samuel R. [RefleXion Medical, Inc., Burlingame, California 94010 (United States)] [RefleXion Medical, Inc., Burlingame, California 94010 (United States); Graves, Edward E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate the potential and feasibility of positron emission tomography for dynamic lung tumor tracking during radiation treatment. The authors propose a center of mass (CoM) tumor tracking algorithm using gated-PET images combined with a respiratory monitor and investigate the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Methods: The proposed PET dynamic lung tumor tracking algorithm estimated the target position information through the CoM of the segmented target volume on gated PET images reconstructed from accumulated coincidence events. The information was continuously updated throughout a scan based on the assumption that real-time processing was supported (actual processing time at each frame ?10?s). External respiratory motion and list-mode PET data were acquired from a phantom programmed to move with measured respiratory traces (external respiratory motion and internal target motion) from human subjects, for which the ground truth target position was known as a function of time. The phantom was cylindrical with six hollow sphere targets (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm in diameter). The measured respiratory traces consisted of two sets: (1) 1D-measured motion from ten healthy volunteers and (2) 3D-measured motion from four lung cancer patients. The authors evaluated the geometric accuracy of the proposed algorithm by quantifying estimation errors (Euclidean distance) between the actual motion of targets (1D-motion and 3D-motion traces) and CoM trajectories estimated by the proposed algorithm as a function of time. Results: The time-averaged error of 1D-motion traces over all trajectories of all targets was 1.6 mm. The error trajectories decreased with time as coincidence events were accumulated. The overall error trajectory of 1D-motion traces converged to within 2 mm in approximately 90 s. As expected, more accurate results were obtained for larger targets. For example, for the 37 mm target, the average error over all 1D-motion traces was 1.1 mm; and for the 10 mm target, the average error over all 1D-motion traces was 2.8 mm. The overall time-averaged error of 3D-motion traces was 1.6 mm, which was comparable to that of the 1D-motion traces. There were small variations in the errors between the 3D-motion traces, although the motion trajectories were very different. The accuracy of the estimates was consistent for all targets except for the smallest. Conclusions: The authors developed an algorithm for dynamic lung tumor tracking using list-mode PET data and a respiratory motion signal, and demonstrated proof-of-principle for PET-guided lung tumor tracking. The overall tracking error in phantom studies is less than 2 mm.

  16. Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of patients immediately following injection. This value can then be reliably scaled to the desired time and distance for planning and staff dose evaluation purposes. At distances closer than 1 m, a distance-specific dose rate constant of 0.367 {mu}Sv/MBq h at 30 cm is recommended for accurate calculations. An accurate patient-specific dose rate constant that accounts for patient-specific variables (e.g., distribution and attenuation) will allow an accurate evaluation of the dose rate from a patient injected with an isotope rather than simply utilizing a physical constant.

  17. Tackling light higgsinos at the ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikael Berggren; Felix Brümmer; Jenny List; Gudrid Moortgat-Pick; Tania Robens; Krzysztof Rolbiecki; Hale Sert

    2013-12-10

    In supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, higgsino-like charginos and neutralinos are preferred to have masses of the order of the electroweak scale by naturalness arguments. Such light $\\widetilde{\\chi}^0_1$, $\\widetilde{\\chi}^0_2$ and $\\widetilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1$ states can be almost mass degenerate, and their decays are then difficult to observe at colliders. In addition to the generic naturalness argument, light higgsinos are well motivated from a top-down perspective. For instance, they arise naturally in certain models of hybrid gauge-gravity mediation. In the present analysis, we study two benchmark points which have been derived in the framework of such a model, which exhibit mass differences of O(GeV) in the higgsino sector. For chargino pair and neutralino associated production with initial-state photon radiation, we simulate the detector response and determine how accurately the small mass differences, the absolute masses and the cross sections can be measured at the International Linear Collider. Assuming that 500/fb has been collected at each of two beam-polarisations $P(e^+,e^-)=(\\pm 30\\%,\\mp 80\\%)$, we find that the mass differences can be measured to 40-300 MeV, the cross sections to 2-5%, and the absolute masses to 1.5-3.3 GeV, where the range of values correspond to the different scenarios and channels. Based on these observables we perform a parameter fit in the MSSM, from which we infer that the higgsino mass parameter $\\mu$ can be measured to a precision of about $\\Delta\\mu=$2--7 GeV. For the electroweak gaugino mass parameters $M_1$, $M_2$, which are chosen in the multi-TeV range, a narrow region is compatible with the measurements. For both parameters independently, we can determine a lower bound.

  18. The Higgs Portal from LHC to ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Englert

    2012-04-20

    Interpretations of searches for the Higgs boson are governed by model-dependent combinations of Higgs production cross sections and Higgs branching ratios. Mixing of the Higgs doublet with a hidden sector captures modifications from the Standard Model Higgs phenomenology in the standard search channels in a representative way, in particular because invisible Higgs decay modes open up. As a consequence, LHC exclusion bounds, which disfavor a heavy Standard Model Higgs can be consistently understood in terms of a standard-hidden mixed Higgs system. Shedding light on the possible existence of such an admixture with a hidden sector and quantifying the resemblance of an eventually discovered scalar resonance with the Standard Model Higgs crucially depends on measurement of invisible decays. This task will already be tackled at LHC, but eventually requires the clean environment of a future linear collider to be ultimately completed.

  19. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  20. Lithium ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Prabir K.

    2014-01-01

    HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. RoyUSA Abstract A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion

  1. Tsunami Sources Icosahedron Globe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunami Sources Icosahedron Globe August 2012 Edition NOAA National Geophysical Data Center World to reduce to 8.5" x 11". This globe of Earth shows the locations of historical tsunami sources, extracted from NGDC'sGlobal Historical Tsunami Database (ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard). A tsunamiisaseriesof traveling

  2. ModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have become the gold standard for imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    for Gamma-Ray Imaging, we are developing a novel small-animal PET scanner that utilizes common modularModPET: A Novel Small-Animal PET System Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT systems have these results to their human counterparts. Current small-animal PET scanners are very costly and complicated

  3. Piezotube borehole seismic source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daley, Tom M; Solbau, Ray D; Majer, Ernest L

    2014-05-06

    A piezoelectric borehole source capable of permanent or semipermanent insertion into a well for uninterrupted well operations is described. The source itself comprises a series of piezoelectric rings mounted to an insulative mandrel internally sized to fit over a section of well tubing, the rings encased in a protective housing and electrically connected to a power source. Providing an AC voltage to the rings will cause expansion and contraction sufficient to create a sonic pulse. The piezoelectric borehole source fits into a standard well, and allows for uninterrupted pass-through of production tubing, and other tubing and electrical cables. Testing using the source may be done at any time, even concurrent with well operations, during standard production.

  4. Head on collision of multi-solitons in an electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Kaushik; Chatterjee, Prasanta Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2014-10-15

    The head-on collision and overtaking collision of four solitons in a plasma comprising superthermal electrons, cold ions, and Boltzmann distributed positrons are investigated using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) together with Hirota's method. PLK method yields two separate Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations where solitons obtained from any KdV equation move along a direction opposite to that of solitons obtained from the other KdV equation, While Hirota's method gives multi-soliton solution for each KdV equation all of which move along the same direction where the fastest moving soliton eventually overtakes the other ones. We have considered here two soliton solutions obtained from Hirota's method. Phase shifts acquired by each soliton due to both head-on collision and overtaking collision are calculated analytically.

  5. Anomalous Higgs-top Coupling Pollution on Triple Higgs Coupling Extraction at Future High-Luminosity Electron-Positron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen Shen; Shou-hua Zhu

    2015-04-25

    One of the most challenging tasks for future high-luminosity electron-positron colliders is to extract Higgs triple coupling. It was proposed that this can be carried out via the precisely measuring the cross section of ZH associated production up to $0.4\\%$. In this paper, we example the possible heavy pollution from Higgs-top anomalous coupling. Our numerical results show that the pollution is small for $\\sqrt{s}_{e^+e^-}= 240 GeV$. However for the higher energy collider, pollution is sizable, which should be taken into account. We further explored the possibility to measure CP-violated Higgs top coupling, via the forward-backward asymmetry $A_{FB}$ for the process $e^+e^- \\rightarrow ZH$. The asymmetry can reach $0.7\\%$ which is comparable to the precision of cross section measurement.

  6. Anomalous Higgs-top Coupling Pollution on Triple Higgs Coupling Extraction at Future High-Luminosity Electron-Positron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen Shen; Shou-hua Zhu

    2015-09-24

    One of the most challenging tasks for future high-luminosity electron-positron colliders is to extract Higgs triple coupling. It was proposed that this can be carried out via the precisely measuring the cross section of ZH associated production up to $0.4\\%$. In this paper, we example the possible heavy pollution from Higgs-top anomalous coupling. Our numerical results show that the pollution is small for $\\sqrt{s}_{e^+e^-}= 240 GeV$. However for the higher energy collider, pollution is sizable, which should be taken into account. We further explored the possibility to measure CP-violated Higgs top coupling, via the forward-backward asymmetry $A_{FB}$ for the process $e^+e^- \\rightarrow ZH$. The asymmetry can reach $0.7\\%$ which is comparable to the precision of cross section measurement.

  7. Anomalous Higgs-top Coupling Pollution on Triple Higgs Coupling Extraction at Future High-Luminosity Electron-Positron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    One of the most challenging tasks for future high-luminosity electron-positron colliders is to extract Higgs triple coupling. It was proposed that this can be carried out via the precisely measuring the cross section of ZH associated production up to $0.4\\%$. In this paper, we example the possible heavy pollution from Higgs-top anomalous coupling. Our numerical results show that the pollution is quite small for $\\sqrt{s}_{e^+e^-}= 240 GeV$. However for the higher energy collider, pollution is sizable, which should be taken into account. We further explored the possibility to measure CP-violated Higgs top coupling, via the forward-backward asymmetry $A_{FB}$ for the process $e^+e^- \\rightarrow ZH$. The asymmetry can reach $0.3\\%$ which is comparable to the precision of cross section measurement.

  8. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  9. Galactic Superluminal Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. A. Harmon

    1998-12-21

    A new class of X-ray sources was clearly established with the discovery of highly relativistic radio jets from the galactic sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40. Both of these objects have given us a broader view of black holes and the formation of jets, yet they also show the complexity of the accretion environment near relativistic objects. The fast apparent motion of the jets, their luminosity and variability, their high energy spectrum, and approximate scaling to the behavior of active galactic nuclei, certainly warrant the description "microquasar". I present a review of the observational data on these sources, and discuss where we stand on a physical picture of GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40 as taken from multi-wavelength studies. I also point out other galactic sources which share some of the properties of the microquasars, and what to look for as a high energy "signature" in future observations.

  10. Open source hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acosta, Roberto, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    Open source software development models have created some of the most innovative tools and companies in the industry today modifying the way value is created and businesses developed. The purpose of this thesis is to analyze ...

  11. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  12. Light Source Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, K.

    1977-05-01

    The perception of surface luster in achromatic single view images seems to depend on the existence of regions with source-like properties. These regions are due to the interaction of specular component of the surface's ...

  13. A surface ionization source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

  14. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  15. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, WA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Grabner, R. Fred (Brentwood, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

  16. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

    1994-08-02

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  18. Emergent gravity from direct-action EM in a toy universe of electrons and positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ibison

    2007-10-29

    We sketch the derivation of a Newtonian gravity-like force emerging from a direct-action variant of classical electromagnetism. The binding energy is a consequence of maximal phase correlation of the sources mediated by approximately monochromatic direct-action fields. The resulting force then has the character of a strong version of the van der Waals force, whose superior strength can be attributed to relatively coherent primary fields (compared with the totally incoherent effects of the ZPF). The model also predicts the existence of a background having some of the character of dark energy.

  19. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  20. Dual source heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  1. Storage Rings for Science with: Electron-Positron Collisions, Hadron Collisions and Synchrotron Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozaki,S.

    2009-05-04

    The author is honored to receive the 2009 Robert Wilson Prize and the recognition that comes with it. The citation for the prize reads, 'For his outstanding contribution to the design and construction of accelerators that has led to the realization of major machines for fundamental science on two continents and his promotion of international collaboration.' In this article, he will discuss the two construction projects, which he led, one (TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider at KEK) in Japan and the other (RHIC at BNL) in the USA, covering project issues and lessons learned from these projects. Although both of them were built on separate continents, it is interesting to note that they are both built on long off-shore islands. He will also add comments on his recent engagement in the development of the Conceptual Design for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

  2. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01

    Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

  3. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  4. Generation of high-energy electron-positron beams in the collision of a laser-accelerated electron beam and a multi-petawatt laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobet, Mathieu; d'Humičres, Emmanuel; Gremillet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Generation of antimatter via the multiphoton Breit-Wheeler process in an all-optical scheme will be made possible on forthcoming high-power laser facilities through the collision of wakefield-accelerated GeV electrons with a counter-propagating laser pulse with $10^{22}$-$10^{23}$ $\\mathrm{Wcm}^{-2}$ peak intensity. By means of integrated 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we show that the production of positron beams with 0.1-1 nC total charge, 100-400 MeV mean energy and 0.01-0.1 rad divergence is within the reach of soon-to-be-available laser systems. The variations of the positron beam's properties with respect to the laser parameters are also examined.

  5. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Positron Scanning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformancePi Day Pi DayPorterfield named ASTMPositive

  6. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  7. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  8. Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1991-12-24

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) interim policy and to provide guidance for sealed radioactive source accountability. The directive does not cancel any directives. Extended by DOE N 5400.10 to 12-24-93 & Extended by DOE N 5400.12 to 12-24-94.

  9. Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-12-22

    This Notice extends DOE N 5400.9, Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability, of 12-24-91, until 12-24-95, unless sooner superseded or rescinded. The contents of DOE N 5400.9 will be updated and incorporated in the revised DOE O 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers.

  10. Source waters Several factors influence the selection of source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Source waters Several factors influence the selection of source waters to feed desalination plants: the location of the plant in relation to water sources available, the deliv- ery destination of the treated water, the quality of the source water, the pretreatment options available, and the ecological

  11. Annex to 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    The Annex to the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Conceptual Design Report updates the Conceptual Design Report of 1987 (CDR-87) to include the results of further optimization and changes of the design during the past year. The design changes can be summarized as affecting three areas: the accelerator system, conventional facilities, and experimental systems. Most of the changes in the accelerator system result from inclusion of a positron accumulator ring (PAR), which was added at the suggestion of the 1987 DOE Review Committee, to speed up the filling rate of the storage ring. The addition of the PAR necessitates many minor changes in the linac system, the injector synchrotron, and the low-energy beam transport lines. 63 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. Nonlinear ion-acoustic structures in a nonextensive electron–positron–ion–dust plasma: Modulational instability and rogue waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Shimin; Research Group MAC, Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Amsterdam, 1098XG ; Mei, Liquan; Center for Computational Geosciences, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 710049 ; Sun, Anbang

    2013-05-15

    The nonlinear propagation of planar and nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized electron–positron–ion–dust plasma with two-electron temperature distributions is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics. Using the reductive perturbation method, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the potential wave amplitude. The effects of plasma parameters on the modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves are discussed in detail for planar as well as for cylindrical and spherical geometries. In addition, for the planar case, we analyze how the plasma parameters influence the nonlinear structures of the first- and second-order ion-acoustic rogue waves within the modulational instability region. The present results may be helpful in providing a good fit between the theoretical analysis and real applications in future spatial observations and laboratory plasma experiments. -- Highlights: ? Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a new plasma model is discussed. ? Tsallis’s statistics is considered in the model. ? The second-order ion-acoustic rogue wave is studied for the first time.

  13. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Muńoz, Víctor; Vińas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, J. Alejandro

    2014-09-15

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfvén mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfvén branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ??/?k?>?0) and an anomalous zone (where ??/?k?

  14. Indirect and direct signatures of Higgs portal decaying vector dark matter for positron excess in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, Seungwon; Ko, P.; Park, Wan-Il; Tang, Yong E-mail: pko@kias.re.kr E-mail: ytang@kias.re.kr

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the indirect signatures of the Higgs portal U(1){sub X} vector dark matter (VDM) X{sub ?} from both its pair annihilation and decay. The VDM is stable at renormalizable level by Z{sub 2} symmetry, and thermalized by Higgs-portal interactions. It can also decay by some nonrenormalizable operators with very long lifetime at cosmological time scale. If dim-6 operators for VDM decays are suppressed by 10{sup 16} GeV scale, the lifetime of VDM with mass ? 2 TeV is just right for explaining the positron excess in cosmic ray observed by PAMELA and AMS02 Collaborations. The VDM decaying into ?{sup +}?{sup ?} can fit the data, evading various constraints on cosmic rays. We give one UV-complete model as an example. This scenario for Higgs portal decaying VDM with mass around ? 2 TeV can be tested by DM direct search at XENON1T, and also at the future colliders by measuring the Higgs self-couplings.

  15. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raczynski, L; Kowalski, P; Wislicki, W; Bednarski, T; Bialas, P; Czerwinski, E; Kaplon, L; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kozik, T; Krzemien, W; Kubicz, E; Molenda, M; Moskal, I; Niedzwiecki, Sz; Palka, M; Pawlik-Niedzwiecka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Slomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Zielinski, M; Zon, N

    2014-01-01

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511~keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four threshold...

  16. Novel method for hit-position reconstruction using voltage signals in plastic scintillators and its application to Positron Emission Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Raczynski; P. Moskal; P. Kowalski; W. Wislicki; T. Bednarski; P. Bialas; E. Czerwinski; L . Kaplon; A. Kochanowski; G. Korcyl; J. Kowal; T. Kozik; W. Krzemien; E. Kubicz; M. Molenda; I. Moskal; Sz. Niedzwiecki; M. Palka; M. Pawlik-Niedzwiecka; Z. Rudy; P. Salabura; N. G. Sharma; M. Silarski; A. Slomski; J. Smyrski; A. Strzelecki; A. Wieczorek; M. Zielinski; N. Zon

    2014-07-31

    Currently inorganic scintillator detectors are used in all commercial Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomograph (TOF-PET) devices. The J-PET collaboration investigates a possibility of construction of a PET scanner from plastic scintillators which would allow for single bed imaging of the whole human body. This paper describes a novel method of hit-position reconstruction based on sampled signals and an example of an application of the method for a single module with a 30 cm long plastic strip, read out on both ends by Hamamatsu R4998 photomultipliers. The sampling scheme to generate a vector with samples of a PET event waveform with respect to four user-defined amplitudes is introduced. The experimental setup provides irradiation of a chosen position in the plastic scintillator strip with an annihilation gamma quanta of energy 511~keV. The statistical test for a multivariate normal (MVN) distribution of measured vectors at a given position is developed, and it is shown that signals sampled at four thresholds in a voltage domain are approximately normally distributed variables. With the presented method of a vector analysis made out of waveform samples acquired with four thresholds, we obtain a spatial resolution of about 1 cm and a timing resolution of about 80 ps

  17. High Energy Positrons and Gamma Radiation from Decaying Constituents of a two-component Dark Atom Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belotsky, K; Kouvaris, C; Laletin, M

    2015-01-01

    We study a two component dark matter candidate inspired by the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. Dark matter consists of a dominant SIMP-like dark atom component made of bound states between primordial helium nuclei and a doubly charged technilepton, and a small WIMP-like component made of another dark atom bound state between a doubly charged technibaryon and a technilepton. This scenario is consistent with direct search experimental findings because the dominant SIMP component interacts too strongly to reach the depths of current detectors with sufficient energy to recoil and the WIMP-like component is too small to cause significant amount of events. In this context a metastable technibaryon that decays to $e^+e^+$, $\\mu^+ \\mu^+$ and $\\tau^+ \\tau^+$ can in principle explain the observed positron excess by AMS-02 and PAMELA, while being consistent with the photon flux observed by FERMI/LAT. We scan the parameters of the model and we find the best possible fit to the latest experimental data. We find that th...

  18. High Energy Positrons and Gamma Radiation from Decaying Constituents of a two-component Dark Atom Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Belotsky; M. Khlopov; C. Kouvaris; M. Laletin

    2015-08-12

    We study a two component dark matter candidate inspired by the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. Dark matter consists of a dominant SIMP-like dark atom component made of bound states between primordial helium nuclei and a doubly charged technilepton, and a small WIMP-like component made of another dark atom bound state between a doubly charged technibaryon and a technilepton. This scenario is consistent with direct search experimental findings because the dominant SIMP component interacts too strongly to reach the depths of current detectors with sufficient energy to recoil and the WIMP-like component is too small to cause significant amount of events. In this context a metastable technibaryon that decays to $e^+e^+$, $\\mu^+ \\mu^+$ and $\\tau^+ \\tau^+$ can in principle explain the observed positron excess by AMS-02 and PAMELA, while being consistent with the photon flux observed by FERMI/LAT. We scan the parameters of the model and we find the best possible fit to the latest experimental data. We find that there is a small range of parameter space that this scenario can be realised under certain conditions regarding the cosmic ray propagation and the final state radiation. This range of parameters fall inside the region where the current run of LHC can probe, and therefore it will soon be possible to either verify or exclude conclusively this model of dark matter.

  19. The International Large Detector: Letter of Intent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, Toshinori; Abramowicz, Halina; Adamus, Marek; Adeva, Bernardo; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Alabau Pons, Carmen; Albrecht, Hartwig; Andricek, Ladislav; Anduze, Marc; Aplin, Steve J.; Arai, Yasuo; Asano, Masaki; Attie, David; Attree, Derek J.; Burger, Jochen; Bailey, David; Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Ball, Markus; Ballin, James; Barbi, Mauricio; Barlow, Roger; Bartels, Christoph; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassignana, Daniela; Bates, Richard; Baudot, Jerome; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Jeannine; Beckmann, Moritz; Bedjidian, Marc; Behnke, Ties; Belkadhi, Khaled; Bellerive, Alain; Bentvelsen, Stan; Bergauer, Thomas; Berggren, C.Mikael U.; Bergholz, Matthias; Bernreuther, Werner; Besancon, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Bhuyan, Bipul; Biebel, Otmar; Bilki, Burak; Blair, Grahame; Blumlein, Johannes; Bo, Li; Boisvert, Veronique; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Boos, Eduard; Boudry, Vincent; Bouquet, Bernard; Bouvier, Joel; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Brient, Jean-Claude; Brock, Ian; Brogna, Andrea; Buchholz, Peter; Buesser, Karsten; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Buzulutskov, A.F.; Caccia, Massimo; Caiazza, Stefano; Calcaterra, Alessandro; Caldwell, Allen; Callier, Stephane L.C.; Calvo Alamillo, Enrique; Campbell, Michael; Campbell, Alan J.; Cappellini, Chiara; Carloganu, Cristina; Castro, Nuno; Castro Carballo, Maria Elena; Chadeeva, Marina; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chang, Paoti; Charpy, Alexandre; Chen, Xun; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Hongfang; Cheon, Byunggu; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, B.C.; Christen, Sandra; Ciborowski, Jacek; Ciobanu, Catalin; Claus, Gilles; Clerc, Catherine; Coca, Cornelia; Colas, Paul; Colijn, Auke; Colledani, Claude; Combaret, Christophe; Cornat, Remi; Cornebise, Patrick; Corriveau, Francois; Cvach, Jaroslav; Czakon, Michal; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Da Silva, Wilfrid; Dadoun, Olivier; Dam, Mogens; Damerell, Chris; Danilov, Mikhail; Daniluk, Witold; Daubard, Guillaume; David, Dorte; David, Jacques; De Boer, Wim; De Groot, Nicolo; De Jong, Sijbrand; De Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De Masi, Rita; De Roeck, Albert; Decotigny, David; Dehmelt, Klaus; Delagnes, Eric; Deng, Zhi; Desch, Klaus; Dieguez, Angel; Diener, Ralf; Dima, Mihai-Octavian; Dissertori, Gunther; Dixit, Madhu S.; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris A.; Dollan, Ralph; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doublet, Philippe; Doyle, Tony; Doziere, Guy; Dragicevic, Marko; Drasal, Zbynek; Drugakov, Vladimir; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Dulucq, Frederic; Dumitru, Laurentiu Alexandru; Dzahini, Daniel; Eberl, Helmut; Eckerlin, Guenter; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eigen, Gerald; Eklund, Lars; Elsen, Eckhard; Elsener, Konrad; Emeliantchik, Igor; Engels, Jan; Evrard, Christophe; Fabbri, Riccardo; Faber, Gerard; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Faus-Golfe, Angeles; Feege, Nils; Feng, Cunfeng; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Garcia, Marcos; Filthaut, Frank; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischer, Manfred; Fleta, Celeste; Fleury, Julien L.; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Foster, Brian; Fourches, Nicolas; Fouz, Mary-Cruz; Frank, Sebastian; Frey, Ariane; Frotin, Mickael; Fujii, Hirofumi; Fujii, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Junpei; Fujita, Yowichi; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gaddi, Andrea; Gaede, Frank; Galkin, Alexei; Galkin, Valery; Gallas, Abraham; Gallin-Martel, Laurent; Gamba, Diego; Gao, Yuanning; Garrido Beltran, Lluis; Garutti, Erika; Gastaldi, Franck; Gaur, Bakul; Gay, Pascal; Gellrich, Andreas; Genat, Jean-Francois; Gentile, Simonetta; Gerwig, Hubert; Gibbons, Lawrence; Ginina, Elena; Giraud, Julien; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Gladilin, Leonid; Goldstein, Joel; Gonzalez Sanchez, Francisco Javier; Gournaris, Filimon; Greenshaw, Tim; Greenwood, Z.D.; Grefe, Christian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Philippe; Grondin, Denis; Grunewald, Martin; Grzelak, Grzegorz; Gurtu, Atul; Haas, Tobias; Haensel, Stephan; Hajdu, Csaba; Hallermann, Lea; Han, Liang; Hansen, Peter H.; Hara, Takanori; Harder, Kristian; Hartin, Anthony; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harz, Martin; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hauschild, Michael; He, Qing; Hedberg, Vincent; Hedin, David; Heinze, Isa; Helebrant, Christian; Henschel, Hans; Hensel, Carsten; Hertenberger, Ralf; Herve, Alain; Higuchi, Takeo; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hironori, Kazurayama; Hlucha, Hana; Hommels, Bart; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horvath, Dezso; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Wei-Shu; Hu-Guo, Christine; Huang, Xingtao; Huppert, Jean Francois; Ide, Yasuhiro; Idzik, Marek; Iglesias Escudero, Carmen; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Igonkina, Olga; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikemoto, Yukiko; Ikuno, Toshinori; Imbault, Didier; Imhof, Andreas; Imhoff, Marc; Ingbir, Ronen; Inoue, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC. The ILC will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV. The ILC has an ambitious physics program, which will extend and complement that of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hallmark of physics at the ILC is precision. The clean initial state and the comparatively benign environment of a lepton collider are ideally suited to high precision measurements. To take full advantage of the physics potential of ILC places great demands on the detector performance. The design of ILD is driven by these requirements. Excellent calorimetry and tracking are combined to obtain the best possible overall event reconstruction, including the capability to reconstruct individual particles within jets for particle ow calorimetry. This requires excellent spatial resolution for all detector systems. A highly granular calorimeter system is combined with a central tracker which st...

  20. The International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsten Buesser

    2013-06-13

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed electron-positron collider for the centre-of-mass energy range of 200 to 500 GeV and with upgrade options towards 1 TeV. The ILC would be the ideal tool to explore with high precision the properties of the new Higgs-like particle that has recently been discovered at the LHC with a mass of around 125 GeV. The ILC accelerator design is based on the mature superconducting technology that has been developed in the TESLA collaboration and that is currently being used for the European XFEL. The exploitation of the huge physics potential of the ILC is a challenge for the design of the ILC detectors.

  1. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  2. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larson, Ronald A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Hall, Harold J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stoddard, Billy D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davis, Sean G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Conrad, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  3. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  4. Evaluated teletherapy source library

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The Evaluated Teletherapy Source Library (ETSL) is a system of hardware and software that provides for maintenance of a library of useful phase space descriptions (PSDs) of teletherapy sources used in radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The PSDs are designed to be used by PEREGRINE, the all-particle Monte Carlo dose calculation system. ETSL also stores other relevant information such as monitor unit factors (MUFs) for use with the PSDs, results of PEREGRINE calculations using the PSDs, clinical calibration measurements, and geometry descriptions sufficient for calculational purposes. Not all of this information is directly needed by PEREGRINE. It also is capable of acting as a repository for the Monte Carlo simulation history files from which the generic PSDs are derived.

  5. High current ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1990-01-01

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  6. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggs, S; Eshraqi, M; Hahn, H; Jansson, A; Lindroos, M; Ponton, A; Rathsman, K; Trahern, G; Bousso, S; Calaga, R; Devanz, G; Duperrier, R D; Eguia, J; Gammino, S; Moller, S P; Oyon, C; Ruber, R.J.M.Y.

    2011-03-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a 5 MW, 2.5 GeV long pulse proton linac, to be built and commissioned in Lund, Sweden. The Accelerator Design Update (ADU) project phase is under way, to be completed at the end of 2012 by the delivery of a Technical Design Report. Improvements to the 2003 ESS design will be summarised, and the latest design activities will be presented.

  7. BERNAS ION SOURCE DISCHARGE SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUDSKOY,I.; KULEVOY, T.V.; PETRENKO, S.V.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; PERSHIN, V.I.; HERSHCOVITCH, A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; OKS, E.M.; POOLE, H.J.

    2007-08-26

    The joint research and development program is continued to develop steady-state ion source of decaborane beam for ion implantation industry. Bemas ion source is the wide used ion source for ion implantation industry. The new simulation code was developed for the Bemas ion source discharge simulation. We present first results of the simulation for several materials interested in semiconductors. As well the comparison of results obtained with experimental data obtained at the ITEP ion source test-bench is presented.

  8. Improved negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delmore, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  9. Negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  10. Source Selection Guide | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide More Documents & Publications Source Selection Guide Attachment FY2011-77 OPAM Policy Flash 2011-77 Attachment...

  11. The International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Battaglia

    2007-05-28

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is the next large scale project in accelerator particle physics. Colliding electrons with positrons at energies from 0.3 TeV up to about 1 TeV, the ILC is expected to provide the accuracy needed to complement the LHC data and extend the sensitivity to new phenomena at the high energy frontier and answer some of the fundamental questions in particle physics and in its relation to Cosmology. This paper reviews some highlights of the ILC physics program and some of the major challenges for the accelerator and detector design.

  12. Sources of tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.E.; Easterly, C.E.

    1980-12-01

    A review of tritium sources is presented. The tritium production and release rates are discussed for light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and molten salt breeder reactors (MSBRs). In addition, release rates are discussed for tritium production facilities, fuel reprocessing plants, weapons detonations, and fusion reactors. A discussion of the chemical form of the release is included. The energy producing facilities are ranked in order of increasing tritium production and release. The ranking is: HTGRs, LWRs, LMFBRs, MSBRs, and HWRs. The majority of tritium has been released in the form of tritiated water.

  13. Compact ion accelerator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

    2014-04-29

    An ion source includes a conductive substrate, the substrate including a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips formed on the substrate. A conductive catalytic coating is formed on the nanostructures and substrate for dissociation of a molecular species into an atomic species, the molecular species being brought in contact with the catalytic coating. A target electrode placed apart from the substrate, the target electrode being biased relative to the substrate with a first bias voltage to ionize the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips and attract the ionized atomic species from the substrate in the direction of the target electrode.

  14. Photon Source Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access| DepartmentPeerFederal FleetUp in thePhoton Source Parameters Print

  15. Photon Source Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access| DepartmentPeerFederal FleetUp in thePhoton Source Parameters

  16. Heat Source Lire,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions for AccidentalHealth, Safety,FOIAHeatSource

  17. Photon Source Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/OPerformance andAreaPhotoinduced electron transferPhoton Source

  18. Gamma-ray and Radio Constraints of High Positron Rate Dark Matter Models Annihilating into New Light Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bergstrom; Gianfranco Bertone; Torsten Bringmann; Joakim Edsjo; Marco Taoso

    2009-06-04

    The possibility of explaining the positron and electron excess recently found by the PAMELA and ATIC collaborations in terms of dark matter (DM) annihilation has attracted considerable attention. Models surviving bounds from, e.g, antiproton production generally fall into two classes, where either DM annihilates directly with a large branching fraction into light leptons, or, as in the recent models of Arkani-Hamed et al., and of Nomura and Thaler, the annihilation gives low-mass (pseudo)scalars or vectors $\\phi$ which then decay into $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ or $e^+e^-$. While the constraints on the first kind of models have recently been treated by several authors, we study here specifically models of the second type which rely on an efficient Sommerfeld enhancement in order to obtain the necessary boost in the annihilation cross section. We compute the photon flux generated by QED radiative corrections to the decay of $\\phi$ and show that this indeed gives a rather spectacular broad peak in $E^2d\\sigma/dE$, that for these extreme values of the cross section violate gamma-ray observations of the Galactic center for DM density profiles steeper than that of Navarro, Frenk and White. The most stringent constraint comes from the comparison of the predicted synchrotron radiation in the central part of the Galaxy with radio observations of Sgr A*. For the most commonly adopted DM profiles, the models that provide a good fit to the PAMELA and ATIC data are ruled out, unless there are physical processes that boost the local anti-matter fluxes more than one order of magnitude, while not affecting the gamma-ray or radio fluxes.

  19. Gamma-ray and radio constraints of high positron rate dark matter models annihilating into new light particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstroem, Lars; Bringmann, Torsten; Edsjoe, Joakim; Bertone, Gianfranco; Taoso, Marco

    2009-04-15

    The possibility of explaining the positron and electron excess recently found by the PAMELA and ATIC Collaborations in terms of dark matter (DM) annihilation has attracted considerable attention. Models surviving bounds from, e.g., antiproton production generally fall into two classes, where either DM annihilates directly with a large branching fraction into light leptons, or, as in the recent models of Arkani-Hamed et al., and of Nomura and Thaler, the annihilation gives low-mass (pseudo)scalars or vectors {phi} which then decay into {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} or e{sup +}e{sup -}. While the constraints on the first kind of models have recently been treated by several authors, we study here specifically models of the second type which rely on an efficient Sommerfeld enhancement in order to obtain the necessary boost in the annihilation cross section. We compute the photon flux generated by QED radiative corrections to the decay of {phi} and show that this indeed gives a rather spectacular broad peak in E{sup 2}d{sigma}/dE, which for these extreme values of the cross section violates gamma-ray observations of the Galactic center for DM density profiles steeper than that of Navarro, Frenk and White. The most stringent constraint comes from the comparison of the predicted synchrotron radiation in the central part of the Galaxy with radio observations of Sgr A*. For the most commonly adopted DM profiles, the models that provide a good fit to the PAMELA and ATIC data are ruled out, unless there are physical processes that boost the local antimatter fluxes more than 1 order of magnitude, while not affecting the gamma-ray or radio fluxes.

  20. Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mitchell, John; Gibson, Murray; Young, Linda; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-04-19

    Upgrade to Advanced Photon Source announced by Department Of Energy. Read more: http://go.usa.gov/ivZ

  1. Completeness of Integrated Information Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freytag, Johann-Christoph

    Completeness of Integrated Information Sources Felix Naumann, Johann-Christoph Freytag, Ulf Leser attributes of these entities. Mediator-based information systems allow integrated access to such sources new merge operators, which formalize the integration of multiple source responses. A completeness

  2. Infrared source test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, L.

    1994-11-15

    The purpose of the Infrared Source Test (IRST) is to demonstrate the ability to track a ground target with an infrared sensor from an airplane. The system is being developed within the Advance Technology Program`s Theater Missile Defense/Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) section. The IRST payload consists of an Amber Radiance 1 infrared camera system, a computer, a gimbaled mirror, and a hard disk. The processor is a custom R3000 CPU board made by Risq Modular Systems, Inc. for LLNL. The board has ethernet, SCSI, parallel I/O, and serial ports, a DMA channel, a video (frame buffer) interface, and eight MBytes of main memory. The real-time operating system VxWorks has been ported to the processor. The application code is written in C on a host SUN 4 UNIX workstation. The IRST is the result of a combined effort by physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers, and computer scientists.

  3. Multiple source heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  4. Neutrino Sources and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Vissani

    2015-05-19

    In this lecture, prepared for PhD students, basic considerations on neutrino interactions, properties and sites of production are overviewed. The detailed content is as follows: Sect. 1, Weak interactions and neutrinos: Fermi coupling; definition of neutrinos; global numbers. Sect. 2, A list of neutrino sources: Explanatory note and examples (solar pp- and supernova-neutrinos). Sect. 3, Neutrinos oscillations: Basic formalism (Pontecorvo); matter effect (Mikheev, Smirnov, Wolfenstein); status of neutrino masses and mixings. Sect. 4, Modifying the standard model to include neutrinos masses: The fermions of the standard model; one additional operator in the standard model (Weinberg); implications. One summary table and several exercises offer the students occasions to check, consolidate and extend their understanding; the brief reference list includes historical and review papers and some entry points to active research in neutrino physics.

  5. Thulium-170 heat source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

    1992-01-01

    An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

  6. Experimental study of the radiation emitted by 180-GeV/c electrons and positrons volume-reflected in a bent crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scandale, Walter; Baricordi, S; Dalpiaz, P; Fiorini, M; Guidi, V; Mazzolari, A; Della Mea, G; Milan, R; Ambrosi, G; Zuccon, P; Bertucci, B; Bürger, W; Duranti, M; Cavoto, G; Santacesaria, R; Valente, P; Luci, C; Iacoangeli, F; Vallazza, E; Afonin, A G; Chesnokov, Yu A; Kotov, V I; Maisheev, V A; Yazynin, I A; Kovalenko, A D; Taratin, A M; Denisov, A S; Gavrikov, Y A; Ivanov, Yu M; Lapina, L P; Malyarenko, L G; Skorogobogatov, V V; Suvorov, V M; Vavilov, S A; Bolognini, D; Hasan, S; Mozzanica, A; Prest, M

    2009-01-01

    The radiation emitted by 180-GeV/c volume-reflected electrons and positrons impinging on a bent crystal has been measured by the H8RD22 Collaboration on the H8 beamline at the CERN SPS. A dedicated spectrometer has been developed to measure high-energy photon spectra (up to ~100 GeV) under volume reflection: photon and charged particle beams have been separated by a bending magnet and leptons were detected and tagged by microstrip silicon detectors and a Pb-scintillator sampling calorimeter. A comparison between the experimental and analytical data for the amorphous and volume-reflection cases is presented and the differences are discussed.

  7. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of die-cast AM60B magnesium alloys in a complex salt solution: A slow positron beam study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.F. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Qin, Q.L. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Yang, W. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Wen, W. [University of Kentucky] [University of Kentucky; Zhai, T. [University of Kentucky] [University of Kentucky; Yu, B. [University of Alberta] [University of Alberta; Liu, D.Y. [University of Alberta] [University of Alberta; Luo, A. [GM Research and Development Center] [GM Research and Development Center; Song, GuangLing [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The microstructure and corrosion behavior of high pressure die-cast (HPDC) and super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AM60B magnesium alloys were investigated in a complex salt solution using slow positron beam technique and potentiodynamic polarization tests. The experiments revealed that a CaCO3 film was formed on the surface of the alloys and that the rate of CaCO3 formation for the SVDC alloy with immersion time was slower than that of the HPDC alloy. The larger volume fraction of b-phase in the skin layer of the SVDC alloy than that of the HPDC alloy was responsible for the better corrosion resistance.

  8. Detection and imaging of the oxygen deficiency in single crystalline YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} thin films using a scanning positron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiner, M.; Gigl, T.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Jany, R.; Hammerl, G.

    2015-03-16

    Single crystalline YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} (YBCO) thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition in order to probe the oxygen deficiency ? using a mono-energetic positron beam. The sample set covered a large range of ? (0.191?positron electron annihilation line and ? determined by X-ray diffraction. Ab-initio calculations have been performed in order to exclude the presence of Y vacancies and to ensure the negligible influence of potentially present Ba or Cu vacancies to the found correlation. Moreover, scanning with the positron beam allowed us to analyze the spatial variation of ?, which was found to fluctuate with a standard deviation of up to 0.079(5) within a single YBCO film.

  9. Pretreatment Staging Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients With Inflammatory Breast Cancer Influences Radiation Treatment Field Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Gary V.; Niikura, Naoki; Yang Wei; Rohren, Eric; Valero, Vicente; Woodward, Wendy A.; Alvarez, Ricardo H.; Lucci, Anthony; Ueno, Naoto T.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly being utilized for staging of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). The purpose of this study was to define how pretreatment PET/CT studies affected postmastectomy radiation treatment (PMRT) planning decisions for IBC. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 62 patients diagnosed with IBC between 2004 and 2009, who were treated with PMRT in our institution and who had a staging PET/CT within 3 months of diagnosis. Patients received a baseline physical examination, staging mammography, ultrasonographic examination of breast and draining lymphatics, and chest radiography; most patients also had a bone scan (55 patients), liver imaging (52 patients), breast MRI (46 patients), and chest CT (25 patients). We compared how PET/CT findings affected PMRT, assuming that standard PMRT would target the chest wall, level III axilla, supraclavicular fossa, and internal mammary chain (IMC). Any modification of target volumes, field borders, or dose prescriptions was considered a change. Results: PET/CT detected new areas of disease in 27 of the 62 patients (44%). The areas of additional disease included the breast (1 patient), ipsilateral axilla (1 patient), ipsilateral supraclavicular (4 patients), ipsilateral infraclavicular (1 patient), ipsilateral IMC (5 patients), ipsilateral subpectoral (3 patients), mediastinal (8 patients), other distant/contralateral lymph nodes (15 patients), or bone (6 patients). One patient was found to have a non-breast second primary tumor. The findings of the PET/CT led to changes in PMRT in 11 of 62 patients (17.7%). These changes included additional fields in 5 patients, adjustment of fields in 2 patients, and higher doses to the supraclavicular fossa (2 patients) and IMC (5 patients). Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed IBC, pretreatment PET/CT provides important information concerning involvement of locoregional lymph nodes, mediastinal lymph nodes, and unsuspected sites of distant metastasis. This information is important in the design of radiotherapy treatment fields and, therefore, we recommend that PET/CT be a component of initial staging for IBC.

  10. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hae Jin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  11. Development of a CW Superconducting RF Booster Cryomodule for Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimm, Terry L; Bogle, Andrew; Deimling, Brian; Hollister, Jerry; II, Randall Jecks; Kolka, Ahren; Romel, Chandra

    2009-04-13

    Future light sources based on seeded free electron lasers (FEL) have the potential to increase the soft xray flux by several orders of magnitude with short bunch lengths to probe electron structure and dynamics. A low emittance, high rep-rate radio frequency (RF) photocathode electron gun will generate the electron beam that will require very stringent beam control and manipulation through the superconducting linear accelerator to maintain the high brightness required for an x-ray FEL. The initial or booster cavities of the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linear accelerator will require stringent control of transverse kicks and higher order modes (HOM) during the beam manipulation and conditioning that is needed for emittance exchange and bunch compression. This SBIR proposal will develop, fabricate and test a continuous-wave SRF booster cryomodule specifically for this application. Phase I demonstrated the technical feasibility of the project by completing the preliminary SRF cavity and cryomodule design and its integration into an R&D test stand for beam studies at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The five-cell bulk niobium cavities operate at 750 MHz, and generate 10 MV each with strong HOM damping and special care to eliminate transverse kicks due to couplers. Due to continuous-wave operation at fairly modest beam currents and accelerating gradients the complexity of the two cavity cryomodule is greatly reduced compared to an ILC type system. Phase II will finalize the design, and fabricate and test the booster cryomodule. The cryomodule consists of two five-cell cavities that will accelerate megahertz bunch trains with nano-coulomb charge. The accelerating gradient is a very modest 10 MV/m with peak surface fields of 20 MV/m and 42.6 mT. The cryogenic system operates at 2 K with a design dynamic load of 20 W and total required cryogenic capacity of 45 W. The average beam current of up to 1 mA corresponds to a beam power of 10 kW per 5- cell cavity and will require 20 kW of RF power for transmission, control and regulation. The RF power will be supplied by a commercial tetrode. Cryogenic tests will be carried out at LBNL to make use of their test facilities, cryogenics and laser systems, and for future use with beam. Demonstration of this new type of booster cryomodule will open many new applications of SRF linear accelerators.

  12. Apparatus and method for preparing oxygen-15 labeled water H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] in an injectable form for use in positron emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Alexoff, David (Westhampton, NY)

    1996-01-09

    A handling and processing apparatus for preparing Oxygen-15 labeled water (H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O]) in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography from preferably H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] produced by irradiating a flowing gas target of nitrogen and hydrogen. The apparatus includes a collector for receiving and directing a gas containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] gas and impurities, mainly ammonia (NH.sub.3) gas into sterile water to trap the H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] and form ammonium (NH.sub.4.sup.+) in the sterile water. A device for displacing the sterile water containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] and NH.sub.4.sup.+ through a cation resin removes NH.sub.4.sup.+ from the sterile water. A device for combining the sterile water containing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] with a saline solution produces an injectable solution. Preferably, the apparatus includes a device for delivering the solution to a syringe for injection into a patient. Also, disclosed is a method for preparing H.sub.2 [.sup.15 O] in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography in which the method neither requires isotopic exchange reaction nor application of high temperature.

  13. Apparatus and method for preparing oxygen-15 labeled water H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] in an injectable form for use in positron emission tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.J.; Alexoff, D.

    1996-01-09

    A handling and processing apparatus is revealed for preparing Oxygen-15 labeled water (H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O]) in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography from preferably H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] produced by irradiating a flowing gas target of nitrogen and hydrogen. The apparatus includes a collector for receiving and directing a gas containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] gas and impurities, mainly ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas into sterile water to trap the H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] and form ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) in the sterile water. A device for displacing the sterile water containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] and NH{sub 4}{sup +} through a cation resin removes NH{sub 4}{sup +} from the sterile water. A device for combining the sterile water containing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] with a saline solution produces an injectable solution. Preferably, the apparatus includes a device for delivering the solution to a syringe for injection into a patient. Also, disclosed is a method for preparing H{sub 2}[{sup 15}O] in injectable form for use in Positron Emission Tomography in which the method neither requires isotopic exchange reaction nor application of high temperature. 7 figs.

  14. Electron Positron Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    are: • dissipating the wall power required to de- velop thethe total (beam + wall) power through the RF input window.super- conducting RF, the wall power is negligible so the

  15. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Dickinson, Michael (San Leandro, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Winnetka, IL)

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  16. Alternative Energy Sources – Myths and Realities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngquist, Walter

    1998-01-01

    Alternative Energy Sources - Myths and Realities Walterneed to think about alternative energy sources; the worlddepletion of oil? Alternative energy sources can be divided

  17. Media Center | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distributed to all APS users and others interested in the APS. Research Highlights Books Articles on Advanced Photon Source research and engineering highlights that are...

  18. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  19. Linac Coherent Light Source Overview

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Take an animated tour of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Follow the laser pulse from the injector gun all the way through to the Far Experimental Hall.

  20. APS Publications | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Publications Database The APS Publications Database is a searchable compendium of information on results from research at the APS. It is the official source for...

  1. THE ONLY SOURCE OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Genevieve J.

    2011-01-01

    s allotment of energy and today's needs, before completelytoday's sunlight which is, and always has been, the ONLY source of energy.

  2. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.H.; Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J.

    1991-02-01

    This report discusses the research and development, design and safety of the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. (LSP)

  3. The SIAM Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pairsuwan, Weerapong

    2007-01-19

    A short history of the SIAM Photon Source in Thailand is described. The facility is based on the 1 GeV storage ring obtained from the SORTEC consortium in Japan. After a redesign to include insertion straight sections it produced the first light in December 2001 and the first beam line became operational in early 2002. Special difficulties appear when a synchrotron light facility is obtained by donation, which have mostly to do with the absence of human resource development that elsewhere is commonly accomplished during design and construction. Additional problems arise by the distance of a developing country like Thailand from the origin of technical parts of the donation. A donation does not provide time to generate local capabilities or include in the technical design locally obtainable parts. This makes future developments, repairs and maintenance more time consuming, difficult and expensive than it should be. In other cases, parts of components are proprietary or obsolete or both which requires redesign and engineering at a time when the replacement part should be available to prevent stoppage of operation.The build-up of a user community is very difficult, especially when the radiation spectrum is confined to the VUV regime. Most of scientific interest these days is focused on the x-ray regime. Due to its low beam energy, the SIAM storage ring did not produce useful x-ray intensities and we are therefore in the midst of an upgrade to produce harder radiation. The first step has been achieved with a 20% increase of energy to 1.2 GeV. This step shifts the critical photon energy of bending magnet radiation from 800 eV to 1.4 keV providing useful radiation up to 7 keV. A XAS-beam line has been completed in 2005 and experimentation is very active by now. The next step is to install a 6.4 T wavelength shifter by the end of 2006 resulting in a critical photon energy of 6.15 keV. Further upgrades are planed for the comming years.

  4. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballou, Nathan E. (West Richland, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures.

  5. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ballou, N.E.

    1992-04-14

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  6. The Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    White, William E.; Robert, Aymeric; Dunne, Mike

    2015-05-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was the first hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) to operate as a user facility. After five years of operation, LCLS is now a mature FEL user facility. Our personal views about opportunities and challenges inherent to these unique light sources are discussed.

  7. Particle Acceleration in Astrophysical Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amato, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Astrophysical sources are extremely efficient accelerators. Some sources emit photons up to multi-TeV energies, a signature of the presence, within them, of particles with energies much higher than those achievable with the largest accelerators on Earth. Even more compelling evidence comes from the study of Cosmic Rays, charged relativistic particles that reach the Earth with incredibly high energies: at the highest energy end of their spectrum, these subatomic particles are carrying a macroscopic energy, up to a few Joules. Here I will address the best candidate sources and mechanisms as cosmic particle accelerators. I will mainly focus on Galactic sources such as Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, which being close and bright, are the best studied among astrophysical accelerators. These sources are held responsible for most of the energy that is put in relativistic particles in the Universe, but they are not thought to accelerate particles up to the highest individual energies, $\\approx 10^{20}$ eV...

  8. Diversity employment and recruitment sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Effective human resources management has been identified as one of four critical success factors in the Department of Energy Strategic Plan. The Plan states relative to this factor: ``The Department seeks greater alignment of resources with agency priorities and increased diversification of the workforce, including gender, ethnicity, age, and skills. This diversification will bring new thinking and perspectives that heretofore have not had a voice in departmental decision-making.`` This Guide has been developed as a key tool to assist Department of Energy management and administrative staff in achieving Goal 2 of this critical success factor, which is to ``Ensure a diverse and talented workforce.`` There are numerous sources from which to recruit minorities, women and persons with disabilities. Applying creativity and proactive effort, using traditional and non-traditional approaches, and reaching out to various professional, academic and social communities will increase the reservoir of qualified candidates from which to make selections. In addition, outreach initiatives will undoubtedly yield further benefits such as a richer cultural understanding and diversity awareness. The resource listings presented in this Guide are offered to encourage active participation in the diversity recruitment process. This Guide contains resource listings by state for organizations in the following categories: (1) African American Recruitment Sources; (2) Asian American/Pacific Islander Recruitment Sources; (3) Hispanic Recruitment Sources; (4) Native American/Alaskan Native Recruitment Sources; (5) Persons with Disabilities Recruitment Sources; and (6) Women Recruitment Sources.

  9. International Data on Radiological Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

    2010-07-01

    ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

  10. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

    1983-11-10

    It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

  11. APS News | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Young, Director of the X-ray Science Division in Argonne's Advanced Photon Source; Elliot Kanter, of the Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Group in the X-ray Science...

  12. Radiation source with shaped emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2003-05-13

    Employing a source of radiation, such as an electric discharge source, that is equipped with a capillary region configured into some predetermined shape, such as an arc or slit, can significantly improve the amount of flux delivered to the lithographic wafers while maintaining high efficiency. The source is particularly suited for photolithography systems that employs a ringfield camera. The invention permits the condenser which delivers critical illumination to the reticle to be simplified from five or more reflective elements to a total of three or four reflective elements thereby increasing condenser efficiency. It maximizes the flux delivered and maintains a high coupling efficiency. This architecture couples EUV radiation from the discharge source into a ring field lithography camera.

  13. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  14. Roadmap for commodity sourcing strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Wenzheng

    2015-01-01

    The procurement and sourcing group of OG company was tasked to systematically forecast, design and develop the future state of the company's next generation supply base. The main objective is to anticipate the preferred ...

  15. THE ONLY SOURCE OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Genevieve J.

    2011-01-01

    of photosynthesis of energy (the sun) still of mil Teniapast due that we use the sun's energy on a current basis andenergy farm" with the sunshine as the source. The sugar cane captures the sun,

  16. Sponsored E-Source Membership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programs Service (EDRP) With EDRP, you'll discover ways to make your EE and demand-response programs more effective. With E Source EDRP you can: Identify attributes...

  17. Next Generation Light Source Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

  18. THE ONLY SOURCE OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Genevieve J.

    2011-01-01

    past due that we use the sun's energy on a current basis andof photosynthesis of energy (the sun) still of mil Teniaenergy farm" with the sunshine as the source. The sugar cane captures the sun,

  19. Unimodular gravity with external sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Álvarez, Enrique; Herrero-Valea, Mario, E-mail: enrique.alvarez@uam.es, E-mail: mario.herrero@estudiante.uam.es [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC and Departamento de Física Teórica Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-01

    The only allowed source of the gravitational field in the unimodular theory, invariant under area-preserving (transverse) diffeomorphisms as well as Weyl transformations, is just the traceless piece of the energy-momentum tensor. This fact notwithstanding, the free energy produced by arbitrary sources (not only static ones) is identical to the one predicted by general relativity. This encompasses all weak field tests of gravitation.

  20. Gravitational Microlensing of Fractal Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraint F. Lewis

    2004-08-11

    Gravitational microlensing has proven to be a powerful tool in the study of quasars, providing some of the strongest limits on the scales of structure in the central engine. Typically sources are considered to be smoothly varying on some particular scale; such simple sources result in recognisable time scales in microlensing light curves from which the size of the source can be determined. Various emission processes, however, result in sources with a fractal appearance, possessing structure on a range of scales. Here, the gravitational microlensing of such fractal sources at the heart of quasars is considered. It is shown that the resulting light curves reflect the fractal nature of the sources, possessing pronounced structure at various scales, markedly different to the case with the random distribution of emission clouds that are typically considered. Hence, the determination of a characteristic scale of variability in a microlensing light curve may not necessarily reveal the size of the individual emission clouds, the key value that is required to determine the physical state of the emission region, rather it may correspond to a particular hierarchy in a fractal structure. Current X-ray satellites can detect such fractal structure via the monitoring of gravitationally lensed quasars during a microlensing event, providing a test of high energy emission processes in quasars.

  1. The International Large Detector: Letter of Intent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ILD Concept Group

    2010-06-17

    The International Large Detector (ILD) is a concept for a detector at the International Linear Collider, ILC. The ILC will collide electrons and positrons at energies of initially 500 GeV, upgradeable to 1 TeV. The ILC has an ambitious physics program, which will extend and complement that of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hallmark of physics at the ILC is precision. The clean initial state and the comparatively benign environment of a lepton collider are ideally suited to high precision measurements. To take full advantage of the physics potential of ILC places great demands on the detector performance. The design of ILD is driven by these requirements. Excellent calorimetry and tracking are combined to obtain the best possible overall event reconstruction, including the capability to reconstruct individual particles within jets for particle ow calorimetry. This requires excellent spatial resolution for all detector systems. A highly granular calorimeter system is combined with a central tracker which stresses redundancy and efficiency. In addition, efficient reconstruction of secondary vertices and excellent momentum resolution for charged particles are essential for an ILC detector. The interaction region of the ILC is designed to host two detectors, which can be moved into the beam position with a push-pull scheme. The mechanical design of ILD and the overall integration of subdetectors takes these operational conditions into account.

  2. Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with separate DC sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, F.Z.; Lai, J.S.

    1997-06-24

    A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations. 15 figs.

  3. Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with seperate DC sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Fang Zheng (Oak Ridge, TN); Lai, Jih-Sheng (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations.

  4. Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with seperate DC sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    2001-04-03

    A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations.

  5. Multilevel cascade voltage source inverter with seperate DC sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Fang Zheng (Knoxville, TN); Lai, Jih-Sheng (Blacksburg, VA)

    2002-01-01

    A multilevel cascade voltage source inverter having separate DC sources is described herein. This inverter is applicable to high voltage, high power applications such as flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS) including static VAR generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting and voltage balancing and fuel cell and photovoltaic utility interface systems. The M-level inverter consists of at least one phase wherein each phase has a plurality of full bridge inverters equipped with an independent DC source. This inverter develops a near sinusoidal approximation voltage waveform with only one switching per cycle as the number of levels, M, is increased. The inverter may have either single-phase or multi-phase embodiments connected in either wye or delta configurations.

  6. CANCELLED Microwave Ion Source and Beam Injection for an Accelerator-Driven Neut ron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Abstract An over-dense microwave driven ion source capableregion. Matching of the microwave power from the waveguideperveance. ION SOURCE Microwave source was selected due to

  7. Research on fusion neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gryaznevich, M. P. [Tokamak Solutions UK, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON, OX133DB (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-19

    The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. 'Fusion for Neutrons' (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

  8. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  9. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  10. Compact portable electric power sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, D.N.; Holcomb, D.E.; Munro, J.K.; Oakes, L.C.; Matson, M.J.

    1997-02-01

    This report provides an overview of recent advances in portable electric power source (PEPS) technology and an assessment of emerging PEPS technologies that may meet US Special Operations Command`s (SOCOM) needs in the next 1--2- and 3--5-year time frames. The assessment was performed through a literature search and interviews with experts in various laboratories and companies. Nineteen PEPS technologies were reviewed and characterized as (1) PEPSs that meet SOCOM requirements; (2) PEPSs that could fulfill requirements for special field conditions and locations; (3) potentially high-payoff sources that require additional R and D; and (4) sources unlikely to meet present SOCOM requirements. 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Dithering Strategies and Point-Source Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samsing, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Strategies and Point-Source Photometry Johan Samsing DARK-The accuracy in the photometry of a point source depends onobjects in a single source photometry (Lauer 1999a) and the

  12. EPA Source Reduction Assistance Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications for the Source Reduction Assistance Grant Program to support pollution prevention/source reduction and/or resource conservation projects that reduce or eliminate pollution at the source.

  13. MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING, SIMULATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS By MUHAMMAD HAIDER KHAN AND OPTIMIZATION OF GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS Thesis Approved..................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Overview of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems.............................................. 1 1

  14. 4th Generation ECR Ion Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyneis, Claude M.

    2010-01-01

    4th Generation ECR Ion Sources Claude M Lyneis, D. Leitner,to developing a 4 th generation ECR ion source with an RFover current 3 rd generation ECR ion sources, which operate

  15. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamura Ed., Lori S.

    2010-01-01

    upgrade on the Advanced Light Source," Nucl. Instrum. Meth.n photoemission at the Advanced Light Source," Radiât. Phys.high-pressure studies at the Advanced Light Source w i t h a

  16. A global sourcing strategy for durable tooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasovski, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Competitive pressures in manufacturing industries have led to an increased utilization of strategic sourcing initiatives: among them is low cost sourcing. While low cost sourcing has been used extensively for direct ...

  17. SOURCE PHENOMENOLOGY EXPERIMENTS IN ARIZONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jessie L. Bonner; Brian Stump; Mark Leidig; Heather Hooper; Xiaoning (David) Yang; Rongmao Zhou; Tae Sung Kim; William R. Walter; Aaron Velasco; Chris Hayward; Diane Baker; C. L. Edwards; Steven Harder; Travis Glenn; Cleat Zeiler; James Britton; James F. Lewkowicz

    2005-09-30

    The Arizona Source Phenomenology Experiments (SPE) have resulted in an important dataset for the nuclear monitoring community. The 19 dedicated single-fired explosions and multiple delay-fired mining explosions were recorded by one of the most densely instrumented accelerometer and seismometer arrays ever fielded, and the data have already proven useful in quantifying confinement and excitation effects for the sources. It is very interesting to note that we have observed differences in the phenomenology of these two series of explosions resulting from the differences between the relatively slow (limestone) and fast (granodiorite) media. We observed differences at the two SPE sites in the way the rock failed during the explosions, how the S-waves were generated, and the amplitude behavior as a function of confinement. Our consortium's goal is to use the synergy of the multiple datasets collected during this experiment to unravel the phenomenological differences between the two emplacement media. The data suggest that the main difference between single-fired chemical and delay-fired mining explosion seismograms at regional distances is the increased surface wave energy for the latter source type. The effect of the delay-firing is to decrease the high-frequency P-wave amplitudes while increasing the surface wave energy because of the longer source duration and spall components. The results suggest that the single-fired explosions are surrogates for nuclear explosions in higher frequency bands (e.g., 6-8 Hz Pg/Lg discriminants). We have shown that the SPE shots, together with the mining explosions, are efficient sources of S-wave energy, and our next research stage is to postulate the possible sources contributing to the shear-wave energy.

  18. Tikal obsidian: sources and typology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moholy-Nagy, H.; Asaro, F.; Stross, F.H.

    1984-01-01

    The obsidian industry of Classic period Tikal, Guatemala, is discussed with regard to geological source determinations and behavioral typology. The potential of these two approaches for cultural reconstruction is greatly extended when they can supplement each other. Recent source determinations of obsidian artifacts from Tikal indicate (1) a behavioral link between locally-produced prismatic blades of Highland Guatemalan stone and ceremonial incised obsidians and eccentrics, and (2) a Central Mexican origin for a seemingly large portion of Tikal's obsidian projectile points and knives. 25 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  19. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    of something like the proposed International Linear Collider--a 25 miles (40 kilometers) long machine place formidable demands on the accelerators that drive them. The design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), an RF-driven, TeV-scale, electron-positron machine, calls for a luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1

  20. California Nonpoint Source Program Strategy and Implementation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: California Nonpoint Source Program Strategy and Implementation Plan, 1998-2013Legal Abstract California Nonpoint Source Program...

  1. Open Source Software Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Open Source Software Update Open Source Software Update CCBY932011.pdf DrewDEAR Data clauses for Software.pdf More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word -...

  2. Inversion Methods for Determining Tsunami Source Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Inversion Methods for Determining Tsunami Source Amplitudes from DART Buoy Data Don Percival: given data from DART buoys and models for unit magnitude earthquakes from various tsunami source

  3. RECENT PROGRESS IN HEAVY ION SOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    of hydrogen into thermonuclear fusion reactors. A summary ofFusion Plasma Sources Other sources of high charge state ions include the dense plasma in magnetic confinement thermonuclear

  4. Alternative Energy Sources - An Interdisciplinary Module for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Sources - An Interdisciplinary Module for Energy Education Alternative Energy Sources - An Interdisciplinary Module for Energy Education Below is information about the...

  5. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary I. (Sunnyvale, CA); Maccagno, Pierre (Stanford, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  6. Synchrotron-driven spallation sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, P J

    1996-01-01

    The use of synchrotrons for pulsed neutron spallation sources is an example of scientific and technological spin-off from the accelerator development for particle physics. Accelerator-driven sources provide an alternative to the continuous-flux, nuclear reactors that currently furnish the majority of neutrons for research and development. Although the present demand for neutrons can be adequately met by the existing reactors, this situation is unlikely to continue due to the increasing severity of safety regulations and the declared policies of many countries to close down their reactors within the next decade or so. Since the demand for neutrons as a research tool is, in any case,expected to grow, there has been a corresponding interest in sources that are synchrotron-driven or linac-driven with a pulse compression ring and currently several design studies are being made. These accelerator-driven sources also have the advantage of a time structure with a high peak neutron flux. The basic requirement is for a...

  7. Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowd, Daniel

    ID-SAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity Enforcement Toby Ehrenkranz ://netsec.cs.uoregon.edu #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE What's The Problem? While routers know which direction a packet should are unreliable ID-SAVE attacks this root cause! 1 #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE ID-SAVE Basics Create and maintain

  8. Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-02-27

    To establish U.S. Department of Energy requirements for inventory reporting, transaction reporting, verification of reporting, and assign responsibilities for reporting of radioactive sealed sources. DOE N 251.86 extends this notice until 5-6-11. No cancellations. Canceled by DOE O 231.1B

  9. Good Sources of Nutrients: Iron 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda; Replogle, Jacqueline

    2008-08-28

    Iron is a mineral that functions primarily to carry oxygen in the body. This publication explains how people can get enough iron in their diets and how to prepare foods to retain iron. It also lists foods that are good sources of iron. (2 pp., 2...

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  11. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  12. Cosmic ray electron anisotropies as a tool to discriminate between exotic and astrophysical sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cernuda, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    Recent results from the PAMELA, ATIC, PPB BETS and Fermi collaborations extend the energy range in the electron flux measurement up to unexplored energies in the hundred GeVs range confirming the bump starting at about 10GeV already suggested by HEAT and AMS01 data . This bump can be explained by annihilating dark matter in the context of exotic physics, or by nearby astrophysical sources e.g. pulsars. In order to discriminate between competing models for primary positron production, the study of anisotropies ,complementary to the spectrum determination, shows up as new tool to look for the origin of the lepton excess. In this letter we calculate the contribution to the electron flux given by the collection of all known gamma ray pulsars (as listed in the ATNF catalogue) and by annihilating dark matter both in case of a clumpy halo or in case the excess can be atributed to a nearby sizeable dark matter clump. We address the problem of the electron anisotropy in both scenarios and estimate the prospect that a ...

  13. A non-perturbative study of the evolution of cosmic magnetised sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Delgado Gaspar; A. Pérez Martínez; G. Piccinelli; Roberto A. Sussman

    2015-04-26

    We undertake a hydrodynamical study of a magnetised cosmic fluid between the end of the leptonic era and the beginning of the radiation-dominated epoch. We assume this fluid to be the source of a Bianchi I model and to be a mixture of tightly coupled primordial radiation, neutrinos, baryons, electrons and positrons, together with a gas of already decoupled dark matter WIMPS and an already existing magnetic field. The interaction of this field with the tightly coupled gas mixture is described by suitable equations of state that are appropriate for the particle species of the mixture. Comparison of our results with those of previous studies based on an FLRW framework reveals that the effects of the anisotropy of the magnetic field on the evolution of the main thermodynamical variables are negligible, thus validating these studies, though subtle differences are found in the evolution of the magnetic field itself. For larger field intensities we find quantitative and qualitative differences from the FLRW based analysis. Our approach and our results may provide interesting guidelines in potential situations in which non-perturbative methods are required to study the interaction between magnetic fields and the cosmic fluid.

  14. A non-perturbative study of the evolution of cosmic magnetised sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaspar, I Delgado; Piccinelli, G; Sussman, Roberto A

    2015-01-01

    We undertake a hydrodynamical study of a magnetised cosmic fluid between the end of the leptonic era and the beginning of the radiation-dominated epoch. We assume this fluid to be the source of a Bianchi I model and to be a mixture of tightly coupled primordial radiation, neutrinos, baryons, electrons and positrons, together with a gas of already decoupled dark matter WIMPS and an already existing magnetic field. The interaction of this field with the tightly coupled gas mixture is described by suitable equations of state that are appropriate for the particle species of the mixture. Comparison of our results with those of previous studies based on an FLRW framework reveals that the effects of the anisotropy of the magnetic field on the evolution of the main thermodynamical variables are negligible, thus validating these studies, though subtle differences are found in the evolution of the magnetic field itself. For larger field intensities we find quantitative and qualitative differences from the FLRW based an...

  15. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  16. RouterMulticast .Source sends a flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Ju-Wook

    #12;Router RouterMulticast . . . Source Router Router . . .Source sends a flooding in periodic time One router is receiving multicast data service flooding Router Router Router Router Router RouterSource flooding flooding RouterRouter Router RouterSource flooding flooding flooding flooding prune Router

  17. Attoyac Bayou Bacterial Source Tracking Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, E.; Gentry, T.; Gregory, L.; Wagner, K.

    2014-01-01

    ...................................................................................... 2 Bacterial Source Tracking ................................................................................................... 4 Library-Independent BST... ............................................................................................... 4 Library-Dependent BST .................................................................................................. 4 Results...

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothman, Eva

    1999-05-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report for period October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998

  19. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  20. Energy Sources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicleDepartmentMedia Advisories Energy MediaGuideSources

  1. Measurement of Azimuthal Modulations in the Cross-Section of Di-Pion Pairs in Di-Jet Production from Electron-Positron Annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Abdesselam; I. Adachi; K. Adamczyk; H. Aihara; S. Al Said; K. Arinstein; Y. Arita; D. M. Asner; T. Aso; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; R. Ayad; T. Aziz; V. Babu; I. Badhrees; S. Bahinipati; A. M. Bakich; A. Bala; Y. Ban; V. Bansal; E. Barberio; M. Barrett; W. Bartel; A. Bay; I. Bedny; P. Behera; M. Belhorn; K. Belous; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; M. Bischofberger; J. Biswal; T. Bloomfield; S. Blyth; A. Bobrov; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; C. Bookwalter; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; F. Breibeck; J. Brodzicka; T. E. Browder; D. ?ervenkov; M. -C. Chang; P. Chang; Y. Chao; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; K. -F. Chen; P. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; S. -K. Choi; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Crnkovic; J. Dalseno; M. Danilov; S. Di Carlo; J. Dingfelder; Z. Doležal; Z. Drásal; A. Drutskoy; S. Dubey; D. Dutta; K. Dutta; S. Eidelman; D. Epifanov; S. Esen; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; M. Feindt; T. Ferber; A. Frey; O. Frost; M. Fujikawa; B. G. Fulsom; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; A. Garmash; D. Getzkow; R. Gillard; F. Giordano; R. Glattauer; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; M. Grosse Perdekamp; J. Grygier; O. Grzymkowska; H. Guo; J. Haba; P. Hamer; Y. L. Han; K. Hara; T. Hara; Y. Hasegawa; J. Hasenbusch; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; X. H. He; M. Heck; M. Hedges; D. Heffernan; M. Heider; A. Heller; T. Higuchi; S. Himori; T. Horiguchi; Y. Hoshi; K. Hoshina; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; C. -L. Hsu; M. Huschle; H. J. Hyun; Y. Igarashi; T. Iijima; M. Imamura; K. Inami; G. Inguglia; A. Ishikawa; K. Itagaki; R. Itoh; M. Iwabuchi; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; S. Iwata; W. W. Jacobs; I. Jaegle; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; T. Julius; D. H. Kah; H. Kakuno; J. H. Kang; K. H. Kang; P. Kapusta; S. U. Kataoka; N. Katayama; E. Kato; Y. Kato; P. Katrenko; H. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; H. Kichimi; C. Kiesling; B. H. Kim; D. Y. Kim; H. J. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. H. Kim; S. K. Kim; Y. J. Kim; K. Kinoshita; C. Kleinwort; J. Klucar; B. R. Ko; N. Kobayashi; S. Koblitz; P. Kodyš; Y. Koga; S. Korpar; R. T. Kouzes; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; B. Kronenbitter; T. Kuhr; R. Kumar; T. Kumita; E. Kurihara; Y. Kuroki; A. Kuzmin; P. Kvasni?ka; Y. -J. Kwon; Y. -T. Lai; J. S. Lange; D. H. Lee; I. S. Lee; S. -H. Lee; M. Leitgab; R. Leitner; P. Lewis; H. Li; J. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; A. Limosani; C. Liu; Y. Liu; Z. Q. Liu; D. Liventsev; A. Loos; R. Louvot; P. Lukin; J. MacNaughton; M. Masuda; D. Matvienko; A. Matyja; S. McOnie; Y. Mikami; K. Miyabayashi; Y. Miyachi; H. Miyake; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; S. Mohanty; D. Mohapatra; A. Moll; H. K. Moon; T. Mori; H. -G. Moser; T. Müller; N. Muramatsu; R. Mussa; T. Nagamine; Y. Nagasaka; Y. Nakahama; I. Nakamura; K. Nakamura; E. Nakano; H. Nakano; T. Nakano; M. Nakao; H. Nakayama; H. Nakazawa; T. Nanut; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; E. Nedelkovska; K. Negishi; K. Neichi; C. Ng; C. Niebuhr; M. Niiyama; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; K. Nishimura; O. Nitoh; T. Nozaki; A. Ogawa; S. Ogawa; T. Ohshima; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; Y. Ono; Y. Onuki; W. Ostrowicz; C. Oswald; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; B. Pal; H. Palka; E. Panzenböck; C. -S. Park; C. W. Park; H. Park; H. K. Park; K. S. Park; L. S. Peak; T. K. Pedlar; T. Peng; L. Pesantez; R. Pestotnik; M. Peters; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; A. Poluektov; K. Prasanth; M. Prim; K. Prothmann; C. Pulvermacher; M. Purohit; B. Reisert; E. Ribežl; M. Ritter; M. Röhrken; J. Rorie; A. Rostomyan; M. Rozanska; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; T. Saito; K. Sakai; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; D. Santel; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; N. Sasao; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; P. Schönmeier; M. Schram; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; B. Schwenker; R. Seidl; A. Sekiya; D. Semmler; K. Senyo; O. Seon; I. S. Seong; M. E. Sevior; L. Shang; M. Shapkin; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; H. Shibuya; S. Shinomiya; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; J. B. Singh; R. Sinha; P. Smerkol; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; Y. Soloviev; E. Solovieva; S. Stani?; M. Stari?; M. Steder; J. Stypula; S. Sugihara; A. Sugiyama; M. Sumihama; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; K. Suzuki; S. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; Z. Suzuki; H. Takeichi; U. Tamponi; M. Tanaka; S. Tanaka; K. Tanida; N. Taniguchi; G. Tatishvili; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; I. Tikhomirov; K. Trabelsi; V. Trusov; Y. F. Tse; T. Tsuboyama; M. Uchida; T. Uchida; Y. Uchida; S. Uehara; K. Ueno; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Ushiroda; Y. Usov; S. E. Vahsen; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; K. Vervink; A. Vinokurova; V. Vorobyev; A. Vossen; M. N. Wagner; C. H. Wang; J. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; X. L. Wang; M. Watanabe; Y. Watanabe; R. Wedd; S. Wehle; E. White; J. Wiechczynski; K. M. Williams; E. Won; B. D. Yabsley; S. Yamada; H. Yamamoto; J. Yamaoka; Y. Yamashita; M. Yamauchi; S. Yashchenko; H. Ye; J. Yelton; Y. Yook; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yusa; C. C. Zhang; L. M. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; L. Zhao; V. Zhilich; V. Zhulanov

    2015-05-29

    We present an extraction of azimuthal correlations between two pairs of charged pions detected in opposite jets from electron-positron annihilation. These correlations may arise from the dependence of the di-pion fragmentation on the polarization of the parent quark in the process $e^+e^- \\rightarrow q \\bar{q}$. Due to the correlation of the quark polarizations, the cross-section of di-pion pair production, in which the pion pairs are detected in opposite jets in a dijet event, exhibits a modulation in the azimuthal angles of the planes containing the hadron pairs with respect to the production plane. The measurement of this modulation allows access to combinations of fragmentation functions that are sensitive to the quark's transverse polarization and helicity. Within our uncertainties we do not observe a significant signal from the previously unmeasured helicity dependent fragmentation function $G_1^\\perp$. This measurement uses a dataset of 938~fb$^{-1}$ collected by the Belle experiment at or near $\\sqrt{s}\\approx10.58$ GeV.

  2. Impact of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Before and After Definitive Radiation Therapy in Patients With Apparently Solitary Plasmacytoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Paul J.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Wirth, Andrew; Ryan, Gail; Seymour, John F.; Prince, H. Miles

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on management of patients with apparently isolated plasmacytoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with apparently solitary plasmacytoma who underwent FDG-PET for staging or restaging were identified from a central PET database. They were either candidates for or had received definitive radiation therapy (RT). Results: Seventeen patients had initial staging scans for bone (n = 11) or soft tissue (n = 6) plasmacytomas, and 11 had PET scans after RT. Only 1 of 14 known untreated sites of plasmacytoma was not identified on staging PET (lesion sensitivity = 93%). Three plasmacytomas were excised before PET. Staging PET influenced management in 6 of 17 patients (35%) by showing multiple myeloma (n = 1), discouraging RT after complete resection (n = 1), excluding plasmacytoma at a second site (n = 1), by increasing RT fields (n = 2), or by suggesting sarcoidosis (n = 1). Fifteen of 17 patients with initial staging PET scans received definitive RT. Restaging PET scans after RT showed complete metabolic response in 8 of 11 cases and progressive disease in 2. Two patients with either no response or partial metabolic response had late responses. Staging sestamibi and PET scans were concordant in five of six occasions (one sestamibi scan was false negative). Conclusions: FDG-PET has value for staging and RT planning in plasmacytoma and potentially could have a role in response-assessment after RT. Slow resolution of FDG uptake posttreatment does not necessarily imply an adverse prognosis.

  3. Far-infrared Point Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Guiderdoni

    1999-03-08

    The analysis of the submm anisotropies that will be mapped by the forthcoming MAP and PLANCK satellites requires careful foreground subtraction before measuring CMB fluctuations. Among these, the foreground due to IR/submm thermal radiation from dusty sources was poorly known until recent observational breakthroughs began unveiling the properties of these objects. We hereafter briefly review the observational evidence for a strong evolution of IR/submm sources with respect to the local universe explored by IRAS. We present the basic principles of a new modeling effort where consistent spectral energy distributions of galaxies are implemented into the paradigm of hierarchical clustering with the fashionable semi-analytic approach. This model provides us with specific predictions in IR/submm wavebands, that seem to reproduce the current status of the observations and help assessing the capabilities of forthcoming instruments to pursue the exploration of the deep universe at IR/submm wavelengths. Finally, the ability of the PLANCK High Frequency Instrument all-sky survey to produce a catalogue of dusty sources at submm wavelengths is briefly described.

  4. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  5. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources (NGLSs). Although NGLSs will not displace synchrotrons from their role they do offer exciting new capabilities which can be understood from the physics of the light production in each device.

  6. Department: Modern and Classical Languages Course No: ILCS 158

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    . The course is organized around these topics and issues (all seen from a variety of literary and cinematic that record this experience in literary and cinematic texts. CA4 Criteria: This course fulfills a number

  7. Department: Modern and Classical Languages Course No: ILCS 149

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    of the economic boom of the 50's and 60's 4. Sexual politics: women and gay stories 5. Migration from and to Italy and the phenomenon of migration from North Africa and the Balkans. Since these are events whose ramifications extend.e., lighting, camera-work, editing, composition, depth-of-field, etc) and film narrative (plot structure

  8. Top Quark Physics at the ILC: Methods and Meanings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zack Sullivan

    2009-03-06

    The physics case for studying top-quark physics at the International Linear Collider is well established. This summary places in context the top-quark physics goals, examines the current state-of-the art in understanding of the top-quark mass, and identifies some areas in which the study of the top-quark mass enhances our understanding of new techniques.

  9. Research on Field Emission and Dark Current in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Kexin; Li, Yongming; Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli

    2013-09-01

    Field emission and dark current are issues of concern for SRF cavity performance and SRF linac operation. Complete understanding and reliable control of the issue are still needed, especially in full-scale multi-cell cavities. Our work aims at developing a generic procedure for finding an active field emitter in a multi-cell cavity and benchmarking the procedure through cavity vertical test. Our ultimate goal is to provide feedback to cavity preparation and cavity string assembly in order to reduce or eliminate filed emission in SRF cavities. Systematic analysis of behaviors of field emitted electrons is obtained by ACE3P developed by SLAC. Experimental benchmark of the procedure was carried out in a 9-cell cavity vertical test at JLab. The energy spectrum of Bremsstrahlung X-rays is measured using a NaI(Tl) detector. The end-point energy in the X-ray energy spectrum is taken as the highest kinetic electron energy to predict longitudinal position of the active field emitter. Angular location of the field emitter is determined by an array of silicon diodes around irises of the cavity. High-resolution optical inspection was conducted at the predicted field emitter location.

  10. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2010-03-15

    Design, analysis, and low-power tests are described on a 1.3 GHz ferroelectric tuner that could find application in the International Linear Collider or in Project X at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The tuner configuration utilizes a three-deck sandwich imbedded in a WR-650 waveguide, in which ferroelectric bars are clamped between conducting plates that allow the tuning bias voltage to be applied. Use of a reduced one-third structure allowed tests of critical parameters of the configuration, including phase shift, loss, and switching speed. Issues that were revealed that require improvement include reducing loss tangent in the ferroelectric material, development of a reliable means of brazing ferroelectric elements to copper parts of the tuner, and simplification of the mechanical design of the configuration.

  11. Configuration Studies and Recommendations for the ILC Damping Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej; Gao, Jie; Guiducci, Susanna

    2006-01-01

    Tunability for optics ?exibility and energy variation (Tunability (for optics or energy variation) Reliabilityoptics in the lattice, and is also strongly dependent on the energy.

  12. Configuration Studies and Recommendations for the ILC Damping Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej; Gao, Jie; Guiducci, Susanna

    2006-01-01

    Ring for the International Linear Collider,” FERMILAB-TM-1998). [35] International Linear Collider Technical ReviewBIBLIOGRAPHY [36] International Linear Collider Technical

  13. Comparison of LHC and ILC Capabilities for Higgs Boson Coupling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROMSciDACReport)

  14. Benchmarking / Crosschecking DFS in the ILC Main Linac (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTechReport) |ScienceSciTech Connect Benchmarking /

  15. Benchmarking / Crosschecking DFS in the ILC Main Linac (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTechReport) |ScienceSciTech Connect Benchmarking

  16. Discovering bottom squark coannihilation at the ILC (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnectlaser-solidSwitchgrass|FeTe0.55Se0.45SciTech Connect Discovering

  17. Higgs boson hadronic branching ratios at the ILC (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers (Journal Article) |different|(Journal Article)

  18. Silicon Detectors at the ILC (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) |Janka,FerraraTechnologiesShining Light on(Technical Report)

  19. Silicon Detectors at the ILC (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) |Janka,FerraraTechnologiesShining Light on(Technical Report)Silicon

  20. Detecting fission from special nuclear material sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2012-06-05

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a graphing component that displays the plot of the neutron distribution from the unknown source over a Poisson distribution and a plot of neutrons due to background or environmental sources. The system further includes a known neutron source placed in proximity to the unknown source to actively interrogate the unknown source in order to accentuate differences in neutron emission from the unknown source from Poisson distributions and/or environmental sources.

  1. Gamma source for active interrogation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Barletta, William A.

    2012-10-02

    A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

  2. Gamma source for active interrogation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Lou, Tak Pui (Berkeley, CA); Barletta, William A. (Oakland, CA)

    2009-09-29

    A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

  3. Relating to monitoring ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for monitoring the position on alpha contamination in or on items or locations. The technique is particularly applicable to pipes, conduits and other locations to which access is difficult. The technique uses indirect monitoring of alpha emissions by detecting ions generated by the alpha emissions. The medium containing the ions is moved in a controlled manner frog in proximity with the item or location to the detecting unit and the signals achieved over time are used to generate alpha source position information.

  4. Storage Ring Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhoton Source Parameters Storage Ringsrlogo_t.gif

  5. ARM - Sources of Atmospheric Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtended Facility8PlainsInstrumentsSources of

  6. Manhattan Project: Sources and Notes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy ofArticle)SciTechNorris Bradbury,Cubes of1945Glenn T.SOURCES

  7. Liquid metal ion source and alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Behrens, Robert G. (Los Alamos, NM); Szklarz, Eugene G. (Los Alamos, NM); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM); Santandrea, Robert P. (Santa Fe, NM); Swanson, Lynwood W. (McMinnville, OR)

    1988-10-04

    A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

  8. Thulium heat sources for space power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alderman, C.J.

    1992-05-01

    Reliable power supplies for use in transportation and remote systems will be an important part of space exploration terrestrial activities. A potential power source is available in the rare earth metal, thulium. Fuel sources can be produced by activating Tm-169 targets in the space station reactor. The resulting Tm-170 heat sources can be used in thermoelectric generators to power instrumentation and telecommunications located at remote sites such as weather stations. As the heat source in a dynamic Sterling or Brayton cycle system, the heat source can provide a lightweight power source for rovers or other terrestrial transportation systems.

  9. SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement. Existing methods have two deficiencies for applying to the open col- lections like the deep web. First query in the deep web, the agreements between theses an- swer sets are likely to be helpful in assessing

  10. SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Subbarao

    SourceRank: Relevance and Trust Assessment for Deep Web Sources Based on Inter-Source Agreement Tempe AZ USA 85287 rajub@asu.edu, rao@asu.edu ABSTRACT One immediate challenge in searching the deep web-similarity-based relevance assess- ment. When applied to the deep web these methods have two deficiencies. First

  11. Multi-source ion funnel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tang, Keqi; Belov, Mikhail B.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-12-27

    A method for introducing ions generated in a region of relatively high pressure into a region of relatively low pressure by providing at least two electrospray ion sources, providing at least two capillary inlets configured to direct ions generated by the electrospray sources into and through each of the capillary inlets, providing at least two sets of primary elements having apertures, each set of elements having a receiving end and an emitting end, the primary sets of elements configured to receive a ions from the capillary inlets at the receiving ends, and providing a secondary set of elements having apertures having a receiving end and an emitting end, the secondary set of elements configured to receive said ions from the emitting end of the primary sets of elements and emit said ions from said emitting end of the secondary set of elements. The method may further include the step of providing at least one jet disturber positioned within at least one of the sets of primary elements, providing a voltage, such as a dc voltage, in the jet disturber, thereby adjusting the transmission of ions through at least one of the sets of primary elements.

  12. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Howard A. (Ripon, CA)

    2006-04-25

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  13. Air Permitting for Stationary Sources (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The permitting system implements the permitting requirements of RSA 125-C and 125-I to regulate the operation and modification of new and existing stationary sources, area sources, and devices to...

  14. Science Highlights 2012 | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Argonne Advanced Photon Source and two other U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science synchrotron light sources. Their breakthrough results pave the way for development of...

  15. Science Highlights 2013 | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from experiments carried out using x-rays from two U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science light sources including the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory...

  16. Solid Waste as an Energy Source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlandsson, K. I.

    1979-01-01

    The cost history of conventional fuels over the past several years has forced a hard search for alternate energy sources. One alternate energy source that has gained more and more acceptance is solid waste. This is the case particularly...

  17. Total cost model for making sourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

  18. Problems with packaged sources in foreign countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeyta, Cristy L; Matzke, James L; Zarling, John; Tompkin, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP), which is administered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), removes excess, unwanted, abandoned, or orphan radioactive sealed sources that pose a potential threat to national security, public health, and safety. In total, GTRI/OSRP has been able to recover more than 25,000 excess and unwanted sealed sources from over 825 sites. In addition to transuranic sources, the GTRI/OSRP mission now includes recovery of beta/gamma emitting sources, which are of concern to both the U.S. government and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This paper provides a synopsis of cooperative efforts in foreign countries to remove excess and unwanted sealed sources by discussing three topical areas: (1) The Regional Partnership with the International Atomic Energy Agency; (2) Challenges in repatriating sealed sources; and (3) Options for repatriating sealed sources.

  19. L-[METHYL-{sup 11}C] Methionine Positron Emission Tomography for Target Delineation in Malignant Gliomas: Impact on Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahasittiwat, Pawinee; Mizoe, Jun-etsu Hasegawa, Azusa; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Yanagi, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryou D.D.S.; Pattaranutaporn, Pittayapoom; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the importance of {sup 11}C-methionine (MET)-positron emission tomography (PET) for clinical target volume (CTV) delineation. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study analyzed 16 patients with malignant glioma (4 patients, anaplastic astrocytoma; 12 patients, glioblastoma multiforme) treated with surgery and carbon ion radiotherapy from April 2002 to Nov 2005. The MET-PET target volume was compared with gross tumor volume and CTV, defined by using computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Correlations with treatment results were evaluated between positive and negative extended volumes (EVs) of the MET-PET target for CTV. Results: Mean volumes of the MET-PET targets, CTV1 (defined by means of high-intensity volume on T2-weighted MRI), and CTV2 (defined by means of contrast-enhancement volume on T1-weighted MRI) were 6.35, 264.7, and 117.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Mean EVs of MET-PET targets for CTV1 and CTV2 were 0.6 and 2.2 cm{sup 3}, respectively. The MET-PET target volumes were included in CTV1 and CTV2 in 13 (81.3%) and 11 patients (68.8%), respectively. Patients with a negative EV for CTV1 had significantly greater survival rate (p = 0.0069), regional control (p = 0.0047), and distant control time (p = 0.0267) than those with a positive EV. Distant control time also was better in patients with a negative EV for CTV2 than those with a positive EV (p = 0.0401). Conclusions: For patients with malignant gliomas, MET-PET has a possibility to be a predictor of outcome in carbon ion radiotherapy. Direct use of MET-PET fused to planning computed tomography will be useful and yield favorable results for the therapy.

  20. Dairy Biomass as a Renewable Fuel Source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib; Goodrich, Barry; Engler, Cady; Capareda, Sergio

    2008-03-19

    biomass. This publication explains the properties of dairy manure that could make it an excellent source of fuel....